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Author (up) Bhatta, L.; Leivseth, L.; Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Brumpton, B.M. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008: The HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Respiratory Medicine Abbreviated Journal Respir Med  
  Volume 138 Issue Pages 50-56  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Disease Progression; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology; Forecasting; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Distribution; Spirometry/methods; Vital Capacity/physiology; *Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; *Incidence; *Norway; *Prevalence; *Symptoms; *Trends  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across the world and new estimates of prevalence and trend are of great importance. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 in Norwegian adults >/=40 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: COPD was assessed using a fixed-ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) criteria. Pre-bronchodilator spirometry was performed during 1995-1997 (n=7158) and 2006-2008 (n=8788). The prevalence of COPD was weighted using the inverse probability of selection and predicted probability of response. RESULTS: The prevalence of pre-bronchodilator COPD was 16.7% in 1995-1997 and 14.8% in 2006-2008 using fixed-ratio criteria, and 10.4% in 1995-1997 and 7.3% in 2006-2008 using LLN criteria. The prevalence of LLN COPD was higher among men (13.0% in 1995-1997, 7.7% in 2006-2008) than women (8.0% in 1995-1997, 6.9% in 2006-2008). From 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, the prevalence decreased among men but remained relatively stable among women. Over the 11-year period, the cumulative incidence of pre-bronchodilator COPD using LLN criteria was 3.3% and 2.7% among men and women respectively. The prevalence of self-reported asthma and respiratory symptoms increased. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence declined in men but not in women from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, and was consistently higher among men than women.  
  Address Department of Thoracic Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-6111 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29724393 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2072  
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Author (up) Chau, J.Y.; Grunseit, A.; Midthjell, K.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A.E.; Van der Ploeg, H.P.   
  Title Sedentary behaviour and risk of mortality from all-causes and cardiometabolic diseases in adults: evidence from the HUNT3 population cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Br J Sports Med Abbreviated Journal British journal of sports medicine  
  Volume 49 Issue 11 Pages 737-742  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Metabolic Diseases/*mortality; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Sex Distribution; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Sedentary behaviour is a potential risk factor for chronic-ill health and mortality, that is, independent of health-enhancing physical activity. Few studies have investigated the risk of mortality associated with multiple contexts of sedentary behaviour. OBJECTIVE: To examine the prospective associations of total sitting time, TV-viewing time and occupational sitting with mortality from all causes and cardiometabolic diseases. METHODS: Data from 50,817 adults aged >/=20 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 (HUNT3) in 2006-2008 were linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry up to 31 December 2010. Cox proportional hazards models examined all-cause and cardiometabolic disease-related mortality associated with total sitting time, TV-viewing and occupational sitting, adjusting for multiple potential confounders including physical activity. RESULTS: After mean follow-up of 3.3 years (137,315.8 person-years), 1068 deaths were recorded of which 388 were related to cardiometabolic diseases. HRs for all-cause mortality associated with total sitting time were 1.12 (95% CI 0.89 to 1.42), 1.18 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.57) and 1.65 (95% CI 1.24 to 2.21) for total sitting time 4-  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Aus Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Chau2015 Serial 1798  
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Author (up) Gabin, J.M.; Tambs, K.; Saltvedt, I.; Sund, E.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title Association between blood pressure and Alzheimer disease measured up to 27 years prior to diagnosis: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alzheimer's Research & Therapy Abbreviated Journal Alzheimers Res Ther  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 37  
  Keywords Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alzheimer Disease/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Asymptomatic Diseases/*epidemiology; Blood Pressure Determination/statistics & numerical data; Comorbidity; Dementia/diagnosis/epidemiology; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*diagnostic imaging/*epidemiology; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sex Distribution; Alzheimer disease; Blood pressure; Epidemiology; Prospective case cohort; Risk factors; Vascular dementia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: A lot of attention has been paid to the relationship of blood pressure and dementia because epidemiological research has reported conflicting evidence. Observational data has shown that midlife hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia later in life, whereas there is evidence that low blood pressure is predictive in later life. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between dementia and blood pressure measured up to 27 years (mean 17.6 years) prior to ascertainment. METHODS: In Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, incident dementia data were collected during 1995-2011, and the diagnoses were validated by a panel of experts in the field. By using the subjects' personal identification numbers, the dementia data were linked to data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a large, population-based health study performed in 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) and 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). A total of 24,638 participants of the HUNT Study were included in the present study, 579 of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, or vascular dementia. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between dementia and blood pressure data from HUNT 1 and HUNT 2. RESULTS: Over the age of 60 years, consistent inverse associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and all-cause dementia, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease, but not with vascular dementia, when adjusting for age, sex, education, and other relevant covariates. This was observed for systolic blood pressure in both HUNT 1 and HUNT 2, regardless of antihypertensive medication use. There was an adverse association between systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and Alzheimer disease in individuals treated with antihypertensive medication under the age of 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our data are in line with those in previous studies demonstrating an inverse association between dementia and systolic blood pressure in individuals over the age of 60 years. We cannot exclude a survival effect, however. Among middle-aged subjects (<60 years), elevated systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were associated with eventual Alzheimer disease in individuals who reported using antihypertensive medication.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1758-9193 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28569205; PMCID:PMC5452294 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1900  
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Author (up) Hoff, M.; Torvik, I.A.; Schei, B. url  doi
  Title Forearm fractures in Central Norway, 1999-2012: incidence, time trends, and seasonal variation Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Arch Osteoporos Abbreviated Journal Archives of osteoporosis  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 7  
  Keywords Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Forearm Injuries/*epidemiology; Fractures, Bone/*epidemiology; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Registries; Seasons; Sex Distribution; Time Factors  
  Abstract The incidence of forearm fractures for men and women >/=40 years in Central Norway was high during the period 1999-2012. A decline in fractures was observed only among women over 50 years. A seasonal variation with highest incidence in the winter months was found among women. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of forearm fractures in Central Norway in men and women 40 years and older from 1999 to 2012 and assess time trends as well as seasonal variations. METHODS: Data is from the fracture registry in Nord-Trondelag, including all forearm fractures in persons >/=40 sustained from 1999 to 2012. Annual incidence of forearm fractures were calculated and tested for trends. Variations in the occurrence of fractures were explored by comparing proportion of fractures by month and seasons. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 4003 subjects (77.1% women). The total number of fractures were 4240. There was an increase in fractures for women with increasing age, steepest, a three-fold increase between age group 40-50 and the age group 50-60. Among men, this pattern was not observed as incidences did not change with increasing age. The age-standardized incidence rate for all fractures among women >/=50 ranged from 82 fractures per 1000 (95% CI 71-94) to 100 (88-114) and among men from 19 (14-27) to 31 (24-39). Restricting the analysis to the first fracture sustained during the observed period, women >/=50 years showed a reduction in fractures of 1.30% per year (95% CI 0.01%: 2.56%,) and 12.18% per 10 years (3.61%: 19.98%). For all women, there was a trend towards a decline of 0.73% per year (-2.29%: 0.85%), although not significant. For men, there was a trend towards an increase in fractures of 1.66% per year (-0.11%: 3.45%). The occurrence of fractures among women varied by season of the year, with higher fracture rates in the winter months. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence rate of forearm fractures in Central Norway was high. However, a small decline in the incidence of the first fracture among women older than 50 years was observed. Fractures were more often sustained during winter months among women.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, PB Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1862-3514 (Electronic) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Hoff, MariTorvik, Ingrid AskSchei, BeritengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2016/01/20 06:00Arch Osteoporos. 2016;11:7. doi: 10.1007/s11657-016-0257-4. Epub 2016 Jan 18. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Hoff2016 Serial 1749  
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Author (up) Iversen, M.M.; Tell, G.S.; Espehaug, B.; Midthjell, K.; Graue, M.; Rokne, B.; Berge, L.I.; Ostbye, T.   
  Title Is depression a risk factor for diabetic foot ulcers?: 11-years follow-up of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Diabetes Complications Abbreviated Journal Journal of diabetes and its complications  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 20-25  
  Keywords HUNT2; HUNT3; Age Distribution; Cohort Studies; Confidence Intervals; Depression/diagnosis/*epidemiology; Diabetic Foot/*epidemiology/physiopathology/*psychology/therapy; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Incidence; Logistic Models; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Neuropsychological Tests; Norway; Odds Ratio; *Quality of Life; Retrospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Distribution; Time Factors; Wound Healing/physiology  
  Abstract AIM: To prospectively examine whether depressive symptoms increase the risk of diabetes and a diabetic foot ulcer. METHODS: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) is a community-based longitudinal study. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D subscale) assessed depressive symptoms. We followed individuals with complete HADS-D data from HUNT2 (1995-97) and assessed whether they reported diabetes with or without a history of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) in HUNT3 (2006-08) (n=36,031). Logistic regression was used to investigate the effect of depressive symptoms on subsequent development of diabetes and of DFU. RESULTS: Unadjusted odds for reporting diabetes at follow-up was higher among individuals who reported a HADS-D score>/=8 at baseline (OR 1.30 95% CI, 1.07-1.57) than among those reporting a lower score. After adjusting for age, gender and BMI, this association was no longer significant. The odds of developing a DFU was almost two-fold (OR=1.95 95% CI, 1.02-3.74) for those reporting a HADS-D score of 8-10, and 3-fold (OR=3.06 95% CI, 1.24-7.54) for HADS-D scores>/=11, compared to HADS-D scores  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, PO Box 7030, N-5020 Bergen, Norway Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Iversen2015c Serial 1826  
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Author (up) Kvalheim, S.; Sandven, I.; Hagen, K.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Smoking as a risk factor for chronic musculoskeletal complaints is influenced by age. The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 154 Issue 7 Pages 1073-1079  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Arthralgia/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Chronic Pain/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Comorbidity; Educational Status; Female; Humans; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Sex Distribution; Smoking/*epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Chronic musculoskeletal complaints (MSCs) are among the major health problems, and cross-sectional studies suggest an association between smoking and MSCs. The causal relationship, however, is not known. The present study is designed to assess the association between smoking and chronic MSCs, and is based on data from a large longitudinal cohort study of all inhabitants 20years in Nord-Trondelag County (Helse Undersokelsen i Nord-Trondelag -HUNT), conducted in 1995-97 (HUNT 2) and 2006-08 (HUNT 3). The study population consisted of 15,134 subjects without chronic MSCs and valid exposure data on smoking at baseline (HUNT 2). The outcome was defined as presence of chronic MSCs at follow-up (HUNT 3). The results show that smoking at baseline represents a 20% increased risk (IRR=1.20, 95% CI 1.14-1.27, P=0.0001) for chronic MSCs at follow-up. The risk for chronic MSCs by daily smoking decreased with increasing age up to 50years; after this, there was no significant association. The results show that modifiable risk factors like smoking should be included in public health intervention programs for MSCs.  
  Address Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. synnovkk@medisin.uio.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23623251 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1434  
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Author (up) Langhammer, A.; Krokstad, S.; Romundstad, P.; Heggland, J.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title The HUNT study: participation is associated with survival and depends on socioeconomic status, diseases and symptoms Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication BMC Medical Research Methodology Abbreviated Journal BMC Med Res Methodol  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 143  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged, 80 and over; Anthropometry; Female; Heart Diseases; Humans; Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; *Patient Participation/statistics & numerical data; Prevalence; *Quality of Life; Questionnaires/*standards; Sex Distribution; *Social Class; *Survival Analysis  
  Abstract ATTENTION: This publication contains an error. In table 2 and table 3 the column labels for genders have been replaced; instead of Women / Men there should be Men /Women

BACKGROUND: Population based studies are important for prevalence, incidence and association studies, but their external validity might be threatened by decreasing participation rates. The 50 807 participants in the third survey of the HUNT Study (HUNT3, 2006-08), represented 54% of the invited, necessitating a nonparticipation study. METHODS: Questionnaire data from HUNT3 were compared with data collected from several sources: a short questionnaire to nonparticipants, anonymous data on specific diagnoses and prescribed medication extracted from randomly selected general practices, registry data from Statistics Norway on socioeconomic factors and mortality, and from the Norwegian Prescription Database on drug consumption. RESULTS: Participation rates for HUNT3 depended on age, sex and type of symptoms and diseases, but only small changes were found in the overall prevalence estimates when including data from 6922 nonparticipants. Among nonparticipants, the prevalences of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and psychiatric disorders were higher both in nonparticipant data and data extracted from general practice, compared to that reported by participants, whilst the opposite pattern was found, at least among persons younger than 80 years, for urine incontinence, musculoskeletal pain and headache. Registry data showed that the nonparticipants had lower socioeconomic status and a higher mortality than participants. CONCLUSION: Nonparticipants had lower socioeconomic status, higher mortality and showed higher prevalences of several chronic diseases, whilst opposite patterns were found for common problems like musculoskeletal pain, urine incontinence and headache. The impact on associations should be analyzed for each diagnosis, and data making such analyses possible are provided in the present paper.
 
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway. arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2288 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22978749; PMC3512497 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1541  
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Author (up) Laugsand, L.E.; Asvold, B.O.; Vatten, L.J.; Romundstad, P.R.; Wiseth, R.; Hveem, K.; Janszky, I. url  doi
  Title Metabolic factors and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication European Journal of Preventive Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Prev Cardiol  
  Volume 19 Issue 5 Pages 1101-1110  
  Keywords Age Distribution; Body Mass Index; C-Reactive Protein/*metabolism; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X/*blood/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; *Population Surveillance; Prevalence; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Distribution  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with metabolic syndrome in younger age groups has not been studied extensively and few population-based studies have included both sexes. Therefore we estimated the association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with the metabolic factors at different ages in men and women in a large population-based study. METHODS AND OBJECTIVES: In this cross-sectional study, clinical information and non-fasting blood samples including measurement of hsCRP from 4587 men and 5408 women 20 years and older in the HUNT study in Norway were used to study the association of components of the metabolic syndrome with levels of hsCRP, by sex and age group. RESULTS: All measured metabolic factors were associated with hsCRP. Among these factors, body mass index appeared to be the most strongly associated, and the strong positive association persisted also after adjustment for the other metabolic factors, with similar associations in women and men. The associations were generally somewhat stronger in younger than in older age groups. CONCLUSION: Metabolic factors, especially body mass index, have a relatively strong association with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein at all ages both in men and women.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. lars.e.laugsand@ntnu.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2047-4873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21775413 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1542  
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Author (up) Mai, X.-M.; Langhammer, A.; Chen, Y.; Camargo, C.A.J. url  doi
  Title Cod liver oil intake and incidence of asthma in Norwegian adults--the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Thorax Abbreviated Journal Thorax  
  Volume 68 Issue 1 Pages 25-30  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Asthma/*epidemiology/*etiology/physiopathology; Cod Liver Oil/administration & dosage/*adverse effects; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dietary Supplements/*adverse effects; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Drug Administration Schedule; Female; Humans; Incidence; Logistic Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Questionnaires; Reference Values; Risk Assessment; Sex Distribution; Vitamin A/administration & dosage/*adverse effects; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cod liver oil is an important source of vitamin D, but also contains other fat-soluble components such as vitamin A. Before 1999, the cod liver oil formula in Norway contained a high concentration of vitamin A (1000 microg per 5 ml). High vitamin A status is associated with increased risks of several chronic diseases. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between cod liver oil intake and asthma development. METHODS: In the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, a total of 25 616 Norwegian adults aged 19-55 years were followed up from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008. Current analysis based on 17 528 subjects who were free of asthma and had complete information on cod liver oil intake at baseline. Cod liver oil intake was defined as daily intake >/= 1 month during the year prior to baseline. Incident asthma was reported as new-onset asthma during the 11-year follow-up. RESULTS: Of the 17 528 subjects, 18% (n=3076) consumed cod liver oil daily for >/= 1 month over the past year. Cod liver oil intake was significantly associated with incident asthma with an OR of 1.62 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.98) after adjustment for age, sex, daily smoking, physical activity, education, socio-economic status, family history of asthma, and body mass index (BMI). The positive association was consistent across age (< 40/>/= 40 years), sex (men/women), family history of asthma (yes/no) and BMI subgroups (< 25/>/= 25 kg/m(2)). CONCLUSIONS: Intake of cod liver oil with high vitamin A content was significantly associated with increased incidence of adult-onset asthma.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. xiao-mei.mai@ntnu.no  
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  ISSN 0040-6376 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:22977130 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1424  
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Author (up) Torvik, F.A.; Rognmo, K.; Tambs, K. url  doi
  Title Alcohol use and mental distress as predictors of non-response in a general population health survey: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol  
  Volume 47 Issue 5 Pages 805-816  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol-Related Disorders/epidemiology/*psychology; Depressive Disorder/epidemiology/*psychology; Female; Health Status Indicators; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Patient Participation/*psychology/statistics & numerical data; Population Surveillance; Questionnaires; Severity of Illness Index; Spouses/psychology  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To investigate to what degree alcohol use and mental distress are associated with non-response in a population-based health study. METHODS: From 1995 to 1997, 91,488 persons were invited to take part in a health study at Nord-Trondelag, Norway, and the response rate was 69.2%. Demographics were available for everyone. Survey answers from a previous survey were available for most of the participants and a majority of non-participants. In addition, the survey responses from spouses and children of the invitees were used to predict participation in the aforementioned study. Crude and adjusted ORs for a number of predictors, among these alcohol consumption and mental distress, are reported. RESULTS: Both heavy drinkers (OR = 1.27) and abstainers (OR = 1.64) had a higher probability of dropping out in comparison to people who usually do not drink. High levels of mental distress (OR = 1.84) also predicted attrition. CONCLUSION: Alcohol use and mental distress are moderately associated with non-response, though probably not a major cause, as controlling for other variables weakened the associations. Nevertheless, the moderate but clear underrepresentation at the crude level of people with high alcohol consumption, abstainers and people with poor mental health should be taken into consideration when interpreting results from health surveys.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, P.O. Box 4404, 0403, Oslo, Norway. fartein.torvik@fhi.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0933-7954 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21544604; PMC3328681 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1582  
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