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Author (up) Karlsen, T.; Nauman, J.; Dalen, H.; Langhammer, A.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title The Combined Association of Skeletal Muscle Strength and Physical Activity on Mortality in Older Women: The HUNT2 Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc  
  Volume 92 Issue 5 Pages 710-718  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Hand Strength; Humans; Leg/physiology; *Muscle Strength; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the isolated and combined associations of leg and arm strength with adherence to current physical activity guidelines with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in healthy elderly women. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study of 2529 elderly women (72.6+/-4.8 years) from the Norwegian Healthy survey of Northern Trondelag (second wave) (HUNT2) between August 15, 1995, and June 18, 1997, with a median of 15.6 years (interquartile range, 10.4-16.3 years) of follow-up. Chair-rise test and handgrip strength performances were assessed, and divided into tertiles. The hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause and cause-specific mortality by tertiles of handgrip strength and chair-rise test performance, and combined associations with physical activity were estimated by using Cox proportional hazard regression models. RESULTS: We observed independent associations of physical activity and the chair-rise test performance with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and between handgrip strength and all-cause mortality. Despite following physical activity guidelines, women with low muscle strength had increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR chair test, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.07-1.76; HR handgrip strength, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.85) and cardiovascular disease mortality (HR chair test, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.01-2.42). Slow chair-test performance was associated with all-cause (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.16-1.51) and cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.14-1.76) mortality. The association between handgrip strength and all-cause mortality was dose dependent (P value for trend <.01). CONCLUSION: Handgrip strength and chair-rise test performance predicted the risk of all-cause and CVD mortality independent of physical activity. Clinically feasible tests of skeletal muscle strength could increase the precision of prognosis, even in elderly women following current physical activity guidelines.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-6196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28473035 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1938  
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Author (up) Liu, J.Z.; Hov, J.R.; Folseraas, T.; Ellinghaus, E.; Rushbrook, S.M.; Doncheva, N.T.; Andreassen, O.A.; Weersma, R.K.; Weismuller, T.J.; Eksteen, B.; Invernizzi, P.; Hirschfield, G.M.; Gotthardt, D.N.; Pares, A.; Ellinghaus, D.; Shah, T.; Juran, B.D.; Milkiewicz, P.; Rust, C.; Schramm, C.; Muller, T.; Srivastava, B.; Dalekos, G.; Nothen, M.M.; Herms, S.; Winkelmann, J.; Mitrovic, M.; Braun, F.; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Croucher, P.J.P.; Sterneck, M.; Teufel, A.; Mason, A.L.; Saarela, J.; Leppa, V.; Dorfman, R.; Alvaro, D.; Floreani, A.; Onengut-Gumuscu, S.; Rich, S.S.; Thompson, W.K.; Schork, A.J.; Naess, S.; Thomsen, I.; Mayr, G.; Konig, I.R.; Hveem, K.; Cleynen, I.; Gutierrez-Achury, J.; Ricano-Ponce, I.; van Heel, D.; Bjornsson, E.; Sandford, R.N.; Durie, P.R.; Melum, E.; Vatn, M.H.; Silverberg, M.S.; Duerr, R.H.; Padyukov, L.; Brand, S.; Sans, M.; Annese, V.; Achkar, J.-P.; Boberg, K.M.; Marschall, H.-U.; Chazouilleres, O.; Bowlus, C.L.; Wijmenga, C.; Schrumpf, E.; Vermeire, S.; Albrecht, M.; Rioux, J.D.; Alexander, G.; Bergquist, A.; Cho, J.; Schreiber, S.; Manns, M.P.; Farkkila, M.; Dale, A.M.; Chapman, R.W.; Lazaridis, K.N.; Franke, A.; Anderson, C.A.; Karlsen, T.H. url  doi
  Title Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies nine new risk loci for primary sclerosing cholangitis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 45 Issue 6 Pages 670-675  
  Keywords Case-Control Studies; Cholangitis, Sclerosing/*genetics/immunology; Gene Frequency; Genetic Loci/immunology; Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotyping Techniques; Humans; Linkage Disequilibrium; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Risk Factors  
  Abstract Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a severe liver disease of unknown etiology leading to fibrotic destruction of the bile ducts and ultimately to the need for liver transplantation. We compared 3,789 PSC cases of European ancestry to 25,079 population controls across 130,422 SNPs genotyped using the Immunochip. We identified 12 genome-wide significant associations outside the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex, 9 of which were new, increasing the number of known PSC risk loci to 16. Despite comorbidity with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 72% of the cases, 6 of the 12 loci showed significantly stronger association with PSC than with IBD, suggesting overlapping yet distinct genetic architectures for these two diseases. We incorporated association statistics from 7 diseases clinically occurring with PSC in the analysis and found suggestive evidence for 33 additional pleiotropic PSC risk loci. Together with network analyses, these findings add to the genetic risk map of PSC and expand on the relationship between PSC and other immune-mediated diseases.  
  Address Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK  
  Corporate Author International PSC Study Group Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23603763; PMC3667736 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1427  
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Author (up) Nes, B.M.; Janszky, I.; Wisloff, U.; Stoylen, A.; Karlsen, T. url  doi
  Title Age-predicted maximal heart rate in healthy subjects: The HUNT Fitness Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports Abbreviated Journal Scand J Med Sci Sports  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 697-704  
  Keywords HUNT; clinical testing; maximum heart rate; population sample  
  Abstract Maximal heart rate (HRmax ) declines substantially with age, but the magnitude and possible modifying effect of gender, body composition, and physical activity are not fully established. The present study examined the relationship between HRmax and age in 3320 healthy men and women within a wide age range using data from the HUNT Fitness Study (2007-2008). Subjects were included if a maximal effort could be verified during a maximal exercise test. General linear modeling was used to determine the effect of age on HRmax . Subsequently, the effects of gender, body mass index (BMI), physical activity status, and maximal oxygen uptake were examined. Mean predicted HRmax by three former prediction formulas were compared with measured HRmax within 10-year age groups. HRmax was univariately explained by the formula 211 – 0.64.age (SEE, 10.8), and we found no evidence of interaction with gender, physical activity, VO2max level, or BMI groups. There were only minor age-adjusted differences in HRmax between these groups. Previously suggested prediction equations underestimated measured HRmax in subjects older than 30 years. HRmax predicted by age alone may be practically convenient for various groups, although a standard error of 10.8 beats/min must be taken into account. HRmax in healthy, older subjects and women were higher than previously reported.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0905-7188 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22376273 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1411  
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