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Author De Ridder, K.A.A.; Pape, K.; Johnsen, R.; Westin, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title School dropout: a major public health challenge: a 10-year prospective study on medical and non-medical social insurance benefits in young adulthood, the Young-HUNT 1 Study (Norway) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 66 Issue 11 Pages 995-1000  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Status; Humans; Insurance, Health/*statistics & numerical data/utilization; Logistic Models; Male; Norway; Prospective Studies; Public Health; Risk Factors; Self Report; Social Problems; Social Security/*statistics & numerical data/utilization; *Socioeconomic Factors; Student Dropouts/*statistics & numerical data; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: School and work participation in adolescence and young adulthood are important for future health and socioeconomic status. The authors studied the association between self-rated health in adolescents, high school dropout and long-term receipt of medical and non-medical social insurance benefits in young adulthood. METHODS: Self-rated health in adolescence was assessed in 8795 adolescents participating in the Norwegian Young-HUNT Study (1995-1997). Linkages to the National Education Database and the National Insurance Administration allowed identification of school dropout and receipt of long-term medical and non-medical benefits during a 10-year follow-up (1998-2007). The data were explored by descriptive statistics and by multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 17% was registered as being high school dropouts at age 24. The predicted 5-year risk of receiving benefits between ages 24-28 was 21% (95% CI 20% to 23%). High school dropouts had a 5-year risk of receiving benefits of 44% (95% CI 41 to 48) compared with 16% (95% CI 15 to 17) in those who completed high school (adjusted for self-rated health, parental education and sex). There was a 27% school dropout rate in adolescents who reported poor health compared with 16% in those who reported good health. The predicted 5-year risk of receiving any long-term social insurance benefits in adolescents who reported poor health was 33% (95% CI 30 to 37) compared with 20% (95% CI 19 to 21) in those who reported good health. CONCLUSION: The strong association between poor self-rated health in adolescence, high school dropout and reduced work integration needs attention and suggests preventive measures on an individual as well as on a societal level.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. karin.de.ridder@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22315238 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1518  
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Author Fimland, M.S.; Vie, G.; Holtermann, A.; Krokstad, S.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title Occupational and leisure-time physical activity and risk of disability pension: prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Occup Environ Med  
  Volume 75 Issue 1 Pages 23-28  
  Keywords Adult; Disability Evaluation; *Disabled Persons; *Exercise; Female; Humans; *Leisure Activities; Lifting; Male; Mental Disorders; Middle Aged; *Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology/prevention & control; Norway; *Occupational Exposure; *Pensions; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Walking; *Work; Public health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To prospectively investigate the association between occupational physical activity (OPA) and disability pension due to musculoskeletal cause, mental cause or any cause. We also examined the combined association of OPA and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) with disability pension. METHODS: A population-based cohort study in Norway on 32 362 persons aged 20-65 years with questionnaire data on OPA and LTPA that were followed up for incident disability pension through the National Insurance Database. We used Cox regression to estimate adjusted HRs with 95% CIs. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 9.3 years, 3837 (12%) received disability pension. Compared with people with mostly sedentary work, those who performed much walking, much walking and lifting, and heavy physical work had HRs of 1.26 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.38), 1.44 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.58) and 1.48 (95% CI 1.33 to 1.70), respectively. These associations were stronger for disability pension due to musculoskeletal disorders, whereas there was no clear association between OPA and risk of disability pension due to mental disorders. People with high OPA and low LTPA had a HR of 1.77 (95% CI 1.58 to 1.98) for overall disability pension and HR of 2.56 (95% CI 2.10 to 3.11) for disability pension due to musculoskeletal disorders, versus low OPA and high LTPA. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a positive association between OPA and risk of disability pension due to all causes and musculoskeletal disorders, but not for mental disorders. Physical activity during leisure time reduced some, but not all of the unfavourable effect of physically demanding work on risk of disability pension.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1351-0711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28698178 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1898  
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Author Hjerkind, K.V.; Stenehjem, J.S.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title Adiposity, physical activity and risk of diabetes mellitus: prospective data from the population-based HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e013142  
  Keywords *Adiposity; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Body Mass Index; Comorbidity; Diabetes Mellitus/*epidemiology; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Young Adult; *Epidemiology; *Public Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Physical activity may counteract the adverse effects of adiposity on cardiovascular mortality; however, the evidence of a similar effect on diabetes is sparse. This study examines whether physical activity may compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk. METHODS: The study population consisted of 38 231 individuals aged 20 years or more who participated in two consecutive waves of the prospective longitudinal Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway: in 1984-1986 and in 1995-1997. A Poisson regression model with SEs derived from robust variance was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios of diabetes between categories of body mass index and physical activity. RESULTS: Risk of diabetes increased both with increasing body mass (Ptrend <0.001) and with decreasing physical activity level (Ptrend <0.001 in men and 0.01 in women). Combined analyses showed that men who were both obese and had low activity levels had a risk ratio of 17 (95% CI 9.52 to 30) compared to men who were normal weight and highly active, whereas obese men who reported high activity had a risk ratio of 13 (95% CI 6.92 to 26). Corresponding analysis in obese women produced risk ratios of 15 (95% CI 9.18 to 25) and 13 (95% CI 7.42 to 21) among women reporting low and high activity levels, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that overweight and obesity are associated with a substantially increased risk of diabetes, particularly among those who also reported being physically inactive. High levels of physical activity were associated with a lower risk of diabetes within all categories of body mass index, but there was no clear evidence that being physically active could entirely compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk.  
  Address Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28093432; PMCID:PMC5253523 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1929  
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Author Jorgensen, P.; Langhammer, A.; Krokstad, S.; Forsmo, S. url  doi
  Title Mortality in persons with undetected and diagnosed hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and hypothyroidism, compared with persons without corresponding disease – a prospective cohort study; The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Family Practice Abbreviated Journal BMC Fam Pract  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 98  
  Keywords Chronic disease; Diabetes; Hypertension; Primary care; Public health; Thyroid disorders  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Suggested strategies in reducing the impact of non-communicable diseases (NCD) are early diagnosing and screening. We have limited proof of benefit of population screening for NCD. Increased mortality in persons with diagnosed NCD has been shown for decades. However, mortality in undetected NCD has barely been studied. This paper explores whether all-cause mortality differed between persons with diagnosed hypothyroidism, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and hypertension, compared with persons with undetected-, and with persons without the corresponding disease. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of the general population in Nord-Trondelag, Norway. Persons >/=20 years at baseline 1995-97 were followed until death or June 15, 2016. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute age and multiple adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between disease status and all-cause mortality. The number of participants in the hypothyroidism study was 31,960, in the T2DM study 37,957, and in the hypertension study 63,371. RESULTS: Mortality was increased in persons with diagnosed type 2 diabetes and hypertension, compared to persons without corresponding disease; HR 1.69 (95% CI 1.55-1.84) and HR 1.23 (95% CI 1.09-1.39), respectively. Among persons with undetected T2DM, the HR was 1.21 (95% CI 1.08-1.37), whilst among undetected hypothyroidism and hypertension, mortality was not increased compared with persons without the diseases. Further, the association with mortality was stronger in persons with long duration of T2DM (HR 1.96 (95% CI 1.57-2.44)) and hypertension (HR 1.32 (95% CI 1.17-1.49)), compared with persons with short duration (HR 1.29 (1.09-1.53) and HR 1.16 (1.03-1-30) respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Mortality was increased in persons with diagnosed T2DM and hypertension, and in undetected T2DM, compared with persons without the diseases. The strength of the association with mortality in undetected T2DM was however lower compared with persons with diagnosed T2DM, and mortality was not increased in persons with undetected hypothyroidism and hypertension, compared with persons without the diseases. Thus, future research needs to test more thoroughly if early diagnosing of these diseases, such as general population screening, is beneficial for health.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Postbox 8905, 7491, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2296 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29212453; PMCID:PMC5719734 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1935  
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Author Perreault, K.; Bauman, A.; Johnson, N.; Britton, A.; Rangul, V.; Stamatakis, E. url  doi
  Title Does physical activity moderate the association between alcohol drinking and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular diseases mortality? A pooled analysis of eight British population cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication British Journal of Sports Medicine Abbreviated Journal Br J Sports Med  
  Volume 51 Issue 8 Pages 651-657  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*adverse effects; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; England; *Exercise; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Mortality; Neoplasms/*mortality; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Cancer; Epidemiology; Physical activity; Public health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine whether physical activity (PA) moderates the association between alcohol intake and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mortality. DESIGN: Prospective study using 8 British population-based surveys, each linked to cause-specific mortality: Health Survey for England (1994, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004 and 2006) and Scottish Health Survey (1998 and 2003). PARTICIPANTS: 36 370 men and women aged 40 years and over were included with a corresponding 5735 deaths and a mean of 353 049 person-years of follow-up. EXPOSURES: 6 sex-specific categories of alcohol intake (UK units/week) were defined: (1) never drunk; (2) ex-drinkers; (3) occasional drinkers; (4) within guidelines (<14 (women); <21 (men)); (5) hazardous (14-35 (women); 21-49 (men)) and (6) harmful (>35 (women) >49 (men)). PA was categorised as inactive (</=7 MET-hour/week), active at the lower (>7.5 MET-hour/week) and upper (>15 MET-hour/week) of recommended levels. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Cox proportional-hazard models were used to examine associations between alcohol consumption and all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality risk after adjusting for several confounders. Stratified analyses were performed to evaluate mortality risks within each PA stratum. RESULTS: We found a direct association between alcohol consumption and cancer mortality risk starting from drinking within guidelines (HR (95% CI) hazardous drinking: 1.40 (1.11 to 1.78)). Stratified analyses showed that the association between alcohol intake and mortality risk was attenuated (all-cause) or nearly nullified (cancer) among individuals who met the PA recommendations (HR (95% CI)). CONCLUSIONS: Meeting the current PA public health recommendations offsets some of the cancer and all-cause mortality risk associated with alcohol drinking.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-3674 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27581162 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1970  
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Author Stensland, S.O.; Dyb, G.; Thoresen, S.; Wentzel-Larsen, T.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Potentially traumatic interpersonal events, psychological distress and recurrent headache in a population-based cohort of adolescents: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 3 Issue 7 Pages  
  Keywords Public Health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: Recurrent headache co-occurs commonly with psychological distress, such as anxiety or depression. Potentially traumatic interpersonal events (PTIEs) could represent important precursors of psychological distress and recurrent headache in adolescents. Our objective was to assess the hypothesised association between exposure to PTIEs and recurrent migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) in adolescents, and to further examine the potential impact of psychological distress on this relationship. DESIGN: Population-based, cross-sectional cohort study. The study includes self-reported data from youth on exposure to potentially traumatic events, psychological distress and a validated interview on headache. SETTING: The adolescent part of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2006-2008 (HUNT), conducted in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: A cohort of 10 464 adolescents were invited to the study. Age ranged from 12 to 20 years. The response rate was 73% (7620), of whom 50% (3832) were girls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Data from the headache interview served as the outcome. Recurrent headache was defined as headache recurring at least monthly during the past year, and was subclassified into monthly, weekly and daily complaints. Subtypes were classified as TTH, migraine, migraine with TTH and/or non-classifiable headache, in accordance with the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria, second edition. RESULTS: Multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusted for sociodemographics, showed consistently significant associations between exposure to PTIEs and recurrent headache, regardless of the frequency or subtype of headache. Increasing exposure to PTIEs was associated with higher prevalence of recurrent headache, indicating a dose-response relationship. The strength of associations between exposure to PTIEs and all recurrent headache disorders was significantly attenuated when psychological distress was entered into the regression equation. CONCLUSIONS: The empirical evidence of a strong and cumulative relationship between exposure to PTIEs, psychological distress and recurrent headache indicates a need for the integration of somatic and psychological healthcare services for adolescents in the prevention, assessment and treatment of recurrent headache. Prospective studies are needed.  
  Address Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23901028; PMC3731723 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1397  
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Author Storeng, S.H.; Sund, E.R.; Krokstad, S. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with basic and instrumental activities of daily living in elderly participants of a population-based survey: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages e018942  
  Keywords *Activities of Daily Living; Aged; Depression/epidemiology; Disabled Persons/*psychology; Exercise; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Services for the Aged/*statistics & numerical data; Health Status; *Health Surveys; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Quality of Life/*psychology; Self Report; Smoking/epidemiology; Social Participation/*psychology; *epidemiology; *public health; *social medicine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To investigate factors associated with the need for assistance in basic and instrumental activities of daily living in Norwegian elderly. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), a large population-based health survey in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 5050 individuals aged 60-69 years old at baseline in HUNT2 (1995-1997) who also participated in HUNT3 (2006-2008) were included in the study. 676/693 individuals were excluded in the analyses due to missing outcomes. OUTCOMES: Needing assistance in one or more basic or instrumental activities of daily living reported in HUNT3. RESULTS: In adjusted multinomial logistic regression analyses, poor self-rated health and depression were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more basic activities of daily living in HUNT3, with ORs of 2.13 (1.35 to 3.38) and 1.58 (0.91 to 2.73). Poor self-rated health and poor life satisfaction were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more instrumental activities of daily living in HUNT3, with ORs of 2.30 (1.93 to 2.74) and 2.29 (1.86 to 2.81), respectively. Excessive sitting time, short or prolonged sleeping time, and physical inactivity seemed to be the most important lifestyle risk factors for basic/instrumental activities of daily living (ADL/IADL) disability. The studied factors were, in general, greater risk factors for mortality during follow-up than for ADL/IADL disability. Smoking was the strongest risk factor for mortality during follow-up and non-participation in HUNT3. Smoking and low social participation were the strongest risk factors for non-participation in HUNT3. CONCLUSIONS: Subjective health perception, life satisfaction and depression were the strongest risk factors for needing assistance in one or more basic/instrumental activities of daily living later in life. These factors could be possible targets for prevention purposes.  
  Address Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29530908; PMCID:PMC5857703 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2175  
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