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Author (up) Bhatta, L.; Leivseth, L.; Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Brumpton, B.M.
Title Prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008: The HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Respiratory Medicine Abbreviated Journal Respir Med
Volume 138 Issue Pages 50-56
Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Disease Progression; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology; Forecasting; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Distribution; Spirometry/methods; Vital Capacity/physiology; *Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; *Incidence; *Norway; *Prevalence; *Symptoms; *Trends
Abstract BACKGROUND: COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across the world and new estimates of prevalence and trend are of great importance. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 in Norwegian adults >/=40 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: COPD was assessed using a fixed-ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) criteria. Pre-bronchodilator spirometry was performed during 1995-1997 (n=7158) and 2006-2008 (n=8788). The prevalence of COPD was weighted using the inverse probability of selection and predicted probability of response. RESULTS: The prevalence of pre-bronchodilator COPD was 16.7% in 1995-1997 and 14.8% in 2006-2008 using fixed-ratio criteria, and 10.4% in 1995-1997 and 7.3% in 2006-2008 using LLN criteria. The prevalence of LLN COPD was higher among men (13.0% in 1995-1997, 7.7% in 2006-2008) than women (8.0% in 1995-1997, 6.9% in 2006-2008). From 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, the prevalence decreased among men but remained relatively stable among women. Over the 11-year period, the cumulative incidence of pre-bronchodilator COPD using LLN criteria was 3.3% and 2.7% among men and women respectively. The prevalence of self-reported asthma and respiratory symptoms increased. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence declined in men but not in women from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, and was consistently higher among men than women.
Address Department of Thoracic Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0954-6111 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29724393 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2072
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Author (up) Burgel, P.-R.; Paillasseur, J.-L.; Janssens, W.; Piquet, J.; Ter Riet, G.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Cosio, B.; Bakke, P.; Puhan, M.A.; Langhammer, A.; Alfageme, I.; Almagro, P.; Ancochea, J.; Celli, B.R.; Casanova, C.; de-Torres, J.P.; Decramer, M.; Echazarreta, A.; Esteban, C.; Gomez Punter, R.M.; Han, M.L.K.; Johannessen, A.; Kaiser, B.; Lamprecht, B.; Lange, P.; Leivseth, L.; Marin, J.M.; Martin, F.; Martinez-Camblor, P.; Miravitlles, M.; Oga, T.; Sofia Ramirez, A.; Sin, D.D.; Sobradillo, P.; Soler-Cataluna, J.J.; Turner, A.M.; Verdu Rivera, F.J.; Soriano, J.B.; Roche, N.
Title A simple algorithm for the identification of clinical COPD phenotypes Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J
Volume 50 Issue 5 Pages
Keywords
Abstract This study aimed to identify simple rules for allocating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to clinical phenotypes identified by cluster analyses.Data from 2409 COPD patients of French/Belgian COPD cohorts were analysed using cluster analysis resulting in the identification of subgroups, for which clinical relevance was determined by comparing 3-year all-cause mortality. Classification and regression trees (CARTs) were used to develop an algorithm for allocating patients to these subgroups. This algorithm was tested in 3651 patients from the COPD Cohorts Collaborative International Assessment (3CIA) initiative.Cluster analysis identified five subgroups of COPD patients with different clinical characteristics (especially regarding severity of respiratory disease and the presence of cardiovascular comorbidities and diabetes). The CART-based algorithm indicated that the variables relevant for patient grouping differed markedly between patients with isolated respiratory disease (FEV1, dyspnoea grade) and those with multi-morbidity (dyspnoea grade, age, FEV1 and body mass index). Application of this algorithm to the 3CIA cohorts confirmed that it identified subgroups of patients with different clinical characteristics, mortality rates (median, from 4% to 27%) and age at death (median, from 68 to 76 years).A simple algorithm, integrating respiratory characteristics and comorbidities, allowed the identification of clinically relevant COPD phenotypes.
Address Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Cochin Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France
Corporate Author Initiatives BPCO, EABPCO, Leuven and 3CIA study groups Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29097431 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1894
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Author (up) Leivseth, L.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Mai, X.-M.; Johnsen, R.; Langhammer, A.
Title Lung function and respiratory symptoms in association with mortality: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication COPD Abbreviated Journal COPD
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 59-80
Keywords
Abstract Whether respiratory symptoms are associated with mortality independent of lung function is unclear. The authors explored the association of the exposures i) lung function, ii) respiratory symptoms, and iii) lung function and respiratory symptoms combined, with the outcomes all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The study included 10,491 adults who participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Lung Study in 1995-1997 and were followed through 2009. Cox regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality associated with pre-bronchodilator% predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (ppFEV1), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) grades, and respiratory symptoms (chronic bronchitis, wheeze, and levels of dyspnoea). Lung function was inversely associated with all-cause mortality. Compared to ppFEV1 >/=100, ppFEV1 <50 increased the HR to 6.85 (4.46-10.52) in women and 3.88 (2.60-5.79) in men. Correspondingly, compared to normal airflow, COPD grade 3 or 4 increased the HR to 6.50 (4.33-9.75) in women and 3.57 (2.60-4.91) in men. Of the respiratory symptoms, only dyspnoea when walking remained associated with all-cause mortality after controlling for lung function (HR 1.73 [1.04-2.89] in women and 1.57 [1.04-2.36] in men). Analyses of lung function and dyspnoea when walking as a combined exposure further supported this finding. Overall, associations between lung function and cardiovascular mortality were weaker, and respiratory symptoms were not associated with cardiovascular mortality. In conclusion, lung function was inversely associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and dyspnoea when walking was associated with all-cause mortality independent of lung function.
Address 1Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) , Trondheim , Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1541-2563 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23875716 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1602
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Author (up) Leivseth, L.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Mai, X.-M.; Johnsen, R.; Langhammer, A.
Title Lung function and anxiety in association with dyspnoea: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Respiratory Medicine Abbreviated Journal Respir Med
Volume 106 Issue 8 Pages 1148-1157
Keywords Adult; Aged; Anxiety/*complications/epidemiology/physiopathology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dyspnea/epidemiology/*etiology/physiopathology/psychology; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology; Humans; Lung/*physiopathology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Vital Capacity/physiology; Walking/physiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Few studies from the general population have investigated the role of anxiety in reporting dyspnoea. We examined the independent and combined association of lung function and anxiety symptoms with the prevalence of dyspnoea in different situations. METHODS: The study included 5627 women and 5066 men who participated in the Lung study of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study second survey in 1995-97. In a cross-sectional design we used logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for reporting dyspnoea associated with levels of percent predicted FEV(1) (ppFEV(1)) and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). RESULTS: Overall, there was a linear inverse association between ppFEV(1) and dyspnoea (all P(trend) < 0.001), and a positive association between anxiety symptoms and dyspnoea (all P(trend) < 0.001). In combined analysis, using people with ppFEV(1) >/=100 without anxiety as reference, the OR (95% confidence interval) for reporting dyspnoea when walking on flat ground was 6.23 (3.45-11.28) in women with ppFEV(1) <80 without anxiety and 15.14 (7.13-32.12) in women with ppFEV(1) <80 with anxiety. The corresponding ORs among men were 5.75 (2.23-14.18) and 15.19 (4.74-48.64), respectively. Similar patterns were seen for dyspnoea when sitting still and woken at night by dyspnoea. CONCLUSION: Impaired lung function and anxiety symptoms were independently associated with reporting dyspnoea. Within lung function levels, reporting dyspnoea was more common among people with anxiety symptoms than among people without. This suggests that, in addition to its relation to reduced lung function, the subjective experience of breathing discomfort may also influence or be influenced by anxiety.
Address Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, P.O. Box 8905, MTFS, NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway. linda.leivseth@ntnu.no
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0954-6111 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22579439 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1544
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Author (up) Vasseljen, O.; Woodhouse, A.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Leivseth, L.
Title Natural course of acute neck and low back pain in the general population: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain
Volume 154 Issue 8 Pages 1237-1244
Keywords Adult; Aged; Back Pain/drug therapy/*epidemiology; Cohort Studies; Community Health Planning; Female; Humans; Low Back Pain/drug therapy/*epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Pain Measurement; Sick Leave/statistics & numerical data; Time Factors; Young Adult
Abstract In this prospective cohort study we aimed to describe the natural course of acute neck and low back pain in a general population of Norway. We screened 9056 subjects aged 20-67 years who participated in a general health survey for a new episode of neck or low back pain the previous month. The screening identified 219 subjects who formed the cohort for this study. Pain intensity was reported on a numeric rating scale (0-10) at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months after start of the new pain episode. The course of pain was described for neck and low back pain, different baseline pain levels, age groups, and number of pain sites at baseline. Use of medication and health care was described and associations between pain intensity and seeking health care were estimated. Pain declined rapidly within 1 month after a new pain episode, with a reduction of 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50-1.32) for neck pain and 1.40 (95% CI 0.82-1.99) for low back pain with little change thereafter. However, pain remained unchanged over the follow-up year for those with equal pain in the neck and low back areas at baseline and for those reporting 4 or more pain sites at baseline. Only 1 in 5 sought health care for their complaints. Still, the course of pain was comparable to effect sizes reported in interventional studies. This study thus contributes natural course reference data for comparisons of pain outcome in clinical trials and practice.
Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. ottar.vasseljen@ntnu.no
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0304-3959 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23664654 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1392
Permanent link to this record