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Author Heuch, I.; Heuch, I.; Hagen, K.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Body mass index as a risk factor for developing chronic low back pain: a follow-up in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Spine Abbreviated Journal Spine (Phila Pa 1976)  
  Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 133-139  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; *Body Mass Index; Chronic Pain; Cohort Studies; Comorbidity; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Low Back Pain/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Population Surveillance; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN: A population-based, prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether overweight, obesity, or more generally an elevated body mass index (BMI) increase the probability of experiencing chronic low back pain (LBP) after an 11-year period, both among participants with and without LBP at baseline. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Chronic LBP is a common disabling disorder in modern society. Cross-sectional studies suggest an association between an elevated BMI and LBP, but it is not clear whether this is a causal relationship. METHODS: Data were obtained from the community-based HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008) studies of an entire Norwegian county. Participants were 8733 men and 10,149 women, aged 30 to 69 years, who did not have chronic LBP at baseline, and 2669 men and 3899 women with LBP at baseline. After 11 years, both groups indicated whether they currently had chronic LBP, defined as pain persisting for at least 3 months continuously during the last year. RESULTS: A significant positive association was found between BMI and risk of LBP among persons without LBP at baseline. The odds ratio for BMI 30 or more versus BMI less than 25 was 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.67) for men and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.03-1.46) for women, in analyses adjusted for age, education, work status, physical activity at work and in leisure time, smoking, blood pressure, and serum lipid levels. A significant positive association was also established between BMI and recurrence of LBP among women. LBP status at baseline had negligible influence on subsequent change in BMI. CONCLUSION: High values of BMI may predispose to chronic LBP 11 years later, both in individuals with and without LBP. The association between BMI and LBP is not explained by an effect of LBP on later change in BMI.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingrid.heuch@uus.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0362-2436 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22718225 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1443  
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Author Hjort, R.; Ahlqvist, E.; Carlsson, P.-O.; Grill, V.; Groop, L.; Martinell, M.; Rasouli, B.; Rosengren, A.; Tuomi, T.; Asvold, B.O.; Carlsson, S. url  doi
  Title Overweight, obesity and the risk of LADA: results from a Swedish case-control study and the Norwegian HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 61 Issue 6 Pages 1333-1343  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Autoantibodies/blood; Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Insulin Resistance; Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism; Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults/*complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*complications/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Overweight/*complications/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sweden; Young Adult; *Andis; *ANDiU; *Body mass index; *Case-control study; *Estrid; *HUNT Study; *Lada; *Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults; *Prospective study; *Type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Excessive weight is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but its role in the promotion of autoimmune diabetes is not clear. We investigated the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) in relation to overweight/obesity in two large population-based studies. METHODS: Analyses were based on incident cases of LADA (n = 425) and type 2 diabetes (n = 1420), and 1704 randomly selected control participants from a Swedish case-control study and prospective data from the Norwegian HUNT Study including 147 people with LADA and 1,012,957 person-years of follow-up (1984-2008). We present adjusted ORs and HRs with 95% CI. RESULTS: In the Swedish data, obesity was associated with an increased risk of LADA (OR 2.93, 95% CI 2.17, 3.97), which was even stronger for type 2 diabetes (OR 18.88, 95% CI 14.29, 24.94). The association was stronger in LADA with low GAD antibody (GADA; <median) (OR 4.25; 95% CI 2.76, 6.52) but present also in LADA with high GADA (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.42, 3.24). In the Swedish data, obese vs normal weight LADA patients had lower GADA levels, better beta cell function, and were more likely to have low-risk HLA-genotypes. The combination of overweight and family history of diabetes (FHD) conferred an OR of 4.57 (95% CI 3.27, 6.39) for LADA and 24.51 (95% CI 17.82, 33.71) for type 2 diabetes. Prospective data from HUNT indicated even stronger associations; HR for LADA was 6.07 (95% CI 3.76, 9.78) for obesity and 7.45 (95% CI 4.02, 13.82) for overweight and FHD. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Overweight/obesity is associated with increased risk of LADA, particularly when in combination with FHD. These findings support the hypothesis that, even in the presence of autoimmunity, factors linked to insulin resistance, such as excessive weight, could promote onset of diabetes.  
  Address Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29589073 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2098  
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Author Kvamme, J.-M.; Holmen, J.; Wilsgaard, T.; Florholmen, J.; Midthjell, K.; Jacobsen, B.K. url  doi
  Title Body mass index and mortality in elderly men and women: the Tromso and HUNT studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 66 Issue 7 Pages 611-617  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Body Mass Index; Female; Humans; Male; Mortality/*trends; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Questionnaires; Registries  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The impact of body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (WC) on mortality in elderly individuals is controversial and previous research has largely focused on obesity. METHODS: With special attention to the lower BMI categories, associations between BMI and both total and cause-specific mortality were explored in 7604 men and 9107 women aged >/= 65 years who participated in the Tromso Study (1994-1995) or the North-Trondelag Health Study (1995-1997). A Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age, marital status, education and smoking was used to estimate HRs for mortality in different BMI categories using the BMI range of 25-27.5 as a reference. The impact of each 2.5 kg/m(2) difference in BMI on mortality in individuals with BMI < 25.0 and BMI >/= 25.0 was also explored. Furthermore, the relations between WC and mortality were assessed. RESULTS: We identified 7474 deaths during a mean follow-up of 9.3 years. The lowest mortality was found in the BMI range 25-29.9 and 25-32.4 in men and women, respectively. Mortality was increased in all BMI categories below 25 and was moderately increased in obese individuals. U-shaped relationships were also found between WC and total mortality. About 40% of the excess mortality in the lower BMI range in men was explained by mortality from respiratory diseases. CONCLUSIONS: BMI below 25 in elderly men and women was associated with increased mortality. A modest increase in mortality was found with increasing BMI among obese men and women. Overweight individuals (BMI 25-29.9) had the lowest mortality.  
  Address Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso, Norway. jan-magnus.kvamme@uit.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21321065; PMC3368492 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1537  
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Author Morkedal, B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Vatten, L.J. url  doi
  Title Mortality from ischaemic heart disease: age-specific effects of blood pressure stratified by body-mass index: the HUNT cohort study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 65 Issue 9 Pages 814-819  
  Keywords HUNT1; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Blood Pressure/*physiology; *Body Mass Index; Cause of Death; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Ischemia/*mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Blood pressure is positively associated with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) mortality, but the strength of the association declines with age, and may differ between lean and obese people. OBJECTIVE: To study the association of blood pressure with IHD mortality stratified by attained age (<65 and >/=65 years) and by body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: General population with baseline measurements in 1984-1986. Participants 34,633 men and 36,749 women. MEASUREMENTS, Standardised measurements of blood pressure and BMI conducted by trained personnel, and information on potentially confounding factors was retrieved from self-administered questionnaires. Information on deaths from IHD was obtained from the Causes of Death Registry in Norway from baseline until the end of 2004. RESULTS: During 2 years of follow-up, 2,529 men and 1,719 women had died from IHD. The association of blood pressure with IHD mortality was stronger in people younger than 65 years than in older age groups (p for interaction, 0.001), and the association was further modified by BMI (p for interaction, 0.001). In this age group, the RR of death from IHD associated with systolic pressure >/=160 mm Hg in lean (BMI<25) people was 5.8 (95% CI 3.8 to 8.7) compared with the reference (systolic pressure 120-139 mm Hg and BMI <25), and in overweight (BMI 25-29) and obese (BMI>/=30) people, the corresponding relative risks were 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.5) and 1.6 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.8), respectively. CONCLUSION: The association of blood pressure with IHD mortality is modified by age and body mass index.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20466710 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1669  
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Author Morkedal, B.; Vatten, L.J.; Romundstad, P.R.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.   
  Title Risk of myocardial infarction and heart failure among metabolically healthy but obese individuals: HUNT (Nord-Trondelag Health Study), Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication J Am Coll Cardiol Abbreviated Journal Journal of the American College of Cardiology  
  Volume 63 Issue 11 Pages 1071-1078  
  Keywords HUNT2; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; *Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; *Cause of Death; Female; Heart Failure/*etiology/mortality/physiopathology; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction/*etiology/mortality/physiopathology; Obesity/*complications/diagnosis/metabolism; Obesity, Morbid/complications/diagnosis; Prognosis; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Factors; Survival Rate; Time Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study sought to investigate whether obesity in the absence of metabolic abnormalities might be a relatively benign condition in relation to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND: The results of previous studies are conflicting for AMI and largely unknown for HF, and the role of the duration of obesity has not been investigated. METHODS: In a population-based prospective cohort study, a total of 61,299 men and women free of cardiovascular disease were classified according to body mass index (BMI) and metabolic status at baseline. BMI also was measured 10 and 30 years before baseline for 27,196 participants. RESULTS: During 12 years of follow-up, 2,547 participants had a first AMI, and 1,201 participants had a first HF. Compared with being normal weight (BMI <25 kg/m(2)) and metabolically healthy, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for AMI was 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 1.4) among obese (BMI >/=30 kg/m(2)) and metabolically healthy participants and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.7 to 2.3) among obese and metabolically unhealthy participants. We found similar results for severe (BMI >/=35 kg/m(2)), long-lasting (>30 years), and abdominal obesity stratified for metabolic status. For HF, the HRs associated with obesity were 1.7 (95% CI: 1.3 to 2.3) and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.4 to 2.2) for metabolically healthy and unhealthy participants, respectively. Severe and long-lasting obesity were particularly harmful in relation to HF, regardless of metabolic status. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to AMI, obesity without metabolic abnormalities did not confer substantial excess risk, not even for severe or long-lasting obesity. For HF, even metabolically healthy obesity was associated with increased risk, particularly for long-lasting or severe obesity.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Tr Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Morkedal2014 Serial 1610  
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Author Ness-Jensen, E.; Lindam, A.; Lagergren, J.; Hveem, K. url  doi
  Title Weight loss and reduction in gastroesophageal reflux. A prospective population-based cohort study: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The American Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Am J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 108 Issue 3 Pages 376-382  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Body Mass Index; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/*epidemiology/etiology; Health Surveys; Heartburn/*epidemiology/etiology; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Smoking; Treatment Outcome; *Weight Loss  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: High body mass index (BMI) is an established risk factor of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). The aim of this study was to clarify if weight loss reduces GERS. METHODS: The study was part of the Nord-Trondelag health study (the HUNT study), a prospective population-based cohort study conducted in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. All residents of the county from 20 years of age were invited. In 1995-1997 (HUNT 2) and 2006-2009 (HUNT 3), 58,869 and 44,997 individuals, respectively, responded to a questionnaire on heartburn and acid regurgitation. Among these, 29,610 individuals (61% response rate) participated at both times and were included in the present study. The association between weight loss and reduction of GERS was calculated using logistic regression. The analyses were stratified by antireflux medication and the results adjusted for sex, age, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, education, and physical exercise. RESULTS: Weight loss was dose-dependently associated with a reduction of GERS and an increased treatment success with antireflux medication. Among individuals with >3.5 units decrease in BMI, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of loss of any (minor or severe) GERS was 1.98 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.45-2.72) when using no or less than weekly antireflux medication, and 3.95 (95% CI 2.03-7.65) when using at least weekly antireflux medication. The corresponding ORs of loss of severe GERS was 0.90 (95% CI 0.32-2.55) and 3.11 (95% CI 1.13-8.58). CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss was dose-dependently associated with both a reduction of GERS and an increased treatment success with antireflux medication in the general population.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway. eivind.ness-jensen@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9270 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23358462 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1409  
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Author Sandvei, M.S.; Lindekleiv, H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Muller, T.B.; Vatten, L.J.; Ingebrigtsen, T.; Njolstad, I.; Mathiesen, E.B.; Vik, A. url  doi
  Title Risk factors for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage – BMI and serum lipids: 11-year follow-up of the HUNT and the Tromso Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Acta Neurologica Scandinavica Abbreviated Journal Acta Neurol Scand  
  Volume 125 Issue 6 Pages 382-388  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Body Mass Index; Cohort Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Lipids/*blood; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Overweight; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage/*blood/diagnosis/*epidemiology  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Life-style factors have been associated with the risk for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), but it is not clear whether body mass index (BMI) and serum lipids are associated with risk. We prospectively assessed these associations in two large population studies. METHODS: A total of 65,526 participants in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (1995-1997) and 26,882 participants in the Tromso Study (1994-1995) were included. Studies included measurements of body weight and height, serum lipids, and self-administered questionnaires. Participants who experienced aSAH were identified, and hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: During 11 years of follow-up, aSAH was diagnosed in 122 participants. Overweight (BMI 25-29.9) was negatively associated with the risk of aSAH (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.4-1.0). There was no over all association of total serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides with the risk of aSAH, but in participants younger than 50 years, HDL cholesterol was inversely associated with the risk (HR per standard deviation increase 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9). CONCLUSIONS: Overweight may be associated with reduced risk of aSAH, but there was no over all association of total serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides with the risk of aSAH in this prospective study.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. marie.s.sandvei@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0001-6314 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21793808 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1573  
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Author Snekvik, I.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV Abbreviated Journal J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol  
  Volume 32 Issue 5 Pages 776-782  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Angina Pectoris/epidemiology; *Body Mass Index; C-Reactive Protein/*metabolism; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Overweight/epidemiology; Psoriasis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Severity of Illness Index; *Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Studies have examined the associations between psoriasis and cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors, but the results are conflicting, especially in the general population. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association of psoriasis, and in particular psoriasis severity, with objectively measured cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity in a large population-based cross-sectional study. METHODS: We linked data on 50 245 persons in the HUNT3 Study, Norway, with information from the National Prescription Database to obtain information on use of psoriasis medication. A total of 2894 persons reported to have psoriasis; 2643 were classified as mild; and 251 as moderate/severe psoriasis. We used linear and logistic regression to estimate adjusted associations with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors and morbidity. RESULTS: We observed a positive association between psoriasis and objective measures of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, but no clear association with blood pressure and blood lipids. People with moderate/severe psoriasis had an odds ratio for being overweight of 1.94 (95% CI 1.42, 2.67), whereas the odds ratio for metabolic syndrome was 1.91 (95% CI 1.47, 2.49). Psoriasis was also positively associated with self-reported diabetes, myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study, we found that psoriasis was positively associated with measures of adiposity, as well as with a clustering of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Overall, these associations were strongest for people with moderate/severe psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0926-9959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29397035 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2155  
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Author Snekvik, I.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV Abbreviated Journal J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol  
  Volume 32 Issue 5 Pages 776-782  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Angina Pectoris/epidemiology; *Body Mass Index; C-Reactive Protein/*metabolism; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Overweight/epidemiology; Psoriasis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Severity of Illness Index; *Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Studies have examined the associations between psoriasis and cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors, but the results are conflicting, especially in the general population. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association of psoriasis, and in particular psoriasis severity, with objectively measured cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity in a large population-based cross-sectional study. METHODS: We linked data on 50 245 persons in the HUNT3 Study, Norway, with information from the National Prescription Database to obtain information on use of psoriasis medication. A total of 2894 persons reported to have psoriasis; 2643 were classified as mild; and 251 as moderate/severe psoriasis. We used linear and logistic regression to estimate adjusted associations with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors and morbidity. RESULTS: We observed a positive association between psoriasis and objective measures of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, but no clear association with blood pressure and blood lipids. People with moderate/severe psoriasis had an odds ratio for being overweight of 1.94 (95% CI 1.42, 2.67), whereas the odds ratio for metabolic syndrome was 1.91 (95% CI 1.47, 2.49). Psoriasis was also positively associated with self-reported diabetes, myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study, we found that psoriasis was positively associated with measures of adiposity, as well as with a clustering of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Overall, these associations were strongest for people with moderate/severe psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0926-9959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29397035 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2167  
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Author Wiedmann, M.; Brunborg, C.; Lindemann, K.; Johannesen, T.B.; Vatten, L.; Helseth, E.; Zwart, J.A. url  doi
  Title Body mass index and the risk of meningioma, glioma and schwannoma in a large prospective cohort study (The HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer  
  Volume 109 Issue 1 Pages 289-294  
  Keywords Body Height; *Body Mass Index; Central Nervous System/pathology; Cohort Studies; Female; Glioma/*epidemiology; Humans; Male; Meningioma/*epidemiology; Neurilemmoma/*epidemiology; Obesity; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Obesity increases the risk for a number of solid malignant tumours. However, it is not clear whether body mass index (BMI) and height are associated with the risk of primary tumours of the central nervous system (CNS). METHODS: In a large population study (The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT Study)) of 74 242 participants in Norway, weight and height were measured. During follow-up, incident CNS tumours were identified by individual linkage to the Norwegian Cancer Registry. Sex- and age-adjusted and multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate BMI and height in relation to the risk of meningioma, glioma and schwannoma. RESULTS: A total of 138 meningiomas, 148 gliomas and 39 schwannomas occurred during 23.5 years (median, range 0-25) of follow-up. In obese women (BMI >/= 30 kg m(-2)), meningioma risk was 67% higher (hazard ratio (HR)=1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.97-2.92, P-trend=0.05) than in the reference group (BMI 20-24.9 kg m(-2)), whereas no association with obesity was observed in males. There was no association of BMI with glioma risk, but there was a negative association of overweight/obesity (BMI >/= 25 kg m(-2)) with the risk of schwannoma (HR=0.48, 95% CI: 0.23-0.99). However, the schwannoma analysis was based on small numbers. Height was not associated with the risk for any tumour subgroup. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that BMI is positively associated with meningioma risk in women, and possibly, inversely associated with schwannoma risk.  
  Address Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital, 0407 Oslo, Norway. Markus.KH.Wiedmann@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23778522; PMC3708582 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1387  
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