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Author (up) Bhatta, L.; Leivseth, L.; Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Brumpton, B.M. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008: The HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Respiratory Medicine Abbreviated Journal Respir Med  
  Volume 138 Issue Pages 50-56  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Disease Progression; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology; Forecasting; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Distribution; Spirometry/methods; Vital Capacity/physiology; *Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; *Incidence; *Norway; *Prevalence; *Symptoms; *Trends  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across the world and new estimates of prevalence and trend are of great importance. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 in Norwegian adults >/=40 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: COPD was assessed using a fixed-ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) criteria. Pre-bronchodilator spirometry was performed during 1995-1997 (n=7158) and 2006-2008 (n=8788). The prevalence of COPD was weighted using the inverse probability of selection and predicted probability of response. RESULTS: The prevalence of pre-bronchodilator COPD was 16.7% in 1995-1997 and 14.8% in 2006-2008 using fixed-ratio criteria, and 10.4% in 1995-1997 and 7.3% in 2006-2008 using LLN criteria. The prevalence of LLN COPD was higher among men (13.0% in 1995-1997, 7.7% in 2006-2008) than women (8.0% in 1995-1997, 6.9% in 2006-2008). From 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, the prevalence decreased among men but remained relatively stable among women. Over the 11-year period, the cumulative incidence of pre-bronchodilator COPD using LLN criteria was 3.3% and 2.7% among men and women respectively. The prevalence of self-reported asthma and respiratory symptoms increased. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence declined in men but not in women from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, and was consistently higher among men than women.  
  Address Department of Thoracic Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-6111 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29724393 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2072  
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Author (up) Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) Abbreviated Journal Respirology  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 278-283  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*physiopathology; Cohort Studies; Disease Progression; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Physical Exertion; Sedentary Lifestyle; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vital Capacity; *forced expiratory volume in 1 s; *forced vital capacity; *leisure time; *peak expiratory flow; *prospective  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: People with asthma may seek advice about physical activity. However, the benefits of leisure time physical activity on lung function are unclear. We investigated the association between leisure time physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study in Norway, we used multiple linear regressions to estimate the annual mean decline in lung function (and 95% CI) in 1329 people with asthma over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. The durations of light and hard physical activity per week in the last year were collected by questionnaire. Inactive participants did not report any light or hard activity, while active participants reported light or hard activity. RESULTS: The mean decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was 37 mL/year among inactive participants and 32 mL/year in active participants (difference: -5 mL/year (95% CI: -13 to 3)). The mean decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 33 mL/year among inactive participants and 31 mL/year in active participants (difference: -2 mL/year (95% CI: -11 to 7)). The mean decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio was 0.36%/year among inactive participants and 0.22%/year in active participants (difference: -0.14%/year (95% CI: -0.27 to -0.01)). The mean decline in peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 14 mL/year among the inactive participants and 10 mL/year in active participants (difference: -4 mL/year (95% CI: -9 to 1)). CONCLUSION: We observed slightly less decline in lung function in physically active than inactive participants with asthma, particularly for FEV1 , FEV1 /FVC ratio and PEF.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1323-7799 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696634 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1892  
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Author (up) Gabin, J.M.; Tambs, K.; Saltvedt, I.; Sund, E.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title Association between blood pressure and Alzheimer disease measured up to 27 years prior to diagnosis: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alzheimer's Research & Therapy Abbreviated Journal Alzheimers Res Ther  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 37  
  Keywords Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alzheimer Disease/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Asymptomatic Diseases/*epidemiology; Blood Pressure Determination/statistics & numerical data; Comorbidity; Dementia/diagnosis/epidemiology; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*diagnostic imaging/*epidemiology; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sex Distribution; Alzheimer disease; Blood pressure; Epidemiology; Prospective case cohort; Risk factors; Vascular dementia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: A lot of attention has been paid to the relationship of blood pressure and dementia because epidemiological research has reported conflicting evidence. Observational data has shown that midlife hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia later in life, whereas there is evidence that low blood pressure is predictive in later life. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between dementia and blood pressure measured up to 27 years (mean 17.6 years) prior to ascertainment. METHODS: In Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, incident dementia data were collected during 1995-2011, and the diagnoses were validated by a panel of experts in the field. By using the subjects' personal identification numbers, the dementia data were linked to data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a large, population-based health study performed in 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) and 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). A total of 24,638 participants of the HUNT Study were included in the present study, 579 of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, or vascular dementia. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between dementia and blood pressure data from HUNT 1 and HUNT 2. RESULTS: Over the age of 60 years, consistent inverse associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and all-cause dementia, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease, but not with vascular dementia, when adjusting for age, sex, education, and other relevant covariates. This was observed for systolic blood pressure in both HUNT 1 and HUNT 2, regardless of antihypertensive medication use. There was an adverse association between systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and Alzheimer disease in individuals treated with antihypertensive medication under the age of 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our data are in line with those in previous studies demonstrating an inverse association between dementia and systolic blood pressure in individuals over the age of 60 years. We cannot exclude a survival effect, however. Among middle-aged subjects (<60 years), elevated systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were associated with eventual Alzheimer disease in individuals who reported using antihypertensive medication.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1758-9193 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28569205; PMCID:PMC5452294 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1900  
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