toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Berndt, S.I.; Gustafsson, S.; Magi, R.; Ganna, A.; Wheeler, E.; Feitosa, M.F.; Justice, A.E.; Monda, K.L.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Esko, T.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gentilini, D.; Jackson, A.U.; Luan, J.'an; Randall, J.C.; Vedantam, S.; Willer, C.J.; Winkler, T.W.; Wood, A.R.; Workalemahu, T.; Hu, Y.-J.; Lee, S.H.; Liang, L.; Lin, D.-Y.; Min, J.L.; Neale, B.M.; Thorleifsson, G.; Yang, J.; Albrecht, E.; Amin, N.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Cadby, G.; den Heijer, M.; Eklund, N.; Fischer, K.; Goel, A.; Hottenga, J.-J.; Huffman, J.E.; Jarick, I.; Johansson, A.; Johnson, T.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Konig, I.R.; Kristiansson, K.; Kutalik, Z.; Lamina, C.; Lecoeur, C.; Li, G.; Mangino, M.; McArdle, W.L.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Ngwa, J.S.; Nolte, I.M.; Paternoster, L.; Pechlivanis, S.; Perola, M.; Peters, M.J.; Preuss, M.; Rose, L.M.; Shi, J.; Shungin, D.; Smith, A.V.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Surakka, I.; Teumer, A.; Trip, M.D.; Tyrer, J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vandenput, L.; Waite, L.L.; Zhao, J.H.; Absher, D.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Atalay, M.; Attwood, A.P.; Balmforth, A.J.; Basart, H.; Beilby, J.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Brambilla, P.; Bruinenberg, M.; Campbell, H.; Chasman, D.I.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Connell, J.M.; Cookson, W.O.; de Faire, U.; de Vegt, F.; Dei, M.; Dimitriou, M.; Edkins, S.; Estrada, K.; Evans, D.M.; Farrall, M.; Ferrario, M.M.; Ferrieres, J.; Franke, L.; Frau, F.; Gejman, P.V.; Grallert, H.; Gronberg, H.; Gudnason, V.; Hall, A.S.; Hall, P.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Hayward, C.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Heath, A.C.; Hebebrand, J.; Homuth, G.; Hu, F.B.; Hunt, S.E.; Hypponen, E.; Iribarren, C.; Jacobs, K.B.; Jansson, J.-O.; Jula, A.; Kahonen, M.; Kathiresan, S.; Kee, F.; Khaw, K.-T.; Kivimaki, M.; Koenig, W.; Kraja, A.T.; Kumari, M.; Kuulasmaa, K.; Kuusisto, J.; Laitinen, J.H.; Lakka, T.A.; Langenberg, C.; Launer, L.J.; Lind, L.; Lindstrom, J.; Liu, J.; Liuzzi, A.; Lokki, M.-L.; Lorentzon, M.; Madden, P.A.; Magnusson, P.K.; Manunta, P.; Marek, D.; Marz, W.; Mateo Leach, I.; McKnight, B.; Medland, S.E.; Mihailov, E.; Milani, L.; Montgomery, G.W.; Mooser, V.; Muhleisen, T.W.; Munroe, P.B.; Musk, A.W.; Narisu, N.; Navis, G.; Nicholson, G.; Nohr, E.A.; Ong, K.K.; Oostra, B.A.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Palotie, A.; Peden, J.F.; Pedersen, N.; Peters, A.; Polasek, O.; Pouta, A.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Prokopenko, I.; Putter, C.; Radhakrishnan, A.; Raitakari, O.; Rendon, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Rudan, I.; Saaristo, T.E.; Sambrook, J.G.; Sanders, A.R.; Sanna, S.; Saramies, J.; Schipf, S.; Schreiber, S.; Schunkert, H.; Shin, S.-Y.; Signorini, S.; Sinisalo, J.; Skrobek, B.; Soranzo, N.; Stancakova, A.; Stark, K.; Stephens, J.C.; Stirrups, K.; Stolk, R.P.; Stumvoll, M.; Swift, A.J.; Theodoraki, E.V.; Thorand, B.; Tregouet, D.-A.; Tremoli, E.; Van der Klauw, M.M.; van Meurs, J.B.J.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Viikari, J.; Virtamo, J.; Vitart, V.; Waeber, G.; Wang, Z.; Widen, E.; Wild, S.H.; Willemsen, G.; Winkelmann, B.R.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zillikens, M.C.; Amouyel, P.; Boehm, B.O.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boomsma, D.I.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chanock, S.J.; Cupples, L.A.; Cusi, D.; Dedoussis, G.V.; Erdmann, J.; Eriksson, J.G.; Franks, P.W.; Froguel, P.; Gieger, C.; Gyllensten, U.; Hamsten, A.; Harris, T.B.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hicks, A.A.; Hingorani, A.; Hinney, A.; Hofman, A.; Hovingh, K.G.; Hveem, K.; Illig, T.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Jockel, K.-H.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, S.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Kuh, D.; Laakso, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Levinson, D.F.; Martin, N.G.; Metspalu, A.; Morris, A.D.; Nieminen, M.S.; Njolstad, I.; Ohlsson, C.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Palmer, L.J.; Penninx, B.; Power, C.; Province, M.A.; Psaty, B.M.; Qi, L.; Rauramaa, R.; Ridker, P.M.; Ripatti, S.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Snieder, H.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Spector, T.D.; Stefansson, K.; Tonjes, A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Uusitupa, M.; van der Harst, P.; Vollenweider, P.; Wallaschofski, H.; Wareham, N.J.; Watkins, H.; Wichmann, H.-E.; Wilson, J.F.; Abecasis, G.R.; Assimes, T.L.; Barroso, I.; Boehnke, M.; Borecki, I.B.; Deloukas, P.; Fox, C.S.; Frayling, T.; Groop, L.C.; Haritunian, T.; Heid, I.M.; Hunter, D.; Kaplan, R.C.; Karpe, F.; Moffatt, M.F.; Mohlke, K.L.; O'Connell, J.R.; Pawitan, Y.; Schadt, E.E.; Schlessinger, D.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Strachan, D.P.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; van Duijn, C.M.; Visscher, P.M.; Di Blasio, A.M.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Lindgren, C.M.; Morris, A.P.; Meyre, D.; Scherag, A.; McCarthy, M.I.; Speliotes, E.K.; North, K.E.; Loos, R.J.F.; Ingelsson, E. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 45 Issue 5 Pages 501-512  
  Keywords *Anthropometry; Body Height/*genetics; Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease; *Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Meta-Analysis as Topic; Obesity/*genetics; Phenotype; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/*genetics; *Quantitative Trait Loci; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.  
  Address US Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23563607 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1466  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Langhammer, A.; Krokstad, S.; Romundstad, P.; Heggland, J.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title The HUNT study: participation is associated with survival and depends on socioeconomic status, diseases and symptoms Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication BMC Medical Research Methodology Abbreviated Journal BMC Med Res Methodol  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 143  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged, 80 and over; Anthropometry; Female; Heart Diseases; Humans; Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; *Patient Participation/statistics & numerical data; Prevalence; *Quality of Life; Questionnaires/*standards; Sex Distribution; *Social Class; *Survival Analysis  
  Abstract ATTENTION: This publication contains an error. In table 2 and table 3 the column labels for genders have been replaced; instead of Women / Men there should be Men /Women

BACKGROUND: Population based studies are important for prevalence, incidence and association studies, but their external validity might be threatened by decreasing participation rates. The 50 807 participants in the third survey of the HUNT Study (HUNT3, 2006-08), represented 54% of the invited, necessitating a nonparticipation study. METHODS: Questionnaire data from HUNT3 were compared with data collected from several sources: a short questionnaire to nonparticipants, anonymous data on specific diagnoses and prescribed medication extracted from randomly selected general practices, registry data from Statistics Norway on socioeconomic factors and mortality, and from the Norwegian Prescription Database on drug consumption. RESULTS: Participation rates for HUNT3 depended on age, sex and type of symptoms and diseases, but only small changes were found in the overall prevalence estimates when including data from 6922 nonparticipants. Among nonparticipants, the prevalences of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and psychiatric disorders were higher both in nonparticipant data and data extracted from general practice, compared to that reported by participants, whilst the opposite pattern was found, at least among persons younger than 80 years, for urine incontinence, musculoskeletal pain and headache. Registry data showed that the nonparticipants had lower socioeconomic status and a higher mortality than participants. CONCLUSION: Nonparticipants had lower socioeconomic status, higher mortality and showed higher prevalences of several chronic diseases, whilst opposite patterns were found for common problems like musculoskeletal pain, urine incontinence and headache. The impact on associations should be analyzed for each diagnosis, and data making such analyses possible are provided in the present paper.
 
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway. arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2288 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22978749; PMC3512497 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1541  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nes, B.M.; Osthus, I.B.O.; Welde, B.; Aspenes, S.T.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Peak oxygen uptake and physical activity in 13- to 18-year-olds: the Young-HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise Abbreviated Journal Med Sci Sports Exerc  
  Volume 45 Issue 2 Pages 304-313  
  Keywords Adolescent; Analysis of Variance; Anthropometry; Female; Humans; Linear Models; Male; *Motor Activity; Norway; Oxygen Consumption/*physiology; Puberty/physiology; Questionnaires; Risk Factors  
  Abstract PURPOSE: The present study describes the distribution of cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) in a large sample of healthy adolescents and the associations between VO2peak, self-reported physical activity, and a selection of conventional markers for future cardiovascular health. METHODS: In a substudy of the Young-HUNT study in Norway, 570 adolescents (289 girls and 281 boys) 13-18 yr. old were tested for directly measured VO2peak. Blood pressure, resting heart rate, height, weight, and waist circumference was measured by standardized procedures. Data about physical activity and pubertal development were obtained using self-administered questionnaires. General linear modeling and ANOVA were used to examine the relationships between VO2peak and age, physical activity, and cardiovascular risk factors. RESULTS: The mean T SD VO2peak was 183.9 +/- 24.6 mL x kg(-0.67) x min(-1) (49.2 mL x kg(-0.67) x min(-1)) in girls and 235.1 +/- 35.3 mL x kg(-0.67) x min(-1) (59.5 mL x kg(-0.67) x min(-1)) in boys. Absolute VO2peak (L x min(-1)) was consistently higher in older age groups in both sexes (P trend < 0.001). VO2peak allometrically scaled to body mass (mL x kg(-0.67) x min(-1)) was similar across the age groups in girls (i.e., difference between 13- to 14-yr-olds and 17- to 18-yr-olds = -3.2 mL x kg(-0.67) x min(-1), 95% confidence interval = 3.8 to -10.1) and slightly higher in the older age groups in boys (i.e., difference between 13- to 14-yr-olds and 15- to 16-yr-olds = -31.0 mL x kg(-0.67) x min(-1), 95% confidence interval = -22.0 to -40.1). Physical activity was positively associated with VO2peak in all sex and age groups. Quartiles of VO2peak were inversely associated with resting heart rate (P trend = 0.004) in both sexes and body mass index (P trend = 0.004) and waist circumference (P trend = 0.006) in boys. CONCLUSION: Although VO2peak was generally high across the age groups, VO2peak was higher in physically active adolescents of both sexes and physical activity in accordance with the recommended level may be sufficient to maintain or even increase VO2peak through adolescence.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. bjarne.nes@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-9131 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22968311 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1410  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: