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Author (up) Beenackers, M.A.; Doiron, D.; Fortier, I.; Noordzij, J.M.; Reinhard, E.; Courtin, E.; Bobak, M.; Chaix, B.; Costa, G.; Dapp, U.; Diez Roux, A.V.; Huisman, M.; Grundy, E.M.; Krokstad, S.; Martikainen, P.; Raina, P.; Avendano, M.; van Lenthe, F.J. url  doi
  Title MINDMAP: establishing an integrated database infrastructure for research in ageing, mental well-being, and the urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 158  
  Keywords *Aging; Canada; *Cities; Cohort Studies; Databases as Topic/*organization & administration; Europe; Humans; Information Storage and Retrieval; *Mental Health; Research/*organization & administration; Russia; United States; Urban Health; *Ageing; *Cohort studies; *Data integration; *Database; *Mental well-being; *Urban health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Urbanization and ageing have important implications for public mental health and well-being. Cities pose major challenges for older citizens, but also offer opportunities to develop, test, and implement policies, services, infrastructure, and interventions that promote mental well-being. The MINDMAP project aims to identify the opportunities and challenges posed by urban environmental characteristics for the promotion and management of mental well-being and cognitive function of older individuals. METHODS: MINDMAP aims to achieve its research objectives by bringing together longitudinal studies from 11 countries covering over 35 cities linked to databases of area-level environmental exposures and social and urban policy indicators. The infrastructure supporting integration of this data will allow multiple MINDMAP investigators to safely and remotely co-analyse individual-level and area-level data. Individual-level data is derived from baseline and follow-up measurements of ten participating cohort studies and provides information on mental well-being outcomes, sociodemographic variables, health behaviour characteristics, social factors, measures of frailty, physical function indicators, and chronic conditions, as well as blood derived clinical biochemistry-based biomarkers and genetic biomarkers. Area-level information on physical environment characteristics (e.g. green spaces, transportation), socioeconomic and sociodemographic characteristics (e.g. neighbourhood income, residential segregation, residential density), and social environment characteristics (e.g. social cohesion, criminality) and national and urban social policies is derived from publically available sources such as geoportals and administrative databases. The linkage, harmonization, and analysis of data from different sources are being carried out using piloted tools to optimize the validity of the research results and transparency of the methodology. DISCUSSION: MINDMAP is a novel research collaboration that is combining population-based cohort data with publicly available datasets not typically used for ageing and mental well-being research. Integration of various data sources and observational units into a single platform will help to explain the differences in ageing-related mental and cognitive disorders both within as well as between cities in Europe, the US, Canada, and Russia and to assess the causal pathways and interactions between the urban environment and the individual determinants of mental well-being and cognitive ageing in older adults.  
  Address Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29351781; PMCID:PMC5775623 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2071  
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Author (up) Cai, Y.; Hansell, A.L.; Blangiardo, M.; Burton, P.R.; de Hoogh, K.; Doiron, D.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; Hveem, K.; Mbatchou, S.; Morley, D.W.; Stolk, R.P.; Zijlema, W.L.; Elliott, P.; Hodgson, S. url  doi
  Title Long-term exposure to road traffic noise, ambient air pollution, and cardiovascular risk factors in the HUNT and lifelines cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume 38 Issue 29 Pages 2290-2296  
  Keywords Air pollution; Blood glucose; Blood lipids; Systemic inflammation; Traffic noise  
  Abstract Aims: Blood biochemistry may provide information on associations between road traffic noise, air pollution, and cardiovascular disease risk. We evaluated this in two large European cohorts (HUNT3, Lifelines). Methods and results: Road traffic noise exposure was modelled for 2009 using a simplified version of the Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe (CNOSSOS-EU). Annual ambient air pollution (PM10, NO2) at residence was estimated for 2007 using a Land Use Regression model. The statistical platform DataSHIELD was used to pool data from 144 082 participants aged >/=20 years to enable individual-level analysis. Generalized linear models were fitted to assess cross-sectional associations between pollutants and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), blood lipids and for (Lifelines only) fasting blood glucose, for samples taken during recruitment in 2006-2013. Pooling both cohorts, an inter-quartile range (IQR) higher day-time noise (5.1 dB(A)) was associated with 1.1% [95% confidence interval (95% CI: 0.02-2.2%)] higher hsCRP, 0.7% (95% CI: 0.3-1.1%) higher triglycerides, and 0.5% (95% CI: 0.3-0.7%) higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL); only the association with HDL was robust to adjustment for air pollution. An IQR higher PM10 (2.0 microg/m3) or NO2 (7.4 microg/m3) was associated with higher triglycerides (1.9%, 95% CI: 1.5-2.4% and 2.2%, 95% CI: 1.6-2.7%), independent of adjustment for noise. Additionally for NO2, a significant association with hsCRP (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.5-3.3%) was seen. In Lifelines, an IQR higher noise (4.2 dB(A)) and PM10 (2.4 microg/m3) was associated with 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.3%) and 0.6% (95% CI: 0.4-0.7%) higher fasting glucose respectively, with both remaining robust to adjustment for air/noise pollution. Conclusion: Long-term exposures to road traffic noise and ambient air pollution were associated with blood biochemistry, providing a possible link between road traffic noise/air pollution and cardio-metabolic disease risk.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, W2 1PG, London, UK  
  Corporate Author BioSHaRE Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28575405 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1895  
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Author (up) Spjuth, O.; Krestyaninova, M.; Hastings, J.; Shen, H.-Y.; Heikkinen, J.; Waldenberger, M.; Langhammer, A.; Ladenvall, C.; Esko, T.; Persson, M.-A.; Heggland, J.; Dietrich, J.; Ose, S.; Gieger, C.; Ried, J.S.; Peters, A.; Fortier, I.; de Geus, E.J.; Klovins, J.; Zaharenko, L.; Willemsen, G.; Hottenga, J.-J.; Litton, J.-E.; Karvanen, J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Groop, L.; Rung, J.; Palmgren, J.; Pedersen, N.L.; McCarthy, M.I.; van Duijn, C.M.; Hveem, K.; Metspalu, A.; Ripatti, S.; Prokopenko, I.; Harris, J.R. url  doi
  Title Harmonising and linking biomedical and clinical data across disparate data archives to enable integrative cross-biobank research Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication European Journal of Human Genetics : EJHG Abbreviated Journal Eur J Hum Genet  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords HUNT3; biobanking  
  Abstract A wealth of biospecimen samples are stored in modern globally distributed biobanks. Biomedical researchers worldwide need to be able to combine the available resources to improve the power of large-scale studies. A prerequisite for this effort is to be able to search and access phenotypic, clinical and other information about samples that are currently stored at biobanks in an integrated manner. However, privacy issues together with heterogeneous information systems and the lack of agreed-upon vocabularies have made specimen searching across multiple biobanks extremely challenging. We describe three case studies where we have linked samples and sample descriptions in order to facilitate global searching of available samples for research. The use cases include the ENGAGE (European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology) consortium comprising at least 39 cohorts, the SUMMIT (surrogate markers for micro- and macro-vascular hard endpoints for innovative diabetes tools) consortium and a pilot for data integration between a Swedish clinical health registry and a biobank. We used the Sample avAILability (SAIL) method for data linking: first, created harmonised variables and then annotated and made searchable information on the number of specimens available in individual biobanks for various phenotypic categories. By operating on this categorised availability data we sidestep many obstacles related to privacy that arise when handling real values and show that harmonised and annotated records about data availability across disparate biomedical archives provide a key methodological advance in pre-analysis exchange of information between biobanks, that is, during the project planning phase.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 26 August 2015; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2015.165.  
  Address Division of Epidemiology, Department of Genes and Environment, The Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1018-4813 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26306643 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1724  
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Author (up) Spjuth, O.; Krestyaninova, M.; Hastings, J.; Shen, H.Y.; Heikkinen, J.; Waldenberger, M.; Langhammer, A.; Ladenvall, C.; Esko, T.; Persson, M.A.; Heggland, J.; Dietrich, J.; Ose, S.; Gieger, C.; Ried, J.S.; Peters, A.; Fortier, I.; de Geus, E.J.; Klovins, J.; Zaharenko, L.; Willemsen, G.; Hottenga, J.J.; Litton, J.E.; Karvanen, J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Groop, L.; Rung, J.; Palmgren, J.; Pedersen, N.L.; McCarthy, M.I.; van Duijn, C.M.; Hveem, K.; Metspalu, A.; Ripatti, S.; Prokopenko, I.; Harris, J.R. url  doi
  Title Harmonising and linking biomedical and clinical data across disparate data archives to enable integrative cross-biobank research Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Eur J Hum Genet Abbreviated Journal European journal of human genetics  
  Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 521-528  
  Keywords HUNT3  
  Abstract A wealth of biospecimen samples are stored in modern globally distributed biobanks. Biomedical researchers worldwide need to be able to combine the available resources to improve the power of large-scale studies. A prerequisite for this effort is to be able to search and access phenotypic, clinical and other information about samples that are currently stored at biobanks in an integrated manner. However, privacy issues together with heterogeneous information systems and the lack of agreed-upon vocabularies have made specimen searching across multiple biobanks extremely challenging. We describe three case studies where we have linked samples and sample descriptions in order to facilitate global searching of available samples for research. The use cases include the ENGAGE (European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology) consortium comprising at least 39 cohorts, the SUMMIT (surrogate markers for micro- and macro-vascular hard endpoints for innovative diabetes tools) consortium and a pilot for data integration between a Swedish clinical health registry and a biobank. We used the Sample avAILability (SAIL) method for data linking: first, created harmonised variables and then annotated and made searchable information on the number of specimens available in individual biobanks for various phenotypic categories. By operating on this categorised availability data we sidestep many obstacles related to privacy that arise when handling real values and show that harmonised and annotated records about data availability across disparate biomedical archives provide a key methodological advance in pre-analysis exchange of information between biobanks, that is, during the project planning phase.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Swedish e-Science Research Centre, Karolinska Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Spjuth, OlaKrestyaninova, MariaHastings, JannaShen, Huei-YiHeikkinen, JaniWaldenberger, MelanieLanghammer, ArnulfLadenvall, ClaesEsko, TonuPersson, Mats-AkeHeggland, JonDietrich, JoernOse, SandraGieger, ChristianRied, Janina SPeters, AnnetteFortier, Isabelde Geus, Eco J CKlovins, JanisZaharenko, LindaWillemsen, GonnekeHottenga, Jouke-JanLitton, Jan-EricKarvanen, JuhaBoomsma, Dorret IGroop, LeifRung, JohanPalmgren, JuniPedersen, Nancy LMcCarthy, Mark Ivan Duijn, Cornelia MHveem, KristianMetspalu, AndresRipatti, SamuliProkopenko, IngaHarris, Jennifer RengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2015/08/27 06:00Eur J Hum Genet. 2016 Apr;24(4):521-8. doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2015.165. Epub 2015 Aug 26. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Spjuth2016 Serial 1784  
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Author (up) van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Nuotio, M.-L.; Slagter, S.N.; Doiron, D.; Fischer, K.; Foco, L.; Gaye, A.; Gogele, M.; Heier, M.; Hiekkalinna, T.; Joensuu, A.; Newby, C.; Pang, C.; Partinen, E.; Reischl, E.; Schwienbacher, C.; Tammesoo, M.-L.; Swertz, M.A.; Burton, P.; Ferretti, V.; Fortier, I.; Giepmans, L.; Harris, J.R.; Hillege, H.L.; Holmen, J.; Jula, A.; Kootstra-Ros, J.E.; Kvaloy, K.; Holmen, T.L.; Mannisto, S.; Metspalu, A.; Midthjell, K.; Murtagh, M.J.; Peters, A.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Saaristo, T.; Salomaa, V.; Stolk, R.P.; Uusitupa, M.; van der Harst, P.; Van der Klauw, M.M.; Waldenberger, M.; Perola, M.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H. url  doi
  Title The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and metabolically healthy obesity in Europe: a collaborative analysis of ten large cohort studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication BMC Endocrine Disorders Abbreviated Journal BMC Endocr Disord  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 9  
  Keywords Harmonization; Obesity; Metabolic syndrome; Cardiovascular disease; Metabolically healthy; HUNT3  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Not all obese subjects have an adverse metabolic profile predisposing them to developing type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. The BioSHaRE-EU Healthy Obese Project aims to gain insights into the consequences of (healthy) obesity using data on risk factors and phenotypes across several large-scale cohort studies. Aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) in ten participating studies. METHODS: Ten different cohorts in seven countries were combined, using data transformed into a harmonized format. All participants were of European origin, with age 18-80 years. They had participated in a clinical examination for anthropometric and blood pressure measurements. Blood samples had been drawn for analysis of lipids and glucose. Presence of MetS was assessed in those with obesity (BMI >= 30 kg/m2) based on the 2001 NCEP-ATPIII criteria, as well as an adapted set of less strict criteria. MHO was defined as obesity, having none of the MetS components, and no previous diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: Data for 163,517 individuals were available; 17% were obese (11,465 men and 16,612 women). The prevalence of obesity varied from 11.6% in the Italian CHRIS cohort to 26.3% in the German KORA cohort. The age-standardized percentage of obese subjects with MetS ranged in women from 24% in CHRIS to 65% in the Finnish Health2000 cohort, and in men from 43% in CHRIS to 78% in the Finnish DILGOM cohort, with elevated blood pressure the most frequently occurring factor contributing to the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. The age-standardized prevalence of MHO varied in women from 7% in Health2000 to 28% in NCDS, and in men from 2% in DILGOM to 19% in CHRIS. MHO was more prevalent in women than in men, and decreased with age in both sexes. CONCLUSIONS: Through a rigorous harmonization process, the BioSHaRE-EU consortium was able to compare key characteristics defining the metabolically healthy obese phenotype across ten cohort studies. There is considerable variability in the prevalence of healthy obesity across the different European populations studied, even when unified criteria were used to classify this phenotype.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1472-6823 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24484869 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1391  
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Author (up) Zijlema, W.; Cai, Y.; Doiron, D.; Mbatchou, S.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; de Hoogh, K.; Morley, D.; Hodgson, S.; Elliott, P.; Key, T.; Kongsgard, H.; Hveem, K.; Gaye, A.; Burton, P.; Hansell, A.; Stolk, R.; Rosmalen, J. url  doi
  Title Corrigendum to “Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses of harmonized data from 88,336 participants” [Environ. Res. 151 (2016) 804-813] Type Published Erratum
  Year 2017 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 152 Issue Pages 520  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27823774 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2027  
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