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Author (up) Cai, Y.; Hodgson, S.; Blangiardo, M.; Gulliver, J.; Morley, D.; Fecht, D.; Vienneau, D.; de Hoogh, K.; Key, T.; Hveem, K.; Elliott, P.; Hansell, A.L. url  doi
  Title Road traffic noise, air pollution and incident cardiovascular disease: A joint analysis of the HUNT, EPIC-Oxford and UK Biobank cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environ Int  
  Volume 114 Issue Pages 191-201  
  Keywords Air Pollutants/*analysis; Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology; Environmental Exposure/*analysis; Humans; *Noise; Norway/epidemiology; United Kingdom/epidemiology; *Air pollution; *Cardiovascular disease; *Ischemic heart disease; *Road traffic noise; *Stroke  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to road traffic noise and air pollution on incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in three large cohorts: HUNT, EPIC-Oxford and UK Biobank. METHODS: In pooled complete-case sample of the three cohorts from Norway and the United Kingdom (N=355,732), 21,081 incident all CVD cases including 5259 ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 2871 cerebrovascular cases were ascertained between baseline (1993-2010) and end of follow-up (2008-2013) through medical record linkage. Annual mean 24-hour weighted road traffic noise (Lden) and air pollution (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter</=10mum [PM10], </=2.5mum [PM2.5] and nitrogen dioxide [NO2]) exposure at baseline address was modelled using a simplified version of the Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe (CNOSSOS-EU) and European-wide Land Use Regression models. Individual-level covariate data were harmonised and physically pooled across the three cohorts. Analysis was via Cox proportional hazard model with mutual adjustments for both noise and air pollution and potential confounders. RESULTS: No significant associations were found between annual mean Lden and incident CVD, IHD or cerebrovascular disease in the overall population except that the association with incident IHD was significant among current-smokers. In the fully adjusted models including adjustment for Lden, an interquartile range (IQR) higher PM10 (4.1mug/m3) or PM2.5 (1.4mug/m3) was associated with a 5.8% (95%CI: 2.5%-9.3%) and 3.7% (95%CI: 0.2%-7.4%) higher risk for all incident CVD respectively. No significant associations were found between NO2 and any of the CVD outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: We found suggestive evidence of a possible association between road traffic noise and incident IHD, consistent with current literature. Long-term particulate air pollution exposure, even at concentrations below current European air quality standards, was significantly associated with incident CVD.  
  Address MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Directorate of Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29518662 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2076  
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Author (up) Grunseit, A.C.; Chau, J.Y.; Rangul, V.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Patterns of sitting and mortality in the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 8  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Posture; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Self Report; Young Adult; *Cardiovascular disease; *Epidemiology; *Mortality; *Sedentary behaviour  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Current evidence concerning sedentary behaviour and mortality risk has used single time point assessments of sitting. Little is known about how changes in sitting levels over time affect subsequent mortality risk. AIM: To examine the associations between patterns of sitting time assessed at two time points 11 years apart and risk of all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality. METHODS: Participants were 25,651 adults aged > =20 years old from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study with self-reported total sitting time in 1995-1997 (HUNT2) and 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Four categories characterised patterns of sitting: (1) low at HUNT2/ low at HUNT3, 'consistently low sitting'; (2) low at HUNT2/high at HUNT3, 'increased sitting'; (3) high at HUNT2/low at HUNT3, 'reduced sitting'; and (4) high at HUNT2 /high at HUNT3, 'consistently high sitting'. Associations of sitting pattern with all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality were analysed using Cox regression adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 6.2 years (158880 person-years); 1212 participants died. Compared to 'consistently low sitting', adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.51 (95% CI: 1.28-2.78), 1.03 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20), and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.06-1.51) for 'increased sitting', 'reduced sitting' and 'consistently high sitting' respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Examining patterns of sitting over time augments single time-point analyses of risk exposures associated with high sitting time. Whilst sitting habits can be stable over a long period, life events (e.g., changing jobs, retiring or illness) may influence sitting trajectories and therefore sitting-attributable risk. Reducing sitting may yield mortality risks comparable to a stable low-sitting pattern.  
  Address Department of Public health and General practice, HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28122625; PMCID:PMC5267382 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1918  
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Author (up) Krokstad, S.; Ding, D.; Grunseit, A.C.; Sund, E.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Multiple lifestyle behaviours and mortality, findings from a large population-based Norwegian cohort study – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 58  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology; Cohort Studies; Diet/adverse effects; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; *Risk-Taking; Sleep; Smoking/adverse effects; Social Behavior; Young Adult; *All-cause mortality; *Cardiovascular disease; *Cohort study; *Lifestyle behaviour; *Metabolic disease; *Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Lifestyle risk behaviours are responsible for a large proportion of disease burden and premature mortality worldwide. Risk behaviours tend to cluster in populations. We developed a new lifestyle risk index by including emerging risk factors (sleep, sitting time, and social participation) and examine unique risk combinations and their associations with all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality. METHODS: Data are from a large population-based cohort study in a Norway, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), with an average follow-up time of 14.1 years. Baseline data from 1995-97 were linked to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry. The analytic sample comprised 36 911 adults aged 20-69 years. Cox regression models were first fitted for seven risk factors (poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption, current smoking, physical inactivity, excessive sitting, too much/too little sleep, and poor social participation) separately and then adjusted for socio-demographic covariates. Based on these results, a lifestyle risk index was developed. Finally, we explored common combinations of the risk factors in relation to all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality outcomes. RESULTS: All single risk factors, except for diet, were significantly associated with both mortality outcomes, and were therefore selected to form a lifestyle risk index. Risk of mortality increased as the index score increased. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality increased from 1.37 (1.15-1.62) to 6.15 (3.56-10.63) as the number of index risk factors increased from one to six respectively. Among the most common risk factor combinations the association with mortality was particularly strong when smoking and/or social participation were included. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to previous research on multiple risk behaviours by incorporating emerging risk factors. Findings regarding social participation and prolonged sitting suggest new components of healthy lifestyles and potential new directions for population health interventions.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28068991; PMCID:PMC5223537 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1946  
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Author (up) Safiri, S.; Ayubi, E. url  doi
  Title Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT study Type Comment
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 242 Issue Pages 7  
  Keywords *Cardiovascular Diseases; Humans; Norway; Risk Factors  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: aubi65@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28619353 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1974  
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