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Author Chau, J.Y.; Grunseit, A.; Midthjell, K.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A.E.; Van der Ploeg, H.P.   
  Title Sedentary behaviour and risk of mortality from all-causes and cardiometabolic diseases in adults: evidence from the HUNT3 population cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Br J Sports Med Abbreviated Journal British journal of sports medicine  
  Volume 49 Issue 11 Pages 737-742  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Metabolic Diseases/*mortality; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Sex Distribution; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Sedentary behaviour is a potential risk factor for chronic-ill health and mortality, that is, independent of health-enhancing physical activity. Few studies have investigated the risk of mortality associated with multiple contexts of sedentary behaviour. OBJECTIVE: To examine the prospective associations of total sitting time, TV-viewing time and occupational sitting with mortality from all causes and cardiometabolic diseases. METHODS: Data from 50,817 adults aged >/=20 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 (HUNT3) in 2006-2008 were linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry up to 31 December 2010. Cox proportional hazards models examined all-cause and cardiometabolic disease-related mortality associated with total sitting time, TV-viewing and occupational sitting, adjusting for multiple potential confounders including physical activity. RESULTS: After mean follow-up of 3.3 years (137,315.8 person-years), 1068 deaths were recorded of which 388 were related to cardiometabolic diseases. HRs for all-cause mortality associated with total sitting time were 1.12 (95% CI 0.89 to 1.42), 1.18 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.57) and 1.65 (95% CI 1.24 to 2.21) for total sitting time 4-  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Aus Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Chau2015 Serial 1798  
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Author Grunseit, A.C.; Chau, J.Y.; Rangul, V.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Patterns of sitting and mortality in the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 8  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Posture; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Self Report; Young Adult; *Cardiovascular disease; *Epidemiology; *Mortality; *Sedentary behaviour  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Current evidence concerning sedentary behaviour and mortality risk has used single time point assessments of sitting. Little is known about how changes in sitting levels over time affect subsequent mortality risk. AIM: To examine the associations between patterns of sitting time assessed at two time points 11 years apart and risk of all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality. METHODS: Participants were 25,651 adults aged > =20 years old from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study with self-reported total sitting time in 1995-1997 (HUNT2) and 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Four categories characterised patterns of sitting: (1) low at HUNT2/ low at HUNT3, 'consistently low sitting'; (2) low at HUNT2/high at HUNT3, 'increased sitting'; (3) high at HUNT2/low at HUNT3, 'reduced sitting'; and (4) high at HUNT2 /high at HUNT3, 'consistently high sitting'. Associations of sitting pattern with all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality were analysed using Cox regression adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 6.2 years (158880 person-years); 1212 participants died. Compared to 'consistently low sitting', adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.51 (95% CI: 1.28-2.78), 1.03 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20), and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.06-1.51) for 'increased sitting', 'reduced sitting' and 'consistently high sitting' respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Examining patterns of sitting over time augments single time-point analyses of risk exposures associated with high sitting time. Whilst sitting habits can be stable over a long period, life events (e.g., changing jobs, retiring or illness) may influence sitting trajectories and therefore sitting-attributable risk. Reducing sitting may yield mortality risks comparable to a stable low-sitting pattern.  
  Address Department of Public health and General practice, HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28122625; PMCID:PMC5267382 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1918  
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Author Karlsen, T.; Nauman, J.; Dalen, H.; Langhammer, A.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title The Combined Association of Skeletal Muscle Strength and Physical Activity on Mortality in Older Women: The HUNT2 Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc  
  Volume 92 Issue 5 Pages 710-718  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Hand Strength; Humans; Leg/physiology; *Muscle Strength; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the isolated and combined associations of leg and arm strength with adherence to current physical activity guidelines with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in healthy elderly women. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study of 2529 elderly women (72.6+/-4.8 years) from the Norwegian Healthy survey of Northern Trondelag (second wave) (HUNT2) between August 15, 1995, and June 18, 1997, with a median of 15.6 years (interquartile range, 10.4-16.3 years) of follow-up. Chair-rise test and handgrip strength performances were assessed, and divided into tertiles. The hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause and cause-specific mortality by tertiles of handgrip strength and chair-rise test performance, and combined associations with physical activity were estimated by using Cox proportional hazard regression models. RESULTS: We observed independent associations of physical activity and the chair-rise test performance with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and between handgrip strength and all-cause mortality. Despite following physical activity guidelines, women with low muscle strength had increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR chair test, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.07-1.76; HR handgrip strength, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.85) and cardiovascular disease mortality (HR chair test, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.01-2.42). Slow chair-test performance was associated with all-cause (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.16-1.51) and cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.14-1.76) mortality. The association between handgrip strength and all-cause mortality was dose dependent (P value for trend <.01). CONCLUSION: Handgrip strength and chair-rise test performance predicted the risk of all-cause and CVD mortality independent of physical activity. Clinically feasible tests of skeletal muscle strength could increase the precision of prognosis, even in elderly women following current physical activity guidelines.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-6196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28473035 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1938  
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Author Moe, B.; Eilertsen, E.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title The combined effect of leisure-time physical activity and diabetes on cardiovascular mortality: the Nord-Trondelag Health (HUNT) cohort study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Diabetes Care Abbreviated Journal Diabetes Care  
  Volume 36 Issue 3 Pages 690-695  
  Keywords Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Diabetes Mellitus/*physiopathology; Female; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Motor Activity/*physiology; Norway; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine if leisure-time physical activity could cancel out the adverse effect of diabetes on cardiovascular mortality. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This study prospectively examined the combined effect of clinical diabetes and reported leisure-time physical activity on cardiovascular mortality. Data on 53,587 Norwegian men and women participating in the population-based Nord-Trondelag Health (HUNT) Study (1995-1997) were linked with the Cause of Death Registry at Statistics Norway. RESULTS: Overall, 1,716 people died of cardiovascular disease during follow-up through 2008. Compared with the reference group of 3,077 physically inactive people without diabetes, 121 inactive people with diabetes had an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 2.81 (95% CI 1.93-4.07). The HR (95% CI) among people who reported >/=3 h of light activity per week was 0.89 (0.48-1.63) if they had diabetes (n = 403) and 0.78 (0.63-0.96) if they did not (n = 17,714). Analyses stratified by total activity level showed a gradually weaker association of diabetes with mortality with increasing activity level (P(interaction) = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that even modest physical activity may cancel out the adverse impact of diabetes on cardiovascular mortality.  
  Address Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. borge.moe@svt.ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0149-5992 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23160724; PMC3579362 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1554  
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Author Moe, B.; Mork, P.J.; Holtermann, A.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title Occupational physical activity, metabolic syndrome and risk of death from all causes and cardiovascular disease in the HUNT 2 cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Occup Environ Med  
  Volume 70 Issue 2 Pages 86-90  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Epidemiologic Methods; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Humans; Lifting; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X/*mortality; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Diseases/*mortality; Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data; Walking/physiology  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To prospectively examine the independent and combined effect of occupational physical activity and metabolic syndrome on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a large population-based cohort. METHODS: Data on 37 300 men and women participating in the Norwegian HUNT Study (1995-1997) were linked with the Cause of Death Registry at Statistics Norway. Cox proportional HR with 95% CI were estimated. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 12.4 years, a total of 1168 persons died. Of these, 278 died from cardiovascular disease. Persons with metabolic syndrome and much walking/lifting at work had a HR of 1.79 (95% CI 1.20 to 2.66) for cardiovascular death referencing persons without metabolic syndrome and much walking/lifting. Using the same reference, persons with metabolic syndrome and sedentary work had a HR of 2.74 (95% CI 1.82 to 4.12) while persons with metabolic syndrome and heavy physical work had a HR of 3.02 (95% CI 1.93 to 4.75). Associations with all-cause mortality were somewhat weaker, and were largely due to deaths from cardiovascular disease. CONCLUSIONS: The association between metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular mortality is stronger for persons with sedentary work and with physically heavy work than for persons with much walking/lifting at work.  
  Address Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. borge.moe@svt.ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1351-0711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23022656 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1420  
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Author Nauman, J.; Nes, B.M.; Lavie, C.J.; Jackson, A.S.; Sui, X.; Coombes, J.S.; Blair, S.N.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Prediction of Cardiovascular Mortality by Estimated Cardiorespiratory Fitness Independent of Traditional Risk Factors: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc  
  Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 218-227  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; *Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Ischemia/mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Registries; Risk Factors; Stroke/mortality  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) and evaluate the additional contribution of traditional risk factors in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality prediction. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: The study included healthy men (n=18,721) and women (n=19,759) aged 30 to 74 years. A nonexercise algorithm estimated cardiorespiratory fitness. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the primary (CVD mortality) and secondary (all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and stroke mortality) end points. The added predictive value of traditional CVD risk factors was evaluated using the Harrell C statistic and net reclassification improvement. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 16.3 years (range, 0.04-17.4 years), there were 3863 deaths, including 1133 deaths from CVD (734 men and 399 women). Low eCRF was a strong predictor of CVD and all-cause mortality after adjusting for established risk factors. The C statistics for eCRF and CVD mortality were 0.848 (95% CI, 0.836-0.861) and 0.878 (95% CI, 0.862-0.894) for men and women, respectively, increasing to 0.851 (95% CI, 0.839-0.863) and 0.881 (95% CI, 0.865-0.897), respectively, when adding clinical variables. By adding clinical variables to eCRF, the net reclassification improvement of CVD mortality was 0.014 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.051) and 0.052 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.127) in men and women, respectively. CONCLUSION: Low eCRF is independently associated with CVD and all-cause mortality. The inclusion of traditional clinical CVD risk factors added little to risk discrimination and did not improve the classification of risk beyond this simple eCRF measurement, which may be proposed as a practical and cost-effective first-line approach in primary prevention settings.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-6196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27866655 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1963  
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Author Omland, T.; de Lemos, J.A.; Holmen, O.L.; Dalen, H.; Benth, J.S.; Nygard, S.; Hveem, K.; Rosjo, H.   
  Title Impact of Sex on the Prognostic Value of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin I in the General Population: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Clin Chem Abbreviated Journal Clinical chemistry  
  Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 646-656  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Biomarkers/blood; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; ROC Curve; Sex Factors; Troponin I/*blood; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: A new, high-sensitivity assay for cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI)11 permits evaluation of the prognostic value of cardiac troponins within the reference interval. Men have higher hs-cTnI concentrations than women, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms and prognostic implications are unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the potential impact of sex on the association between hs-cTnI and cardiovascular death. METHODS: By use of the Architect STAT High-Sensitive Troponin assay, we measured hs-cTnI in 4431 men and 5281 women aged >/=20 years participating in the prospective observational Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). RESULTS: hs-cTnI was detectable in 98.5% of men and 94.7% of women. During a mean follow-up period of 13.9 years, 708 cardiovascular deaths were registered. hs-cTnI was associated with the incidence of cardiovascular death [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per 1 SD in log hs-cTnI 1.23 (95% CI 1.15-1.31)], with higher relative risk in women than men [HR 1.44 (1.31-1.58) vs 1.10 (1.00-1.20); Pinteraction  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Division of Medicine and Center for Heart Failure Research and K.G. Jebsen Cardiac Research Centre a Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Omland2015 Serial 1851  
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Author Perreault, K.; Bauman, A.; Johnson, N.; Britton, A.; Rangul, V.; Stamatakis, E. url  doi
  Title Does physical activity moderate the association between alcohol drinking and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular diseases mortality? A pooled analysis of eight British population cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication British Journal of Sports Medicine Abbreviated Journal Br J Sports Med  
  Volume 51 Issue 8 Pages 651-657  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*adverse effects; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; England; *Exercise; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Mortality; Neoplasms/*mortality; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Cancer; Epidemiology; Physical activity; Public health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine whether physical activity (PA) moderates the association between alcohol intake and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mortality. DESIGN: Prospective study using 8 British population-based surveys, each linked to cause-specific mortality: Health Survey for England (1994, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004 and 2006) and Scottish Health Survey (1998 and 2003). PARTICIPANTS: 36 370 men and women aged 40 years and over were included with a corresponding 5735 deaths and a mean of 353 049 person-years of follow-up. EXPOSURES: 6 sex-specific categories of alcohol intake (UK units/week) were defined: (1) never drunk; (2) ex-drinkers; (3) occasional drinkers; (4) within guidelines (<14 (women); <21 (men)); (5) hazardous (14-35 (women); 21-49 (men)) and (6) harmful (>35 (women) >49 (men)). PA was categorised as inactive (</=7 MET-hour/week), active at the lower (>7.5 MET-hour/week) and upper (>15 MET-hour/week) of recommended levels. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Cox proportional-hazard models were used to examine associations between alcohol consumption and all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality risk after adjusting for several confounders. Stratified analyses were performed to evaluate mortality risks within each PA stratum. RESULTS: We found a direct association between alcohol consumption and cancer mortality risk starting from drinking within guidelines (HR (95% CI) hazardous drinking: 1.40 (1.11 to 1.78)). Stratified analyses showed that the association between alcohol intake and mortality risk was attenuated (all-cause) or nearly nullified (cancer) among individuals who met the PA recommendations (HR (95% CI)). CONCLUSIONS: Meeting the current PA public health recommendations offsets some of the cancer and all-cause mortality risk associated with alcohol drinking.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-3674 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27581162 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1970  
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