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Author (up) Aarhus, L.; Tambs, K.; Kvestad, E.; Engdahl, B. url  doi
  Title Childhood Otitis Media: A Cohort Study With 30-Year Follow-Up of Hearing (The HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Ear Hear Abbreviated Journal Ear and hearing  
  Volume 36 Issue 3 Pages 302-308  
  Keywords Acute Disease; Adolescent; Adult; Audiometry, Pure-Tone; Child; Chronic Disease; Cohort Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Hearing Loss/*epidemiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Otitis Media/epidemiology; Otitis Media with Effusion/*epidemiology; Otitis Media, Suppurative/*epidemiology; Recurrence; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To study the extent to which otitis media (OM) in childhood is associated with adult hearing thresholds. Furthermore, to study whether the effects of OM on adult hearing thresholds are moderated by age or noise exposure. DESIGN: Population-based cohort study of 32,786 participants who had their hearing tested by pure-tone audiometry in primary school and again at ages ranging from 20 to 56 years. Three thousand sixty-six children were diagnosed with hearing loss; the remaining sample had normal childhood hearing. RESULTS: Compared with participants with normal childhood hearing, those diagnosed with childhood hearing loss caused by otitis media with effusion (n = 1255), chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM; n = 108), or hearing loss after recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM; n = 613) had significantly increased adult hearing thresholds in the whole frequency range (2 dB/17-20 dB/7-10 dB, respectively). The effects were adjusted for age, sex, and noise exposure. Children diagnosed with hearing loss after rAOM had somewhat improved hearing thresholds as adults. The effects of CSOM and hearing loss after rAOM on adult hearing thresholds were larger in participants tested in middle adulthood (ages 40 to 56 years) than in those tested in young adulthood (ages 20 to 40 years). Eardrum pathology added a marginally increased risk of adult hearing loss (1-3 dB) in children with otitis media with effusion or hearing loss after rAOM. The study could not reveal significant differences in the effect of self-reported noise exposure on adult hearing thresholds between the groups with OM and the group with normal childhood hearing. CONCLUSIONS: This cohort study indicates that CSOM and rAOM in childhood are associated with adult hearing loss, underlining the importance of optimal treatment in these conditions. It appears that ears with a subsequent hearing loss after OM in childhood age at a faster rate than those without; however this should be confirmed by studies with several follow-up tests through adulthood.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, Nydalen, Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Aarhus, LisaTambs, KristianKvestad, EllenEngdahl, BoengN01 DC62104/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/N01-DC-6-2104/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/Research Support, N.I.H., ExtramuralResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't2014/11/18 06:00Ear Hear. 2015 May-Jun;36(3):302-8. doi: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000118. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Aarhus2015c Serial 1791  
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Author (up) Alsnes, I.V.; Vatten, L.J.; Fraser, A.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Rich-Edwards, J.; Romundstad, P.R.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Hypertension in Pregnancy and Offspring Cardiovascular Risk in Young Adulthood: Prospective and Sibling Studies in the HUNT Study (Nord-Trondelag Health Study) in Norway Type Multicenter Study
  Year 2017 Publication Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) Abbreviated Journal Hypertension  
  Volume 69 Issue 4 Pages 591-598  
  Keywords Adult; Blood Pressure/*physiology; Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology/physiopathology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Incidence; Infant, Newborn; Norway/epidemiology; Pregnancy; *Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular; Prospective Studies; *Registries; Risk Factors; Siblings; adolescent; blood pressure; cardiovascular disease; mother; preeclampsia  
  Abstract Women with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are at increased lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease. We examined the offspring's cardiovascular risk profile in young adulthood and their siblings' cardiovascular risk profile. From the HUNT study (Nord-Trondelag Health Study) in Norway, 15 778 participants (mean age: 29 years), including 210 sibling groups, were linked to information from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Blood pressure, anthropometry, serum lipids, and C-reactive protein were assessed. Seven hundred and six participants were born after exposure to maternal hypertension in pregnancy: 336 mothers had gestational hypertension, 343 had term preeclampsia, and 27 had preterm preeclampsia. Offspring whose mothers had hypertension in pregnancy had 2.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure, 1.5 (0.9-2.1) mm Hg higher diastolic blood pressure, 0.66 (0.31-1.01) kg/m2 higher body mass index, and 1.49 (0.65-2.33) cm wider waist circumference, compared with offspring of normotensive pregnancies. Similar differences were observed for gestational hypertension and term preeclampsia. Term preeclampsia was also associated with higher concentrations of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.14 mmol/L, 0.03-0.25) and triglycerides (0.13 mmol/L, 0.06-0.21). Siblings born after a normotensive pregnancy had nearly identical risk factor levels as siblings born after maternal hypertension. Offspring born after maternal hypertension in pregnancy have a more adverse cardiovascular risk profile in young adulthood than offspring of normotensive pregnancies. Their siblings, born after a normotensive pregnancy, have a similar risk profile, suggesting that shared genes or lifestyle may account for the association, rather than an intrauterine effect. All children of mothers who have experienced hypertension in pregnancy may be at increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease.  
  Address From the Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (I.V.A., L.J.V., J.H.B., J.R.-E., P.R.R., B.O.A.); MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol and School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, United Kingdom (A.F.); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Connors Center for Women's Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (J.R.-E.); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (J.R.-E.); Department of Epidemiology, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (L.J.V., J.R.-E.); and Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway (B.O.A.)  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0194-911X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28223467 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1875  
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Author (up) Andre, B.; Canhao, H.; Espnes, G.A.; Ferreira Rodrigues, A.M.; Gregorio, M.J.; Nguyen, C.; Sousa, R.; Gronning, K. url  doi
  Title Is there an association between food patterns and life satisfaction among Norway's inhabitants ages 65 years and older? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Appetite Abbreviated Journal Appetite  
  Volume 110 Issue Pages 108-115  
  Keywords Anxiety; Depression; Elderly adults; Food patterns; Life satisfaction  
  Abstract The lack of information regarding older adults' health and lifestyles makes it difficult to design suitable interventions for people at risk of developing unhealth lifestyles. Therefore, there is a need to increase knowledge about older adults' food patterns and quality of life. Our aim was to determine associations among food patterns, anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction in Norwegian inhabitants ages 65+. The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (The HUNT Study) is a large, population-based cohort study that includes data for 125 000 Norwegian participants. The cohort used for this study is wave three of the study, consisting of 11 619 participants age 65 and over. Cluster analysis was used to categorize the participants based on similarities in food consumption; two clusters were identified based on similarities regarding food consumption among participants. Significant differences between the clusters were found, as participants in the healthy food-patterns cluster had higher life satisfaction and lower anxiety and depression than those in the unhealthy food-patterns cluster. The associations among food patterns, anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction among older adults show the need for increased focus on interactions among food patterns, food consumption, and life satisfaction among the elderly in order to explore how society can influence these patterns.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway; NTNU Center for Health Promotion Research, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-6663 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27988367 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1878  
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Author (up) Asberg, A.; Thorstensen, K.; Borch-Iohnsen, B. url  doi
  Title Unbound iron binding capacity (UIBC) as a test for empty iron stores--results from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation Abbreviated Journal Scand J Clin Lab Invest  
  Volume 72 Issue 6 Pages 506-509  
  Keywords Adult; Area Under Curve; Chemistry, Clinical/*methods; Female; Humans; Iron/*metabolism; Middle Aged; Norway; Protein Binding; ROC Curve; Transferrin/metabolism; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: When s-iron and s-transferrin are used to diagnose empty iron stores, the measurements are usually combined in the calculation of s-transferrin saturation. This may not be the best way to utilize the information in s-iron and s-transferrin, as s-transferrin alone has a better diagnostic accuracy than s-transferrin saturation. We suggest that unbound iron binding capacity (UIBC), which is s-total iron binding capacity (2 times s-transferrin) minus s-iron could be used for diagnosing empty iron stores. METHODS: To test this hypothesis, we used ROC curve analysis to compare the diagnostic accuracy of s-iron, s-transferrin, s-transferrin saturation and s-UIBC in diagnosing empty iron stores in 3029 women of childbearing age. Empty iron stores were defined as s-ferritin less than 10 mug/L or less than 15 mug/L. RESULTS: At both definitions of empty iron stores s-UIBC had a better diagnostic accuracy than the other tests, with area under the ROC curve of 0.80-0.87. This was also the trend in a subpopulation of 172 anemic women, where the area under the ROC curve of s-UIBC was 0.92. CONCLUSION: When diagnosing empty iron stores calculation of s-UIBC is a better way to utilize the information in s-iron and s-transferrin than is calculation of s-transferrin saturation.  
  Address Department of Clinical Chemistry, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. arne.aasberg@stolav.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22935044 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1504  
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Author (up) Asberg, A.; Thorstensen, K.; Irgens, W.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Hveem, K. url  doi
  Title Cancer risk in HFE C282Y homozygotes: results from the HUNT 2 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 48 Issue 2 Pages 189-195  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*genetics; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology/*genetics; Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology/*genetics; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Genetic Markers; Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/*genetics; *Homozygote; Humans; Incidence; Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology/*genetics; Male; Membrane Proteins/*genetics; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Mutation; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Registries; Risk Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: In addition to hepatocellular cancer, HFE C282Y homozygotes are reported to have increased risk of colorectal cancer and breast cancer. This study was done to further explore the cancer risk in C282Y homozygotes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied cancer incidence in 292 homozygotes and 62,568 others that participated in the HUNT 2 population screening in 1995-1997. Using Cox proportional hazard models, we estimated cancer hazard ratio as a function of C282Y homozygosity and several screening variables including serum transferrin saturation, alcohol consumption and daily smoking. RESULTS: Cancer was diagnosed in 36 homozygotes, five of which had two cancer diagnoses. The overall cancer incidence was not increased in C282Y homozygotes (hazard ratio 1.10 [95% CI 0.60-2.03] in women and 0.94 [95% CI 0.53-1.66] in men). However, homozygous men had increased risk of colorectal cancer (hazard ratio 3.03 [95% CI 1.17-7.82], p = 0.022) and primary liver cancer (hazard ratio 54.0 [95% CI 2.68-1089], p = 0.009). The risk of breast cancer in homozygous women was not increased (hazard ratio 1.13 [95% CI 0.35-3.72]). Adjusted for other variables including C282Y homozygosity, very low and very high serum transferrin saturation were associated with increased overall cancer incidence. CONCLUSIONS: C282Y homozygosity is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer and hepatocellular cancer in men. In the general population, individuals with a very low or a very high serum transferrin saturation may have increased cancer risk.  
  Address Department of Clinical Chemistry, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. arne.aasberg@stolav.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5521 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23281741 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1470  
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Author (up) Ask, H.; Idstad, M.; Engdahl, B.; Tambs, K. url  doi
  Title Non-random mating and convergence over time for mental health, life satisfaction, and personality: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Behavior Genetics Abbreviated Journal Behav Genet  
  Volume 43 Issue 2 Pages 108-119  
  Keywords Adult; Female; Humans; Male; Marriage/*psychology; Middle Aged; Norway; *Personal Satisfaction; *Personality; Spouses/*psychology  
  Abstract Earlier studies have shown evidence for various sources of observed spousal similarity regarding different traits and characteristics. We explored the relative contribution of non-random mating and convergence to spouse similarity with respect to global mental health, life satisfaction, optimism, and type A personality. We used population-based data collected for the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (1984-1986) and prospective registry information about when and with whom people entered into marriage/cohabitation between 1970 and 2000 for 19,599 married/cohabitating couples and 1,551 future couples that entered into marriage/cohabitation during the 16 years after data collection. Couples were categorized by interval between data collection and entry into marriage/cohabitation. Age-adjusted polychoric correlations calculated for each group were used as the dependent variables in non-linear, segmented regression analysis, with time since or until marriage/cohabitation as the independent variable. Initial correlations between partners-to-be were low to moderate, typically around one-half of the values estimated in existing couples, indicating both non-random mating and early convergence. There appeared to be moderate divergence during the first 20 years of marriage/cohabitation and moderate convergence during the rest of life.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. heas@fhi.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0001-8244 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23264209 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1467  
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Author (up) Ask, H.; Rognmo, K.; Torvik, F.A.; Roysamb, E.; Tambs, K. url  doi
  Title Non-random mating and convergence over time for alcohol consumption, smoking, and exercise: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Behavior Genetics Abbreviated Journal Behav Genet  
  Volume 42 Issue 3 Pages 354-365  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology/*genetics/psychology; Cohort Studies; Cross-Sectional Studies; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Exercise/*physiology/psychology; Female; Humans; Life Style; Longitudinal Studies; Male; *Marriage; Middle Aged; Nonlinear Dynamics; Norway/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Smoking/epidemiology/*genetics/psychology; Spouses; Young Adult  
  Abstract Spouses tend to have similar lifestyles. We explored the degree to which spouse similarity in alcohol use, smoking, and physical exercise is caused by non-random mating or convergence. We used data collected for the Nord-Trondelag Health Study from 1984 to 1986 and prospective registry information about when and with whom people entered marriage/cohabitation between 1970 and 2000. Our sample included 19,599 married/cohabitating couples and 1,551 future couples that were to marry/cohabitate in the 14-16 years following data collection. All couples were grouped according to the duration between data collection and entering into marriage/cohabitation. Age-adjusted polychoric spouse correlations were used as the dependent variables in non-linear segmented regression analysis; the independent variable was time. The results indicate that spouse concordance in lifestyle is due to both non-random mating and convergence. Non-random mating appeared to be strongest for smoking. Convergence in alcohol use and smoking was evident during the period prior to marriage/cohabitation, whereas convergence in exercise was evident throughout life. Reduced spouse similarity in smoking with relationship duration may reflect secular trends.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. heas@fhi.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0001-8244 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22005768 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1505  
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Author (up) Asvold, B.O.; Midthjell, K.; Krokstad, S.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Prolonged sitting may increase diabetes risk in physically inactive individuals: an 11 year follow-up of the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 60 Issue 5 Pages 830-835  
  Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology/metabolism; Exercise/physiology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Epidemiology; Sedentary lifestyle; Type 2 diabetes mellitus  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We examined the association between sitting time and diabetes incidence, overall and by strata of leisure-time physical activity and BMI. METHODS: We followed 28,051 adult participants of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a population-based study, for diabetes incidence from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 and estimated HRs of any diabetes by categories of self-reported total daily sitting time at baseline. RESULTS: Of 28,051 participants, 1253 (4.5%) developed diabetes during 11 years of follow-up. Overall, sitting >/=8 h/day was associated with a 17% (95% CI 2, 34) higher risk of developing diabetes compared with sitting </=4 h/day, adjusted for age, sex and education. However, the association was attenuated to a non-significant 9% (95% CI -5, 26) increase in risk after adjustment for leisure-time physical activity and BMI. The association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by leisure-time physical activity (p Interaction = 0.01). Among participants with low leisure-time physical activity (</=2 h light activity per week and no vigorous activity), sitting 5-7 h/day and >/=8 h/day were associated with a 26% (95% CI 2, 57) and 30% (95% CI 5, 61) higher risk of diabetes, respectively, compared with sitting </=4 h/day. There was no corresponding association among participants with high leisure-time physical activity (>/=3 h light activity or >0 h vigorous activity per week). There was no statistical evidence that the association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by obesity (p Interaction = 0.65). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that total sitting time has little association with diabetes risk in the population as a whole, but prolonged sitting may contribute to an increased diabetes risk among physically inactive people.  
  Address School of Public Health, Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28054097 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1879  
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Author (up) Bhatta, L.; Leivseth, L.; Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Brumpton, B.M. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008: The HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Respiratory Medicine Abbreviated Journal Respir Med  
  Volume 138 Issue Pages 50-56  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Disease Progression; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology; Forecasting; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Distribution; Spirometry/methods; Vital Capacity/physiology; *Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; *Incidence; *Norway; *Prevalence; *Symptoms; *Trends  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across the world and new estimates of prevalence and trend are of great importance. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 in Norwegian adults >/=40 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: COPD was assessed using a fixed-ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) criteria. Pre-bronchodilator spirometry was performed during 1995-1997 (n=7158) and 2006-2008 (n=8788). The prevalence of COPD was weighted using the inverse probability of selection and predicted probability of response. RESULTS: The prevalence of pre-bronchodilator COPD was 16.7% in 1995-1997 and 14.8% in 2006-2008 using fixed-ratio criteria, and 10.4% in 1995-1997 and 7.3% in 2006-2008 using LLN criteria. The prevalence of LLN COPD was higher among men (13.0% in 1995-1997, 7.7% in 2006-2008) than women (8.0% in 1995-1997, 6.9% in 2006-2008). From 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, the prevalence decreased among men but remained relatively stable among women. Over the 11-year period, the cumulative incidence of pre-bronchodilator COPD using LLN criteria was 3.3% and 2.7% among men and women respectively. The prevalence of self-reported asthma and respiratory symptoms increased. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence declined in men but not in women from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, and was consistently higher among men than women.  
  Address Department of Thoracic Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-6111 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:29724393 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2072  
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Author (up) Bjorngaard, J.H.; Gunnell, D.; Elvestad, M.B.; Davey Smith, G.; Skorpen, F.; Krokan, H.; Vatten, L.; Romundstad, P. url  doi
  Title The causal role of smoking in anxiety and depression: a Mendelian randomization analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Psychological Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychol Med  
  Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 711-719  
  Keywords Adult; Alleles; Anxiety Disorders/*epidemiology/genetics; Body Mass Index; Causality; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15/genetics; Depressive Disorder/*epidemiology/genetics; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/epidemiology/genetics; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; *Mendelian Randomization Analysis; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics; Pregnancy; Prevalence; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Receptors, Nicotinic/*genetics; Self Report; Smoking/*epidemiology/genetics/psychology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is strongly associated with mental illness but the causal direction of the association is uncertain. We investigated the causal relationship between smoking and symptoms of anxiety and depression in the Norwegian HUNT study using the rs1051730 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant located in the nicotine acetylcholine receptor gene cluster on chromosome 15 as an instrumental variable for smoking phenotypes. Among smokers, this SNP is robustly associated with smoking quantity and nicotine dependence. Method In total, 53 601 participants were genotyped for the rs1051730 SNP and provided information on smoking habits and symptoms of anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). RESULTS: Self-reported smoking was positively associated with the prevalence of both anxiety and depression, and the measured polymorphism was positively associated with being a current smoker and the number of cigarettes smoked in current smokers. In the sample as a whole, risk of anxiety increased with each affected T allele [odds ratio (OR) 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.09, p = 0.002] but there was no association with depression (p = 0.31). However, we found no clear association of the polymorphism with either anxiety (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.97-1.09, p = 0.34) or depression (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95-1.09, p = 0.62) among smokers. CONCLUSIONS: As there was no association of the smoking-related rs1051730 SNP with anxiety and depression among smokers, the results suggest that smoking is not a cause of anxiety and depression.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. johan.h.bjorngaard@ntnu.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-2917 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22687325 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1465  
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Author (up) Blaauw, B.A.; Dyb, G.; Hagen, K.; Holmen, T.L.; Linde, M.; Wentzel-Larsen, T.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Anxiety, depression and behavioral problems among adolescents with recurrent headache: the Young-HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication The Journal of Headache and Pain Abbreviated Journal J Headache Pain  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 38  
  Keywords HUNT2; Young Adult; Young-HUNT; Young-HUNT1; headache; depression; anxiety; behavioral problems  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: It is well documented that both anxiety and depression are associated with headache, but there is limited knowledge regarding the relation between recurrent primary headaches and symptoms of anxiety and depression as well as behavioral problems among adolescents. Assessment of co-morbid disorders is important in order to improve the management of adolescents with recurrent headaches. Thus the main purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of recurrent headache with anxiety and depressive symptoms and behavioral problems in a large population based cross-sectional survey among adolescents in Norway. METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted in Norway from 1995 to 1997 (Young-HUNT1). In Young-HUNT1, 4872 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years were interviewed about their headache complaints and completed a comprehensive questionnaire that included assessment of symptoms of anxiety and depression and behavioral problems, i.e. conduct and attention difficulties. RESULTS: In adjusted multivariate analyses among adolescents aged 12-14 years, recurrent headache was associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.61-2.61, p < 0.001), but not with behavioral problems. A significant association with anxiety and depressive symptoms was evident for all headache categories; i.e. migraine, tension-type headache and non-classifiable headache. Among adolescents aged 15-17 years there was a significant association between recurrent headache and symptoms of anxiety and depression (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.39-1.93, p < 0,001) and attention difficulties (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.09-1.44, p =0.001). For migraine there was a significant association with both anxiety and depressive symptoms and attention difficulties, while tension-type headache was significantly associated only with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Non-classifiable headache was associated with attention difficulties and conduct difficulties, but not with anxiety and depressive symptoms. Headache frequency was significantly associated with increasing symptoms scores for anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as attention difficulties, evident for both age groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results from the present study indicate that both anxiety and depressive symptoms and behavioral problems are associated with recurrent headache, and should accordingly be considered a part of the clinical assessment of children and adolescents with headache. Identification of these associated factors and addressing them in interventions may improve headache management.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Vestfold Hospital, Tonsberg, Norway. britaj@mac.com  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1129-2369 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24925252; PMC4062897 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1620  
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Author (up) Borren, I.; Tambs, K.; Idstad, M.; Ask, H.; Sundet, J.M. url  doi
  Title Psychological distress and subjective well-being in partners of somatically ill or physically disabled: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Psychology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Psychol  
  Volume 53 Issue 6 Pages 475-482  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cross-Sectional Studies; Disabled Persons/*psychology; Family Characteristics; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Marriage/*psychology; *Mental Health; Middle Aged; Personal Satisfaction; Spouses/*psychology; Stress, Psychological/*psychology  
  Abstract This study investigated the cross-sectional associations between various somatic conditions in one partner and the level of distress and well-being in the spouse. The study is based on survey data from the Norwegian Nord-Trondelag Health Study, HUNT II (1995-1997). A sample of 9,797 married or cohabiting couples with valid data on subjective well-being (SWB), psychological distress (Hopkins Symptom Check List (SCL)-10) and somatic illness were identified. Regression analyses stratified by sex were conducted with SCL-10 and SWB scores as dependent variables and a joint somatic score as predictor, including; stroke, cancer, angina, myocardial infarction and physical disability (PD). The contribution of each somatic condition was also explored. Spouses of persons previously diagnosed with at least one somatic condition scored significantly lower on SWB and significantly higher on SCL-10 than spouses of healthy persons, though effect sizes were small. The effect seems to be at least partly mediated by the ill partner's psychological distress. Of the specific conditions, PD had the most significant contribution for both genders, though an association between male angina and spousal distress/SWB was also demonstrated.  
  Address Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. ingrid.borren@fhi.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5564 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23170864 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1509  
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Author (up) Borte, S.; Winsvold, B.S.; Stensland, S.O.; Smastuen, M.C.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title The effect of foetal growth restriction on the development of migraine and tension-type headache in adulthood. The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175908  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Weight; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology/*etiology; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Logistic Models; Male; Migraine Disorders/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Tension-Type Headache/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about how factors early in life affect the development of migraine and tension-type headache. We aimed to examine whether growth restriction in utero is associated with development of migraine and frequent tension-type headache in adults. METHODS: The population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3) contained a validated headache questionnaire, which differentiated between migraine and tension-type headache. These data were linked to information on weight and gestational age at birth from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. In total 4557 females and 2789 males, aged 19-41 years, were included in this registry-based study. Participants were categorized as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, 10th-90th percentile), small for gestational age (SGA, 3rd-10th percentile) or very small for gestational age (VSGA, < 3rd percentile). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for migraine and tension-type headache, with exposure being growth restriction at birth. RESULTS: The effect of growth restriction on migraine was modified by sex, with a significant association in males (p<0.001), but not in females (p = 0.20). In particular, males born VSGA were at increased risk of developing migraine (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.63-4.58, p<0.001), with an intermediate risk among those born SGA (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.35, p = 0.08) compared to those born AGA. There was no significant association between growth restriction and frequent TTH (p = 0.051). CONCLUSION: Growth restriction was associated with increased risk of migraine in adulthood among males, but not among females. This suggests that migraine might, in part, be influenced by early life events, and that males seem to be particularly vulnerable.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28410431; PMCID:PMC5391957 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1885  
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Author (up) Brumpton, B.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.; Chen, Y.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title General and abdominal obesity and incident asthma in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 41 Issue 2 Pages 323-329  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*complications/*epidemiology; Body Mass Index; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Models, Statistical; Norway; Obesity/*complications/*epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Smoking; Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract Measures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference define general obesity and abdominal obesity respectively. While high BMI has been established as a risk factor for asthma in adults, waist circumference has seldom been investigated. To determine the association between BMI, waist circumference and incident asthma in adults, we conducted a prospective study (n=23,245) in a population living in Nord-Trondelag, Norway in 1995-2008. Baseline BMI and waist circumference were measured and categorised as general obesity (BMI >/=30.0 kg.m(2)) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference >/=88 cm in females and >/=102 cm in males). Incident asthma was self-reported new-onset cases during an 11-yr follow-up period. Odds ratios for asthma associated with obesity were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. General obesity was a risk factor for asthma in females (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.52-2.52) and males (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.30-2.59). In females, after additional adjustment for BMI, abdominal obesity remained a risk factor for asthma development (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.04-2.05). Abdominal obesity seems to increase the risk of incident asthma in females in addition to BMI, indicating that using both measures of BMI and waist circumference in females may be a superior clinical assessment for asthma risk than any measure alone.  
  Address Dept. of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. ben.brumpton@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22653771 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1461  
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Author (up) Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) Abbreviated Journal Respirology  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 278-283  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*physiopathology; Cohort Studies; Disease Progression; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Physical Exertion; Sedentary Lifestyle; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vital Capacity; *forced expiratory volume in 1 s; *forced vital capacity; *leisure time; *peak expiratory flow; *prospective  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: People with asthma may seek advice about physical activity. However, the benefits of leisure time physical activity on lung function are unclear. We investigated the association between leisure time physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study in Norway, we used multiple linear regressions to estimate the annual mean decline in lung function (and 95% CI) in 1329 people with asthma over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. The durations of light and hard physical activity per week in the last year were collected by questionnaire. Inactive participants did not report any light or hard activity, while active participants reported light or hard activity. RESULTS: The mean decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was 37 mL/year among inactive participants and 32 mL/year in active participants (difference: -5 mL/year (95% CI: -13 to 3)). The mean decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 33 mL/year among inactive participants and 31 mL/year in active participants (difference: -2 mL/year (95% CI: -11 to 7)). The mean decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio was 0.36%/year among inactive participants and 0.22%/year in active participants (difference: -0.14%/year (95% CI: -0.27 to -0.01)). The mean decline in peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 14 mL/year among the inactive participants and 10 mL/year in active participants (difference: -4 mL/year (95% CI: -9 to 1)). CONCLUSION: We observed slightly less decline in lung function in physically active than inactive participants with asthma, particularly for FEV1 , FEV1 /FVC ratio and PEF.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1323-7799 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696634 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1892  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Chen, Y.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, vitamin D supplement and asthma control: The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Respiratory Medicine Abbreviated Journal Respir Med  
  Volume 136 Issue Pages 65-70  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Asthma/*prevention & control; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dietary Supplements; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Vitamin D/administration & dosage/*analogs & derivatives/blood; Vitamin D Deficiency/*complications/drug therapy; Vitamins/*administration & dosage; Young Adult; *Asthma; *Epidemiology; *Vitamin-D  
  Abstract Few studies have investigated the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), vitamin D supplement and asthma control among adults. We aimed to examine whether low levels of serum 25(OH)D or not taking vitamin D supplement were associated with an increased risk of poorly controlled asthma among Norwegian adults with asthma. We used a definition of asthma control adapted from the Global Initiative for Asthma. We first examined cross-sectional associations between serum 25(OH)D (n=806) or vitamin D supplement (n=1179) and poorly controlled asthma. Next, among those with well controlled asthma at baseline, we examined prospective associations between serum 25(OH)D (n=147) or vitamin D supplement (n=208) and poorly controlled asthma at follow-up, approximately 11 years later. We estimated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) with Poisson regression. The adjusted RR for poorly controlled asthma was 1.00 (95% CI, 0.89-1.13) for adults with serum 25(OH)D<50nmol/L in cross-sectional and 1.50 (95% CI, 0.46-4.95) in prospective analyses. The adjusted RR for poorly controlled asthma was 1.17 (95% CI 1.00-1.37) for non-users of vitamin D supplement in cross-sectional and 1.66 (95% CI 0.49-5.67) in prospective analyses. Our study did not show strong evidence that among adults with asthma, having a low serum 25(OH)D or being a non-user of vitamin D supplement was associated with an increased risk of poorly controlled asthma. Some point estimates indicated an increased risk, however our estimates were generally imprecise and further evidence is needed.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-6111 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29501248 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2075  
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Author (up) Brunes, A.; Gudmundsdottir, S.L.; Augestad, L.B.   
  Title Gender-specific associations between leisure-time physical activity and symptoms of anxiety: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol Abbreviated Journal Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology  
  Volume 50 Issue 3 Pages 419-427  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*diagnosis/epidemiology/psychology; Anxiety Disorders/*diagnosis/psychology; Exercise/*psychology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Leisure Activities/*psychology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Prospective Studies; Sex Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Young Adult; HUNT2; HUNT3  
  Abstract PURPOSE: The underlying goal of the study was to examine gender-specific effects of leisure-time physical activity on the development of symptoms of anxiety. METHODS: The second wave of a prospective cohort survey (HUNT 2) was conducted during 1995-1997 in the county of Nord-Trondelag, Norway, with a follow-up in 2006-2008 (HUNT 3). The sample consisted of 12,796 women and 11,195 men with an age range of 19-85 years. A binomial model with a log-link function and generalized linear model analysis with gamma distribution was used to assess the association between physical activity and anxiety symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale anxiety subscale, HADS-A). RESULTS: A total of 1,211 (9.5 %) women and 650 (5.8 %) men developed HADS-defined anxiety (>/=8 on the HADS-A scale). Men who scored in the middle tertile of the calculated physical activity index developed significantly fewer cases of HADS-defined anxiety compared with men in the lowest tertile (p  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Neuroscience, The Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Brunes2015 Serial 1797  
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Author (up) Bye, A.; Rosjo, H.; Aspenes, S.T.; Condorelli, G.; Omland, T.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Circulating microRNAs and aerobic fitness--the HUNT-Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 2 Pages e57496  
  Keywords Adult; Cohort Studies; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; MicroRNAs/*blood; Oxygen Consumption; *Physical Fitness  
  Abstract Aerobic fitness, measured as maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), is a good indicator of cardiovascular health, and a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality. Biomarkers associated with low VO2max may therefore represent potential early markers of future cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to assess whether circulating microRNAs (miRs) are associated with VO2max-level in healthy individuals. In a screening study, 720 miRs were measured in serum samples from healthy individuals (40-45 yrs) with high (n = 12) or low (n = 12) VO2max matched for gender, age and physical activity. Candiate miRs were validated in a second cohort of subjects with high (n = 38) or low (n = 38) VO2max. miR-210 and miR-222 were found to be higher in the low VO2max-group (p<0.05). In addition, miR-21 was increased in male participants with low VO2max (p<0.05). There were no correlations between traditional risk factors for CVD (blood pressure, cholesterol, smoking habit, or obesity) and miR-21, miR-210 and miR-222. DIANA-mirPath identified 611 potential gene-targets of miR-21, miR-210 and miR-222, and pathway analysis indicated alterations in several important signaling systems in subjects with low VO2max. Potential bias involve that blood was collected from non-fasting individuals, and that 8 performed exercise within 24 h before sampling. In conclusion, we found that miR-210, miR-21, and miR-222 were increased in healthy subjects with low VO2max. The lack of association between these three miRs, and other fitness related variables as well as traditional CVD risk factors, suggests that these miRs may have a potential as new independent biomarkers of fitness level and future CVD.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Anja.Bye@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23469005; PMC3585333 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1459  
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Author (up) Chau, J.Y.; Grunseit, A.; Midthjell, K.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A.E.; Van der Ploeg, H.P.   
  Title Sedentary behaviour and risk of mortality from all-causes and cardiometabolic diseases in adults: evidence from the HUNT3 population cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Br J Sports Med Abbreviated Journal British journal of sports medicine  
  Volume 49 Issue 11 Pages 737-742  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Metabolic Diseases/*mortality; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Sex Distribution; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Sedentary behaviour is a potential risk factor for chronic-ill health and mortality, that is, independent of health-enhancing physical activity. Few studies have investigated the risk of mortality associated with multiple contexts of sedentary behaviour. OBJECTIVE: To examine the prospective associations of total sitting time, TV-viewing time and occupational sitting with mortality from all causes and cardiometabolic diseases. METHODS: Data from 50,817 adults aged >/=20 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 (HUNT3) in 2006-2008 were linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry up to 31 December 2010. Cox proportional hazards models examined all-cause and cardiometabolic disease-related mortality associated with total sitting time, TV-viewing and occupational sitting, adjusting for multiple potential confounders including physical activity. RESULTS: After mean follow-up of 3.3 years (137,315.8 person-years), 1068 deaths were recorded of which 388 were related to cardiometabolic diseases. HRs for all-cause mortality associated with total sitting time were 1.12 (95% CI 0.89 to 1.42), 1.18 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.57) and 1.65 (95% CI 1.24 to 2.21) for total sitting time 4-  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Aus Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Chau2015 Serial 1798  
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Author (up) Chen, C.H.; Peng, Q.; Schork, A.J.; Lo, M.T.; Fan, C.C.; Wang, Y.; Desikan, R.S.; Bettella, F.; Hagler, D.J.; Westlye, L.T.; Kremen, W.S.; Jernigan, T.L.; Hellard, S.L.; Steen, V.M.; Espeseth, T.; Huentelman, M.; Haberg, A.K.; Agartz, I.; Djurovic, S.; Andreassen, O.A.; Schork, N.; Dale, A.M. url  doi
  Title Large-scale genomics unveil polygenic architecture of human cortical surface area Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Nat Commun Abbreviated Journal Nature communications  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages 7549  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Base Sequence; Cerebral Cortex/*anatomy & histology; Child; Child, Preschool; Conserved Sequence; Female; Genome, Human/*genetics; *Genomics; Genotype; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Neuroimaging; Phenotype; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Twins/*genetics; Twins, Dizygotic/genetics; Twins, Monozygotic/genetics; Young Adult  
  Abstract Little is known about how genetic variation contributes to neuroanatomical variability, and whether particular genomic regions comprising genes or evolutionarily conserved elements are enriched for effects that influence brain morphology. Here, we examine brain imaging and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) data from approximately 2,700 individuals. We show that a substantial proportion of variation in cortical surface area is explained by additive effects of SNPs dispersed throughout the genome, with a larger heritable effect for visual and auditory sensory and insular cortices (h(2) approximately 0.45). Genome-wide SNPs collectively account for, on average, about half of twin heritability across cortical regions (N=466 twins). We find enriched genetic effects in or near genes. We also observe that SNPs in evolutionarily more conserved regions contributed significantly to the heritability of cortical surface area, particularly, for medial and temporal cortical regions. SNPs in less conserved regions contributed more to occipital and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Multimodal Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Chen, Chi-HuaPeng, QianSchork, Andrew JLo, Min-TzuFan, Chun-ChiehWang, YunpengDesikan, Rahul SBettella, FrancescoHagler, Donald JPediatric Imaging, Neurocognition and Genetics StudyAlzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging InitiativeWestlye, Lars TKremen, William SJernigan, Terry LHellard, Stephanie LeSteen, Vidar MEspeseth, ThomasHuentelman, MattHaberg, Asta KAgartz, IngridDjurovic, SrdjanAndreassen, Ole ASchork, NicholasDale, Anders MPediatric Imaging Neurocognition and Genetics StudyEnglandNat Commun. 2015 Jul 20;6:7549. doi: 10.1038/ncomms8549. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Chen2015 Serial 1799  
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Author (up) Cuypers, K.; De Ridder, K.; Kvaloy, K.; Knudtsen, M.S.; Krokstad, S.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L. url  doi
  Title Leisure time activities in adolescence in the presence of susceptibility genes for obesity: risk or resilience against overweight in adulthood? The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 820  
  Keywords Adolescent; Body Mass Index; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics; Genotype; Humans; *Leisure Activities; Male; Norway; Obesity/*genetics/*prevention & control; Overweight/genetics/prevention & control; Population Surveillance; Questionnaires; Waist Circumference/physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Environment, health behavior, and genetic background are important in the development of obesity. Adolescents spend substantial part of daily leisure time on cultural and social activities, but knowledge about the effects of participation in such activities on weight is limited. METHODS: A number of 1450 adolescents from the Norwegian HUNT study (1995-97) were followed-up in 2006-08 as young adults. Phenotypic data on lifestyle and anthropometric measures were assessed using questionnaires and standardized clinical examinations. Genotypic information on 12 established obesity-susceptibility loci were available for analyses. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the associations between cultural and social activities in adolescence and adiposity measures in young adulthood. In addition, interaction effects of a genetic predisposition score by leisure time activities were tested. RESULTS: In girls, participation in cultural activities was negatively associated with waist circumference (WC) (B = -0.04, 95%CI: -0.08 to -0.00) and with waist-hip ratio (WHR) (B = -0.058, 95%CI: -0.11 to -0.01). However, participation in social activities was positively associated with WC (B = 0.040, CI: 0.00 to 0.08) in girls and with BMI (B = 0.027, CI: 0.00 to 0.05) in boys. The effect of the obesity-susceptibility genetic variants on anthropometric measures was lower in adolescents with high participation in cultural activities compared to adolescents with low participation. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the effects of cultural activities on body fat are different from the effects of participation in social activities. The protective influence of cultural activities in female adolescents against overweight in adulthood and their moderating effect on obesity-susceptibility genes suggest that even cultural activities may be useful in public health strategies against obesity.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian, University of Science and Technology, Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway. koenraad.cuypers@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22998931; PMC3491037 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1511  
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Author (up) Cuypers, K.; Krokstad, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Skjei Knudtsen, M.; Bygren, L.O.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title Patterns of receptive and creative cultural activities and their association with perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life among adults: the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 66 Issue 8 Pages 698-703  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology/*psychology; Creativity; Cross-Sectional Studies; *Cultural Characteristics; Depressive Disorder/epidemiology/*psychology; Female; *Health Status; Humans; Interpersonal Relations; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; *Personal Satisfaction; Poverty/statistics & numerical data; Quality of Life/psychology; Questionnaires; *Self Concept; Sex Distribution; Social Participation/*psychology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cultural participation has been used both in governmental health policies and as medical therapy, based on the assumption that cultural activities will improve health. Previous population studies and a human intervention study have shown that religious, social and cultural activities predict increased survival rate. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between cultural activity and perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life in both genders. METHODS: The study is based on the third population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (2006-2008), including 50,797 adult participants from Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. Data on cultural activities, both receptive and creative, perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life were collected by comprehensive questionnaires. RESULTS: The logistic regression models, adjusted for relevant cofactors, show that participation in receptive and creative cultural activities was significantly associated with good health, good satisfaction with life, low anxiety and depression scores in both genders. Especially in men, attending receptive, rather than creative, cultural activities was more strongly associated with all health-related outcomes. Statistically significant associations between several single receptive, creative cultural activities and the health-related outcome variables were revealed. CONCLUSION: This population-based study suggests gender-dependent associations between cultural participation and perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life. The results support hypotheses on the effect of cultural activities in health promotion and healthcare, but further longitudinal and experimental studies are warranted to establish a reliable cause-effect relationship.  
  Address Nord-Trondelag Health Study Research Center, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Skjesol Ostre, Asenfjord 7632, Norway. kjcuype@online.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21609946 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1512  
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Author (up) Dalen, J.D.; Huijts, T.; Krokstad, S.; Eikemo, T.A. url  doi
  Title Are there educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality in Norway? The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 40 Issue 7 Pages 641-647  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Diagnostic Self Evaluation; *Educational Status; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Mortality/*trends; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models  
  Abstract AIMS: The aim of this study was to test whether the association between self-rated health and mortality differs between educational groups in Norway, and to examine whether health problems and health-related behaviour can explain any of these differences within a previously unexplored contextual setting. METHODS: The study used data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 84-86 (HUNT) with a 20-year follow up. The analyses were performed for respondents between 25-101 years at baseline (n = 56,788). The association between self-rated health and mortality was tested using Cox regression. RESULTS: The results indicate that although self-rated health is associated with mortality there is no difference in the association between self-rated health and mortality between educational groups. Introducing health-related variables did not have an impact on the result. CONCLUSIONS: Given the small educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality, this supports the reliability of self-reported health as a measurement for objective health.  
  Address Norwegian University Science and Technology, NTNU Dragvoll, Institutt for sosiologi og statsvitenskap, Trondheim, Norway. joakim.dalen@samfunn.ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference