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Author Bhatta, L.; Leivseth, L.; Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Brumpton, B.M. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008: The HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Respiratory Medicine Abbreviated Journal Respir Med  
  Volume 138 Issue Pages 50-56  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Disease Progression; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology; Forecasting; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Distribution; Spirometry/methods; Vital Capacity/physiology; *Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; *Incidence; *Norway; *Prevalence; *Symptoms; *Trends  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across the world and new estimates of prevalence and trend are of great importance. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 in Norwegian adults >/=40 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: COPD was assessed using a fixed-ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) criteria. Pre-bronchodilator spirometry was performed during 1995-1997 (n=7158) and 2006-2008 (n=8788). The prevalence of COPD was weighted using the inverse probability of selection and predicted probability of response. RESULTS: The prevalence of pre-bronchodilator COPD was 16.7% in 1995-1997 and 14.8% in 2006-2008 using fixed-ratio criteria, and 10.4% in 1995-1997 and 7.3% in 2006-2008 using LLN criteria. The prevalence of LLN COPD was higher among men (13.0% in 1995-1997, 7.7% in 2006-2008) than women (8.0% in 1995-1997, 6.9% in 2006-2008). From 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, the prevalence decreased among men but remained relatively stable among women. Over the 11-year period, the cumulative incidence of pre-bronchodilator COPD using LLN criteria was 3.3% and 2.7% among men and women respectively. The prevalence of self-reported asthma and respiratory symptoms increased. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence declined in men but not in women from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, and was consistently higher among men than women.  
  Address Department of Thoracic Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-6111 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29724393 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2072  
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Author Borren, I.; Tambs, K.; Idstad, M.; Ask, H.; Sundet, J.M. url  doi
  Title Psychological distress and subjective well-being in partners of somatically ill or physically disabled: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Psychology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Psychol  
  Volume 53 Issue 6 Pages 475-482  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cross-Sectional Studies; Disabled Persons/*psychology; Family Characteristics; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Marriage/*psychology; *Mental Health; Middle Aged; Personal Satisfaction; Spouses/*psychology; Stress, Psychological/*psychology  
  Abstract This study investigated the cross-sectional associations between various somatic conditions in one partner and the level of distress and well-being in the spouse. The study is based on survey data from the Norwegian Nord-Trondelag Health Study, HUNT II (1995-1997). A sample of 9,797 married or cohabiting couples with valid data on subjective well-being (SWB), psychological distress (Hopkins Symptom Check List (SCL)-10) and somatic illness were identified. Regression analyses stratified by sex were conducted with SCL-10 and SWB scores as dependent variables and a joint somatic score as predictor, including; stroke, cancer, angina, myocardial infarction and physical disability (PD). The contribution of each somatic condition was also explored. Spouses of persons previously diagnosed with at least one somatic condition scored significantly lower on SWB and significantly higher on SCL-10 than spouses of healthy persons, though effect sizes were small. The effect seems to be at least partly mediated by the ill partner's psychological distress. Of the specific conditions, PD had the most significant contribution for both genders, though an association between male angina and spousal distress/SWB was also demonstrated.  
  Address Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. ingrid.borren@fhi.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5564 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23170864 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1509  
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Author Borte, S.; Winsvold, B.S.; Stensland, S.O.; Smastuen, M.C.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title The effect of foetal growth restriction on the development of migraine and tension-type headache in adulthood. The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175908  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Weight; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology/*etiology; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Logistic Models; Male; Migraine Disorders/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Tension-Type Headache/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about how factors early in life affect the development of migraine and tension-type headache. We aimed to examine whether growth restriction in utero is associated with development of migraine and frequent tension-type headache in adults. METHODS: The population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3) contained a validated headache questionnaire, which differentiated between migraine and tension-type headache. These data were linked to information on weight and gestational age at birth from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. In total 4557 females and 2789 males, aged 19-41 years, were included in this registry-based study. Participants were categorized as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, 10th-90th percentile), small for gestational age (SGA, 3rd-10th percentile) or very small for gestational age (VSGA, < 3rd percentile). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for migraine and tension-type headache, with exposure being growth restriction at birth. RESULTS: The effect of growth restriction on migraine was modified by sex, with a significant association in males (p<0.001), but not in females (p = 0.20). In particular, males born VSGA were at increased risk of developing migraine (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.63-4.58, p<0.001), with an intermediate risk among those born SGA (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.35, p = 0.08) compared to those born AGA. There was no significant association between growth restriction and frequent TTH (p = 0.051). CONCLUSION: Growth restriction was associated with increased risk of migraine in adulthood among males, but not among females. This suggests that migraine might, in part, be influenced by early life events, and that males seem to be particularly vulnerable.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28410431; PMCID:PMC5391957 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1885  
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Author de Ridder, K.; Pape, K.; Krokstad, S.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Health in adolescence and subsequent receipt of social insurance benefits – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen Abbreviated Journal Tidsskrift for den Norske laegeforening  
  Volume 135 Issue 10 Pages 942-948  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Cost of Illness; Female; Follow-Up Studies; *Health Status; Health Surveys; Humans; Insurance Benefits/statistics & numerical data; Insurance, Disability/*statistics & numerical data; Male; Norway; Registries; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors; Self Report; Sex Factors; Sick Leave; Social Security/*statistics & numerical data; Time Factors; Young Adult; Young-HUNT; HUNT2  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Long-term illness and work incapacity in young adulthood has consequences for both the individual and for society. The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between adolescent health and receipt of long-term sickness and disability benefits for young adults in their twenties. MATERIAL AND METHOD: An adolescent population of 8949 school students (aged 13-21 years) assessed their own health in the Young-HUNT1 Study (1995-1997). Health was measured by means of a questionnaire enquiring about chronic somatic illnesses, somatic symptoms, symptoms of anxiety and depression, sleep disturbance, poor concentration, self-reported health and smoking, and by measuring height and weight. Information about receipt of long-term benefits was retrieved from the FD-Trygd registry for the period 1998-2008 and defined as receipt of sickness benefit (>180 days/year), medical/vocational rehabilitation benefit and disability pension in the age group 20-29 years. We investigated the relationship between adolescent health and long-term social insurance benefits with logistic regression, adjusted for sex, age, follow-up time, mother's education and family composition. Siblings with different exposure and outcome were investigated to adjust for all familial factors shared by siblings. RESULTS: Each of the health measures was associated with an increased risk of long-term benefit. For example, adolescents who reported one or more somatic illnesses or poor concentration had a 5.4 and 3.4 percentage point higher risk, respectively, of receiving long-term benefits at the age of 20-29 years than adolescents who did not report somatic illness or poor concentration. Moreover the risk increased with an increase in the number of health problems. Sibling analyses supported these associations. INTERPRETATION: Health in adolescence is an indicator of increased vulnerability in the transition to the labour market. Preventing health selection during this transition should be a priority for welfare policy.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Institutt for samfunnsmedisin Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet og Folkehelseinstitutt, Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes de Ridder, KarinPape, KristineKrokstad, SteinarBjorngaard, Johan HakonengnorNorway2015/06/04 06:00Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Jun 2;135(10):942-8. doi: 10.4045/tidsskr.14.0261. eCollection 2015 Jun 2. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ deRidder2015 Serial 1802  
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Author Derdikman-Eiron, R.; Hjemdal, O.; Lydersen, S.; Bratberg, G.H.; Indredavik, M.S. url  doi
  Title Adolescent predictors and associates of psychosocial functioning in young men and women: 11 year follow-up findings from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Psychology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Psychol  
  Volume 54 Issue 2 Pages 95-101  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Anxiety/psychology; Depression/psychology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; *Mental Health; *Personal Satisfaction; Questionnaires; *Self Concept; Self Report; Sex Factors; *Social Adjustment; *Social Support; Socioeconomic Factors  
  Abstract The aim of this paper was to investigate whether psychosocial functioning in adulthood (e.g., friends support, cohabitation, community connectedness and work satisfaction) could be predicted by mental health, subjective well-being, social relations and behavior problems in adolescence, and whether gender was a moderator in these associations. Data were obtained from a major population-based Norwegian study, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), in which 517 men and 819 women completed an extensive self-report questionnaires at baseline (mean age 14.4 years) and at follow-up (mean age 26.9 years). Community connectedness as well as work satisfaction were predicted by subjective well-being. Cohabitation was predicted by male gender and frequency of meeting friends in adolescence, and friends support was predicted by frequency of meeting friends. Gender had a minor effect as a moderator. Frequency of meeting friends and subjective well-being seemed to be the strongest adolescent predictors of psychosocial functioning in young adulthood. These findings may have implications both for prevention and intervention in adolescence, as well as for future research.  
  Address The Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, RBUP, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. ruth.derdikman@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5564 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23350873 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1454  
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Author Derdikman-Eiron, R.; Indredavik, M.S.; Bakken, I.J.; Bratberg, G.H.; Hjemdal, O.; Colton, M. url  doi
  Title Gender differences in psychosocial functioning of adolescents with symptoms of anxiety and depression: longitudinal findings from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol  
  Volume 47 Issue 11 Pages 1855-1863  
  Keywords Adaptation, Psychological; Adolescent; Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology; Child Behavior Disorders/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology; Depression/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology; Depressive Disorder/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Norway; Personality Tests/statistics & numerical data; Quality of Life/psychology; Questionnaires; Self Concept; Sex Characteristics; Sex Factors; Social Adjustment  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To explore longitudinally gender differences in the associations between psychosocial functioning, subjective well-being and self-esteem among adolescents with and without symptoms of anxiety and depression. METHODS: Data were obtained from a major population-based Norwegian study, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, in which 1,092 boys and 1,262 girls (86% of all invited) completed an extensive self-report questionnaire at baseline (mean age 14.4 years) and at follow-up (mean age 18.4 years). RESULTS: Gender was a moderator variable in the associations between symptoms of anxiety and depression and impairment, meaning that boys' functioning was impaired to a larger extent than girls' functioning. A statistically significant interaction effect between gender and symptoms of anxiety and depression was found at follow-up in terms of subjective well-being (p < 0.05), self-esteem (p < 0.05), academic problems (p < 0.01), behaviour problems (p < 0.01) and frequency of meeting friends (p < 0.001). Onset of symptoms between baseline and follow-up was associated with less frequent meetings with friends among boys, but not among girls. After remission of symptoms, boys still had more behaviour and academic problems, less frequently met friends and reported lower subjective well-being and self-esteem than boys who had no symptoms at both time points. No similar differences were found among the girls. CONCLUSION: Previous and ongoing symptoms of anxiety and depression had more negative consequences for boys than for girls. These findings may contribute to improved assessment and intervention methods tailored differently for each gender.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, The Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (RBUP), Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491, Trondheim, Norway. ruth.derdikman@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0933-7954 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22382555 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1521  
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Author Fossa, S.D.; Dahl, A.A.; Langhammer, A.; Weedon-Fekjaer, H. url  doi
  Title Cancer patients' participation in population-based health surveys: findings from the HUNT studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Res Notes Abbreviated Journal BMC research notes  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages 649  
  Keywords HUNT1; HUNT2; HUNT3; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Health Surveys/*methods/*statistics & numerical data; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasms/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Patient Participation/*statistics & numerical data; Registries/statistics & numerical data; Sex Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The magnitude of participation bias due to non-participation should be considered for cancer patients invited to population-based surveys. We studied participation rates among persons with and without cancer in a large population based study, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). METHODS: Citizens 20 years or above living in the Nord-Trondelag County of Norway have been invited three times to comprehensive health surveys. The invitation files with data on sex, invitation date and participation were linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. In a first step unadjusted crude participation rates (participants/invited persons) were estimated for cancer patients (CaPts) and non-cancer persons (NonCaPers), followed by logistic regression analyses with adjustment for age and sex. To evaluate the “practical” significance of the estimated odds ratios in the cancer diagnosis group, relative risks were also estimated comparing the observed rates to the estimated rates under the counterfactual assumption of no earlier cancer diagnosis among CaPts. RESULTS: Overall 3 % of the participants in the three HUNT studies were CaPts and 59 % of them had been diagnosed with their first life-time cancer >5 years prior to each survey. In each of the three HUNT surveys crude participation rates were similar for CaPts and NonCaPers. Adjusted for sex and age, CaPts' likelihood to participate in HUNT1 (1984-86) and HUNT2 (1995-97), but not in HUNT3 (2006-2008), was statistically significantly reduced compared to NonCaPers, equaling a relative risk of 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The lowest odds ratio emerged for CaPts diagnosed during the last 2 years preceding a HUNT invitation. Only one-third of CaPts participating in a survey also participated in the subsequent survey compared to approximately two-thirds of NonCaPers, and 11 % of CaPts participated in all three HUNT surveys compared to 37 % of NonCaPers. CONCLUSION: In the three HUNT surveys no or only minor participation bias exist as to CaPts' participation rates. In longitudinal studies selection bias as to long-term cancer survivorship should be taken into account, the percentage of repeatedly participating CaPts diminishing more strongly than among NonCaPers.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication National Advisory Unit for Late Effects after Cancer Therapy, Oslo University Hospital, Radium Hospi Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Fossa, Sophie DDahl, Alv ALanghammer, ArnulfWeedon-Fekjaer, HaraldengEngland2015/11/07 06:00BMC Res Notes. 2015 Nov 5;8:649. doi: 10.1186/s13104-015-1635-5. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Fossa2015 Serial 1809  
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Author Gudmundsdottir, S.L.; Flanders, W.D.; Augestad, L.B. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and age at menopause: the Nord-Trondelag population-based health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society Abbreviated Journal Climacteric  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 78-87  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Confidence Intervals; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; Logistic Models; *Menopause; Middle Aged; Motor Activity/*physiology; Norway; Odds Ratio; Proportional Hazards Models; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Age at menopause may affect women's subsequent morbidity and mortality. In contrast to numerous other health outcomes, little is known about the possible effects of physical activity on age at menopause. OBJECTIVES: To assess the relationship between leisure-time physical activity and age at menopause. METHODS: Premenopausal women participating in a population-based health survey (HUNT 2) conducted in the county of Nord-Trondelag, Norway reported their physical activity in the period of 1995-1997. Age at menopause was reported during 2006-2008 (HUNT 3). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios for menopause and logistic regression to estimate odds ratios for early menopause, with 95% confidence intervals, adjusting for age at menarche, parity, use of oral contraceptives prior to the 6 months preceding participation in HUNT 2, symptoms of depression, smoking status, and education. RESULTS: Women aged 40-49 years at baseline had lower hazard ratios for menopause when participating in any light leisure-time physical activity compared with no activity (p < 0.05) and similar results were observed in 19-39-year-olds. In 50-59-year-old women, the results varied greatly and did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of leisure-time physical activity on age at menopause may be age-dependent. We found indications of earlier menopause for the least active women aged 19-49 years at baseline.  
  Address Department of Human Movement Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1369-7137 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22339441 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1449  
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Author Gudmundsdottir, S.L.; Flanders, W.D.; Augestad, L.B. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and cardiovascular risk factors at menopause: the Nord-Trondelag health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society Abbreviated Journal Climacteric  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 438-446  
  Keywords Adult; Blood Glucose/analysis; Blood Pressure; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology; Cholesterol, HDL/blood; *Exercise; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; *Menopause; Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Premenopause/physiology; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Triglycerides/blood; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Lowered physical activity levels may partially explain changes in metabolic risk factors in women after menopause. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the association between physical activity and metabolic risk factors at baseline and after 11 years, as well as the change in that association over time in women who were premenopausal and >/= 40 years at baseline. METHODS: Subjects in a Norwegian population-based health survey answered questionnaires and had body and serum measurements during 1995-1997 (HUNT 2) and in a follow-up study during 2006-2008 (HUNT 3). Repeated-measures analyses were used to estimate the association between physical activity and metabolic factors, adjusting for age, smoking status, education, alcohol intake, and parity. Adjustment for hormonal treatment and medication was made, as appropriate. RESULTS: In women remaining premenopausal, a higher physical activity score in HUNT 3 was associated with lower weight (p < 0.01) and waist-hip ratio (p < 0.01) and higher high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in HUNT 3 (p < 0.01). In women that were postmenopausal by the time of follow-up, a higher physical activity score in HUNT 3 was associated with lower weight (p < 0.01), waist-hip ratio (p < 0.01), triglycerides (p < 0.01), and higher total cholesterol (p < 0.05), HDL cholesterol (p < 0.01), and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.05) in HUNT 3. The association of total physical activity score with weight and waist-hip ratio was stronger in HUNT 3 than in HUNT 2 (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Increased physical activity may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes and use of pharmacological management in women of menopausal age.  
  Address Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1369-7137 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23347190 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1450  
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Author Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult: family linkage data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication JAMA Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal JAMA Pediatr  
  Volume 167 Issue 1 Pages 61-69  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Chronic Pain/economics/*etiology/psychology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Family/psychology; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Norway; Odds Ratio; *Parents/psychology; Psychology; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine a possible association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult and to explore whether a relationship could be explained by socioeconomic and psychosocial factors or may be affected by differences in family structure. DESIGN: Unselected, population-based, cross-sectional study. SETTING: Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. PARTICIPANTS: All inhabitants of Nord-Trondelag County who were 13 years or older were invited to enroll in the study. In total, 8200 of 10 485 invitees (78.2%) participated in the investigation. Among 7913 participants in the target age group (age range, 13-18 years), 7373 (93.2%) completed the pain questions. The final study population consisted of 5370 adolescents or young adults for whom one or both parents participated in the adult survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was chronic nonspecific pain in adolescents and young adults, defined as pain in at least 1 location, unrelated to any known disease or injury, experienced at least once a week during the past 3 months. Chronic multisite pain was defined as chronic pain in at least 3 locations. RESULTS: Maternal chronic pain was associated with chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.8). Paternal chronic pain was associated with increased odds of pain in adolescents and young adults. The odds of chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults increased when both parents reported pain. Adjustments for socioeconomic and psychosocial factors did not change the results, although differences in family structure did. Among offspring living primarily with their mothers, clear associations were observed between maternal pain and pain in adolescents and young adults, but no association was found with paternal pain. CONCLUSIONS: Parental chronic pain is associated with chronic nonspecific pain and especially with chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults. Family structure influences the relationship, indicating that family pain models and shared environmental factors are important in the origin of chronic pain.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. gry.b.hoftun@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23403843 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1441  
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Author Holseter, C.; Dalen, J.D.; Krokstad, S.; Eikemo, T.A. url  doi
  Title Self-rated health and mortality in different occupational classes and income groups in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Tidsskrift for den Norske Laegeforening : Tidsskrift for Praktisk Medicin, ny Raekke Abbreviated Journal Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen  
  Volume 135 Issue 5 Pages 434-438  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Follow-Up Studies; *Health Status; Health Status Disparities; Health Surveys; Humans; Income; Male; Middle Aged; *Mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Occupations; Proportional Hazards Models; *Self Report; *Social Class; Socioeconomic Factors; Unemployment; HUNT1  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: People with a lower socioeconomic position have a higher the prevalence of most self-rated health problems. In this article we ask whether this may be attributed to self-rated health not reflecting actual health, understood as mortality, in different socioeconomic groups. MATERIAL AND METHOD: For the study we used data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 1984-86 (HUNT1), in which the county's entire adult population aged 20 years and above were invited to participate. The association between self-rated health and mortality in different occupational classes and income groups was analysed. The analysis corrected for age, chronic disease, functional impairment and lifestyle factors. RESULTS: The association between self-rated health and mortality was of the same order of magnitude for the occupational classes and income groups, but persons without work/income and with poor self-rated health stood out. Compared with persons in the highest socioeconomic class, unemployed men had a hazard ratio for death that was three times higher in the follow-up period. For women with no income, the ratio was twice as high. INTERPRETATION Self-rated health and mortality largely conform to the different socioeconomic strata. This supports the perception that socioeconomic differences in health are a reality and represent a significant challenge nationally. Our results also increase the credibility of findings from other studies that use self-reported health in surveys to measure differences and identify the mechanisms that create them.  
  Address Institutt for sosiologi og statsvitenskap Fakultet for samfunnsvitenskap og teknologiledelse Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Norwegian Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-2001 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25761028 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1713  
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Author Johansen, A.; Holmen, J.; Stewart, R.; Bjerkeset, O. url  doi
  Title Anxiety and depression symptoms in arterial hypertension: the influence of antihypertensive treatment. the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 63-72  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Antihypertensive Agents/*adverse effects/therapeutic use; Anxiety/*chemically induced/complications; Blood Pressure Determination; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/*chemically induced/complications; Drug Therapy, Combination; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Hypertension/complications/*drug therapy/psychology; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Odds Ratio; Self Report  
  Abstract Antihypertensive drugs have been suggested to modulate symptoms of depression and anxiety. It is disputed whether this is due to the hypertension per se, its treatment, or both. The aim of this study was to investigate these associations in a large population sample. 55,472 participants in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2, 1995-1997), Norway, who completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression rating Scale, were divided into 3 groups according to their diastolic blood pressure and antihypertensive treatment status. A cut-off of >/=90 mmHg diastolic blood pressure was used to identify hypertensive status. Differences in anxiety and depression symptom levels in untreated and treated hypertensives (all treatments) versus the normotensive reference group were explained by differences in age and gender distribution in the three groups in this study. However, the receipt of two or more antihypertensive drugs was associated with depressive symptoms alone (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.03-1.90), but not with symptoms of anxiety (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.83-1.57) or mixed anxiety and depression (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.82-1.72) in the fully adjusted model, compared to untreated hypertension. Antihypertensive monotherapy (all agents) nor any single antihypertensive drug class were associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety, or mixed anxiety and depression. There may be a positive association between multi antihypertensive drug use and symptoms of depression, whereas this was not found in persons with symptoms of anxiety or mixed anxiety and depression. This might reflect poor antihypertensive treatment adherence leading to polypharmacy, or other unfavorable health behaviors in people with symptoms of pure depression.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22183137 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1533  
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Author Jorgensen, P.; Langhammer, A.; Krokstad, S.; Forsmo, S. url  doi
  Title Diagnostic labelling influences self-rated health. A prospective cohort study: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Fam Pract Abbreviated Journal Family practice  
  Volume 32 Issue 5 Pages 492-499  
  Keywords HUNT2; HUNT3; Adult; Aged; Diabetes Mellitus/*psychology; *Diagnostic Self Evaluation; Female; Follow-Up Studies; *Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; *Health Status; Health Surveys; Humans; Hypertension/*psychology; Hypothyroidism/*psychology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Prospective Studies; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Studies have shown an independent association between poor self-rated health (SRH) and increased mortality. Few studies, however, have investigated any possible impact on SRH of diagnostic labelling. OBJECTIVE: To test whether SRH differed in persons with known and unknown hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus (DM) or hypertension, opposed to persons without these conditions, after 11-year follow-up. METHODS: Prospective population-based cohort study in North-Trondelag County, Norway, HUNT2 (1995-97) to HUNT3 (2006-08). All inhabitants aged 20 years and older were invited. The response rate was 69.5% in HUNT2 and 54.1% in HUNT3. In total, 34144 persons aged 20-70 years were included in the study population. The outcome was poor SRH. RESULTS: Persons with known disease had an increased odds ratio (OR) to report poor SRH at follow-up; figures ranging from 1.11 (0.68-1.79) to 2.52 (1.46-4.34) (men with hypothyroidism kept out owing to too few numbers). However, in persons not reporting, but having laboratory results indicating these diseases (unknown disease), no corresponding associations with SRH were found. Contrary, the OR for poor SRH in women with unknown hypothyroidism and unknown hypertension was 0.64 (0.38-1.06) and 0.89 (0.79-1.01), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Awareness opposed to ignorance of hypothyroidism, DM and hypertension seemed to be associated with poor perceived health, suggesting that diagnostic labelling could have a negative effect on SRH. This relationship needs to be tested more thoroughly in future research but should be kept in mind regarding the benefits of early diagnosing of diseases.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 74 Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Jorgensen, PalLanghammer, ArnulfKrokstad, SteinarForsmo, SiriengEngland2015/08/05 06:00Fam Pract. 2015 Oct;32(5):492-9. doi: 10.1093/fampra/cmv065. Epub 2015 Aug 3. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Jorgensen2015 Serial 1828  
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Author Kaasboll, J.; Lydersen, S.; Indredavik, M.S. url  doi
  Title Psychological symptoms in children of parents with chronic pain-the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 153 Issue 5 Pages 1054-1062  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adolescent Behavior/psychology; Anxiety/*diagnosis/psychology; Child of Impaired Parents/*psychology; Chronic Pain/*psychology; Depression/*diagnosis/psychology; Female; Health Status; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Norway; Questionnaires; Sex Factors  
  Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between parental chronic pain and anxiety, depression, and conduct problems in adolescents. The current study was based on cross-sectional surveys performed during 2006 to 2008 from the Nord Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3 and Young-HUNT 3). The sample consisted of 3227 adolescents aged 13 to 18 years for whom information was available on parental chronic pain and health statuses. Separate analyses were conducted for girls and boys. The results indicated that if both parents experienced chronic pain, there was an increased risk of symptoms of anxiety and depression in girls (OR=2.17, CI=1.36-3.45, P=.001) and boys (OR=2.33, CI=1.17-4.63, P=.016) compared with children for whom neither parent had chronic pain. Girls had an increased risk of conduct problems in school if their mothers had chronic pain (OR=1.33, CI=1.02-1.74, P=.034). These results remained after adjusting for the possible effects of confounding factors and parental mental health. The results suggest that the presence of both maternal and paternal chronic pain is a high risk factor for internalizing symptoms in both girls and boys. The present study offers insights that should prove useful in clinical work and further large-scale research.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. jannike.kaasboll@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22444189 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1535  
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Author Knudsen, A.K.; Skogen, J.C. url  doi
  Title Monthly variations in self-report of time-specified and typical alcohol use: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3) Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC public health  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 172  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*epidemiology; *Alcoholic Beverages; Bias (Epidemiology); Data Collection/*standards; Female; Health Surveys/*standards; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Research Design; Risk Factors; Seasons; Self Report; Time Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Aggregated measures are often employed when prevalence, risk factors and consequences of alcohol use in the population are monitored. In order to avoid time-dependent bias in aggregated measures, reference periods which assess alcohol use over longer time-periods or measures assessing typical alcohol use are considered superior to reference periods assessing recent or current alcohol consumption. Alcohol consumption in the population is found to vary through the months of the year, but it is not known whether monthly variations in actual alcohol use affects self-reports of long-term or typical alcohol consumption. Using data from a large, population-based study with data-collection over two years, the aim of the present study was to examine whether self-reported measures of alcohol use with different reference periods fluctuated across the months of the year. METHODS: Participants in the third wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Survey (HUNT3) answered questions regarding alcohol use in the last 4 weeks, weekly alcohol consumption last twelve months, typical weekly binge drinking and typical number of alcoholic drinks consumed in a 14 day period. For each of the alcohol measures, monthly variations in reporting were estimated and compared to the overall average. RESULTS: Monthly variations in self-reported alcohol use were found across all alcohol measures regardless of reference period. A general tendency was found for highest level of alcohol use being reported during the summer season, however, the highest number of individuals who reported alcohol use in the last 4 weeks was found in January. Women reported substantially larger increase in weekly binge drinking during the summer months than men. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reports of alcohol use over longer time and typical alcohol use varies according to the month the respondents are assessed. Monthly variations should therefore be taken into account when designing, analyzing and interpreting data from population-based studies aimed to examine descriptive and analytical characteristics of alcohol use in the population.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Health Registries, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Kalfarveien 31, 5018, Bergen, Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Knudsen, Ann KristinSkogen, Jens ChristofferengEngland2015/04/18 06:00BMC Public Health. 2015 Feb 21;15:172. doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-1533-8. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Knudsen2015 Serial 1832  
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Author Lie, T.M.; Bomme, M.; Hveem, K.; Hansen, J.M.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title Snus and risk of gastroesophageal reflux. A population-based case-control study: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 193-198  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/*epidemiology; Heartburn/etiology; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Tobacco Use/*epidemiology; Tobacco, Smokeless/*adverse effects; Young Adult; Health surveys; oral tobacco; smokeless tobacco; snuff  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Tobacco smoking is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux, but whether other tobacco products increase the risk is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if snus increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was based on the third Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT3), a population-based study of all adult residents in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, performed in 2006-2009. The association between self-reported severe heartburn/regurgitation and snus use was assessed by logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared to never snus users, daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS (OR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.93), while previous snus users and those using <2 boxes of snus/month had an increased risk (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.46 and OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, respectively). There was no association between age when starting using snus and GERS. Snus users who started using snus to quit or cut down on cigarette smoking, who started using both snus and cigarettes or cigarettes alone had an increased risk of GERS. Snus users <30 years of age had an increased risk of GERS (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.16), while those aged between 50-60 and 60-70 years had a reduced risk (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93 and OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28-0.94, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS. However, previous snus users and subgroups of snus users had an increased risk of GERS indicating reverse causality, such that snus use could increase the risk of GERS.  
  Address d Department of Medicine , Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust , Levanger , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5521 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27797289 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1942  
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Author Linde, M.; Langnes, H.A.; Hagen, K.; Bergh, K.; Stovner, L.J. url  doi
  Title No increase in headache after previous intracranial infections: a historical cohort study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication European Journal of Neurology : the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurol  
  Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 324-331  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Central Nervous System Infections/*complications; Cohort Studies; Female; Headache/diagnosis/*epidemiology/*etiology; Health Surveys; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Prevalence; Questionnaires  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Despite the absence of robust scientific evidence, it is today generally accepted that the acute headache typical for intracranial infections can develop into permanent headache complaints. This widespread concept was explored in the first, large, longitudinal, population-based study. METHODS: Data on confirmed exposure to intracranial infections amongst all adult inhabitants in a geographical area during a 20-year period were assembled from hospital records. Surviving individuals were later invited to the third Nord-Trondelag Health Survey (HUNT 3), where 39,690 (42%) of 94,194 invited inhabitants aged >/=20 years responded to a validated headache questionnaire. Using logistic regression, the 1-year prevalence of headache and its subtypes according to the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society was assessed and compared between those with and without previous confirmed intracranial infection. Age and sex were used as covariates. RESULTS: Overall, 43 participants were identified with earlier intracranial infection, whereof three had more than one infection: bacterial meningitis (n=19), lymphocytic meningitis (n=18), encephalitis (n=9), and brain abscess (n=1).The mean interval from infection to participation in HUNT 3 was 11.2 (range 1.5-19.7) years. There was no significant increase in the prevalence of headache (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.58-2.07), its subtypes (migraine, or tension-type headache), or chronic daily headache (OR 1.85, 95% CI 0.45-7.68) amongst participants with previous intracranial infection compared with the surrounding population. CONCLUSIONS: This study challenges the existence of chronic post-bacterial meningitis headache and does not indicate the presence of other long-term headaches induced by intracranial infection.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. mattias.linde@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1351-5101 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21951375 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1545  
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Author Lonnee-Hoffmann, R.A.; Salvesen, O.; Morkved, S.; Schei, B.   
  Title Self-reported pelvic organ prolapse surgery, prevalence, and nonobstetric risk factors: findings from the Nord Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Int Urogynecol J Abbreviated Journal International urogynecology journal  
  Volume 26 Issue 3 Pages 407-414  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Asthma/epidemiology; Body Mass Index; Constipation/epidemiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Lifting; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Occupations; Pelvic Organ Prolapse/*epidemiology/*surgery; Prevalence; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Self Report; Smoking/epidemiology  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and risk factors of self-reported pelvic organ prolapse (POP) surgery in a Nordic county. METHODS: We assessed cross-sectional data collection from participants in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study in 2006-2008. All women in the county >/=30 years were eligible, of whom 20,285 (50.3 %) responded by completing questionnaires and attending screening stations. Outcome measures were self-reported POP surgery, age at survey, sociodemographic factors, and information on selected risk factors for POP: self-reported smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, constipation a decade prior, and measured body mass index (BMI). Descriptive statistics, Kaplan-Meier estimates, and multivariate logistic regression were used. Statistical significance was defined as p  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Po Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Lonnee-Hoffmann2015a Serial 1842  
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Author Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title Cross-sectional and prospective cohort study of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and obesity in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 175 Issue 10 Pages 1029-1036  
  Keywords Adult; Biological Markers/blood; Body Mass Index; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Hydroxycholecalciferols/blood/*deficiency; Incidence; Linear Models; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/blood/epidemiology/*etiology; Odds Ratio; Prevalence; Prospective Studies; Vitamin D Deficiency/blood/*complications; Waist Circumference  
  Abstract Experimental studies suggest that vitamin D modulates the activity of adipocytes. The authors examined baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level in relation to prevalent and cumulative incident obesity in Norway. A cohort of 25,616 adults aged 19-55 years participated in both the second and third surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008)). Serum 25(OH)D levels measured at baseline and anthropometric measurements taken at both baseline and follow-up were available for a random sample of 2,460 subjects. Overall, 40% of the 2,460 subjects had a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L, and 37% had a level of 50.0-74.9 nmol/L. The prevalence and cumulative incidence of obesity, defined as body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) >/=30, were 12% and 15%, respectively. Lower serum 25(OH)D level was associated with a higher prevalence of obesity. In the 2,165 subjects with baseline BMI less than 30, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was associated with a significantly increased odds ratio for incident obesity during follow-up (adjusted odds ratio = 1.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.24, 2.41). When prevalent and incident obesity were classified according to waist circumference (>/=88 cm for women, >/=102 cm for men), similar results were obtained. In addition to prevalent obesity, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was significantly associated with new-onset obesity in adults.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. xiao-mei.mai@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22312120 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1551  
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Author Michelsen, T.M.; Dorum, A.; Cvancarova, M.; Liavaag, A.H.; Dahl, A.A. url  doi
  Title Association between hysterectomy with ovarian preservation and cardiovascular disease in a Norwegian population-based sample Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation Abbreviated Journal Gynecol Obstet Invest  
  Volume 75 Issue 1 Pages 61-67  
  Keywords Aged; Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use; Body Mass Index; Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology; Female; Health Surveys; Hormone Replacement Therapy/utilization; Humans; Hysterectomy/*statistics & numerical data; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Ovariectomy; Prevalence; Questionnaires; Risk Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND/AIMS: Some previous studies have reported that hysterectomy predicts increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, but the findings are disputed. We aimed to examine associations between hysterectomy and cardiovascular disease in a Norwegian cross-sectional health study. METHODS: The data were obtained from the population-based cross-sectional Nord-Trondelag Health Study (The HUNT-2 Study). Of 46,709 invited females, 35,280 (76%) participated; 939 (3%) reported hysterectomy without oophorectomy (exposed women). Each exposed woman was age-matched with four randomly chosen women (n = 3,756) without hysterectomy or oophorectomy. Oophorectomy and hysterectomy status was self-reported by the women. Hazard ratio for cardiovascular diseases was calculated by Cox regression analyses with hysterectomy as a time-dependent covariate. RESULTS: Median time since hysterectomy was 14 years (range 0-56 years). We calculated a significantly larger cumulative probability of cardiovascular diseases after hysterectomy with a hazard ratio of 1.92, 95% CI (1.51-2.38) after adjustments for cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes, age, use of hormonal replacement therapy and positive family history of myocardial infarction). CONCLUSION: Women had a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular diseases after hysterectomy compared to age-matched controls. Studies with longitudinal design and confirmed medical outcome data are needed.  
  Address Section for Obstetrics, Rikshospitalet, Women and Children's Division, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. trond.melbye.michelsen @ rikshospitalet.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0378-7346 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23220872 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1423  
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Author Moe, B.; Nilsen, T.I.   
  Title Cancer risk in people with diabetes: Does physical activity and adiposity modify the association? Prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Diabetes Complications Abbreviated Journal Journal of diabetes and its complications  
  Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 176-179  
  Keywords *Adiposity; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Body Mass Index; Cohort Studies; Diabetes Complications/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Motor Activity; Neoplasms/complications/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*physiopathology; Overweight/*physiopathology; Prevalence; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Young Adult; Cancer risk; Diabetes; Epidemiology; Leisure time physical exercise  
  Abstract AIMS: To examine whether physical activity and adiposity modify the increased risk of cancer associated with diabetes. METHODS: We prospectively examined the association of diabetes and risk of cancer among 73,726 persons stratified by physical activity and body mass index (BMI). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from Cox regression. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 22.0 years, 9572 people were diagnosed with incident cancer. There was no clear association between diabetes and cancer risk in those reporting high levels of physical activity (>/=2.0h per week) (HR 0.93; 95% CI: 0.70-1.24) or those with a normal weight (BMI  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Tr Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Moe2015b Serial 1847  
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Author Myklestad, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Magnussen, E.B.; Salvesen, K.A.; Smith, G.D.; Romundstad, P.R. url  doi
  Title Offspring birth weight and cardiovascular risk in parents: a population-based HUNT 2 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 175 Issue 6 Pages 546-555  
  Keywords Adult; *Birth Weight; Blood Glucose/metabolism; Blood Pressure; Body Mass Index; Cardiovascular Diseases/*genetics; Female; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; *Infant, Low Birth Weight; Infant, Newborn; Lipids/blood; Male; Models, Statistical; Norway; *Parents; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Waist Circumference  
  Abstract Low birth weight is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in later life. The fetal insulin hypothesis suggests that shared genetic factors partly explain this association. If fetal genes predispose to both low birth weight and cardiovascular disease in adulthood, fathers of offspring with low birth weight should display an unfavorable profile of cardiovascular risk factors. To study this, the authors linked data on more than 14,000 parents, collected from the second Health Study of Nord Trondelag County, Norway (HUNT 2, 1995-1997), to offspring data from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry (1967-2005). Linear regression was used to study associations of offspring birth weight for gestational age with the parents' body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, and serum lipids. All analyses were adjusted for shared environment by means of the socioeconomic measures, lifestyle, and cardiovascular risk factors of the partner. The authors found that low offspring birth weight for gestational age was associated with increased paternal blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and unfavorable levels of glucose and lipids. For mothers, associations similar to those for fathers were found for blood pressure, whereas associations in the opposite direction were found for glucose, lipids, and body mass index. The paternal findings strengthen the genetic hypothesis.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norways. kirsti.myklestad@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22328703 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1556  
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Author Myrtveit, S.M.; Wilhelmsen, I.; Petrie, K.J.; Skogen, J.C.; Sivertsen, B. url  doi
  Title What characterizes individuals developing chronic whiplash?: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Psychosomatic Research Abbreviated Journal J Psychosom Res  
  Volume 74 Issue 5 Pages 393-400  
  Keywords Adaptation, Psychological; Adult; Aged; Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis/psychology; Chronic Disease; Cohort Studies; Compensation and Redress; Female; Health Services/utilization; Health Surveys; Humans; Illness Behavior; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Pain Measurement/psychology; Prescription Drugs/therapeutic use; Prognosis; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Somatoform Disorders/diagnosis/psychology; Utilization Review; Whiplash Injuries/*diagnosis/*psychology; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Most individuals experiencing whiplash accidents recover rapidly. A considerable proportion, however, develop chronic symptoms. Psychological factors may slow recovery, possibly by increasing the likelihood of other symptoms being misattributed to, and amplified by the whiplash injury. We aimed to investigate how pre-injury mental and somatic symptoms, self-rated health, use of health-services and medications, health-behavior and socio-demographics predict the development of chronic whiplash. METHODS: Data from two waves of a large, population based study (HUNT2 (baseline) and HUNT3) were used. Individuals reporting no whiplash at baseline were identified in HUNT3. Characteristics reported at baseline were compared between those who had developed chronic whiplash in HUNT3 (n=199) and those who had not (n=20,600), using Pearson's chi-squared tests, independent sample t-tests and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Individuals developing chronic whiplash reported worse baseline health than those reporting no chronic whiplash. Poor self-rated health was a strong risk factor for subsequent chronic whiplash (OR=2.26, 95%CI: 1.68-3.04). Musculoskeletal pain also increased the risk (OR=1.21, 95%CI: 1.15-1.26), as did diffuse somatic symptoms (OR=2.09, 95%CI: 1.47-2.96), use of different health services (OR=1.31, 95%CI: 1.19-1.45), high use of medications (OR=1.28, 95%CI: 1.14-1.43) and symptoms of anxiety (OR=1.93, 95%CI: 1.39-2.68). Physical activity was protective (OR=0.67, 95%CI: 0.49-0.91). Most socio-demographic variables were not significantly associated with chronic whiplash. CONCLUSION: Poor somatic and mental pre-injury health increased the risk of subsequent chronic whiplash. This suggests that chronic whiplash is not merely an organic disorder, and highlights the importance of individual expectations, symptom reattribution and amplification in development of chronic whiplash.  
  Address Department of Clinical Medicine II, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. makalani.myrtveit@med.uib.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3999 ISBN Medium