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Author (up) Ask, H.; Langballe, E.M.; Holmen, J.; Selbaek, G.; Saltvedt, I.; Tambs, K.
Title Mental health and wellbeing in spouses of persons with dementia: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health
Volume 14 Issue Pages 413
Keywords HUNT3; Dementia
Abstract BACKGROUND: Caring for a spouse diagnosed with dementia can be a stressful situation and can put the caregiving partner at risk of loss of mental health and wellbeing. The main aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between dementia and spousal mental health in a population-based sample of married couples older than 55 years of age. The association was investigated for individuals living together with their demented partner, as well as for individuals whose demented partner was living in an institution. METHODS: Data on dementia were collected from hospitals and nursing homes in the county of Nord-Trondelag, Norway. These data were combined with data on spousal mental health, which were collected in a population-based health screening: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). Of 6,951 participating couples (>55 years), 131 included one partner that had been diagnosed with dementia. RESULTS: Our results indicate that after adjustment for covariates, having a partner with dementia is associated with lower levels of life satisfaction and more symptoms of anxiety and depression than reported by spouses of elderly individuals without dementia. Spouses living together with a partner diagnosed with dementia experienced moderately lower levels of life satisfaction (0.35 standard deviation [SD]) and more symptoms of depression (0.38 SD) and anxiety (0.23 SD) than did their non-caregiving counterparts. Having a partner with dementia that resided in a nursing home was associated with clearly lower life satisfaction. Compared with non-caregivers, these spouses reported lower levels of life satisfaction (1.16 SD), and also more symptoms of depression (0.38 SD), and more symptoms of anxiety (0.42 SD). CONCLUSIONS: Having a partner with dementia is associated with loss of mental health and reduced life satisfaction. The risk of adverse mental health outcomes is greatest after the partner's nursing home admission.
Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P,O, Box 4404, Nydalen N-0403 Oslo, Norway. heas@fhi.no
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ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24885732; PMC4041138 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1622
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Author (up) Bergh, S.; Holmen, J.; Gabin, J.; Stordal, E.; Fikseaunet, A.; Selbæk, G.; Saltvedt, I.; Langballe, E.M.; Tambs, K.
Title Cohort Profile: The Health and Memory Study (HMS): a dementia cohort linked to the HUNT study in Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract The aim of the Health and Memory Study (HMS) of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, was primarily to establish a database suitable as basis for a large number of studies on dementia. Data from the HMS study were collected via questionnaires and examinations during the period from 1995 to 2011. The dementia panel consists of 620 participants residing in nursing homes and 920 participants referred to memory clinics of Nord-Trøndelag. Data from this dementia panel may be linked to the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (the HUNT study), three large population based health surveys that took place in 1984–86 (HUNT1), 1995–97 (HUNT2) and 2006–08 (HUNT3). Data collection is complete and the participation rate in the HUNT1 for patients diagnosed with dementia was 86%. The sub-studies in the HMS are focused on examining risk factors, caregiver burden, healthcare consumption and economic consequences of treating and having dementia. Researchers interested in the HMS study are invited to contact HUNT at hunt@medisin.ntnu.no.
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Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1471
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Author (up) Bergh, S.; Holmen, J.; Saltvedt, I.; Tambs, K.; Selbaek, G.
Title Dementia and neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing-home patients in Nord-Trondelag County Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Tidsskrift for den Norske Laegeforening : Tidsskrift for Praktisk Medicin, ny Raekke Abbreviated Journal Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen
Volume 132 Issue 17 Pages 1956-1959
Keywords Activities of Daily Living; Affective Symptoms/*epidemiology; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Aggression; Apathy; Dementia/diagnosis/*epidemiology; Female; Homes for the Aged/*statistics & numerical data; Humans; Male; Neuropsychological Tests; Norway/epidemiology; Nursing Homes/*statistics & numerical data; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Psychomotor Agitation/epidemiology; Psychotic Disorders/*epidemiology; Questionnaires
Abstract BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have revealed a high prevalence of dementia among nursing home patients. We conducted a descriptive study of dementia and neuropsychiatric symptoms among patients in nursing homes in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 704 nursing home patients were included and studied with the Norwegian versions of the clinical demential rating scale (CDR) and the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI). RESULTS: The study indicated that 575 patients (82%) had dementia. Of these, 430 patients (75%) had at least one clinically significant neuropsychiatric syndrome in addition, most commonly delusions, apathy or irritability. The neuropsychiatric symptoms could be grouped in four categories: psychosis, apathy, affective symptoms and agitation. INTERPRETATION: The findings are comparable with earlier studies of Norwegian nursing home patients. The high prevalence of dementia and neuropsychiatric symptoms is of significance for the clinical practice, running and planning of nursing homes.
Address Centre for Old-Age Psychiatry Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway. sverre.bergh@sykehuset-innlandet.no
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Norwegian Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0029-2001 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23007358 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1508
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Author (up) Gabin, J.M.; Saltvedt, I.; Tambs, K.; Holmen, J.
Title The association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and incident Alzheimer disease in patients 60 years and older: The HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Immunity & Ageing : I & A Abbreviated Journal Immun Ageing
Volume 15 Issue Pages 4
Keywords Alzheimer disease; Epidemiology; High sensitivity C-reactive protein; Low-grade inflammation
Abstract Background: With ageing, long-standing inflammation can be destructive, contributing to development of several disorders, among these Alzheimer's disease (AD). C-reactive protein (CRP) is a relatively stable peripheral inflammatory marker, but in previous studies the association between highly sensitive CRP (hsCRP) and AD have shown inconsistent results. This study examines the association between AD and hsCRP in blood samples taken up to 15 years prior to the diagnoses of 52 persons with AD amongst a total of 2150 persons >/=60 years of age. Results: Data from Norway's Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2) and the Health and Memory Study (HMS) were linked. The participants had an average age of 73 years, and diagnosed with AD up to 15 years [mean 8.0 (+/-3.9)] following hsCRP measurement. Logistic regression models showed an adverse association between hsCRP and AD in participants aged 60-70.5 (odds ratio: 2.37, 95% CI: 1.01-5.58). Conversely, in participants aged 70.6-94, there was an inverse association between hsCRP and AD (odds ratio: 0.39, 95% CI: 0.19-0.84). When applying multivariate models the findings were significant in individuals diagnosed 0.4-7 years after the hsCRP was measured; and attenuated when AD was diagnosed more than seven years following hsCRP measurement. Conclusions: Our study is in line with previous studies indicating a shift in the association between hsCRP and AD by age: in adults (60-70.5 years) there is an adverse association, while in seniors (>70.6 years) there is an inverse association. If our findings can be replicated, a focus on why a more active peripheral immune response may have a protective role in individuals >/=70 years should be further examined.
Address 1HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600 Levanger, Norway.0000 0001 1516 2393grid.5947.f
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1742-4933 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:29387136; PMCID:PMC5776764 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2083
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Author (up) Gabin, J.M.; Tambs, K.; Saltvedt, I.; Sund, E.; Holmen, J.
Title Association between blood pressure and Alzheimer disease measured up to 27 years prior to diagnosis: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Alzheimer's Research & Therapy Abbreviated Journal Alzheimers Res Ther
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 37
Keywords Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alzheimer Disease/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Asymptomatic Diseases/*epidemiology; Blood Pressure Determination/statistics & numerical data; Comorbidity; Dementia/diagnosis/epidemiology; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*diagnostic imaging/*epidemiology; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sex Distribution; Alzheimer disease; Blood pressure; Epidemiology; Prospective case cohort; Risk factors; Vascular dementia
Abstract BACKGROUND: A lot of attention has been paid to the relationship of blood pressure and dementia because epidemiological research has reported conflicting evidence. Observational data has shown that midlife hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia later in life, whereas there is evidence that low blood pressure is predictive in later life. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between dementia and blood pressure measured up to 27 years (mean 17.6 years) prior to ascertainment. METHODS: In Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, incident dementia data were collected during 1995-2011, and the diagnoses were validated by a panel of experts in the field. By using the subjects' personal identification numbers, the dementia data were linked to data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a large, population-based health study performed in 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) and 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). A total of 24,638 participants of the HUNT Study were included in the present study, 579 of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, or vascular dementia. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between dementia and blood pressure data from HUNT 1 and HUNT 2. RESULTS: Over the age of 60 years, consistent inverse associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and all-cause dementia, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease, but not with vascular dementia, when adjusting for age, sex, education, and other relevant covariates. This was observed for systolic blood pressure in both HUNT 1 and HUNT 2, regardless of antihypertensive medication use. There was an adverse association between systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and Alzheimer disease in individuals treated with antihypertensive medication under the age of 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our data are in line with those in previous studies demonstrating an inverse association between dementia and systolic blood pressure in individuals over the age of 60 years. We cannot exclude a survival effect, however. Among middle-aged subjects (<60 years), elevated systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were associated with eventual Alzheimer disease in individuals who reported using antihypertensive medication.
Address HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1758-9193 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28569205; PMCID:PMC5452294 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1900
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Author (up) Langballe, E.M.; Ask, H.; Holmen, J.; Stordal, E.; Saltvedt, I.; Selbaek, G.; Fikseaunet, A.; Bergh, S.; Nafstad, P.; Tambs, K.
Title Alcohol consumption and risk of dementia up to 27 years later in a large, population-based sample: the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Eur J Epidemiol Abbreviated Journal European journal of epidemiology
Volume 30 Issue 9 Pages 1049-1056
Keywords HUNT1; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*epidemiology/*physiopathology; Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology/*prevention & control; Cohort Studies; Dementia/*epidemiology; Dementia, Vascular/epidemiology/*prevention & control; Female; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Population Surveillance; Risk Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract The relationship between alcohol consumption and dementia risk is unclear. This investigation estimates the association between alcohol consumption reported in a population-based study in the mid-1980s and the risk for dementia up to 27 years later. The entire adult population in one Norwegian county was invited to the Nord-Trondelag Health Study during 1984-1986 (HUNT1): 88 % participated. The sample used in this study includes HUNT1 participants born between 1905 and 1946 who completed the questionnaire assessing alcohol consumption. A total of 40,435 individuals, of whom 1084 have developed dementia, are included in the analysis adjusted for age, sex, years of education, hypertension, obesity, smoking, and symptoms of depression. When adjusting for age and sex, and compared to reporting consumption of alcohol 1-4 times during the last 14 days (drinking infrequently), both abstaining from alcohol and reporting consumption of alcohol five or more times (drinking frequently) were statistically significantly associated with increased dementia risk with hazard ratios of 1.30 (95 % CI 1.05-1.61) and 1.45 (1.11-1.90), respectively. In the fully adjusted analysis, drinking alcohol frequently was still significantly associated with increased dementia risk with a hazard ratio of 1.40 (1.07-1.84). However, the association between dementia and abstaining from alcohol was no longer significant (1.15, 0.92-1.43). Equivalent results for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia indicated the same patterns of associations. When adjusting for other factors associated with dementia, frequent alcohol drinking, but not abstaining from alcohol, is associated with increased dementia risk compared to drinking alcohol infrequently.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, 0403, Nydalen, Oslo, Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Langballe, Ellen MelbyeAsk, HelgaHolmen, JosteinStordal, EysteinSaltvedt, IngvildSelbaek, GeirFikseaunet, ArvidBergh, SverreNafstad, PerTambs, KristianengNetherlands2015/05/15 06:00Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Sep;30(9):1049-56. doi: 10.1007/s10654-015-0029-2. Epub 2015 May 13. Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Langballe2015 Serial 1834
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