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Author Asvold, B.O.; Vatten, L.J.; Midthjell, K.; Bjoro, T. url  doi
  Title Serum TSH within the reference range as a predictor of future hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism: 11-year follow-up of the HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 97 Issue 1 Pages 93-99  
  Keywords Asymptomatic Diseases; Cohort Studies; Diagnostic Techniques, Endocrine/*standards; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hyperthyroidism/blood/*diagnosis/etiology; Hypothyroidism/blood/*diagnosis/etiology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Prognosis; Reference Values; Risk Factors; Thyrotropin/*blood; Time Factors  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Serum TSH in the upper part of the reference range may sometimes be a response to autoimmune thyroiditis in early stage and may therefore predict future hypothyroidism. Conversely, relatively low serum TSH could predict future hyperthyroidism. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to assess TSH within the reference range and subsequent risk of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a prospective population-based study with linkage to the Norwegian Prescription Database. SUBJECTS: A total of 10,083 women and 5,023 men without previous thyroid disease who had a baseline TSH of 0.20-4.5 mU/liter and who participated at a follow-up examination 11 yr later. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Predicted probabilities of developing hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism during follow-up, by categories of baseline TSH, were estimated. RESULTS: During 11 yr of follow-up, 3.5% of women and 1.3% of men developed hypothyroidism, and 1.1% of women and 0.6% of men developed hyperthyroidism. In both sexes, the baseline TSH was positively associated with the risk of subsequent hypothyroidism. The risk increased gradually from TSH of 0.50-1.4 mU/liter [women, 1.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-1.4; men, 0.3%, 95% CI 0.1-0.6] to a TSH of 4.0-4.5 mU/liter (women, 31.5%, 95% CI 24.6-39.3; men, 14.7%, 95% CI 7.7-26.2). The risk of hyperthyroidism was higher in women with a baseline TSH of 0.20-0.49 mU/liter (3.9%, 95% CI 1.8-8.4) than in women with a TSH of 0.50-0.99 mU/liter (1.4%, 95% CI 0.9-2.1) or higher ( approximately 1.0%). CONCLUSION: TSH within the reference range is positively and strongly associated with the risk of future hypothyroidism. TSH at the lower limit of the reference range may be associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Postboks 8905 MTFS, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway. bjorn.o.asvold@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22049180 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1507  
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Author Karlsen, T.; Nauman, J.; Dalen, H.; Langhammer, A.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title The Combined Association of Skeletal Muscle Strength and Physical Activity on Mortality in Older Women: The HUNT2 Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc  
  Volume 92 Issue 5 Pages 710-718  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Hand Strength; Humans; Leg/physiology; *Muscle Strength; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the isolated and combined associations of leg and arm strength with adherence to current physical activity guidelines with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in healthy elderly women. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study of 2529 elderly women (72.6+/-4.8 years) from the Norwegian Healthy survey of Northern Trondelag (second wave) (HUNT2) between August 15, 1995, and June 18, 1997, with a median of 15.6 years (interquartile range, 10.4-16.3 years) of follow-up. Chair-rise test and handgrip strength performances were assessed, and divided into tertiles. The hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause and cause-specific mortality by tertiles of handgrip strength and chair-rise test performance, and combined associations with physical activity were estimated by using Cox proportional hazard regression models. RESULTS: We observed independent associations of physical activity and the chair-rise test performance with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and between handgrip strength and all-cause mortality. Despite following physical activity guidelines, women with low muscle strength had increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR chair test, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.07-1.76; HR handgrip strength, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.85) and cardiovascular disease mortality (HR chair test, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.01-2.42). Slow chair-test performance was associated with all-cause (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.16-1.51) and cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.14-1.76) mortality. The association between handgrip strength and all-cause mortality was dose dependent (P value for trend <.01). CONCLUSION: Handgrip strength and chair-rise test performance predicted the risk of all-cause and CVD mortality independent of physical activity. Clinically feasible tests of skeletal muscle strength could increase the precision of prognosis, even in elderly women following current physical activity guidelines.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-6196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28473035 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1938  
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Author Morkedal, B.; Vatten, L.J.; Romundstad, P.R.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.   
  Title Risk of myocardial infarction and heart failure among metabolically healthy but obese individuals: HUNT (Nord-Trondelag Health Study), Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication J Am Coll Cardiol Abbreviated Journal Journal of the American College of Cardiology  
  Volume 63 Issue 11 Pages 1071-1078  
  Keywords HUNT2; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; *Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; *Cause of Death; Female; Heart Failure/*etiology/mortality/physiopathology; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction/*etiology/mortality/physiopathology; Obesity/*complications/diagnosis/metabolism; Obesity, Morbid/complications/diagnosis; Prognosis; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Factors; Survival Rate; Time Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study sought to investigate whether obesity in the absence of metabolic abnormalities might be a relatively benign condition in relation to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND: The results of previous studies are conflicting for AMI and largely unknown for HF, and the role of the duration of obesity has not been investigated. METHODS: In a population-based prospective cohort study, a total of 61,299 men and women free of cardiovascular disease were classified according to body mass index (BMI) and metabolic status at baseline. BMI also was measured 10 and 30 years before baseline for 27,196 participants. RESULTS: During 12 years of follow-up, 2,547 participants had a first AMI, and 1,201 participants had a first HF. Compared with being normal weight (BMI <25 kg/m(2)) and metabolically healthy, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for AMI was 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 1.4) among obese (BMI >/=30 kg/m(2)) and metabolically healthy participants and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.7 to 2.3) among obese and metabolically unhealthy participants. We found similar results for severe (BMI >/=35 kg/m(2)), long-lasting (>30 years), and abdominal obesity stratified for metabolic status. For HF, the HRs associated with obesity were 1.7 (95% CI: 1.3 to 2.3) and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.4 to 2.2) for metabolically healthy and unhealthy participants, respectively. Severe and long-lasting obesity were particularly harmful in relation to HF, regardless of metabolic status. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to AMI, obesity without metabolic abnormalities did not confer substantial excess risk, not even for severe or long-lasting obesity. For HF, even metabolically healthy obesity was associated with increased risk, particularly for long-lasting or severe obesity.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Tr Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Morkedal2014 Serial 1610  
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Author Myrtveit, S.M.; Wilhelmsen, I.; Petrie, K.J.; Skogen, J.C.; Sivertsen, B. url  doi
  Title What characterizes individuals developing chronic whiplash?: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Psychosomatic Research Abbreviated Journal J Psychosom Res  
  Volume 74 Issue 5 Pages 393-400  
  Keywords Adaptation, Psychological; Adult; Aged; Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis/psychology; Chronic Disease; Cohort Studies; Compensation and Redress; Female; Health Services/utilization; Health Surveys; Humans; Illness Behavior; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Pain Measurement/psychology; Prescription Drugs/therapeutic use; Prognosis; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Somatoform Disorders/diagnosis/psychology; Utilization Review; Whiplash Injuries/*diagnosis/*psychology; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Most individuals experiencing whiplash accidents recover rapidly. A considerable proportion, however, develop chronic symptoms. Psychological factors may slow recovery, possibly by increasing the likelihood of other symptoms being misattributed to, and amplified by the whiplash injury. We aimed to investigate how pre-injury mental and somatic symptoms, self-rated health, use of health-services and medications, health-behavior and socio-demographics predict the development of chronic whiplash. METHODS: Data from two waves of a large, population based study (HUNT2 (baseline) and HUNT3) were used. Individuals reporting no whiplash at baseline were identified in HUNT3. Characteristics reported at baseline were compared between those who had developed chronic whiplash in HUNT3 (n=199) and those who had not (n=20,600), using Pearson's chi-squared tests, independent sample t-tests and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Individuals developing chronic whiplash reported worse baseline health than those reporting no chronic whiplash. Poor self-rated health was a strong risk factor for subsequent chronic whiplash (OR=2.26, 95%CI: 1.68-3.04). Musculoskeletal pain also increased the risk (OR=1.21, 95%CI: 1.15-1.26), as did diffuse somatic symptoms (OR=2.09, 95%CI: 1.47-2.96), use of different health services (OR=1.31, 95%CI: 1.19-1.45), high use of medications (OR=1.28, 95%CI: 1.14-1.43) and symptoms of anxiety (OR=1.93, 95%CI: 1.39-2.68). Physical activity was protective (OR=0.67, 95%CI: 0.49-0.91). Most socio-demographic variables were not significantly associated with chronic whiplash. CONCLUSION: Poor somatic and mental pre-injury health increased the risk of subsequent chronic whiplash. This suggests that chronic whiplash is not merely an organic disorder, and highlights the importance of individual expectations, symptom reattribution and amplification in development of chronic whiplash.  
  Address Department of Clinical Medicine II, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. makalani.myrtveit@med.uib.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3999 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23597326 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1413  
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Author Osthus, I.B.O.; Lydersen, S.; Dalen, H.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Association of Telomere Length With Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Cohort From the Population Based HUNT 2 Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis  
  Volume 59 Issue 6 Pages 649-655  
  Keywords Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Genetic Markers; Humans; Incidence; Linear Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis/epidemiology/*genetics; Norway/epidemiology; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Telomere/*genetics; *Telomere Homeostasis; Time Factors; Cardiovascular diseases; Myocardial infarction; Prevention; Risk factors; Telomeres  
  Abstract As possible markers of biological age, telomere length (TL) has been associated with age-related diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI) with conflicting findings. We sought to assess the relationship between TL and risk of future MI in 915 healthy participants (51.7% women) 65 years or older from a population-based prospective cohort (the HUNT 2 study, Norway). Mean TL was measured by quantitative PCR expressed as relative T (telomere repeat copy number) to S (single copy gene number) ratio, and log-transformed. During a mean follow up of 13.0 (SD, 3.2) years and 11,923 person-years, 82 participants were diagnosed with MI. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Relative TL was associated with age in women (P=0.01), but not in men (P=0.43). Using relative TL as a continuous variable, we observed a higher risk of MI in participants with longer telomeres with HRs of 2.46 (95% CI; 1.13 to 4.54) in men, and 2.93 (95% CI; 1.41 to 6.10) in women. Each 1-SD change in relative TL was associated with an HR of 1.54 (95% CI; 1.15 to 2.06) and 1.67 (95% CI; 1.18 to 2.37) in men and women, respectively. Compared with the bottom tertile of relative TL, HR of incident MI in top tertile was 2.71 (95% CI; 1.25 to 5.89) in men, and 3.65 (95% CI; 1.35 to 9.90) in women. Longer telomeres in healthy participants 65 years or older are associated with a high risk of incident MI. Future large scale prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore the potential association between TL and MI.  
  Address K. G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-0620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28442329 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1968  
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