toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Borte, S.; Winsvold, B.S.; Stensland, S.O.; Smastuen, M.C.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title The effect of foetal growth restriction on the development of migraine and tension-type headache in adulthood. The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175908  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Weight; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology/*etiology; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Logistic Models; Male; Migraine Disorders/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Tension-Type Headache/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about how factors early in life affect the development of migraine and tension-type headache. We aimed to examine whether growth restriction in utero is associated with development of migraine and frequent tension-type headache in adults. METHODS: The population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3) contained a validated headache questionnaire, which differentiated between migraine and tension-type headache. These data were linked to information on weight and gestational age at birth from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. In total 4557 females and 2789 males, aged 19-41 years, were included in this registry-based study. Participants were categorized as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, 10th-90th percentile), small for gestational age (SGA, 3rd-10th percentile) or very small for gestational age (VSGA, < 3rd percentile). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for migraine and tension-type headache, with exposure being growth restriction at birth. RESULTS: The effect of growth restriction on migraine was modified by sex, with a significant association in males (p<0.001), but not in females (p = 0.20). In particular, males born VSGA were at increased risk of developing migraine (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.63-4.58, p<0.001), with an intermediate risk among those born SGA (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.35, p = 0.08) compared to those born AGA. There was no significant association between growth restriction and frequent TTH (p = 0.051). CONCLUSION: Growth restriction was associated with increased risk of migraine in adulthood among males, but not among females. This suggests that migraine might, in part, be influenced by early life events, and that males seem to be particularly vulnerable.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28410431; PMCID:PMC5391957 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1885  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brumpton, B.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.; Chen, Y.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title General and abdominal obesity and incident asthma in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 41 Issue 2 Pages 323-329  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*complications/*epidemiology; Body Mass Index; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Models, Statistical; Norway; Obesity/*complications/*epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Smoking; Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract Measures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference define general obesity and abdominal obesity respectively. While high BMI has been established as a risk factor for asthma in adults, waist circumference has seldom been investigated. To determine the association between BMI, waist circumference and incident asthma in adults, we conducted a prospective study (n=23,245) in a population living in Nord-Trondelag, Norway in 1995-2008. Baseline BMI and waist circumference were measured and categorised as general obesity (BMI >/=30.0 kg.m(2)) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference >/=88 cm in females and >/=102 cm in males). Incident asthma was self-reported new-onset cases during an 11-yr follow-up period. Odds ratios for asthma associated with obesity were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. General obesity was a risk factor for asthma in females (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.52-2.52) and males (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.30-2.59). In females, after additional adjustment for BMI, abdominal obesity remained a risk factor for asthma development (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.04-2.05). Abdominal obesity seems to increase the risk of incident asthma in females in addition to BMI, indicating that using both measures of BMI and waist circumference in females may be a superior clinical assessment for asthma risk than any measure alone.  
  Address Dept. of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. ben.brumpton@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22653771 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1461  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Davies, S.J.C.; Bjerkeset, O.; Nutt, D.J.; Lewis, G. url  doi
  Title A U-shaped relationship between systolic blood pressure and panic symptoms: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Psychological Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychol Med  
  Volume 42 Issue 9 Pages 1969-1976  
  Keywords Anxiety Disorders/*epidemiology; *Blood Pressure; Comorbidity; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; *Panic; Panic Disorder/*epidemiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies on the relationship between blood pressure (BP) and psychological morbidity are conflicting. To resolve this confusing picture we examined the hypothesis that there is a non-linear relationship between panic and systolic BP (SBP) and explored the association of generalized anxiety symptoms with SBP. Method We used data from the population-based Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) in which all 92 936 individuals aged >/=20 years residing in one Norwegian county were invited to participate. Panic was assessed using one item from the anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and generalized anxiety with the remaining six items of this subscale. SBP was the mean of two measurements by an automatic device. RESULTS: A total of 64 871 respondents had SBP recorded (70%). Both unadjusted (n=61 408) and adjusted analyses provided evidence for a non-linear relationship between panic and SBP, represented by a U-shaped curve with a minimum prevalence of panic at around 140 mmHg. The relationship was strengthened after adjustment for confounders, with the quadratic term significantly associated with panic (p=0.03). Generalized anxiety symptoms were associated only with low SBP. CONCLUSIONS: The U-shaped relationship between SBP and panic provides a unifying explanation for the separate strands of published literature in this area. The results support the hypothesis that high BP and panic disorder could share brainstem autonomic and serotonergic abnormalities. By contrast, generalized anxiety symptoms were more common only at lower BPs, suggesting that any biological link between panic and high BP does not extend to generalized anxiety.  
  Address Academic Unit of Psychiatry, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. simon.davies@bristol.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-2917 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22251707 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1517  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Debeij, J.; Dekkers, O.M.; Asvold, B.O.; Christiansen, S.C.; Naess, I.A.; Hammerstrom, J.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Cannegieter, S.C. url  doi
  Title Increased levels of free thyroxine and risk of venous thrombosis in a large population-based prospective study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis : JTH Abbreviated Journal J Thromb Haemost  
  Volume 10 Issue 8 Pages 1539-1546  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Autoantibodies/blood; Biological Markers/blood; Case-Control Studies; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors; Thyrotropin/blood; Thyroxine/*blood; Time Factors; Up-Regulation; Venous Thrombosis/*blood/epidemiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Recent studies have shown that high levels of free thyroxine (FT4), even without leading to hyperthyroidism, are associated with a procoagulant state. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to determine whether high levels of thyroid hormones are associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis. PATIENTS/METHODS: From a prospective nested case-cohort design within the second Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2) cohort (1995-1997; 66,140 subjects), all patients with venous thrombosis during follow-up (n=515) and 1476 randomly selected age-stratified and sex-stratified controls were included. Relative and absolute risks for venous thrombosis were calculated for different cut-off levels of thyroid hormones on the basis of percentiles in the controls and different times between blood sampling and thombosis. RESULTS: In subjects with an FT4 level above the 98th percentile (17.3 pmol L(-1)), the odds ratio (OR) was 2.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-5.0) as compared with subjects with levels below this percentile. For venous thrombosis within 1 year from blood sampling, this relative risk was more pronounced, with an OR of 4.8 (95% CI 1.7-14.0). Within 0.5 years, the association was even stronger, with an OR of 9.9 (95% CI 2.9-34.0, adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index). For thyroid-stimulating hormone, the relationship was inverse and less pronounced. The absolute risk within 6 months in the population for FT4 levels above the 98th percentile was 6.1 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 1.7-15.7). CONCLUSIONS: Levels of FT4 at the upper end of the normal range are a strong risk factor for venous thrombosis. The risk increased with higher levels of thyroxine and shorter time between blood sampling and thrombosis. Further studies on the effect of clinical hyperthyroidism are warranted.  
  Address Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1538-7836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22703181 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1519  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Egan, K.B.; Ettinger, A.S.; DeWan, A.T.; Holford, T.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Bracken, M.B. url  doi
  Title Longitudinal associations between asthma and general and abdominal weight status among Norwegian adolescents and young adults: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Pediatr Obes Abbreviated Journal Pediatric obesity  
  Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages 345-352  
  Keywords Adiposity; Adolescent; Adult; Asthma/epidemiology/etiology/*physiopathology; Body Mass Index; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity, Abdominal/complications/epidemiology/*physiopathology; Odds Ratio; Overweight; Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In adolescents the temporal directionality to the asthma and adiposity association remains unclear. Asthma may be a consequence of obesity; however, asthma may increase adiposity. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the associations between (i) baseline weight status and subsequent asthma and (ii) baseline asthma and subsequent weight status after 4 and 11 years of follow-up (N = 1543 and N = 1596, respectively) using data from three, sequentially enrolled population-based surveys of Norwegians aged 12-30 years from 1995 to 2008. METHODS: Weight status was defined as general (body mass index) or abdominal (waist circumference) underweight, normal weight, overweight or obesity. Self-report physician-diagnosed asthma defined asthma status. RESULTS: Over the longitudinal 11-year follow-up, baseline generally overweight or abdominally obese adolescents had increased risk of asthma. Likewise, baseline asthmatics had increased risk of general overweight or abdominal obesity. After sex stratification, these associations were stronger in males. Generally (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32, 2.73) or abdominally (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.13, 2.44) overweight males were at increased risk of asthma. Baseline asthmatic males were also at increased risk of general (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.54, 2.98) and abdominal (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.27, 2.47) overweight. CONCLUSIONS: Among Norwegian adolescents, a bidirectional association of asthma and adiposity was observed in males. Each baseline condition increased the risk of the other condition over time. No association was observed in females.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.Center Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Egan, K BEttinger, A SDeWan, A THolford, T RHolmen, T LBracken, M BengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2014/11/19 06:00Pediatr Obes. 2015 Oct;10(5):345-52. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.271. Epub 2014 Nov 18. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Egan2015 Serial 1803  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gudmundsdottir, S.L.; Flanders, W.D.; Augestad, L.B. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and age at menopause: the Nord-Trondelag population-based health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society Abbreviated Journal Climacteric  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 78-87  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Confidence Intervals; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; Logistic Models; *Menopause; Middle Aged; Motor Activity/*physiology; Norway; Odds Ratio; Proportional Hazards Models; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Age at menopause may affect women's subsequent morbidity and mortality. In contrast to numerous other health outcomes, little is known about the possible effects of physical activity on age at menopause. OBJECTIVES: To assess the relationship between leisure-time physical activity and age at menopause. METHODS: Premenopausal women participating in a population-based health survey (HUNT 2) conducted in the county of Nord-Trondelag, Norway reported their physical activity in the period of 1995-1997. Age at menopause was reported during 2006-2008 (HUNT 3). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios for menopause and logistic regression to estimate odds ratios for early menopause, with 95% confidence intervals, adjusting for age at menarche, parity, use of oral contraceptives prior to the 6 months preceding participation in HUNT 2, symptoms of depression, smoking status, and education. RESULTS: Women aged 40-49 years at baseline had lower hazard ratios for menopause when participating in any light leisure-time physical activity compared with no activity (p < 0.05) and similar results were observed in 19-39-year-olds. In 50-59-year-old women, the results varied greatly and did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of leisure-time physical activity on age at menopause may be age-dependent. We found indications of earlier menopause for the least active women aged 19-49 years at baseline.  
  Address Department of Human Movement Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1369-7137 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22339441 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1449  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hatlen, P.; Langhammer, A.; Forsmo, S.; Carlsen, S.M.; Amundsen, T. url  doi
  Title Bone mass density, fracture history, self-reported osteoporosis as proxy variables for estrogen and the risk of non-small-cell lung cancer--a population based cohort study, the HUNT study: are proxy variables friends or faults? Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Lung Cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Abbreviated Journal Lung Cancer  
  Volume 81 Issue 1 Pages 39-46  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Body Mass Index; *Bone Density; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/*epidemiology/etiology; Cohort Studies; Estrogens/metabolism; Female; Fractures, Bone/complications/*epidemiology; Humans; Logistic Models; Lung Diseases/etiology; Lung Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Male; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal/complications/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Self Report  
  Abstract Lung cancer has the highest mortality of all cancers. Patients with early stage disease have the best cure rates and that emphasizes the importance of early detection. About half of all non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are estrogen receptor positive. The impact of estrogen and its receptors for NSCLC carcinogenesis has been studied but is still unclear. Low estrogen levels are associated with osteoporosis. We hypothesize that low bone mineral density (BMD), a positive history of fracture or self-reported osteoporosis, used as a proxy variable for life time estrogen exposure, are associated with a low incidence of NSCLC. We analyzed data from a cohort study, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2 (1995-1997) linked to the Norwegian Cancer Registry. Using the logistic regression model we calculated the odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) for the risk of NSCLC for the three proxy variables, stratified by sex. Participants older than 50 years of age, having measured bone density (N = 18,156), having answered the questions on self-reported fracture (N = 37,883) and osteoporosis (N = 25,701) and known body mass index (BMI) (N = 29,291), were evaluated for inclusion. In 6996 participants all these information was available in addition to tobacco use, and in women also hormonal replacement therapy (HRT). Lung function (FEV1 percent of predicted) was included in a sensitivity analysis. We identified 132 (1.9%) cases of NSCLC, 59 (1.2%) and 73 (3.3%) cases in women and men, respectively. Low BMD was associated with a higher risk of NSCLC, OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.09-5.18 and OR: 2.67, 95% CI: 1.39-5.16 in women and men, respectively. No association was found between the two other proxy variables and the risk of NSCLC. Inclusion of lung function in the model did not change the results. Contrary to our hypothesis, women and men with low BMD had a higher risk for NSCLC. In addition the study demonstrates that the risk depends on which proxy variable was chosen, and we may ask: are proxy variables reliable?  
  Address Department of Thoracic Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital HF, 7006 Trondheim, Norway. Peter.Hatlen@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-5002 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23618654 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1446  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Helvik, A.-S.; Engedal, K.; Krokstad, S.; Stordal, E.; Selbaek, G. url  doi
  Title A comparison of depressive symptoms in elderly medical inpatients and the elderly in a population-based health study (the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Nordic Journal of Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Nord J Psychiatry  
  Volume 66 Issue 3 Pages 189-197  
  Keywords Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/epidemiology; Anxiety Disorders/complications/diagnosis/epidemiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/*epidemiology; Depressive Disorder/diagnosis/*epidemiology; Depressive Disorder, Major/complications; Female; *Health Status; Humans; Inpatients/*statistics & numerical data; Male; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Prevalence; Risk; Rural Population; Urban Population  
  Abstract AIM: To compare depression in a sample of the medically hospitalized elderly with elderly people participating in a population-based health study in Norway and further to study the odds for depression, controlling for demographic and health differences between the two samples. METHOD: This cross-sectional observational study evaluated 484 medical inpatients from rural areas and 10,765 drawn from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 (HUNT-3 Study) including participants from rural and urban areas. All participants were elderly (>/=65 years) with a mean (+/- standard deviation) age of 80.7 +/- 7.4 and 73.3 +/- 6.3 years, respectively. Symptoms of depression were screened by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). RESULTS: The prevalence of symptoms indicating mild, moderate or more severe depression (depression score >/=8) was about the same in both groups. In regression analyses, adjusting demographic and health differences, the odds for depression was lower for the elderly in the hospital sample than in the HUNT-3 Study. Older age, male gender, perceiving general health as poor, having impaired ability to function in daily life, previous consultation or treatment for emotional problems and anxiety (anxiety score >/=8) were associated with increased odds for depression in the elderly independent of being hospitalized or not. CONCLUSION: Surprisingly, we found the odds for depression after controlling for demographic and health variables to be lower in the hospitalized elderly individuals than in the elderly participating in the population-based health study. The health variables that were most strongly associated with an increased risk of depression were poor physical health and anxiety.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. Anne-Sofi e.Helvik@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0803-9488 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21958367 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1530  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hjerkind, K.V.; Stenehjem, J.S.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title Adiposity, physical activity and risk of diabetes mellitus: prospective data from the population-based HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e013142  
  Keywords *Adiposity; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Body Mass Index; Comorbidity; Diabetes Mellitus/*epidemiology; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Young Adult; *Epidemiology; *Public Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Physical activity may counteract the adverse effects of adiposity on cardiovascular mortality; however, the evidence of a similar effect on diabetes is sparse. This study examines whether physical activity may compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk. METHODS: The study population consisted of 38 231 individuals aged 20 years or more who participated in two consecutive waves of the prospective longitudinal Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway: in 1984-1986 and in 1995-1997. A Poisson regression model with SEs derived from robust variance was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios of diabetes between categories of body mass index and physical activity. RESULTS: Risk of diabetes increased both with increasing body mass (Ptrend <0.001) and with decreasing physical activity level (Ptrend <0.001 in men and 0.01 in women). Combined analyses showed that men who were both obese and had low activity levels had a risk ratio of 17 (95% CI 9.52 to 30) compared to men who were normal weight and highly active, whereas obese men who reported high activity had a risk ratio of 13 (95% CI 6.92 to 26). Corresponding analysis in obese women produced risk ratios of 15 (95% CI 9.18 to 25) and 13 (95% CI 7.42 to 21) among women reporting low and high activity levels, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that overweight and obesity are associated with a substantially increased risk of diabetes, particularly among those who also reported being physically inactive. High levels of physical activity were associated with a lower risk of diabetes within all categories of body mass index, but there was no clear evidence that being physically active could entirely compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk.  
  Address Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28093432; PMCID:PMC5253523 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1929  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hjort, R.; Ahlqvist, E.; Carlsson, P.-O.; Grill, V.; Groop, L.; Martinell, M.; Rasouli, B.; Rosengren, A.; Tuomi, T.; Asvold, B.O.; Carlsson, S. url  doi
  Title Overweight, obesity and the risk of LADA: results from a Swedish case-control study and the Norwegian HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 61 Issue 6 Pages 1333-1343  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Autoantibodies/blood; Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Insulin Resistance; Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism; Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults/*complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*complications/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Overweight/*complications/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sweden; Young Adult; *Andis; *ANDiU; *Body mass index; *Case-control study; *Estrid; *HUNT Study; *Lada; *Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults; *Prospective study; *Type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Excessive weight is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but its role in the promotion of autoimmune diabetes is not clear. We investigated the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) in relation to overweight/obesity in two large population-based studies. METHODS: Analyses were based on incident cases of LADA (n = 425) and type 2 diabetes (n = 1420), and 1704 randomly selected control participants from a Swedish case-control study and prospective data from the Norwegian HUNT Study including 147 people with LADA and 1,012,957 person-years of follow-up (1984-2008). We present adjusted ORs and HRs with 95% CI. RESULTS: In the Swedish data, obesity was associated with an increased risk of LADA (OR 2.93, 95% CI 2.17, 3.97), which was even stronger for type 2 diabetes (OR 18.88, 95% CI 14.29, 24.94). The association was stronger in LADA with low GAD antibody (GADA; <median) (OR 4.25; 95% CI 2.76, 6.52) but present also in LADA with high GADA (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.42, 3.24). In the Swedish data, obese vs normal weight LADA patients had lower GADA levels, better beta cell function, and were more likely to have low-risk HLA-genotypes. The combination of overweight and family history of diabetes (FHD) conferred an OR of 4.57 (95% CI 3.27, 6.39) for LADA and 24.51 (95% CI 17.82, 33.71) for type 2 diabetes. Prospective data from HUNT indicated even stronger associations; HR for LADA was 6.07 (95% CI 3.76, 9.78) for obesity and 7.45 (95% CI 4.02, 13.82) for overweight and FHD. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Overweight/obesity is associated with increased risk of LADA, particularly when in combination with FHD. These findings support the hypothesis that, even in the presence of autoimmunity, factors linked to insulin resistance, such as excessive weight, could promote onset of diabetes.  
  Address Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29589073 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2098  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult: family linkage data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication JAMA Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal JAMA Pediatr  
  Volume 167 Issue 1 Pages 61-69  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Chronic Pain/economics/*etiology/psychology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Family/psychology; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Norway; Odds Ratio; *Parents/psychology; Psychology; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine a possible association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult and to explore whether a relationship could be explained by socioeconomic and psychosocial factors or may be affected by differences in family structure. DESIGN: Unselected, population-based, cross-sectional study. SETTING: Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. PARTICIPANTS: All inhabitants of Nord-Trondelag County who were 13 years or older were invited to enroll in the study. In total, 8200 of 10 485 invitees (78.2%) participated in the investigation. Among 7913 participants in the target age group (age range, 13-18 years), 7373 (93.2%) completed the pain questions. The final study population consisted of 5370 adolescents or young adults for whom one or both parents participated in the adult survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was chronic nonspecific pain in adolescents and young adults, defined as pain in at least 1 location, unrelated to any known disease or injury, experienced at least once a week during the past 3 months. Chronic multisite pain was defined as chronic pain in at least 3 locations. RESULTS: Maternal chronic pain was associated with chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.8). Paternal chronic pain was associated with increased odds of pain in adolescents and young adults. The odds of chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults increased when both parents reported pain. Adjustments for socioeconomic and psychosocial factors did not change the results, although differences in family structure did. Among offspring living primarily with their mothers, clear associations were observed between maternal pain and pain in adolescents and young adults, but no association was found with paternal pain. CONCLUSIONS: Parental chronic pain is associated with chronic nonspecific pain and especially with chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults. Family structure influences the relationship, indicating that family pain models and shared environmental factors are important in the origin of chronic pain.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. gry.b.hoftun@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23403843 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1441  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hung, R.J.; McKay, J.D.; Gaborieau, V.; Boffetta, P.; Hashibe, M.; Zaridze, D.; Mukeria, A.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Lissowska, J.; Rudnai, P.; Fabianova, E.; Mates, D.; Bencko, V.; Foretova, L.; Janout, V.; Chen, C.; Goodman, G.; Field, J.K.; Liloglou, T.; Xinarianos, G.; Cassidy, A.; McLaughlin, J.; Liu, G.; Narod, S.; Krokan, H.E.; Skorpen, F.; Elvestad, M.B.; Hveem, K.; Vatten, L.; Linseisen, J.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Vineis, P.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Lund, E.; Martinez, C.; Bingham, S.; Rasmuson, T.; Hainaut, P.; Riboli, E.; Ahrens, W.; Benhamou, S.; Lagiou, P.; Trichopoulos, D.; Holcatova, I.; Merletti, F.; Kjaerheim, K.; Agudo, A.; Macfarlane, G.; Talamini, R.; Simonato, L.; Lowry, R.; Conway, D.I.; Znaor, A.; Healy, C.; Zelenika, D.; Boland, A.; Delepine, M.; Foglio, M.; Lechner, D.; Matsuda, F.; Blanche, H.; Gut, I.; Heath, S.; Lathrop, M.; Brennan, P. url  doi
  Title A susceptibility locus for lung cancer maps to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit genes on 15q25 Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 452 Issue 7187 Pages 633-637  
  Keywords HUNT2; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15/*genetics; Europe; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics; Genotype; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/*genetics; Odds Ratio; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics; Protein Subunits/*genetics; Receptors, Nicotinic/*genetics  
  Abstract Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide, with over one million cases annually. To identify genetic factors that modify disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association study by analysing 317,139 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,989 lung cancer cases and 2,625 controls from six central European countries. We identified a locus in chromosome region 15q25 that was strongly associated with lung cancer (P = 9 x 10(-10)). This locus was replicated in five separate lung cancer studies comprising an additional 2,513 lung cancer cases and 4,752 controls (P = 5 x 10(-20) overall), and it was found to account for 14% (attributable risk) of lung cancer cases. Statistically similar risks were observed irrespective of smoking status or propensity to smoke tobacco. The association region contains several genes, including three that encode nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits (CHRNA5, CHRNA3 and CHRNB4). Such subunits are expressed in neurons and other tissues, in particular alveolar epithelial cells, pulmonary neuroendocrine cells and lung cancer cell lines, and they bind to N'-nitrosonornicotine and potential lung carcinogens. A non-synonymous variant of CHRNA5 that induces an amino acid substitution (D398N) at a highly conserved site in the second intracellular loop of the protein is among the markers with the strongest disease associations. Our results provide compelling evidence of a locus at 15q25 predisposing to lung cancer, and reinforce interest in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as potential disease candidates and chemopreventative targets.  
  Address International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon 69008, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:18385738 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1678  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Iversen, M.M.; Tell, G.S.; Espehaug, B.; Midthjell, K.; Graue, M.; Rokne, B.; Berge, L.I.; Ostbye, T.   
  Title Is depression a risk factor for diabetic foot ulcers?: 11-years follow-up of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Diabetes Complications Abbreviated Journal Journal of diabetes and its complications  
  Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 20-25  
  Keywords HUNT2; HUNT3; Age Distribution; Cohort Studies; Confidence Intervals; Depression/diagnosis/*epidemiology; Diabetic Foot/*epidemiology/physiopathology/*psychology/therapy; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Incidence; Logistic Models; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Neuropsychological Tests; Norway; Odds Ratio; *Quality of Life; Retrospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Distribution; Time Factors; Wound Healing/physiology  
  Abstract AIM: To prospectively examine whether depressive symptoms increase the risk of diabetes and a diabetic foot ulcer. METHODS: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) is a community-based longitudinal study. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D subscale) assessed depressive symptoms. We followed individuals with complete HADS-D data from HUNT2 (1995-97) and assessed whether they reported diabetes with or without a history of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) in HUNT3 (2006-08) (n=36,031). Logistic regression was used to investigate the effect of depressive symptoms on subsequent development of diabetes and of DFU. RESULTS: Unadjusted odds for reporting diabetes at follow-up was higher among individuals who reported a HADS-D score>/=8 at baseline (OR 1.30 95% CI, 1.07-1.57) than among those reporting a lower score. After adjusting for age, gender and BMI, this association was no longer significant. The odds of developing a DFU was almost two-fold (OR=1.95 95% CI, 1.02-3.74) for those reporting a HADS-D score of 8-10, and 3-fold (OR=3.06 95% CI, 1.24-7.54) for HADS-D scores>/=11, compared to HADS-D scores  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, PO Box 7030, N-5020 Bergen, Norway Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Iversen2015c Serial 1826  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Johansen, A.; Holmen, J.; Stewart, R.; Bjerkeset, O. url  doi
  Title Anxiety and depression symptoms in arterial hypertension: the influence of antihypertensive treatment. the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol  
  Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 63-72  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Antihypertensive Agents/*adverse effects/therapeutic use; Anxiety/*chemically induced/complications; Blood Pressure Determination; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/*chemically induced/complications; Drug Therapy, Combination; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Hypertension/complications/*drug therapy/psychology; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Odds Ratio; Self Report  
  Abstract Antihypertensive drugs have been suggested to modulate symptoms of depression and anxiety. It is disputed whether this is due to the hypertension per se, its treatment, or both. The aim of this study was to investigate these associations in a large population sample. 55,472 participants in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2, 1995-1997), Norway, who completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression rating Scale, were divided into 3 groups according to their diastolic blood pressure and antihypertensive treatment status. A cut-off of >/=90 mmHg diastolic blood pressure was used to identify hypertensive status. Differences in anxiety and depression symptom levels in untreated and treated hypertensives (all treatments) versus the normotensive reference group were explained by differences in age and gender distribution in the three groups in this study. However, the receipt of two or more antihypertensive drugs was associated with depressive symptoms alone (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.03-1.90), but not with symptoms of anxiety (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.83-1.57) or mixed anxiety and depression (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.82-1.72) in the fully adjusted model, compared to untreated hypertension. Antihypertensive monotherapy (all agents) nor any single antihypertensive drug class were associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety, or mixed anxiety and depression. There may be a positive association between multi antihypertensive drug use and symptoms of depression, whereas this was not found in persons with symptoms of anxiety or mixed anxiety and depression. This might reflect poor antihypertensive treatment adherence leading to polypharmacy, or other unfavorable health behaviors in people with symptoms of pure depression.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22183137 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1533  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Larose, T.L.; Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.; Mai, X.M.   
  Title Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, smoking and lung function in adults: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Eur Respir J Abbreviated Journal The European respiratory journal  
  Volume 46 Issue 2 Pages 355-363  
  Keywords Adult; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Logistic Models; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Smoking/*blood/*epidemiology; Spirometry; Vitamin D/*analogs & derivatives/blood; Young Adult  
  Abstract The association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level and lung function changes in the general population remains unclear.We conducted cross-sectional (n=1220) and follow-up (n=869) studies to investigate the interrelationship of serum 25(OH)D, smoking and lung function changes in a random sample of adults from the Nord-Trondelag Health (HUNT) Study, Norway.Lung function was measured using spirometry and included forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) % predicted, forced vital capacity (FVC) % pred and FEV1/FVC ratio. Multiple linear and logistic regression models estimated the adjusted difference in lung function measures or lung function decline, adjusted odds ratios for impaired lung function or development of impaired lung function and 95% confidence intervals.40% of adults had serum 25(OH)D levels  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Scien Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Larose2015b Serial 1837  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title Cross-sectional and prospective cohort study of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and obesity in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 175 Issue 10 Pages 1029-1036  
  Keywords Adult; Biological Markers/blood; Body Mass Index; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Hydroxycholecalciferols/blood/*deficiency; Incidence; Linear Models; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/blood/epidemiology/*etiology; Odds Ratio; Prevalence; Prospective Studies; Vitamin D Deficiency/blood/*complications; Waist Circumference  
  Abstract Experimental studies suggest that vitamin D modulates the activity of adipocytes. The authors examined baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level in relation to prevalent and cumulative incident obesity in Norway. A cohort of 25,616 adults aged 19-55 years participated in both the second and third surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008)). Serum 25(OH)D levels measured at baseline and anthropometric measurements taken at both baseline and follow-up were available for a random sample of 2,460 subjects. Overall, 40% of the 2,460 subjects had a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L, and 37% had a level of 50.0-74.9 nmol/L. The prevalence and cumulative incidence of obesity, defined as body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) >/=30, were 12% and 15%, respectively. Lower serum 25(OH)D level was associated with a higher prevalence of obesity. In the 2,165 subjects with baseline BMI less than 30, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was associated with a significantly increased odds ratio for incident obesity during follow-up (adjusted odds ratio = 1.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.24, 2.41). When prevalent and incident obesity were classified according to waist circumference (>/=88 cm for women, >/=102 cm for men), similar results were obtained. In addition to prevalent obesity, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was significantly associated with new-onset obesity in adults.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. xiao-mei.mai@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22312120 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1551  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mai, X.-M.; Langhammer, A.; Chen, Y.; Camargo, C.A.J. url  doi
  Title Cod liver oil intake and incidence of asthma in Norwegian adults--the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Thorax Abbreviated Journal Thorax  
  Volume 68 Issue 1 Pages 25-30  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Asthma/*epidemiology/*etiology/physiopathology; Cod Liver Oil/administration & dosage/*adverse effects; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dietary Supplements/*adverse effects; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Drug Administration Schedule; Female; Humans; Incidence; Logistic Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Questionnaires; Reference Values; Risk Assessment; Sex Distribution; Vitamin A/administration & dosage/*adverse effects; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cod liver oil is an important source of vitamin D, but also contains other fat-soluble components such as vitamin A. Before 1999, the cod liver oil formula in Norway contained a high concentration of vitamin A (1000 microg per 5 ml). High vitamin A status is associated with increased risks of several chronic diseases. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between cod liver oil intake and asthma development. METHODS: In the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, a total of 25 616 Norwegian adults aged 19-55 years were followed up from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008. Current analysis based on 17 528 subjects who were free of asthma and had complete information on cod liver oil intake at baseline. Cod liver oil intake was defined as daily intake >/= 1 month during the year prior to baseline. Incident asthma was reported as new-onset asthma during the 11-year follow-up. RESULTS: Of the 17 528 subjects, 18% (n=3076) consumed cod liver oil daily for >/= 1 month over the past year. Cod liver oil intake was significantly associated with incident asthma with an OR of 1.62 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.98) after adjustment for age, sex, daily smoking, physical activity, education, socio-economic status, family history of asthma, and body mass index (BMI). The positive association was consistent across age (< 40/>/= 40 years), sex (men/women), family history of asthma (yes/no) and BMI subgroups (< 25/>/= 25 kg/m(2)). CONCLUSIONS: Intake of cod liver oil with high vitamin A content was significantly associated with increased incidence of adult-onset asthma.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. xiao-mei.mai@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0040-6376 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22977130 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1424  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Myklestad, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Magnussen, E.B.; Salvesen, K.A.; Romundstad, P.R. url  doi
  Title Do parental heights influence pregnancy length?: A population-based prospective study, HUNT 2 Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth Abbreviated Journal BMC Pregnancy Childbirth  
  Volume 13 Issue Pages 33  
  Keywords Adult; *Body Height; Female; *Gestational Age; Humans; Linear Models; Logistic Models; Male; Menstruation; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Pregnancy; Premature Birth/*epidemiology/ultrasonography; Prospective Studies; Registries; *Term Birth; Ultrasonography, Prenatal  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to examine the association of maternal and paternal height with pregnancy length, and with the risk of pre- and post-term birth. In addition we aimed to study whether cardiovascular risk factors could explain possible associations. METHODS: Parents who participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2; 1995-1997) were linked to offspring data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (1997-2005). The main analyses included 3497 women who had delivered 5010 children, and 2005 men who had fathered 2798 pregnancies. All births took place after parental participation in HUNT 2. Linear regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted differences in pregnancy length according to parental heights. Logistic regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted associations of parental heights with the risk of pre- and post-term births. RESULTS: We found a gradual increase in pregnancy length by increasing maternal height, and the association was essentially unchanged after adjustment for maternal cardiovascular risk factors, parental age, offspring sex, parity, and socioeconomic measures. When estimated date of delivery was based on ultrasound, the difference between mothers in the lower height quintile (<163 cm cm) and mothers in the upper height quintile (>/= 173 cm) was 4.3 days, and when estimated date of delivery was based on last menstrual period (LMP), the difference was 2.8 days. Shorter women (< 163 cm) had lower risk of post-term births, and when estimated date of delivery was based on ultrasound they also had higher risk of pre-term births. Paternal height was not associated with pregnancy length, or with the risks of pre- and post-term births. CONCLUSIONS: Women with shorter stature had shorter pregnancy length and lower risk of post-term births than taller women, and when EDD was based on ultrasound, they also had higher risk of preterm births. The effect of maternal height was generally stronger when pregnancy length was based on second trimester ultrasound compared to last menstrual period. The association of maternal height with pregnancy length could not be explained by cardiovascular risk factors. Paternal height was neither associated with pregnancy length nor with the risk of pre- and post-term birth.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim N-7489, Norway. kirsti.myklestad@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2393 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23383756; PMC3608172 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1417  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sivertsen, B.; Salo, P.; Mykletun, A.; Hysing, M.; Pallesen, S.; Krokstad, S.; Nordhus, I.H.; Overland, S. url  doi
  Title The bidirectional association between depression and insomnia: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Psychosomatic Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychosom Med  
  Volume 74 Issue 7 Pages 758-765  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Comorbidity; Depression/*epidemiology; Depressive Disorder/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/*epidemiology; Time Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Depression and insomnia are closely linked, yet our understanding of their prospective relationships remains limited. The aim of the current study was to investigate the directionality of association between depression and insomnia. METHODS: Data were collected from a prospective population-based study comprising the most recent waves of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) (the HUNT2 in 1995-1997 and the HUNT3 in 2006-2008). A total of 24,715 persons provided valid responses on the relevant questionnaires from both surveys. Study outcomes were onset of depression or insomnia at HUNT3 in persons not reporting the other disorder in HUNT2. RESULTS: Both insomnia and depression significantly predicted the onset of the other disorder. Participants who did not have depression in HUNT2 but who had insomnia in both HUNT2 and HUNT3 had an odds ratio (OR) of 6.2 of developing depression at HUNT3. Participants who did not have insomnia in HUNT2 but who had depression in both HUNT2 and HUNT3 had an OR of 6.7 of developing insomnia at HUNT3. ORs were only slightly attenuated when adjusting for potential confounding factors. CONCLUSIONS: The results support a bidirectional relationship between insomnia and depression. This finding stands in contrast to the previous studies, which have mainly focused on insomnia as a risk factor for the onset of depression.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Christiesgt 13, 5020 Bergen, Norway. borge.sivertsen@fhi.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-3174 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22879427 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1574  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sivertsen, H.; Lillefjell, M.; Espnes, G.A. url  doi
  Title The relationship between health promoting resources and work participation in a sample reporting musculoskeletal pain from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, HUNT 3, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders Abbreviated Journal BMC Musculoskelet Disord  
  Volume 14 Issue Pages 100  
  Keywords Absenteeism; Adaptation, Psychological; Adult; Aged; Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology/psychology; Chi-Square Distribution; Cross-Sectional Studies; *Employment; Female; *Health Behavior; *Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice; *Health Promotion; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Musculoskeletal Diseases/diagnosis/epidemiology/physiopathology/*psychology; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Health; Odds Ratio; Pain/diagnosis/epidemiology/physiopathology/*psychology; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Sick Leave; Social Support; Unemployment; Workload; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain (MSP) is one of the most frequent causes of sick leave from work, and is a common and potentially disabling condition. This study is based on the salutogenic perspective and investigates the relationship between personal, social, and functional health resources and work participation in a population reporting MSP. METHOD: Analysis was performed on cross sectional data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, HUNT 3, in Norway. The sample of n= 6702 was extracted from HUNT 3, including a total of N= 50807 participants. Self-reported health (SRH) and, personal, social, and functional resources were assessed by a questionnaire. Reported sick leave was collected by interview at the point of time when the data were collected, from October 2006 until June 2008. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis demonstrated statistically significant differences between the work group and sick leave group in self-rated health, work support, work control, work load, and feeling strong, and the model predicted 68% of the cases correctly. Females had a lower statistically significant probability (B= -.53) to be in the work group then men when suffering from MSP, with odds of 41%. CONCLUSION: There was a statistically significant relationship between health promoting resources such as SRH, feeling strong, absence of neuroticism, work load, work control, and work participation in MSP population.  
  Address Department of Social Work and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway. heidisiv@online.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2474 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23509959; PMC3606465 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1402  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Skogen, J.C.; Bergh, S.; Stewart, R.; Knudsen, A.K.; Bjerkeset, O. url  doi
  Title Midlife mental distress and risk for dementia up to 27 years later: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) in linkage with a dementia registry in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Geriatr Abbreviated Journal BMC geriatrics  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 23  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Dementia/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; *Registries; Risk Factors; Self Report; Stress, Psychological/*psychology; Time Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Dementia is an increasing public health challenge, and the number of individuals affected is growing rapidly. Mental disorders and symptoms of mental distress have been reported to be risk factors for dementia. The aim of this study was to examine whether midlife mental distress is a predictor for onset of dementia later in life. METHODS: Using data from a large population-based study (The Nord-Trondelag Health Study; HUNT1) linked to a dementia registry (The Health and Memory study; HMS) enabling a maximum 27 years of follow-up, we ascertained mental distress and subsequent dementia status for 30,902 individuals aged 30-60 years at baseline. In HUNT1, self-reported mental distress was assessed using the four-item Anxiety and Depression Index (ADI-4). Dementia status was ascertained from HMS, which included patient and caregiver history, cognitive testing and clinical and physical examinations from the hospitals and nursing homes serving the catchment area of HUNT1. In the main analysis, unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models were computed for the prospective association between mental distress and dementia. In secondary analyses, two-way age and gender interactions with mental distress on later dementia were examined. RESULTS: A 50% increased odds for dementia among HUNT1-participants reporting mental distress was found (crude odds ratio (OR): 1.52; 95% CI 1.15-2.01), and a 35% increase in the fully adjusted model (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.01-1.80). In secondary analyses, we found evidence for a two-way interaction with age on the association between mental distress and dementia (p = 0.030): the age- and gender adjusted OR was 2.44 (95% CI 1.18-5.05) in those aged 30-44 years at baseline, and 1.24 (0.91-1.69) in 45-60 year olds. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate an association between midlife mental distress and increased risk of later dementia, an association that was stronger for distress measured in early compared to later midlife. Mental distress should be investigated further as a potentially modifiable risk factor for dementia.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Division of Mental Health, Department of Public Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Skogen, Jens ChristofferBergh, SverreStewart, RobertKnudsen, Ann KristinBjerkeset, OttarengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2015/04/19 06:00BMC Geriatr. 2015 Mar 10;15:23. doi: 10.1186/s12877-015-0020-5. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Skogen2015 Serial 1861  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stray-Pedersen, M.; Helsing, R.M.; Gibbons, L.; Cormick, G.; Holmen, T.L.; Vik, T.; Belizan, J.M. url  doi
  Title Weight status and hypertension among adolescent girls in Argentina and Norway: data from the ENNyS and HUNT studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 398  
  Keywords Adolescent Argentina/epidemiology Body Mass Index Female Humans Hypertension/complications/*epidemiology Norway/epidemiology Obesity/complications/*epidemiology Odds Ratio Overweight/*epidemiology Prevalence Young-HUNT HUNT1  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To provide data on overweight, obesity and hypertension among adolescent girls in Norway and Argentina. METHODS: Data was obtained from two population-based, cross-sectional and descriptive studies containing anthropometric and blood pressure measurements of 15 to 18 year old girls. The study included 2,156 adolescent girls from Norway evaluated between 1995 and 1997, and 669 from Argentina evaluated between 2004 and 2005. RESULTS: Around 15% of adolescent girls in Norway and 19% in Argentina are overweight or obese. Body mass index (BMI) distribution in these two countries is similar, with a low percentage (< 1%) of girls classified as thin. Norwegian adolescents show a height mean value 8 cm taller than the Argentinean. Obesity is strongly associated with systolic hypertension in both populations, with odds ratios of 11.4 [1.6; 82.0] and 28.3 [11.8; 67.7] in Argentina and Norway, respectively. No direct association between BMI and systolic hypertension was found, and only extreme BMI values (above 80th – 90th percentile) were associated with hypertension. CONCLUSION: This study confirms a current world health problem by showing the high prevalence of obesity in adolescents and its association with hypertension in two different countries (one developed and one in transition).  
  Address Department of Mother & Child Health Research, Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS), Buenos Aires, Argentina. strayped@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language eng Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition 2009/11/03  
  ISSN 1471-2458 (Electronic) 1471-2458 (Linking) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Stray-Pedersen, Marit Helsing, Ragnhild M Gibbons, Luz Cormick, Gabriela Holmen, Turid L Vik, Torstein Belizan, Jose M eng Comparative Study England 2009/11/03 06:00 BMC Public Health. 2009 Oct 30;9:398. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-9-398. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ 1983 Serial 1344  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Theofylaktopoulou, D.; Midttun, O.; Ueland, P.M.; Meyer, K.; Fanidi, A.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Prentice, R.; Pettinger, M.; Thomson, C.A.; Giles, G.G.; Hodge, A.; Cai, Q.; Blot, W.J.; Wu, J.; Johansson, M.; Hultdin, J.; Grankvist, K.; Stevens, V.L.; McCullough, M.M.; Weinstein, S.J.; Albanes, D.; Ziegler, R.; Freedman, N.D.; Langhammer, A.; Hveem, K.; Naess, M.; Sesso, H.D.; Gaziano, J.M.; Buring, J.E.; Lee, I.-M.; Severi, G.; Zhang, X.; Stampfer, M.J.; Han, J.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Le Marchand, L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Wang, R.; Butler, L.M.; Koh, W.-P.; Gao, Y.-T.; Rothman, N.; Ericson, U.; Sonestedt, E.; Visvanathan, K.; Jones, M.R.; Relton, C.; Brennan, P.; Johansson, M.; Ulvik, A. url  doi
  Title Impaired functional vitamin B6 status is associated with increased risk of lung cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume 142 Issue 12 Pages 2425-2434  
  Keywords Aged; Biomarkers/blood; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/*blood/*pathology; Case-Control Studies; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/*blood/*pathology; Male; Middle Aged; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; Vitamin B 6/*blood; *3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid; *Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium; *functional vitamin B6 marker; *pyridoxal 5'-phosphate  
  Abstract Circulating vitamin B6 levels have been found to be inversely associated with lung cancer. Most studies have focused on the B6 form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a direct biomarker influenced by inflammation and other factors. Using a functional B6 marker allows further investigation of the potential role of vitamin B6 status in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. We prospectively evaluated the association of the functional marker of vitamin B6 status, the 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid (HK:XA) ratio, with risk of lung cancer in a nested case-control study consisting of 5,364 matched case-control pairs from the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between HK:XA and lung cancer, and random effect models to combine results from different cohorts and regions. High levels of HK:XA, indicating impaired functional B6 status, were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, the odds ratio comparing the fourth and the first quartiles (OR4thvs.1st ) was 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.41). Stratified analyses indicated that this association was primarily driven by cases diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. Notably, the risk associated with HK:XA was approximately 50% higher in groups with a high relative frequency of squamous cell carcinoma, i.e., men, former and current smokers. This risk of squamous cell carcinoma was present in both men and women regardless of smoking status.  
  Address Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  <