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Author (up) Cepelis, A.; Brumpton, B.M.; Malmo, V.; Laugsand, L.E.; Loennechen, J.P.; Ellekjaer, H.; Langhammer, A.; Janszky, I.; Strand, L.B. url  doi
  Title Associations of Asthma and Asthma Control With Atrial Fibrillation Risk: Results From the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication JAMA Cardiology Abbreviated Journal JAMA Cardiol  
  Volume 3 Issue 8 Pages 721-728  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Importance: Asthma, a chronic inflammatory airway disease, and atrial fibrillation (AF) share several common pathophysiological mechanisms. Research on the association between asthma and atrial fibrillation is lacking, and to our knowledge, no previous studies have assessed the dose-response association between levels of asthma control and AF. Objective: To assess the association between asthma, levels of asthma control, and AF. Design, Setting, and Participants: This prospective population cohort analyzed data on adults from a second and third iteration of the survey-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) in Norway. All included participants were free from AF at baseline. Atrial fibrillation was ascertained by linking HUNT data with hospital records from the 2 hospitals in Nord-Trondelag County. Data analysis was completed from May 2017 to November 2017. Exposures: Self-reported asthma was categorized into 3 groups: those who had ever had asthma, those who self-report being diagnosed with asthma, and those who had active asthma. Asthma control was defined according to Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines and was categorized into controlled, partly controlled, and uncontrolled cases. Main Outcomes and Measures: Atrial fibrillation. Results: A total of 54567 adults were included (of whom 28821 [52.8%] were women). Of these, 5961 participants (10.9%) reported ever having asthma, 3934 participants (7.2%) reported being diagnosed with asthma, and 2485 participants (4.6%) reported having active asthma. During a mean (SD) follow-up of 15.4 (5.8) years, 2071 participants (3.8%) developed AF. Participants with physician-diagnosed asthma had an estimated 38% higher risk of developing AF (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.18-1.61]) compared with participants without asthma. There was a dose-response association between levels of asthma control and risk of AF with the highest risk for AF in participants with uncontrolled asthma (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.74 [95% CI, 1.26-2.42]; P for trend < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: Asthma and lack of asthma control were associated with moderately increased risks of AF in a dose-response manner. Further studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms and clarify causal pathways between asthma and AF.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2380-6591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29998294; PMCID:PMC6143075 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2077  
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Author (up) Gemes, K.; Malmo, V.; Laugsand, L.E.; Loennechen, J.P.; Ellekjaer, H.; Laszlo, K.D.; Ahnve, S.; Vatten, L.J.; Mukamal, K.J.; Janszky, I. url  doi
  Title Does Moderate Drinking Increase the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation? The Norwegian HUNT (Nord-Trondelag Health) Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of the American Heart Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Heart Assoc  
  Volume 6 Issue 10 Pages  
  Keywords Hunt; alcohol; atrial fibrillation; cohort study; epidemiology; moderate alcohol  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Compelling evidence suggests that excessive alcohol consumption increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), but the effect of light-moderate alcohol consumption is less certain. We investigated the association between alcohol consumption within recommended limits and AF risk in a light-drinking population. METHODS AND RESULTS: Among 47 002 participants with information on alcohol consumption in a population-based cohort study in Norway, conducted from October 2006 to June 2008, 1697 validated AF diagnoses were registered during the 8 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazard models with fractional polynomials to analyze the association between alcohol intake and AF. Population attributable risk for drinking within the recommended limit (ie, at most 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men without risky drinking) compared with nondrinking was also calculated. The average alcohol intake was 3.8+/-4.8 g/d. The adjusted hazard ratio for AF was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.80) when we compared participants consuming >7 drinks per week with abstainers. When we modeled the quantity of alcohol intake as a continuous variable, the risk increased in a curvilinear manner. It was higher with heavier alcohol intake, but there was virtually no association at <1 drink per day for women and <2 drinks per day for men in the absence of risky drinking. The population attributable risk among nonrisky drinkers was 0.07% (95% confidence interval, -0.01% to 0.13%). CONCLUSIONS: Although alcohol consumption was associated with a curvilinearly increasing risk of AF in general, the attributable risk of alcohol consumption within recommended limits among participants without binge or problem drinking was negligible in this population.  
  Address Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav's Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2047-9980 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29054845; PMCID:PMC5721892 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1901  
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Author (up) Holmen, O.L.; Zhang, H.; Fan, Y.; Hovelson, D.H.; Schmidt, E.M.; Zhou, W.; Guo, Y.; Zhang, J.; Langhammer, A.; Lochen, M.-L.; Ganesh, S.K.; Vatten, L.; Skorpen, F.; Dalen, H.; Zhang, J.; Pennathur, S.; Chen, J.; Platou, C.; Mathiesen, E.B.; Wilsgaard, T.; Njolstad, I.; Boehnke, M.; Chen, Y.E.; Abecasis, G.R.; Hveem, K.; Willer, C.J. url  doi
  Title Systematic evaluation of coding variation identifies a candidate causal variant in TM6SF2 influencing total cholesterol and myocardial infarction risk Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 345-351  
  Keywords Animals; Cholesterol, LDL/blood/genetics; Exome/genetics; Gene Knockdown Techniques; *Genetic Variation; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Lipids/*blood/genetics; Membrane Proteins/*genetics; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mutation, Missense/genetics; Myocardial Infarction/*epidemiology/*genetics; Norway/epidemiology; Risk Factors  
  Abstract Blood lipid levels are heritable, treatable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We systematically assessed genome-wide coding variation to identify new genes influencing lipid traits, fine map known lipid loci and evaluate whether low-frequency variants with large effects exist for these traits. Using an exome array, we genotyped 80,137 coding variants in 5,643 Norwegians. We followed up 18 variants in 4,666 Norwegians and identified ten loci with coding variants associated with a lipid trait (P < 5 x 10(-8)). One variant in TM6SF2 (encoding p.Glu167Lys), residing in a known genome-wide association study locus for lipid traits, influences total cholesterol levels and is associated with myocardial infarction. Transient TM6SF2 overexpression or knockdown of Tm6sf2 in mice alters serum lipid profiles, consistent with the association observed in humans, identifying TM6SF2 as a functional gene within a locus previously known as NCAN-CILP2-PBX4 or 19p13. This study demonstrates that systematic assessment of coding variation can quickly point to a candidate causal gene.  
  Address 1] Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. [2] Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. [3] Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24633158 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1597  
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Author (up) Holmen, O.L.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, W.; Schmidt, E.; Hovelson, D.H.; Langhammer, A.; Lochen, M.-L.; Ganesh, S.K.; Mathiesen, E.B.; Vatten, L.; Platou, C.; Wilsgaard, T.; Chen, J.; Skorpen, F.; Dalen, H.; Boehnke, M.; Abecasis, G.R.; Njolstad, I.; Hveem, K.; Willer, C.J. url  doi
  Title No large-effect low-frequency coding variation found for myocardial infarction Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Human Molecular Genetics Abbreviated Journal Hum Mol Genet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords HUNT3  
  Abstract Genome-wide association studies have identified variants, primarily common, that are associated with coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction (MI), but have not tested the majority of the low frequency and rare variation in the genome. We explored the hypothesis that previously untested low frequency (1-5% minor allele frequency) and rare (<1% minor allele frequency) coding variants are associated with MI. We genotyped 2906 MI cases and 6738 non-MI controls from Norway using the Illumina HumanExome Beadchip, allowing for direct genotyping of 85 972 polymorphic coding variants as well as 48 known GWAS SNPs. We followed-up 34 coding variants in an additional 2350 MI cases and 2318 controls from Norway. We evaluated exome array coverage in a subset of these samples using whole exome sequencing (N = 151). The exome array provided successful genotyping for an estimated 72.5% of Norwegian loss-of-function or missense variants with frequency >1% and 66.2% of variants <1% frequency observed more than once. Despite 80% power in the two-stage study (N = 14 312) to detect association with low-frequency variants with high effect sizes [odds ratio (OR) >1.86 and >1.36 for 1 and 5% frequency, respectively], we did not identify any novel genes or single variants that reached significance. This suggests that low-frequency coding variants with large effect sizes (OR >2) may not exist for MI. Larger sample sizes may identify coding variants with more moderate effects.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7600 Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0964-6906 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24728188 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1626  
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Author (up) Locke, A.E.; Kahali, B.; Berndt, S.I.; Justice, A.E.; Pers, T.H.; Day, F.R.; Powell, C.; Vedantam, S.; Buchkovich, M.L.; Yang, J.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Esko, T.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gustafsson, S.; Kutalik, Z.; Luan, J.'an; Magi, R.; Randall, J.C.; Winkler, T.W.; Wood, A.R.; Workalemahu, T.; Faul, J.D.; Smith, J.A.; Hua Zhao, J.; Zhao, W.; Chen, J.; Fehrmann, R.; Hedman, A.K.; Karjalainen, J.; Schmidt, E.M.; Absher, D.; Amin, N.; Anderson, D.; Beekman, M.; Bolton, J.L.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Buyske, S.; Demirkan, A.; Deng, G.; Ehret, G.B.; Feenstra, B.; Feitosa, M.F.; Fischer, K.; Goel, A.; Gong, J.; Jackson, A.U.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Kristiansson, K.; Lim, U.; Lotay, V.; Mangino, M.; Mateo Leach, I.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Medland, S.E.; Nalls, M.A.; Palmer, C.D.; Pasko, D.; Pechlivanis, S.; Peters, M.J.; Prokopenko, I.; Shungin, D.; Stancakova, A.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Ju Sung, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Teumer, A.; Trompet, S.; van der Laan, S.W.; van Setten, J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Wang, Z.; Yengo, L.; Zhang, W.; Isaacs, A.; Albrecht, E.; Arnlov, J.; Arscott, G.M.; Attwood, A.P.; Bandinelli, S.; Barrett, A.; Bas, I.N.; Bellis, C.; Bennett, A.J.; Berne, C.; Blagieva, R.; Bluher, M.; Bohringer, S.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Bottcher, Y.; Boyd, H.A.; Bruinenberg, M.; Caspersen, I.H.; Ida Chen, Y.-D.; Clarke, R.; Warwick Daw, E.; de Craen, A.J.M.; Delgado, G.; Dimitriou, M.; Doney, A.S.F.; Eklund, N.; Estrada, K.; Eury, E.; Folkersen, L.; Fraser, R.M.; Garcia, M.E.; Geller, F.; Giedraitis, V.; Gigante, B.; Go, A.S.; Golay, A.; Goodall, A.H.; Gordon, S.D.; Gorski, M.; Grabe, H.-J.; Grallert, H.; Grammer, T.B.; Grassler, J.; Gronberg, H.; Groves, C.J.; Gusto, G.; Haessler, J.; Hall, P.; Haller, T.; Hallmans, G.; Hartman, C.A.; Hassinen, M.; Hayward, C.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Helmer, Q.; Hengstenberg, C.; Holmen, O.; Hottenga, J.-J.; James, A.L.; Jeff, J.M.; Johansson, A.; Jolley, J.; Juliusdottir, T.; Kinnunen, L.; Koenig, W.; Koskenvuo, M.; Kratzer, W.; Laitinen, J.; Lamina, C.; Leander, K.; Lee, N.R.; Lichtner, P.; Lind, L.; Lindstrom, J.; Sin Lo, K.; Lobbens, S.; Lorbeer, R.; Lu, Y.; Mach, F.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Mahajan, A.; McArdle, W.L.; McLachlan, S.; Menni, C.; Merger, S.; Mihailov, E.; Milani, L.; Moayyeri, A.; Monda, K.L.; Morken, M.A.; Mulas, A.; Muller, G.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Musk, A.W.; Nagaraja, R.; Nothen, M.M.; Nolte, I.M.; Pilz, S.; Rayner, N.W.; Renstrom, F.; Rettig, R.; Ried, J.S.; Ripke, S.; Robertson, N.R.; Rose, L.M.; Sanna, S.; Scharnagl, H.; Scholtens, S.; Schumacher, F.R.; Scott, W.R.; Seufferlein, T.; Shi, J.; Vernon Smith, A.; Smolonska, J.; Stanton, A.V.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Stirrups, K.; Stringham, H.M.; Sundstrom, J.; Swertz, M.A.; Swift, A.J.; Syvanen, A.-C.; Tan, S.-T.; Tayo, B.O.; Thorand, B.; Thorleifsson, G.; Tyrer, J.P.; Uh, H.-W.; Vandenput, L.; Verhulst, F.C.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Verweij, N.; Vonk, J.M.; Waite, L.L.; Warren, H.R.; Waterworth, D.; Weedon, M.N.; Wilkens, L.R.; Willenborg, C.; Wilsgaard, T.; Wojczynski, M.K.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zhang, Q.; Brennan, E.P.; Choi, M.; Dastani, Z.; Drong, A.W.; Eriksson, P.; Franco-Cereceda, A.; Gadin, J.R.; Gharavi, A.G.; Goddard, M.E.; Handsaker, R.E.; Huang, J.; Karpe, F.; Kathiresan, S.; Keildson, S.; Kiryluk, K.; Kubo, M.; Lee, J.-Y.; Liang, L.; Lifton, R.P.; Ma, B.; McCarroll, S.A.; McKnight, A.J.; Min, J.L.; Moffatt, M.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Murabito, J.M.; Nicholson, G.; Nyholt, D.R.; Okada, Y.; Perry, J.R.B.; Dorajoo, R.; Reinmaa, E.; Salem, R.M.; Sandholm, N.; Scott, R.A.; Stolk, L.; Takahashi, A.; Tanaka, T.; Van't Hooft, F.M.; Vinkhuyzen, A.A.E.; Westra, H.-J.; Zheng, W.; Zondervan, K.T.; Heath, A.C.; Arveiler, D.; Bakker, S.J.L.; Beilby, J.; Bergman, R.N.; Blangero, J.; Bovet, P.; Campbell, H.; Caulfield, M.J.; Cesana, G.; Chakravarti, A.; Chasman, D.I.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Crawford, D.C.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Cusi, D.; Danesh, J.; de Faire, U.; den Ruijter, H.M.; Dominiczak, A.F.; Erbel, R.; Erdmann, J.; Eriksson, J.G.; Farrall, M.; Felix, S.B.; Ferrannini, E.; Ferrieres, J.; Ford, I.; Forouhi, N.G.; Forrester, T.; Franco, O.H.; Gansevoort, R.T.; Gejman, P.V.; Gieger, C.; Gottesman, O.; Gudnason, V.; Gyllensten, U.; Hall, A.S.; Harris, T.B.; Hattersley, A.T.; Hicks, A.A.; Hindorff, L.A.; Hingorani, A.D.; Hofman, A.; Homuth, G.; Kees Hovingh, G.; Humphries, S.E.; Hunt, S.C.; Hypponen, E.; Illig, T.; Jacobs, K.B.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Jockel, K.-H.; Johansen, B.; Jousilahti, P.; Wouter Jukema, J.; Jula, A.M.; Kaprio, J.; Kastelein, J.J.P.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, S.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Knekt, P.; Kooner, J.S.; Kooperberg, C.; Kovacs, P.; Kraja, A.T.; Kumari, M.; Kuusisto, J.; Lakka, T.A.; Langenberg, C.; Le Marchand, L.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lyssenko, V.; Mannisto, S.; Marette, A.; Matise, T.C.; McKenzie, C.A.; McKnight, B.; Moll, F.L.; Morris, A.D.; Morris, A.P.; Murray, J.C.; Nelis, M.; Ohlsson, C.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Ong, K.K.; Madden, P.A.F.; Pasterkamp, G.; Peden, J.F.; Peters, A.; Postma, D.S.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Price, J.F.; Qi, L.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rankinen, T.; Rao, D.C.; Rice, T.K.; Ridker, P.M.; Rioux, J.D.; Ritchie, M.D.; Rudan, I.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Saramies, J.; Sarzynski, M.A.; Schunkert, H.; Schwarz, P.E.H.; Sever, P.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Sinisalo, J.; Stolk, R.P.; Strauch, K.; Tonjes, A.; Tregouet, D.-A.; Tremblay, A.; Tremoli, E.; Virtamo, J.; Vohl, M.-C.; Volker, U.; Waeber, G.; Willemsen, G.; Witteman, J.C.; Zillikens, M.C.; Adair, L.S.; Amouyel, P.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Assimes, T.L.; Bochud, M.; Boehm, B.O.; Boerwinkle, E.; Bornstein, S.R.; Bottinger, E.P.; Bouchard, C.; Cauchi, S.; Chambers, J.C.; Chanock, S.J.; Cooper, R.S.; de Bakker, P.I.W.; Dedoussis, G.; Ferrucci, L.; Franks, P.W.; Froguel, P.; Groop, L.C.; Haiman, C.A.; Hamsten, A.; Hui, J.; Hunter, D.J.; Hveem, K.; Kaplan, R.C.; Kivimaki, M.; Kuh, D.; Laakso, M.; Liu, Y.; Martin, N.G.; Marz, W.; Melbye, M.; Metspalu, A.; Moebus, S.; Munroe, P.B.; Njolstad, I.; Oostra, B.A.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Pedersen, N.L.; Perola, M.; Perusse, L.; Peters, U.; Power, C.; Quertermous, T.; Rauramaa, R.; Rivadeneira, F.; Saaristo, T.E.; Saleheen, D.; Sattar, N.; Schadt, E.E.; Schlessinger, D.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Snieder, H.; Spector, T.D.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stumvoll, M.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Uusitupa, M.; van der Harst, P.; Walker, M.; Wallaschofski, H.; Wareham, N.J.; Watkins, H.; Weir, D.R.; Wichmann, H.-E.; Wilson, J.F.; Zanen, P.; Borecki, I.B.; Deloukas, P.; Fox, C.S.; Heid, I.M.; O'Connell, J.R.; Strachan, D.P.; Stefansson, K.; van Duijn, C.M.; Abecasis, G.R.; Franke, L.; Frayling, T.M.; McCarthy, M.I.; Visscher, P.M.; Scherag, A.; Willer, C.J.; Boehnke, M.; Mohlke, K.L.; Lindgren, C.M.; Beckmann, J.S.; Barroso, I.; North, K.E.; Ingelsson, E.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Loos, R.J.F.; Speliotes, E.K. url  doi
  Title Genetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 518 Issue 7538 Pages 197-206  
  Keywords HUNT3; obesity; genetics  
  Abstract Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 x 10(-8)), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for approximately 2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, and Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA  
  Corporate Author International Endogene Consortium Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25673413 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1673  
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Author (up) Malmo, V.; Langhammer, A.; Bonaa, K.H.; Loennechen, J.P.; Ellekjaer, H. url  doi
  Title Validation of self-reported and hospital-diagnosed atrial fibrillation: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Clin Epidemiol Abbreviated Journal Clinical epidemiology  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages 185-193  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Self-reported atrial fibrillation (AF) and diagnoses from hospital registers are often used to identify persons with AF. The objective of this study was to validate self-reported AF and hospital discharge diagnoses of AF among participants in a population-based study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Among 50,805 persons who participated in the third survey of the HUNT Study (HUNT3), 16,247 participants from three municipalities were included. Individuals who reported cardiovascular disease, renal disease, or hypertension in the main questionnaire received a cardiovascular-specific questionnaire. An affirmative answer to a question on physician-diagnosed AF in this second questionnaire defined self-reported AF diagnoses in the study. In addition, AF diagnoses were retrieved from hospital and primary care (PC) registers. All AF diagnoses were verified by review of hospital and PC medical records. RESULTS: A total of 502 HUNT3 participants had a diagnosis of AF verified in hospital or PC records. Of these, 249 reported their AF diagnosis in the HUNT3 questionnaires and 370 had an AF diagnosis in hospital discharge registers before participation in HUNT3. The sensitivity of self-reported AF in HUNT3 was 49.6%, specificity 99.2%, positive predictive value (PPV) 66.2%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 98.4%. The sensitivity of a hospital discharge diagnosis of AF was 73.7%, specificity 99.7%, PPV 88.5%, and NPV 99.2%. CONCLUSION: Use of questionnaires alone to identify cases of AF has low sensitivity. Extraction of diagnoses from health care registers enhances the sensitivity substantially and should be applied when estimates of incidence and prevalence of AF are studied.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trond Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Malmo, VegardLanghammer, ArnulfBonaa, Kaare HLoennechen, Jan PEllekjaer, HanneengNew Zealand2016/06/30 06:00Clin Epidemiol. 2016 Jun 11;8:185-93. doi: 10.2147/CLEP.S103346. eCollection 2016. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Malmo2016 Serial 1772  
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Author (up) Shungin, D.; Winkler, T.W.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Ferreira, T.; Locke, A.E.; Magi, R.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Pers, T.H.; Fischer, K.; Justice, A.E.; Workalemahu, T.; Wu, J.M.; Buchkovich, M.L.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Roman, T.S.; Drong, A.W.; Song, C.; Gustafsson, S.; Day, F.R.; Esko, T.; Fall, T.; Kutalik, Z.; Luan, J.; Randall, J.C.; Scherag, A.; Vedantam, S.; Wood, A.R.; Chen, J.; Fehrmann, R.; Karjalainen, J.; Kahali, B.; Liu, C.T.; Schmidt, E.M.; Absher, D.; Amin, N.; Anderson, D.; Beekman, M.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Buyske, S.; Demirkan, A.; Ehret, G.B.; Feitosa, M.F.; Goel, A.; Jackson, A.U.; Johnson, T.; Kleber, M.E.; Kristiansson, K.; Mangino, M.; Mateo Leach, I.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Palmer, C.D.; Pasko, D.; Pechlivanis, S.; Peters, M.J.; Prokopenko, I.; Stancakova, A.; Ju Sung, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Teumer, A.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Yengo, L.; Zhang, W.; Albrecht, E.; Arnlov, J.; Arscott, G.M.; Bandinelli, S.; Barrett, A.; Bellis, C.; Bennett, A.J.; Berne, C.; Bluher, M.; Bohringer, S.; Bonnet, F.; Bottcher, Y.; Bruinenberg, M.; Carba, D.B.; Caspersen, I.H.; Clarke, R.; Daw, E.W.; Deelen, J.; Deelman, E.; Delgado, G.; Doney, A.S.; Eklund, N.; Erdos, M.R.; Estrada, K.; Eury, E.; Friedrich, N.; Garcia, M.E.; Giedraitis, V.; Gigante, B.; Go, A.S.; Golay, A.; Grallert, H.; Grammer, T.B.; Grassler, J.; Grewal, J.; Groves, C.J.; Haller, T.; Hallmans, G.; Hartman, C.A.; Hassinen, M.; Hayward, C.; Heikkila, K.; Herzig, K.H.; Helmer, Q.; Hillege, H.L.; Holmen, O.; Hunt, S.C.; Isaacs, A.; Ittermann, T.; James, A.L.; Johansson, I.; Juliusdottir, T.; Kalafati, I.P.; Kinnunen, L.; Koenig, W.; Kooner, I.K.; Kratzer, W.; Lamina, C.; Leander, K.; Lee, N.R.; Lichtner, P.; Lind, L.; Lindstrom, J.; Lobbens, S.; Lorentzon, M.; Mach, F.; Magnusson, P.K.; Mahajan, A.; McArdle, W.L.; Menni, C.; Merger, S.; Mihailov, E.; Milani, L.; Mills, R.; Moayyeri, A.; Monda, K.L.; Mooijaart, S.P.; Muhleisen, T.W.; Mulas, A.; Muller, G.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Nagaraja, R.; Nalls, M.A.; Narisu, N.; Glorioso, N.; Nolte, I.M.; Olden, M.; Rayner, N.W.; Renstrom, F.; Ried, J.S.; Robertson, N.R.; Rose, L.M.; Sanna, S.; Scharnagl, H.; Scholtens, S.; Sennblad, B.; Seufferlein, T.; Sitlani, C.M.; Vernon Smith, A.; Stirrups, K.; Stringham, H.M.; Sundstrom, J.; Swertz, M.A.; Swift, A.J.; Syvanen, A.C.; Tayo, B.O.; Thorand, B.; Thorleifsson, G.; Tomaschitz, A.; Troffa, C.; van Oort, F.V.; Verweij, N.; Vonk, J.M.; Waite, L.L.; Wennauer, R.; Wilsgaard, T.; Wojczynski, M.K.; Wong, A.; Zhang, Q.; Hua Zhao, J.; Brennan, E.P.; Choi, M.; Eriksson, P.; Folkersen, L.; Franco-Cereceda, A.; Gharavi, A.G.; Hedman, A.K.; Hivert, M.F.; Huang, J.; Kanoni, S.; Karpe, F.; Keildson, S.; Kiryluk, K.; Liang, L.; Lifton, R.P.; Ma, B.; McKnight, A.J.; McPherson, R.; Metspalu, A.; Min, J.L.; Moffatt, M.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Murabito, J.M.; Nicholson, G.; Nyholt, D.R.; Olsson, C.; Perry, J.R.; Reinmaa, E.; Salem, R.M.; Sandholm, N.; Schadt, E.E.; Scott, R.A.; Stolk, L.; Vallejo, E.E.; Westra, H.J.; Zondervan, K.T.; Consortium, A.D.I.P.O.G.; Consortium, C.A.R.D.I.O.G.R.A.M.C.4D.; Consortium, C.K.D.G.; Consortium, G.; Consortium, G.; Glgc; Icbp; International Endogene, C.; LifeLines Cohort, S.; Investigators, M.; Mu, T.C.; Consortium, P.; ReproGen, C.; Amouyel, P.; Arveiler, D.; Bakker, S.J.; Beilby, J.; Bergman, R.N.; Blangero, J.; Brown, M.J.; Burnier, M.; Campbell, H.; Chakravarti, A.; Chines, P.S.; Claudi-Boehm, S.; Collins, F.S.; Crawford, D.C.; Danesh, J.; de Faire, U.; de Geus, E.J.; Dorr, M.; Erbel, R.; Eriksson, J.G.; Farrall, M.; Ferrannini, E.; Ferrieres, J.; Forouhi, N.G.; Forrester, T.; Franco, O.H.; Gansevoort, R.T.; Gieger, C.; Gudnason, V.; Haiman, C.A.; Harris, T.B.; Hattersley, A.T.; Heliovaara, M.; Hicks, A.A.; Hingorani, A.D.; Hoffmann, W.; Hofman, A.; Homuth, G.; Humphries, S.E.; Hypponen, E.; Illig, T.; Jarvelin, M.R.; Johansen, B.; Jousilahti, P.; Jula, A.M.; Kaprio, J.; Kee, F.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, S.M.; Kooner, J.S.; Kooperberg, C.; Kovacs, P.; Kraja, A.T.; Kumari, M.; Kuulasmaa, K.; Kuusisto, J.; Lakka, T.A.; Langenberg, C.; Le Marchand, L.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lyssenko, V.; Mannisto, S.; Marette, A.; Matise, T.C.; McKenzie, C.A.; McKnight, B.; Musk, A.W.; Mohlenkamp, S.; Morris, A.D.; Nelis, M.; Ohlsson, C.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Ong, K.K.; Palmer, L.J.; Penninx, B.W.; Peters, A.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rankinen, T.; Rao, D.C.; Rice, T.K.; Ridker, P.M.; Ritchie, M.D.; Rudan, I.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Saramies, J.; Sarzynski, M.A.; Schwarz, P.E.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Staessen, J.A.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Stolk, R.P.; Strauch, K.; Tonjes, A.; Tremblay, A.; Tremoli, E.; Vohl, M.C.; Volker, U.; Vollenweider, P.; Wilson, J.F.; Witteman, J.C.; Adair, L.S.; Bochud, M.; Boehm, B.O.; Bornstein, S.R.; Bouchard, C.; Cauchi, S.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chambers, J.C.; Chasman, D.I.; Cooper, R.S.; Dedoussis, G.; Ferrucci, L.; Froguel, P.; Grabe, H.J.; Hamsten, A.; Hui, J.; Hveem, K.; Jockel, K.H.; Kivimaki, M.; Kuh, D.; Laakso, M.; Liu, Y.; Marz, W.; Munroe, P.B.; Njolstad, I.; Oostra, B.A.; Palmer, C.N.; Pedersen, N.L.; Perola, M.; Perusse, L.; Peters, U.; Power, C.; Quertermous, T.; Rauramaa, R.; Rivadeneira, F.; Saaristo, T.E.; Saleheen, D.; Sinisalo, J.; Slagboom, P.E.; Snieder, H.; Spector, T.D.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stumvoll, M.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Uusitupa, M.; van der Harst, P.; Veronesi, G.; Walker, M.; Wareham, N.J.; Watkins, H.; Wichmann, H.E.; Abecasis, G.R.; Assimes, T.L.; Berndt, S.I.; Boehnke, M.; Borecki, I.B.; Deloukas, P.; Franke, L.; Frayling, T.M.; Groop, L.C.; Hunter, D.J.; Kaplan, R.C.; O'Connell, J.R.; Qi, L.; Schlessinger, D.; Strachan, D.P.; Stefansson, K.; van Duijn, C.M.; Willer, C.J.; Visscher, P.M.; Yang, J.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Zillikens, M.C.; McCarthy, M.I.; Speliotes, E.K.; North, K.E.; Fox, C.S.; Barroso, I.; Franks, P.W.; Ingelsson, E.; Heid, I.M.; Loos, R.J.; Cupples, L.A.; Morris, A.P.; Lindgren, C.M.; Mohlke, K.L.   
  Title New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 518 Issue 7538 Pages 187-196  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adipocytes/metabolism; Adipogenesis/genetics; Adipose Tissue/*metabolism; Age Factors; *Body Fat Distribution; Body Mass Index; Continental Population Groups/genetics; Epigenesis, Genetic; Europe/ethnology; Female; Genome, Human/genetics; *Genome-Wide Association Study; Humans; Insulin/*metabolism; Insulin Resistance/genetics; Male; Models, Biological; Neovascularization, Physiologic/genetics; Obesity/genetics; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics; Quantitative Trait Loci/*genetics; Sex Characteristics; Transcription, Genetic/genetics; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication 1] Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Medicine, Umea University, 901 87 Umea Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Shungin2015 Serial 1858  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Tang, C.S.; Zhang, H.; Cheung, C.Y.; Xu, M.; Ho, J.C.; Zhou, W.; Cherny, S.S.; Zhang, Y.; Holmen, O.; Au, K.W.; Yu, H.; Xu, L.; Jia, J.; Porsch, R.M.; Sun, L.; Xu, W.; Zheng, H.; Wong, L.Y.; Mu, Y.; Dou, J.; Fong, C.H.; Wang, S.; Hong, X.; Dong, L.; Liao, Y.; Wang, J.; Lam, L.S.; Su, X.; Yan, H.; Yang, M.L.; Chen, J.; Siu, C.W.; Xie, G.; Woo, Y.C.; Wu, Y.; Tan, K.C.; Hveem, K.; Cheung, B.M.; Zollner, S.; Xu, A.; Eugene Chen, Y.; Jiang, C.Q.; Lam, T.H.; Ganesh, S.K.; Huo, Y.; Sham, P.C.; Lam, K.S.; Willer, C.J.; Tse, H.F.; Gao, W.   
  Title Exome-wide association analysis reveals novel coding sequence variants associated with lipid traits in Chinese Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Nat Commun Abbreviated Journal Nature communications  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 10206  
  Keywords Asian Continental Ancestry Group/*genetics; Cholesterol, HDL/metabolism; Cholesterol, LDL/metabolism; Exome/*genetics; *Genetic Variation; Genotype; Humans; Lipid Metabolism/*genetics; Triglycerides/metabolism  
  Abstract Blood lipids are important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). Here we perform an exome-wide association study by genotyping 12,685 Chinese, using a custom Illumina HumanExome BeadChip, to identify additional loci influencing lipid levels. Single-variant association analysis on 65,671 single nucleotide polymorphisms reveals 19 loci associated with lipids at exome-wide significance (P  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Psychiatry, the University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Department of Internal Medic Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Tang2015 Serial 1866  
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Author (up) Zhou, W.; Fritsche, L.G.; Das, S.; Zhang, H.; Nielsen, J.B.; Holmen, O.L.; Chen, J.; Lin, M.; Elvestad, M.B.; Hveem, K.; Abecasis, G.R.; Kang, H.M.; Willer, C.J. url  doi
  Title Improving power of association tests using multiple sets of imputed genotypes from distributed reference panels Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Genetic Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Genet Epidemiol  
  Volume 41 Issue 8 Pages 744-755  
  Keywords Gwas; genotype imputation; multiple reference panels; population-specific; study power  
  Abstract The accuracy of genotype imputation depends upon two factors: the sample size of the reference panel and the genetic similarity between the reference panel and the target samples. When multiple reference panels are not consented to combine together, it is unclear how to combine the imputation results to optimize the power of genetic association studies. We compared the accuracy of 9,265 Norwegian genomes imputed from three reference panels-1000 Genomes phase 3 (1000G), Haplotype Reference Consortium (HRC), and a reference panel containing 2,201 Norwegian participants from the population-based Nord Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) from low-pass genome sequencing. We observed that the population-matched reference panel allowed for imputation of more population-specific variants with lower frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.05% and 0.5%). The overall imputation accuracy from the population-specific panel was substantially higher than 1000G and was comparable with HRC, despite HRC being 15-fold larger. These results recapitulate the value of population-specific reference panels for genotype imputation. We also evaluated different strategies to utilize multiple sets of imputed genotypes to increase the power of association studies. We observed that testing association for all variants imputed from any panel results in higher power to detect association than the alternative strategy of including only one version of each genetic variant, selected for having the highest imputation quality metric. This was particularly true for lower frequency variants (MAF < 1%), even after adjusting for the additional multiple testing burden.  
  Address Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0741-0395 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28861891 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2026  
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