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Author Davies, S.J.C.; Bjerkeset, O.; Nutt, D.J.; Lewis, G. url  doi
  Title A U-shaped relationship between systolic blood pressure and panic symptoms: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Psychological Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychol Med  
  Volume 42 Issue 9 Pages 1969-1976  
  Keywords Anxiety Disorders/*epidemiology; *Blood Pressure; Comorbidity; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; *Panic; Panic Disorder/*epidemiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies on the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and psychological morbidity are conflicting. To resolve this confusing picture we examined the hypothesis that there is a non-linear relationship between panic and systolic BP (SBP) and explored the association of generalized anxiety symptoms with SBP. Method We used data from the population-based Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) in which all 92 936 individuals aged >/=20 years residing in one Norwegian county were invited to participate. Panic was assessed using one item from the anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and generalized anxiety with the remaining six items of this subscale. SBP was the mean of two measurements by an automatic device. RESULTS: A total of 64 871 respondents had SBP recorded (70%). Both unadjusted (n=61 408) and adjusted analyses provided evidence for a non-linear relationship between panic and SBP, represented by a U-shaped curve with a minimum prevalence of panic at around 140 mmHg. The relationship was strengthened after adjustment for confounders, with the quadratic term significantly associated with panic (p=0.03). Generalized anxiety symptoms were associated only with low SBP. CONCLUSIONS: The U-shaped relationship between SBP and panic provides a unifying explanation for the separate strands of published literature in this area. The results support the hypothesis that high BP and panic disorder could share brainstem autonomic and serotonergic abnormalities. By contrast, generalized anxiety symptoms were more common only at lower BPs, suggesting that any biological link between panic and high BP does not extend to generalized anxiety.  
  Address Academic Unit of Psychiatry, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. simon.davies@bristol.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-2917 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22251707 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1517  
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Author Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with adolescent chronic non-specific pain, chronic multisite pain, and chronic pain with high disability: the Young-HUNT Study 2008 Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Journal of Pain : Official Journal of the American Pain Society Abbreviated Journal J Pain  
  Volume 13 Issue 9 Pages 874-883  
  Keywords Adolescent; Anxiety/epidemiology; Chronic Pain/*epidemiology/*physiopathology/psychology; Depression/epidemiology; *Disabled Persons; Female; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Norway; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Prevalence; Psychology; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Factors  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the association of chronic pain with different lifestyle factors and psychological symptoms in a large, unselected adolescent population. Pain was evaluated as chronic non-specific pain, chronic multisite pain, and in additional analyses, chronic pain with high disability. The study was performed during 2006 to 2008 in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. Adolescents aged 13 to 18 years were invited to participate. The response rate was 78%. The final study population consisted of 7,373. Sedentary behavior and pain were associated only in girls. In both sexes, overweight and obesity were associated with increased odds of pain. Whereas both smoking and alcohol intoxication showed strong associations with pain, the associations were attenuated after adjustments for psychosocial factors. Symptoms of anxiety and depression showed the strongest associations with pain (odds ratio 4.1 in girls and 3.7 in boys). The odds of pain increased gradually by number of unfavorable lifestyle factors reported. This study revealed consistent associations between lifestyle factors, anxiety and depression, and chronic pain, including multisite pain and pain with high disability. The consistency across the different pain categories suggests common underlying explanatory mechanisms, and despite the cross-sectional design, the study indicates several modifiable targets in the management of adolescent chronic pain. PERSPECTIVE: This study showed a clear and consistent relation between different lifestyle factors, anxiety and depression, and the pain categories chronic non-specific pain, multisite pain, and also pain with high disability. Independent of causality, it underlines the importance of a broad perspective when studying, preventing, and treating chronic pain in adolescents.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. gry.b.hoftun@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1526-5900 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22832694 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1531  
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Author Storeng, S.H.; Sund, E.R.; Krokstad, S. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with basic and instrumental activities of daily living in elderly participants of a population-based survey: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages e018942  
  Keywords *Activities of Daily Living; Aged; Depression/epidemiology; Disabled Persons/*psychology; Exercise; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Services for the Aged/*statistics & numerical data; Health Status; *Health Surveys; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Quality of Life/*psychology; Self Report; Smoking/epidemiology; Social Participation/*psychology; *epidemiology; *public health; *social medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To investigate factors associated with the need for assistance in basic and instrumental activities of daily living in Norwegian elderly. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), a large population-based health survey in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 5050 individuals aged 60-69 years old at baseline in HUNT2 (1995-1997) who also participated in HUNT3 (2006-2008) were included in the study. 676/693 individuals were excluded in the analyses due to missing outcomes. OUTCOMES: Needing assistance in one or more basic or instrumental activities of daily living reported in HUNT3. RESULTS: In adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses, poor self-rated health and depression were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more basic activities of daily living in HUNT3, with ORs of 2.13 (1.35 to 3.38) and 1.58 (0.91 to 2.73). Poor self-rated health and poor life satisfaction were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more instrumental activities of daily living in HUNT3, with ORs of 2.30 (1.93 to 2.74) and 2.29 (1.86 to 2.81), respectively. Excessive sitting time, short or prolonged sleeping time, and physical inactivity seemed to be the most important lifestyle risk factors for basic/instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL) disability. The studied factors were, in general, greater risk factors for mortality during follow-up than for ADL/IADL disability. Smoking was the strongest risk factor for mortality during follow-up and non-participation in HUNT3. Smoking and low social participation were the strongest risk factors for non-participation in HUNT3. CONCLUSIONS: Subjective health perception, life satisfaction and depression were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more basic/instrumental activities of daily living later in life. These factors could be possible targets for prevention purposes.  
  Address Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29530908; PMCID:PMC5857703 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2175  
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