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Author Haugland, S.H.; Strandheim, A.; Bratberg, G. url  doi
  Title Is high-risk use of intoxicants more common among adolescents who have seen their parents intoxicated? Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Tidsskrift for den Norske Laegeforening : Tidsskrift for Praktisk Medicin, ny Raekke Abbreviated Journal Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen  
  Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 410-413  
  Keywords Adolescent; *Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Drinking/psychology; Alcoholic Intoxication/psychology; Female; Humans; Male; *Parents; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Self Report; Sex Factors; *Substance-Related Disorders/etiology/psychology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Young people's alcohol consumption is related to their parents' alcohol consumption, but little focus has been placed on whether there is a connection with parental intoxication. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the experience of seeing their parents intoxicated is associated with young people's alcohol consumption and experimenting with drugs in their teens. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The study is prospective and based on data from 2,399 teenagers who took part in the Ung-HUNT 1 study in 1995-1997 and the Ung-HUNT 2 study in 2000-2001. Self-reported questionnaire data and analysis by means of logistic regression, stratified by gender, were used. RESULTS: Having been drunk > 10 times was associated with having seen their parents intoxicated among boys (OR 3.7; 95% CI 2.7-5.1 and girls (OR 2.0; 1.5-2.6). Drinking alcohol weekly or more frequently was associated with parental intoxication among boys (OR 2.2; 1.6-3.0), but not girls unless they had seen their parents drunk many times (OR 2.4; 1.1-5.2). Experimenting with drugs was associated with parental intoxication among both boys (OR 2.6; 1.7-3.9) and girls (OR 1.6; 1.1-2.2). INTERPRETATION: Repeated intoxication, frequent alcohol consumption and experimenting with drugs by teenagers were associated with seeing their parents intoxicated. There are other explanatory factors for which the study was unable to control, and interpretation of the results should take this into account.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. siri.h.haugland@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Norwegian Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-2001 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22353832 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1529  
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Author Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult: family linkage data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication JAMA Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal JAMA Pediatr  
  Volume 167 Issue 1 Pages 61-69  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Chronic Pain/economics/*etiology/psychology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Family/psychology; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Norway; Odds Ratio; *Parents/psychology; Psychology; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine a possible association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult and to explore whether a relationship could be explained by socioeconomic and psychosocial factors or may be affected by differences in family structure. DESIGN: Unselected, population-based, cross-sectional study. SETTING: Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. PARTICIPANTS: All inhabitants of Nord-Trondelag County who were 13 years or older were invited to enroll in the study. In total, 8200 of 10 485 invitees (78.2%) participated in the investigation. Among 7913 participants in the target age group (age range, 13-18 years), 7373 (93.2%) completed the pain questions. The final study population consisted of 5370 adolescents or young adults for whom one or both parents participated in the adult survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was chronic nonspecific pain in adolescents and young adults, defined as pain in at least 1 location, unrelated to any known disease or injury, experienced at least once a week during the past 3 months. Chronic multisite pain was defined as chronic pain in at least 3 locations. RESULTS: Maternal chronic pain was associated with chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.8). Paternal chronic pain was associated with increased odds of pain in adolescents and young adults. The odds of chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults increased when both parents reported pain. Adjustments for socioeconomic and psychosocial factors did not change the results, although differences in family structure did. Among offspring living primarily with their mothers, clear associations were observed between maternal pain and pain in adolescents and young adults, but no association was found with paternal pain. CONCLUSIONS: Parental chronic pain is associated with chronic nonspecific pain and especially with chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults. Family structure influences the relationship, indicating that family pain models and shared environmental factors are important in the origin of chronic pain.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. gry.b.hoftun@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23403843 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1441  
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Author Jeppesen, E.; Bjelland, I.; Fossa, S.D.; Loge, J.H.; Dahl, A.A. url  doi
  Title Psychosocial problems of teenagers who have a parent with cancer: a population-based case-control study (young-HUNT study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Clin Oncol  
  Volume 31 Issue 32 Pages 4099-4104  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adolescent Psychology/*statistics & numerical data; Case-Control Studies; Female; Humans; Male; Mental Disorders/*epidemiology; Neoplasms/*psychology; *Parents; Psychology; Young Adult  
  Abstract PURPOSE: High prevalence of psychosocial problems has been observed in clinical studies of teenagers who have a parent with cancer. In contrast, we used a population-based design to study such problems in teenagers who have a parent with cancer (cases) compared with matched teenagers with cancer-free parents (controls). We hypothesized that higher prevalence of psychosocial problems would be observed in cases compared with controls and that sex differences would be observed between cases and controls. METHODS: We used data from a cross-sectional population-based survey of teenagers (Young-HUNT study). Among 8,986 teenage participants, 120 of their parents had invasive cancer before the Young-HUNT study according to the Norwegian Cancer Registry. These parents had 143 teenagers (cases) participating in the Young-HUNT study. Matched on sex, age, and municipality, 429 control teenagers with cancer-free parents were drawn from the Young-HUNT study. Six psychosocial problems were studied. RESULTS: No significant differences in psychosocial problems were observed between cases and controls in the total sample. Fewer case daughters reported eating problems compared with control daughters, and more case sons reported eating problems compared with control sons. More case daughters than case sons reported somatic stress symptoms and low self-esteem and displayed more caseness of anxiety/depression. These three sex differences were also observed among controls, indicating that they were general sex differences. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study, teenagers who had a parent with cancer did not have higher prevalence of psychosocial problems than controls. Sex differences observed in previous clinically based studies were confirmed but may simply reflect sex differences observed among teenagers in general.  
  Address Elisabeth Jeppesen, Sophie D. Fossa, Jon H. Loge, and Alv A. Dahl, Oslo University Hospital, The Norwegian Radiumhospitalet, and University of Oslo, Oslo; Ingvar Bjelland, Haukeland University Hospital and University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0732-183X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24101041 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1438  
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Author Kaasboll, J.; Ranoyen, I.; Nilsen, W.; Lydersen, S.; Indredavik, M.S. url  doi
  Title Associations between parental chronic pain and self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion in adolescent girls and boys--family linkage data from the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC public health  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 817  
  Keywords Young-HUNT; HUNT3; Adolescent; Chronic Pain/*psychology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Family Relations; Fathers; Female; Humans; Male; Mothers; *Parents; Resilience, Psychological; Risk Factors; *Self Concept; Self Report; Sex Factors; *Social Skills  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Parental chronic pain has been associated with adverse outcomes in offspring. However, knowledge on individual and family resilience factors in adolescent offspring of chronic pain sufferers is scarce. This study thus aimed to investigate the associations between parental chronic pain and self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion levels reported by adolescent girls and boys. METHODS: Based on cross-sectional surveys from the Nord Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT 3 study), the study used independent self-reports from adolescents aged 13 to 18 years (n = 3227) and their parents and conducted separate linear regression analyses for girls and boys. RESULTS: Concurrent maternal and paternal chronic pain was associated with reduced self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion in girls. Moreover, maternal chronic pain was associated with higher social competence in boys and reduced self-esteem in girls. The majority of the observed associations were significantly different between girls and boys. Paternal chronic pain was not found to be associated with child outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that the presence of both maternal and paternal chronic pain could be a potential risk factor for lower levels of individual and family resilience factors reported by girls. Further research on the relationship between parental pain and sex-specific offspring characteristics, including positive resilience factors, is warranted. The study demonstrates the importance of targeting the entire family in chronic pain care.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare (RKBU) of Central Norway, Facult Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Kaasboll, JannikeRanoyen, IngunnNilsen, WendyLydersen, StianIndredavik, Marit SengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2015/08/25 06:00BMC Public Health. 2015 Aug 22;15:817. doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-2164-9. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Kaasboll2015 Serial 1829  
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Author Myklestad, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Magnussen, E.B.; Salvesen, K.A.; Smith, G.D.; Romundstad, P.R. url  doi
  Title Offspring birth weight and cardiovascular risk in parents: a population-based HUNT 2 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 175 Issue 6 Pages 546-555  
  Keywords Adult; *Birth Weight; Blood Glucose/metabolism; Blood Pressure; Body Mass Index; Cardiovascular Diseases/*genetics; Female; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; *Infant, Low Birth Weight; Infant, Newborn; Lipids/blood; Male; Models, Statistical; Norway; *Parents; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Waist Circumference  
  Abstract Low birth weight is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in later life. The fetal insulin hypothesis suggests that shared genetic factors partly explain this association. If fetal genes predispose to both low birth weight and cardiovascular disease in adulthood, fathers of offspring with low birth weight should display an unfavorable profile of cardiovascular risk factors. To study this, the authors linked data on more than 14,000 parents, collected from the second Health Study of Nord Trondelag County, Norway (HUNT 2, 1995-1997), to offspring data from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry (1967-2005). Linear regression was used to study associations of offspring birth weight for gestational age with the parents' body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, and serum lipids. All analyses were adjusted for shared environment by means of the socioeconomic measures, lifestyle, and cardiovascular risk factors of the partner. The authors found that low offspring birth weight for gestational age was associated with increased paternal blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and unfavorable levels of glucose and lipids. For mothers, associations similar to those for fathers were found for blood pressure, whereas associations in the opposite direction were found for glucose, lipids, and body mass index. The paternal findings strengthen the genetic hypothesis.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norways. kirsti.myklestad@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22328703 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1556  
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Author Pape, K.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; De Ridder, K.A.A.; Westin, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Krokstad, S. url  doi
  Title Medical benefits in young Norwegians and their parents, and the contribution of family health and socioeconomic status. The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 41 Issue 5 Pages 455-462  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; *Child of Impaired Parents; Family Health; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Insurance Benefits/*statistics & numerical data; Insurance, Disability/*statistics & numerical data; Male; Norway; *Parents; Registries; Risk Factors; Social Class; Social Welfare/*statistics & numerical data; Young Adult; Adolescents; family; health; longitudinal; population study; social insurance benefits; socioeconomic status  
  Abstract AIMS: Family and intergenerational perspectives might contribute to a better understanding of why young people in many European countries experience work impairment and end up being dependent on public benefits for life sustenance. The aim of this cohort study was to explore the relationship between the receipt of medical benefits in parents and their young adult offspring and the contributions of family health and family socioeconomic status. METHODS: Baseline information on the health of 7597 adolescents and their parents who participated in the HUNT Study 1995-1997 was linked to national registers to identify long-term receipt of medical benefits for parents (1992-1997) and adolescents as they entered adulthood (1998-2008). We used logistic regression to explore the association between parent and offspring receipt of medical benefits, adjusting for family health and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: Among adolescents, 13% received medical benefits from age 20-29. Adolescents whose parents had received medical benefits (26%) were more likely to receive such benefits themselves from age 20-29 compared with adolescents without benefit-receiving parents (age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.16, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.86-2.49). Adjustment for family health reduced this estimate considerably (to OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.38-1.99), whereas adjustment for family socioeconomic status had less impact. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents whose parents receive medical benefits enter adult working life with an elevated risk of health-related work exclusion. Family health vulnerability appears to be a key to understanding this association, suggesting that more attention to intergenerational continuities of health could be a way to prevent welfare dependence in future generations.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. kristine.pape@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23508948 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1407  
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