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Author (up) Borte, S.; Winsvold, B.S.; Stensland, S.O.; Smastuen, M.C.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title The effect of foetal growth restriction on the development of migraine and tension-type headache in adulthood. The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175908  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Weight; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology/*etiology; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Logistic Models; Male; Migraine Disorders/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Tension-Type Headache/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about how factors early in life affect the development of migraine and tension-type headache. We aimed to examine whether growth restriction in utero is associated with development of migraine and frequent tension-type headache in adults. METHODS: The population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3) contained a validated headache questionnaire, which differentiated between migraine and tension-type headache. These data were linked to information on weight and gestational age at birth from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. In total 4557 females and 2789 males, aged 19-41 years, were included in this registry-based study. Participants were categorized as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, 10th-90th percentile), small for gestational age (SGA, 3rd-10th percentile) or very small for gestational age (VSGA, < 3rd percentile). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for migraine and tension-type headache, with exposure being growth restriction at birth. RESULTS: The effect of growth restriction on migraine was modified by sex, with a significant association in males (p<0.001), but not in females (p = 0.20). In particular, males born VSGA were at increased risk of developing migraine (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.63-4.58, p<0.001), with an intermediate risk among those born SGA (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.35, p = 0.08) compared to those born AGA. There was no significant association between growth restriction and frequent TTH (p = 0.051). CONCLUSION: Growth restriction was associated with increased risk of migraine in adulthood among males, but not among females. This suggests that migraine might, in part, be influenced by early life events, and that males seem to be particularly vulnerable.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28410431; PMCID:PMC5391957 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1885  
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Author (up) Eik-Nes, T.T.; Horn, J.; Strohmaier, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Micali, N.; Bjornelv, S. url  doi
  Title Impact of eating disorders on obstetric outcomes in a large clinical sample: A comparison with the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The International Journal of Eating Disorders Abbreviated Journal Int J Eat Disord  
  Volume 51 Issue 10 Pages 1134-1143  
  Keywords anorexia nervosa; birth weight; bulimia nervosa; eating disorders; eating disorders not otherwise specified; obstetric outcomes; registry studies  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Current evidence from clinical studies suggests that having an active eating disorder (ED) during pregnancy is associated with unfavorable obstetric outcomes. However, the role of a lifetime diagnosis of ED is not fully understood. Variations in findings suggest a need for additional studies of maternal ED. This study aims to identify associations between a lifetime ED and obstetric outcomes. METHOD: Data from a hospital patient register and a population-based study (The HUNT Study) were linked to the Medical Birth Registry in Norway. Register based information of obstetric complications (preeclampsia, preterm birth, perinatal deaths, small for gestational age (SGA), large for gestational age (LGA), Caesarean sections, and 5-min Apgar score) were acquired for 532 births of women with ED and 43,657 births of non-ED women. Multivariable regression in generalized estimating equations was used to account for clusters within women as they contributed multiple births to the dataset. RESULTS: After adjusting for parity, maternal age, marital status, and year of delivery, lifetime history of anorexia nervosa was associated with increased odds of having offspring who were SGA (Odds ratio (OR) 2.7, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.4-5.2). Women with a lifetime history of bulimia nervosa had higher odds of having a Caesarian section (OR 1.7 95% CI 1.1-2.5). Women with EDNOS/sub-threshold ED had a higher likelihood of having a low Apgar score at 5 min (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.1-8.8). CONCLUSION: Our study corroborates available evidence on the associations between maternal ED and adverse obstetric outcomes.  
  Address Department of Mental Health and Addiction, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0276-3478 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30189108 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2079  
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Author (up) Iversen, J.M.; Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Adolescent chronic pain and association to perinatal factors: linkage of Birth Registry data with the Young-HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Eur J Pain Abbreviated Journal European journal of pain  
  Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages 567-575  
  Keywords HUNT3; Young-HUNT; Adolescent; Age Factors; *Birth Weight; Chronic Pain/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Male; Pregnancy; *Registries; Sex Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Time Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the associations of birthweight, gestation and 5-min Apgar score with self-reported chronic nonspecific pain in a large, unselected adolescent population. METHODS: The third population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) included 8200 adolescents aged 13-19 years, constituting 78.2% of adolescents in Nord-Trondelag County. In the target age group, 13-18 years, data on pain frequency from 10 localizations were available from 7373 adolescents. Chronic nonspecific pain was defined as pain at least once a week during the last 3 months, not related to any known disease or injury. Chronic multisite pain was defined as chronic pain in at least three localizations, and chronic daily pain was defined as chronic pain almost every day. Perinatal data were retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, and data were available for 7120 of the 7373 adolescents. Covariates included adolescent and maternal general health measures from the HUNT study. RESULTS: We found no consistent association between preterm birth and chronic pain and no clear association between birthweight and chronic pain complaints in adolescence. Post-term birth in boys and a low 5-min Apgar score in both sexes tended to increase the reporting of chronic pain in adolescence. CONCLUSIONS: Perinatal factors, and especially preterm birth and low birthweight, did not seem to have a major impact on pain complaints in adolescence.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian Uni Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Iversen, J MHoftun, G BRomundstad, P RRygg, MengEnglandLondon, England2014/08/21 06:00Eur J Pain. 2015 Apr;19(4):567-75. doi: 10.1002/ejp.581. Epub 2014 Aug 20. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Iversen2015a Serial 1824  
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Author (up) Myklestad, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Magnussen, E.B.; Salvesen, K.A.; Smith, G.D.; Romundstad, P.R. url  doi
  Title Offspring birth weight and cardiovascular risk in parents: a population-based HUNT 2 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 175 Issue 6 Pages 546-555  
  Keywords Adult; *Birth Weight; Blood Glucose/metabolism; Blood Pressure; Body Mass Index; Cardiovascular Diseases/*genetics; Female; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; *Infant, Low Birth Weight; Infant, Newborn; Lipids/blood; Male; Models, Statistical; Norway; *Parents; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Waist Circumference  
  Abstract Low birth weight is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in later life. The fetal insulin hypothesis suggests that shared genetic factors partly explain this association. If fetal genes predispose to both low birth weight and cardiovascular disease in adulthood, fathers of offspring with low birth weight should display an unfavorable profile of cardiovascular risk factors. To study this, the authors linked data on more than 14,000 parents, collected from the second Health Study of Nord Trondelag County, Norway (HUNT 2, 1995-1997), to offspring data from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry (1967-2005). Linear regression was used to study associations of offspring birth weight for gestational age with the parents' body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, and serum lipids. All analyses were adjusted for shared environment by means of the socioeconomic measures, lifestyle, and cardiovascular risk factors of the partner. The authors found that low offspring birth weight for gestational age was associated with increased paternal blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and unfavorable levels of glucose and lipids. For mothers, associations similar to those for fathers were found for blood pressure, whereas associations in the opposite direction were found for glucose, lipids, and body mass index. The paternal findings strengthen the genetic hypothesis.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norways. kirsti.myklestad@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22328703 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1556  
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