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Author (up) Haberg, A.K.; Hammer, T.A.; Kvistad, K.A.; Rydland, J.; Muller, T.B.; Eikenes, L.; Garseth, M.; Stovner, L.J. url  doi
  Title Incidental Intracranial Findings and Their Clinical Impact; The HUNT MRI Study in a General Population of 1006 Participants between 50-66 Years Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PloS one  
  Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages e0151080  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; *Brain; Brain Diseases/diagnosis/surgery; False Positive Reactions; Female; Humans; *Incidental Findings; *Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Neuroimaging; Neurosurgical Procedures; Referral and Consultation; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Evaluate types and prevalence of all, incidental, and clinically relevant incidental intracranial findings, i.e. those referred to primary physician or clinical specialist, in a cohort between 50 and 66 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health (HUNT) study. Types of follow-up, outcome of repeated neuroimaging and neurosurgical treatment were assessed. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 1006 participants (530 women) underwent MRI of the head at 1.5T consisting of T1 weighted sagittal IR-FSPGR volume, axial T2 weighted, gradient echo T2* weighted and FLAIR sequences plus time of flight cerebral angiography covering the circle of Willis. The nature of a finding and if it was incidental were determined from previous radiological examinations, patient records, phone interview, and/or additional neuroimaging. Handling and outcome of the clinically relevant incidental findings were prospectively recorded. True and false positives were estimated from the repeated neuroimaging. RESULTS: Prevalence of any intracranial finding was 32.7%. Incidental intracranial findings were present in 27.1% and clinically relevant findings in 15.1% of the participants in the HUNT MRI cohort. 185 individuals (18.4%) were contacted by phone about their findings. 40 participants (6.2%) underwent >/= 1 additional neuroimaging session to establish etiology. Most false positives were linked to an initial diagnosis of suspected glioma, and overall positive predictive value of initial MRI was 0.90 across different diagnoses. 90.8% of the clinically relevant incidental findings were developmental and acquired cerebrovascular pathologies, the remaining 9.2% were intracranial tumors, of which extra-axial tumors predominated. In total, 3.9% of the participants were referred to a clinical specialist, and 11.7% to their primary physician. 1.4% underwent neurosurgery/radiotherapy, and 1 (0.1%) experienced a procedure related postoperative deficit. CONCLUSIONS: In a general population between 50 and 66 years most intracranial findings on MRI were incidental, and >15% of the cohort was referred to clinical-follow up. Hence good routines for handling of findings need to be in place to ensure timely and appropriate handling.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Haberg, Asta KristineHammer, Tommy ArildKvistad, Kjell ArneRydland, JanaMuller, Tomm BEikenes, LiveGarseth, MariStovner, Lars JacobengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't2016/03/08 06:00PLoS One. 2016 Mar 7;11(3):e0151080. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0151080. eCollection 2016. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Haberg2016 Serial 1743  
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Author (up) Liu, J.Z.; Hov, J.R.; Folseraas, T.; Ellinghaus, E.; Rushbrook, S.M.; Doncheva, N.T.; Andreassen, O.A.; Weersma, R.K.; Weismuller, T.J.; Eksteen, B.; Invernizzi, P.; Hirschfield, G.M.; Gotthardt, D.N.; Pares, A.; Ellinghaus, D.; Shah, T.; Juran, B.D.; Milkiewicz, P.; Rust, C.; Schramm, C.; Muller, T.; Srivastava, B.; Dalekos, G.; Nothen, M.M.; Herms, S.; Winkelmann, J.; Mitrovic, M.; Braun, F.; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Croucher, P.J.P.; Sterneck, M.; Teufel, A.; Mason, A.L.; Saarela, J.; Leppa, V.; Dorfman, R.; Alvaro, D.; Floreani, A.; Onengut-Gumuscu, S.; Rich, S.S.; Thompson, W.K.; Schork, A.J.; Naess, S.; Thomsen, I.; Mayr, G.; Konig, I.R.; Hveem, K.; Cleynen, I.; Gutierrez-Achury, J.; Ricano-Ponce, I.; van Heel, D.; Bjornsson, E.; Sandford, R.N.; Durie, P.R.; Melum, E.; Vatn, M.H.; Silverberg, M.S.; Duerr, R.H.; Padyukov, L.; Brand, S.; Sans, M.; Annese, V.; Achkar, J.-P.; Boberg, K.M.; Marschall, H.-U.; Chazouilleres, O.; Bowlus, C.L.; Wijmenga, C.; Schrumpf, E.; Vermeire, S.; Albrecht, M.; Rioux, J.D.; Alexander, G.; Bergquist, A.; Cho, J.; Schreiber, S.; Manns, M.P.; Farkkila, M.; Dale, A.M.; Chapman, R.W.; Lazaridis, K.N.; Franke, A.; Anderson, C.A.; Karlsen, T.H. url  doi
  Title Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies nine new risk loci for primary sclerosing cholangitis Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 45 Issue 6 Pages 670-675  
  Keywords Case-Control Studies; Cholangitis, Sclerosing/*genetics/immunology; Gene Frequency; Genetic Loci/immunology; Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotyping Techniques; Humans; Linkage Disequilibrium; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Risk Factors  
  Abstract Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a severe liver disease of unknown etiology leading to fibrotic destruction of the bile ducts and ultimately to the need for liver transplantation. We compared 3,789 PSC cases of European ancestry to 25,079 population controls across 130,422 SNPs genotyped using the Immunochip. We identified 12 genome-wide significant associations outside the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex, 9 of which were new, increasing the number of known PSC risk loci to 16. Despite comorbidity with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 72% of the cases, 6 of the 12 loci showed significantly stronger association with PSC than with IBD, suggesting overlapping yet distinct genetic architectures for these two diseases. We incorporated association statistics from 7 diseases clinically occurring with PSC in the analysis and found suggestive evidence for 33 additional pleiotropic PSC risk loci. Together with network analyses, these findings add to the genetic risk map of PSC and expand on the relationship between PSC and other immune-mediated diseases.  
  Address Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK  
  Corporate Author International PSC Study Group Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23603763; PMC3667736 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1427  
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Author (up) Sandvei, M.S.; Lindekleiv, H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Muller, T.B.; Vatten, L.J.; Ingebrigtsen, T.; Njolstad, I.; Mathiesen, E.B.; Vik, A. url  doi
  Title Risk factors for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage – BMI and serum lipids: 11-year follow-up of the HUNT and the Tromso Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Acta Neurologica Scandinavica Abbreviated Journal Acta Neurol Scand  
  Volume 125 Issue 6 Pages 382-388  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Body Mass Index; Cohort Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Lipids/*blood; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Overweight; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/*blood/diagnosis/*epidemiology  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Life-style factors have been associated with the risk for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), but it is not clear whether body mass index (BMI) and serum lipids are associated with risk. We prospectively assessed these associations in two large population studies. METHODS: A total of 65,526 participants in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (1995-1997) and 26,882 participants in the Tromso Study (1994-1995) were included. Studies included measurements of body weight and height, serum lipids, and self-administered questionnaires. Participants who experienced aSAH were identified, and hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: During 11 years of follow-up, aSAH was diagnosed in 122 participants. Overweight (BMI 25-29.9) was negatively associated with the risk of aSAH (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.4-1.0). There was no over all association of total serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides with the risk of aSAH, but in participants younger than 50 years, HDL cholesterol was inversely associated with the risk (HR per standard deviation increase 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9). CONCLUSIONS: Overweight may be associated with reduced risk of aSAH, but there was no over all association of total serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides with the risk of aSAH in this prospective study.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. marie.s.sandvei@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0001-6314 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21793808 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1573  
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