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Author (up) Bratberg, G.H.; S, C.W.; Wilsnack, R.; Havas Haugland, S.; Krokstad, S.; Sund, E.R.; Bjorngaard, J.H.
Title Gender differences and gender convergence in alcohol use over the past three decades (1984-2008), The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC public health
Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 723
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: To examine changes in men's and women's drinking in Norway over a 20-year period, in order to learn whether such changes have led to gender convergence in alcohol drinking. METHODS: Repeated cross-sectional studies (in 1984-86, 1995-97, and 2006-08) of a large general population living in a geographically defined area (county) in Norway. Information about alcohol drinking is based on self-report questionnaires. Not all measures were assessed in all three surveys. RESULTS: Adult alcohol drinking patterns have changed markedly over a 20-year period. Abstaining has become rarer while consumption and rates of recent drinking and problematic drinking have increased. Most changes were in the same direction for men and women, but women have moved towards men's drinking patterns in abstaining, recent drinking, problematic drinking and consumption. Intoxication (among recent drinkers) has decreased in both genders, but more in men than in women. The declines in gender differences, however, were age-specific and varied depending on which drinking behavior and which beverage was taken into account. CONCLUSIONS: There has been a gender convergence in most drinking behaviours, including lifetime history of problem drinking, over the past 2-3 decades in this Norwegian general population, but the reasons for this convergence appear to be complex.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegi Editor
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Notes Bratberg, Grete HelenC Wilsnack, SharonWilsnack, RichardHavas Haugland, SiriKrokstad, SteinarSund, Erik ReidarBjorngaard, Johan HaakonENG2016/08/06 06:00BMC Public Health. 2016 Aug 5;16(1):723. Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Bratberg2016 Serial 1732
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Author (up) Gabin, J.M.; Tambs, K.; Saltvedt, I.; Sund, E.; Holmen, J.
Title Association between blood pressure and Alzheimer disease measured up to 27 years prior to diagnosis: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Alzheimer's Research & Therapy Abbreviated Journal Alzheimers Res Ther
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 37
Keywords Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alzheimer Disease/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Asymptomatic Diseases/*epidemiology; Blood Pressure Determination/statistics & numerical data; Comorbidity; Dementia/diagnosis/epidemiology; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*diagnostic imaging/*epidemiology; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sex Distribution; Alzheimer disease; Blood pressure; Epidemiology; Prospective case cohort; Risk factors; Vascular dementia
Abstract BACKGROUND: A lot of attention has been paid to the relationship of blood pressure and dementia because epidemiological research has reported conflicting evidence. Observational data has shown that midlife hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia later in life, whereas there is evidence that low blood pressure is predictive in later life. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between dementia and blood pressure measured up to 27 years (mean 17.6 years) prior to ascertainment. METHODS: In Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, incident dementia data were collected during 1995-2011, and the diagnoses were validated by a panel of experts in the field. By using the subjects' personal identification numbers, the dementia data were linked to data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a large, population-based health study performed in 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) and 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). A total of 24,638 participants of the HUNT Study were included in the present study, 579 of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, or vascular dementia. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between dementia and blood pressure data from HUNT 1 and HUNT 2. RESULTS: Over the age of 60 years, consistent inverse associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and all-cause dementia, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease, but not with vascular dementia, when adjusting for age, sex, education, and other relevant covariates. This was observed for systolic blood pressure in both HUNT 1 and HUNT 2, regardless of antihypertensive medication use. There was an adverse association between systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and Alzheimer disease in individuals treated with antihypertensive medication under the age of 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our data are in line with those in previous studies demonstrating an inverse association between dementia and systolic blood pressure in individuals over the age of 60 years. We cannot exclude a survival effect, however. Among middle-aged subjects (<60 years), elevated systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were associated with eventual Alzheimer disease in individuals who reported using antihypertensive medication.
Address HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1758-9193 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28569205; PMCID:PMC5452294 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1900
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Author (up) Hansen, E.; Sund, E.; Skjei Knudtsen, M.; Krokstad, S.; Holmen, T.L.
Title Cultural activity participation and associations with self-perceived health, life-satisfaction and mental health: the Young HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health
Volume 15 Issue Pages 544
Keywords HUNT3; Young-HUNT
Abstract BACKGROUND: Leisure time activities and culture participation may have health effects and be important in pulic health promotion. More knowledge on how cultural activity participation may influence self-perceived health, life-satisfaction, self-esteem and mental health is needed. METHODS: This article use data from the general population-based Norwegian HUNT Study, using the cross-sectional Young-HUNT3 (2006-08) Survey including 8200 adolescents. Data on cultural activity participation, self-perceived health, life-satisfaction, self-esteem, anxiety and depression were collected by self-reported questionnaires. RESULTS: Both attending meetings or training in an organisation or club, and attending sports events were positively associated with each of the health parameters good self-percieved health, good life-satisfaction, good self-esteem, and low anxiety and depression symptoms. We found differences according to gender and age (13-15 years versus 16-19 years old) for several culture activities, where girls aged 16-19 years seemed to benefit most from being culturally active. The extent of participation seemed to matter. Those who had frequent participation in cultural activities reported better health outcomes compared to inactive adolecents. CONCLUSIONS: The results from this study indicate that participation in cultural activities may be positively associated with health, life-satisfaction and self-esteem in adolescents and thus important in public health promotion. Possible sex and age differences should be taken into account.
Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway. turid.lingaas.holmen@ntnu.no
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26055410; PMC4460785 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1717
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Author (up) Haugland, S.H.; Holmen, T.L.; Krokstad, S.; Sund, E.R.; Bratberg, G.H.
Title Intergenerational Hazardous Alcohol Use and Area Factors: The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Subst Use Misuse Abbreviated Journal Substance use & misuse
Volume 50 Issue 14 Pages 1753-1764
Keywords HUNT3; Young-HUNT
Abstract BACKGROUND: Alcohol use among adolescents has been found to be associated with parental alcohol abuse, but it's relation to more prevalent forms of hazardous drinking patterns among parents has been less explored. Few studies have included area factors when investigating alcohol use across generations. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate whether adolescent intoxication was associated with parental heavy episodic drinking (HED) and intoxication, area-level socioeconomic status (SES), and rates of area-level HED. METHODS: General Estimation Equations (GEE) was applied to analyze data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (2006-08) including 2,306 adolescents. Adolescent alcohol use was defined by self-reported frequency of intoxication. Parental alcohol use was defined by parental self-reports of drinking five glasses of alcohol at one occasion (HED), whether they had been strongly intoxicated, and adolescent reports of seeing parents intoxicated. Area-level SES and HED were based on data from HUNT3 and Statistics Norway. RESULTS: Parental and offspring alcohol use were associated, although this varied to some extent with gender and exposures. The strongest associations were found between offspring intoxication and offspring reports of seeing their parent intoxicated (girls: OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.3-4.7; boys: OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.4-4.7). Intoxication was more common among girls, who lived in areas with a higher level of adult HED. Living in areas with higher SES was associated with less intoxication among adolescents. CONCLUSION: Intoxication in adolescence was associated with factors at both family and area level, which emphasize the need of both population and high risk preventive approaches.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication a Department of Psychosocial Health , University of Agder , Agder , Norway.b HUNT Research Center , Editor
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Notes Haugland, Siri HavasHolmen, Turid LingaasKrokstad, SteinarSund, Erik RBratberg, Grete HengEngland2015/12/10 06:00Subst Use Misuse. 2015;50(14):1753-64. doi: 10.3109/10826084.2015.1037396. Epub 2015 Dec 8. Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Haugland2015 Serial 1816
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Author (up) Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L.; Tverdal, A.; Holmen, O.L.; Sund, E.R.; Midthjell, K.
Title Blood pressure changes during 22-year of follow-up in large general population – the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication BMC Cardiovasc Disord Abbreviated Journal BMC cardiovascular disorders
Volume 16 Issue Pages 94
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: While hypertension still is a major health problem worldwide, some studies have indicated that the blood pressure level has decreased in some populations. This population based cohort study aims at analysing blood pressure changes in a large Norwegian population over a 22 year period. METHODS: Data is acquired from three comprehensive health surveys of the HUNT Study conducted from 1984-86 to 2006-08. All citizens of Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, >20 years were invited: 74,549 individuals participated in 1984-86; 64,523 in 1995-97; and 43,905 in 2006-08. RESULTS: Both systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels decreased substantially from mid 1980s to mid 2000s, with the most pronounced decrease from 1995-97 to 2006-08 (from 136.0/78.9 to 128.3/70.9 mmHg in women and from 140.1/82.1 to 133.7/76.5 mmHg in men). Although the use of blood pressure lowering medication increased, there was a considerable decrease even in those who reported never use of medication (mean decrease 6.8/7.2 mmHg in women and 6.3/5.3 mmHg in men), and the decrease was most pronounced in the elderly (mean decrease 16.1/12.4 mmHg in women and 14.7/10.4 mmHg in men aged 80+). Mean heart rate, total cholesterol and daily smoking decreased, self-reported hard physical activity increased, while body weight and the prevalence of diabetes increased during the same period. CONCLUSIONS: The BP decrease might seem paradoxically, as body weight and prevalence of diabetes increased during the same period. Salt consumption might have decreased, but no salt data is available. The parallel decrease in mean heart rate might indicate reduction in the white-coat phenomenon, or increased use of beta blockers or calcium channel blockers for other diagnosis than hypertension. Additionally, the data could support the “healthy obese” hypothesis, i.e., that subgroups in the population can sustain obesity without serious health consequences.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Scie Editor
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Notes Holmen, JosteinHolmen, Turid LingaasTverdal, AageHolmen, Oddgeir LingaasSund, Erik RMidthjell, KristianengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2016/05/14 06:00BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016 May 12;16:94. doi: 10.1186/s12872-016-0257-8. Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Holmen2016a Serial 1750
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Author (up) Krokstad, S.; Ding, D.; Grunseit, A.C.; Sund, E.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A.
Title Multiple lifestyle behaviours and mortality, findings from a large population-based Norwegian cohort study – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health
Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 58
Keywords Adult; Aged; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology; Cohort Studies; Diet/adverse effects; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; *Risk-Taking; Sleep; Smoking/adverse effects; Social Behavior; Young Adult; *All-cause mortality; *Cardiovascular disease; *Cohort study; *Lifestyle behaviour; *Metabolic disease; *Risk factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: Lifestyle risk behaviours are responsible for a large proportion of disease burden and premature mortality worldwide. Risk behaviours tend to cluster in populations. We developed a new lifestyle risk index by including emerging risk factors (sleep, sitting time, and social participation) and examine unique risk combinations and their associations with all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality. METHODS: Data are from a large population-based cohort study in a Norway, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), with an average follow-up time of 14.1 years. Baseline data from 1995-97 were linked to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry. The analytic sample comprised 36 911 adults aged 20-69 years. Cox regression models were first fitted for seven risk factors (poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption, current smoking, physical inactivity, excessive sitting, too much/too little sleep, and poor social participation) separately and then adjusted for socio-demographic covariates. Based on these results, a lifestyle risk index was developed. Finally, we explored common combinations of the risk factors in relation to all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality outcomes. RESULTS: All single risk factors, except for diet, were significantly associated with both mortality outcomes, and were therefore selected to form a lifestyle risk index. Risk of mortality increased as the index score increased. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality increased from 1.37 (1.15-1.62) to 6.15 (3.56-10.63) as the number of index risk factors increased from one to six respectively. Among the most common risk factor combinations the association with mortality was particularly strong when smoking and/or social participation were included. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to previous research on multiple risk behaviours by incorporating emerging risk factors. Findings regarding social participation and prolonged sitting suggest new components of healthy lifestyles and potential new directions for population health interventions.
Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28068991; PMCID:PMC5223537 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1946
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Author (up) Krokstad, S.; Ernstsen, L.; Sund, E.R.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Langhammer, A.; Midthjell, K.; Holmen, T.L.; Holmen, J.; Thoen, H.; Westin, S.
Title Social and spatial patterns of obesity diffusion over three decades in a Norwegian county population: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health
Volume 13 Issue Pages 973
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: In order to develop effective preventive strategies, knowledge of trends in socioeconomic and geographical differences in risk factor levels is important. The objective of this study was to examine social and spatial patterns of obesity diffusion in a Norwegian population during three decades. METHODS: Data on adults aged 30-69 years from three cross-sectional health surveys eleven years apart in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway, HUNT1 (1984-1986), HUNT2 (1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008) were utilized. Body mass index (BMI) was used as a measure of obesity. Height and weight were measured clinically. Age standardized prevalences, absolute prevalence differences and ratios, prevalence odds ratios for BMI and the Relative Index of Inequality (RII) were calculated. Multilevel statistical models were fitted for analysing geographical patterns. RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity was systematically higher in groups with lower socio-economic status and increased successively in all groups in the population during the three decades. The relative socioeconomic inequalities in obesity measured by level of education did not change substantially in the period. In HUNT1 (1984-86) obesity was most prevalent among low educated women (14.1%) and in HUNT3 (2006-08) among low educated men (30.4%). The RII for men changed from 2.60 to 1.91 and 2.36 in HUNT1, HUNT2 and HUNT3. In women the RIIs were 1.71, 2.28 and 2.30 correspondingly. However, the absolute obesity prevalence inequalities increased, and a geographical diffusion from central to distal districts was observed from HUNT2 to HUNT3. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of obesity increased in all socioeconomic groups in this Norwegian adult county population from the 1980ies up to present time. The data did not suggest increasing relative inequalities, but increasing absolute socioeconomic differences and a geographical diffusion towards rural districts. Public health preventive strategies should be oriented to counteract the obesity epidemic in the population.
Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway. steinar.krokstad@ntnu.no
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24138786; PMC3853702 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1436
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Author (up) Naess, M.; Sund, E.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Kvaloy, K.
Title Implications of parental lifestyle changes and education level on adolescent offspring weight: a population based cohort study – The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open
Volume 8 Issue 8 Pages e023406
Keywords Bmi; lifestyle; parent-offspring weight associations; parental physical activity change; parental weight-change
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Obesity tends to cluster in families reflecting both common genetics and shared lifestyle patterns within the family environment. The aim of this study was to examine whether parental lifestyle changes over time, exemplified by changes in weight and physical activity, could affect offspring weight in adolescents and if parental education level influenced the relationship. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The population-based cohort study included 4424 parent-offspring participants from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway. Exposition was parental change in weight and physical activity over 11 years, and outcome was offspring weight measured in z-scores of body mass index (BMI) in mixed linear models. RESULTS: Maternal weight reduction by 2-6 kg was significantly associated with lower offspring BMI z-scores: -0.132 (95% CI -0.259 to -0.004) in the model adjusted for education. Parental weight change displayed similar effect patterns on offspring weight regardless of parents' education level. Further, BMI was consistently lower in families of high education compared with low education in the fully adjusted models. In mothers, reduced physical activity level over time was associated with higher BMI z-scores in offspring: 0.159 (95% CI 0.030 to 0.288). Associations between physical activity change and adolescent BMI was not moderated by parental education levels. CONCLUSION: Lifestyle changes in mothers were associated with offspring BMI; reduced weight with lower-and reduced physical activity with higher BMI. Father's lifestyle changes, however, did not significantly affect adolescent offspring's weight. Overall, patterns of association between parental changes and offspring's BMI were independent of parental education levels, though adolescents with parents with high education had lower weight in general.
Address Department of Research and Development, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Health Trust, Levanger, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30166309; PMCID:PMC6119406 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2140
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Author (up) Rangul, V.; Sund, E.R.; Mork, P.J.; Roe, O.D.; Bauman, A.
Title The associations of sitting time and physical activity on total and site-specific cancer incidence: Results from the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 13 Issue 10 Pages e0206015
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior is thought to pose different risks to those attributable to physical inactivity. However, few studies have examined the association between physical activity and sitting time with cancer incidence within the same population. METHODS: We followed 38,154 healthy Norwegian adults in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) for cancer incidence from 1995-97 to 2014. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate risk of site-specific and total cancer incidence by baseline sitting time and physical activity. RESULTS: During the 16-years follow-up, 4,196 (11%) persons were diagnosed with cancer. We found no evidence that people who had prolonged sitting per day or had low levels of physical activity had an increased risk of total cancer incidence, compared to those who had low sitting time and were physically active. In the multivariate model, sitting >/=8 h/day was associated with 22% (95% CI, 1.05-1.42) higher risk of prostate cancer compared to sitting <8 h/day. Further, men with low physical activity (</=8.3 MET-h/week) had 31% (95% CI, 1.00-1.70) increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 45% (95% CI, 1.01-2.09) increased risk of lung cancer compared to participants with a high physical activity (>16.6 MET-h/week). The joint effects of physical activity and sitting time the indicated that prolonged sitting time increased the risk of CRC independent of physical activity in men. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that prolonged sitting and low physical activity are positively associated with colorectal-, prostate- and lung cancer among men. Sitting time and physical activity were not associated with cancer incidence among women. The findings emphasizing the importance of reducing sitting time and increasing physical activity.
Address Prevention Research Collaboration, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30352079; PMCID:PMC6198967 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2146
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Author (up) Storeng, S.H.; Krokstad, S.; Westin, S.; Sund, E.R.
Title Decennial trends and inequalities in healthy life expectancy: The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health
Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 124-131
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; *Health Status Disparities; Humans; Life Expectancy/*trends; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Socioeconomic Factors; Norway; chronic illness; education; healthy life expectancy; life expectancy; pensioning age; self-rated health; social determinants of health
Abstract AIMS: Norway is experiencing a rising life expectancy combined with an increasing dependency ratio – the ratio of those outside over those within the working force. To provide data relevant for future health policy we wanted to study trends in total and healthy life expectancy in a Norwegian population over three decades (1980s, 1990s and 2000s), both overall and across gender and educational groups. METHODS: Data were obtained from the HUNT Study, and the Norwegian Educational Database. We calculated total life expectancy and used the Sullivan method to calculate healthy life expectancies based on self-rated health and self-reported longstanding limiting illness. The change in health expectancies was decomposed into mortality and disability effects. RESULTS: During three consecutive decades we found an increase in life expectancy for 30-year-olds (~7 years) and expected lifetime in self-rated good health (~6 years), but time without longstanding limiting illness increased less (1.5 years). Women could expect to live longer than men, but the extra life years for females were spent in poor self-rated health and with longstanding limiting illness. Differences in total life expectancy between educational groups decreased, whereas differences in expected lifetime in self-rated good health and lifetime without longstanding limiting illness increased. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in total life expectancy was accompanied by an increasing number of years spent in good self-rated health but more years with longstanding limiting illness. This suggests increasing health care needs for people with chronic diseases, given an increasing number of elderly. Socioeconomic health inequalities remain a challenge for increasing pensioning age.
Address 4 Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Levanger, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29191110 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2162
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Author (up) Storeng, S.H.; Krokstad, S.; Westin, S.; Sund, E.R.
Title Decennial trends and inequalities in healthy life expectancy: The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health
Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 124-131
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; *Health Status Disparities; Humans; Life Expectancy/*trends; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Socioeconomic Factors; Norway; chronic illness; education; healthy life expectancy; life expectancy; pensioning age; self-rated health; social determinants of health
Abstract AIMS: Norway is experiencing a rising life expectancy combined with an increasing dependency ratio – the ratio of those outside over those within the working force. To provide data relevant for future health policy we wanted to study trends in total and healthy life expectancy in a Norwegian population over three decades (1980s, 1990s and 2000s), both overall and across gender and educational groups. METHODS: Data were obtained from the HUNT Study, and the Norwegian Educational Database. We calculated total life expectancy and used the Sullivan method to calculate healthy life expectancies based on self-rated health and self-reported longstanding limiting illness. The change in health expectancies was decomposed into mortality and disability effects. RESULTS: During three consecutive decades we found an increase in life expectancy for 30-year-olds (~7 years) and expected lifetime in self-rated good health (~6 years), but time without longstanding limiting illness increased less (1.5 years). Women could expect to live longer than men, but the extra life years for females were spent in poor self-rated health and with longstanding limiting illness. Differences in total life expectancy between educational groups decreased, whereas differences in expected lifetime in self-rated good health and lifetime without longstanding limiting illness increased. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in total life expectancy was accompanied by an increasing number of years spent in good self-rated health but more years with longstanding limiting illness. This suggests increasing health care needs for people with chronic diseases, given an increasing number of elderly. Socioeconomic health inequalities remain a challenge for increasing pensioning age.
Address 4 Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Levanger, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29191110 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2174
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Author (up) Storeng, S.H.; Sund, E.R.; Krokstad, S.
Title Factors associated with basic and instrumental activities of daily living in elderly participants of a population-based survey: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open
Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages e018942
Keywords *Activities of Daily Living; Aged; Depression/epidemiology; Disabled Persons/*psychology; Exercise; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Services for the Aged/*statistics & numerical data; Health Status; *Health Surveys; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Quality of Life/*psychology; Self Report; Smoking/epidemiology; Social Participation/*psychology; *epidemiology; *public health; *social medicine
Abstract OBJECTIVES: To investigate factors associated with the need for assistance in basic and instrumental activities of daily living in Norwegian elderly. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), a large population-based health survey in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 5050 individuals aged 60-69 years old at baseline in HUNT2 (1995-1997) who also participated in HUNT3 (2006-2008) were included in the study. 676/693 individuals were excluded in the analyses due to missing outcomes. OUTCOMES: Needing assistance in one or more basic or instrumental activities of daily living reported in HUNT3. RESULTS: In adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses, poor self-rated health and depression were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more basic activities of daily living in HUNT3, with ORs of 2.13 (1.35 to 3.38) and 1.58 (0.91 to 2.73). Poor self-rated health and poor life satisfaction were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more instrumental activities of daily living in HUNT3, with ORs of 2.30 (1.93 to 2.74) and 2.29 (1.86 to 2.81), respectively. Excessive sitting time, short or prolonged sleeping time, and physical inactivity seemed to be the most important lifestyle risk factors for basic/instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL) disability. The studied factors were, in general, greater risk factors for mortality during follow-up than for ADL/IADL disability. Smoking was the strongest risk factor for mortality during follow-up and non-participation in HUNT3. Smoking and low social participation were the strongest risk factors for non-participation in HUNT3. CONCLUSIONS: Subjective health perception, life satisfaction and depression were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more basic/instrumental activities of daily living later in life. These factors could be possible targets for prevention purposes.
Address Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29530908; PMCID:PMC5857703 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2175
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Author (up) Stover, M.; Pape, K.; Johnsen, R.; Fleten, N.; Sund, E.R.; Ose, S.O.; Bjorngaard, J.H.
Title Work environment and disability pension-- an 18-year follow-up study in a Norwegian working population Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health
Volume 41 Issue 6 Pages 587-596
Keywords Adult; Disabled Persons/*statistics & numerical data; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Norway; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; *Social Environment; Socioeconomic Factors; *Workplace; Occupational Health; epidemiology; work disability; work environment; work exposures
Abstract AIMS: To investigate the associations between work environment indicators and health- related work disability. METHODS: A health survey of 5,749 working 40-42-year-old Norwegians from Nordland County were linked to a national register for disability pension during a follow-up of over 18 years. The risk for disability pension following various self-reported physical and psychosocial work environmental exposures (individual and cumulative) were estimated using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Both cumulative physical and psychosocial work environmental exposures were associated with an increased risk for disability pension, although this association was attenuated for most variables after adjusting for health and education. An increase in five poor psychosocial work environmental exposures was associated with a 22% increased risk for disability (adjusted hazard ratio, aHR, 1.22, 95% CI 1.04-1.44), whereas a similar increase in five poor physical work environmental exposures was associated with a 29% increased risk (aHR, 1.29, 95% CI 1.16-1.44). There were no indications of statistical interaction between either sex or education and work exposures. CONCLUSIONS: People who report a poor work environment are at a higher risk for subsequent work disability. This finding suggests that improving working conditions may be an area of intervention in order to reduce the number of people who leave the labour market with a disability pension.
Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Morten.stover@ntnu.no
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23686367 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1396
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