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Author Nilsen, S.M.; Ernstsen, L.; Krokstad, S.; Westin, S. url  doi
  Title Educational inequalities in disability pensioning – the impact of illness and occupational, psychosocial, and behavioural factors: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 133-141  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cost of Illness; *Disability Evaluation; Disabled Persons/*statistics & numerical data; *Educational Status; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Pensions/*statistics & numerical data; Proportional Hazards Models; Psychology; Sex Distribution; Socioeconomic Factors  
  Abstract AIMS: Socioeconomic inequalities in disability pensioning are well established, but we know little about the causes. The main aim of this study was to disentangle educational inequalities in disability pensioning in Norwegian women and men. METHODS: The baseline data consisted of 32,948 participants in the Norwegian Nord-Trondelag Health Study (1995-97), 25-66 years old, without disability pension, and in paid work. Additional analyses were made for housewives and unemployed/laid-off persons. Information on the occurrence of disability pension was obtained from the National Insurance Administration database up to 2008. Data analyses were performed using Cox regression. RESULTS: We found considerable educational inequalities in disability pensioning, and the incidence proportion by 2008 was higher in women (25-49 years 11%, 50-66 years 30%) than men (25-49 years 6%, 50-66 years 24%). Long-standing limiting illness and occupational, psychosocial, and behavioural factors were not sufficient to explain the educational inequalities: young men with primary education had a hazard ratio of 3.1 (95% CI 2.3-4.3) compared to young men with tertiary education. The corresponding numbers for young women were 2.7 (2.1-3.1). We found small educational inequalities in the oldest women in paid work and no inequalities in the oldest unemployed/laid-off women and housewives. CONCLUSIONS: Illness and occupational, psychosocial, and behavioural factors explained some of the educational inequalities in disability pensioning. However, considerable inequalities remain after accounting for these factors. The higher incidence of disability pensioning in women than men and the small or non-existing educational inequalities in the oldest women calls for a gender perspective in future research.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. sara.m.nilsen@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22314253 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1562  
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Author Stover, M.; Pape, K.; Johnsen, R.; Fleten, N.; Sund, E.R.; Ose, S.O.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Work environment and disability pension-- an 18-year follow-up study in a Norwegian working population Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 41 Issue 6 Pages 587-596  
  Keywords Adult; Disabled Persons/*statistics & numerical data; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Norway; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; *Social Environment; Socioeconomic Factors; *Workplace; Occupational Health; epidemiology; work disability; work environment; work exposures  
  Abstract AIMS: To investigate the associations between work environment indicators and health- related work disability. METHODS: A health survey of 5,749 working 40-42-year-old Norwegians from Nordland County were linked to a national register for disability pension during a follow-up of over 18 years. The risk for disability pension following various self-reported physical and psychosocial work environmental exposures (individual and cumulative) were estimated using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Both cumulative physical and psychosocial work environmental exposures were associated with an increased risk for disability pension, although this association was attenuated for most variables after adjusting for health and education. An increase in five poor psychosocial work environmental exposures was associated with a 22% increased risk for disability (adjusted hazard ratio, aHR, 1.22, 95% CI 1.04-1.44), whereas a similar increase in five poor physical work environmental exposures was associated with a 29% increased risk (aHR, 1.29, 95% CI 1.16-1.44). There were no indications of statistical interaction between either sex or education and work exposures. CONCLUSIONS: People who report a poor work environment are at a higher risk for subsequent work disability. This finding suggests that improving working conditions may be an area of intervention in order to reduce the number of people who leave the labour market with a disability pension.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Morten.stover@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23686367 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1396  
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Author Vie, G.A.; Romundstad, P.R.; Krokstad, S.; Johnsen, R.; Bjorngaard, J.H.   
  Title Mortality and work disability in a cohort of Norwegian couples-the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Eur J Public Health Abbreviated Journal European journal of public health  
  Volume 25 Issue 5 Pages 807-814  
  Keywords HUNT2; Adult; Aged; Disabled Persons/*statistics & numerical data; Educational Status; Employment/statistics & numerical data; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; *Mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Registries; Risk Factors; Smoking/epidemiology/mortality; Spouses/*statistics & numerical data  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Poor health is clustered in families, and partners might influence each other. We studied possible consequences of living with a spouse with poor health or unhealthy lifestyle on mortality and work disability. METHODS: In total, 18 943 couples from the HUNT2 Study (1995-97) were linked to national registries and followed until December 2007, identifying deaths and disability pension retirements. Couple's mean exposures were included together with the individual's deviation from the couple mean in discrete time multilevel logistic regression. RESULTS: There was weak evidence of associations between partner's health and risk of dying. Associations between couples slightly exceeded associations within couples for smoking [odds ratio (OR) within 1.57 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38-1.78); OR between 1.88 (95% CI: 1.70-2.08), P value for difference 0.027] and education [OR within 1.07 (95% CI: 0.99-1.15); OR between 1.17 (1.11-1.23), P value for difference 0.065]. Indicators of partner's health, such as self-rated health [OR within 3.17 (95% CI: 2.80-3.58); OR between 3.92 (95% CI: 3.50-4.40), P value for difference 0.014], insomnia [OR within 1.39 (95% CI: 1.18-1.64); OR between 2.11 (95% CI: 1.86-2.53), P value for difference  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication 1 Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Vie2015 Serial 1871  
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