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Author (up) Gabin, J.M.; Tambs, K.; Saltvedt, I.; Sund, E.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title Association between blood pressure and Alzheimer disease measured up to 27 years prior to diagnosis: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alzheimer's Research & Therapy Abbreviated Journal Alzheimers Res Ther  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 37  
  Keywords Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alzheimer Disease/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Asymptomatic Diseases/*epidemiology; Blood Pressure Determination/statistics & numerical data; Comorbidity; Dementia/diagnosis/epidemiology; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*diagnostic imaging/*epidemiology; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sex Distribution; Alzheimer disease; Blood pressure; Epidemiology; Prospective case cohort; Risk factors; Vascular dementia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: A lot of attention has been paid to the relationship of blood pressure and dementia because epidemiological research has reported conflicting evidence. Observational data has shown that midlife hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia later in life, whereas there is evidence that low blood pressure is predictive in later life. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between dementia and blood pressure measured up to 27 years (mean 17.6 years) prior to ascertainment. METHODS: In Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, incident dementia data were collected during 1995-2011, and the diagnoses were validated by a panel of experts in the field. By using the subjects' personal identification numbers, the dementia data were linked to data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a large, population-based health study performed in 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) and 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). A total of 24,638 participants of the HUNT Study were included in the present study, 579 of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, or vascular dementia. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between dementia and blood pressure data from HUNT 1 and HUNT 2. RESULTS: Over the age of 60 years, consistent inverse associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and all-cause dementia, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease, but not with vascular dementia, when adjusting for age, sex, education, and other relevant covariates. This was observed for systolic blood pressure in both HUNT 1 and HUNT 2, regardless of antihypertensive medication use. There was an adverse association between systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and Alzheimer disease in individuals treated with antihypertensive medication under the age of 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our data are in line with those in previous studies demonstrating an inverse association between dementia and systolic blood pressure in individuals over the age of 60 years. We cannot exclude a survival effect, however. Among middle-aged subjects (<60 years), elevated systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were associated with eventual Alzheimer disease in individuals who reported using antihypertensive medication.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN 1758-9193 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28569205; PMCID:PMC5452294 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1900  
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Author (up) Hansen, T.I.; Haferstrom, E.C.; Brunner, J.F.; Lehn, H.; Haberg, A.K. url  doi
  Title Initial validation of a web-based self-administered neuropsychological test battery for older adults and seniors Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Clin Exp Neuropsychol Abbreviated Journal Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology  
  Volume 37 Issue 6 Pages 581-594  
  Keywords HUNT3; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Computer Literacy; Factor Analysis, Statistical; Female; Humans; *Internet; Male; Middle Aged; Neuropsychological Tests/*standards; Psychometrics/*instrumentation; Reproducibility of Results  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: Computerized neuropsychological tests are effective in assessing different cognitive domains, but are often limited by the need of proprietary hardware and technical staff. Web-based tests can be more accessible and flexible. We aimed to investigate validity, effects of computer familiarity, education, and age, and the feasibility of a new web-based self-administered neuropsychological test battery (Memoro) in older adults and seniors. METHOD: A total of 62 (37 female) participants (mean age 60.7 years) completed the Memoro web-based neuropsychological test battery and a traditional battery composed of similar tests intended to measure the same cognitive constructs. Participants were assessed on computer familiarity and how they experienced the two batteries. To properly test the factor structure of Memoro, an additional factor analysis in 218 individuals from the HUNT population was performed. RESULTS: Comparing Memoro to traditional tests, we observed good concurrent validity (r = .49-.63). The performance on the traditional and Memoro test battery was consistent, but differences in raw scores were observed with higher scores on verbal memory and lower in spatial memory in Memoro. Factor analysis indicated two factors: verbal and spatial memory. There were no correlations between test performance and computer familiarity after adjustment for age or age and education. Subjects reported that they preferred web-based testing as it allowed them to set their own pace, and they did not feel scrutinized by an administrator. CONCLUSIONS: Memoro showed good concurrent validity compared to neuropsychological tests measuring similar cognitive constructs. Based on the current results, Memoro appears to be a tool that can be used to assess cognitive function in older and senior adults. Further work is necessary to ascertain its validity and reliability.  
  Address  
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  Publisher Place of Publication a Department of Neuroscience , Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) , Trondheim , N Editor  
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  Notes Hansen, Tor IvarHaferstrom, Elise Christina DBrunner, Jan FLehn, HanneHaberg, Asta KristineEnglandJ Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2015 Aug;37(6):581-94. doi: 10.1080/13803395.2015.1038220. Epub 2015 May 26. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Hansen2015d Serial 1815  
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Author (up) Johnson, M.P.; Brennecke, S.P.; East, C.E.; Goring, H.H.H.; Kent, J.W.J.; Dyer, T.D.; Said, J.M.; Roten, L.T.; Iversen, A.-C.; Abraham, L.J.; Heinonen, S.; Kajantie, E.; Kere, J.; Kivinen, K.; Pouta, A.; Laivuori, H.; Austgulen, R.; Blangero, J.; Moses, E.K. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide association scan identifies a risk locus for preeclampsia on 2q14, near the inhibin, beta B gene Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 7 Issue 3 Pages e33666  
  Keywords Australia; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2/*genetics; Cohort Studies; Computational Biology; Female; Finland; Gene Expression Regulation; Genetic Loci/*genetics; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Genome, Human/genetics; *Genome-Wide Association Study; Humans; Inhibin-beta Subunits/*genetics/metabolism; Norway; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics; Pre-Eclampsia/*genetics; Pregnancy; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; Sequence Analysis, DNA  
  Abstract Elucidating the genetic architecture of preeclampsia is a major goal in obstetric medicine. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for preeclampsia in unrelated Australian individuals of Caucasian ancestry using the Illumina OmniExpress-12 BeadChip to successfully genotype 648,175 SNPs in 538 preeclampsia cases and 540 normal pregnancy controls. Two SNP associations (rs7579169, p = 3.58x10(-7), OR = 1.57; rs12711941, p = 4.26x10(-7), OR = 1.56) satisfied our genome-wide significance threshold (modified Bonferroni p<5.11x10(-7)). These SNPs reside in an intergenic region less than 15 kb downstream from the 3' terminus of the Inhibin, beta B (INHBB) gene on 2q14.2. They are in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other (r(2) = 0.92), but not (r(2)<0.80) with any other genotyped SNP +/-250 kb. DNA re-sequencing in and around the INHBB structural gene identified an additional 25 variants. Of the 21 variants that we successfully genotyped back in the case-control cohort the most significant association observed was for a third intergenic SNP (rs7576192, p = 1.48x10(-7), OR = 1.59) in strong LD with the two significant GWAS SNPs (r(2)>0.92). We attempted to provide evidence of a putative regulatory role for these SNPs using bioinformatic analyses and found that they all reside within regions of low sequence conservation and/or low complexity, suggesting functional importance is low. We also explored the mRNA expression in decidua of genes +/-500 kb of INHBB and found a nominally significant correlation between a transcript encoded by the EPB41L5 gene, approximately 250 kb centromeric to INHBB, and preeclampsia (p = 0.03). We were unable to replicate the associations shown by the significant GWAS SNPs in case-control cohorts from Norway and Finland, leading us to conclude that it is more likely that these SNPs are in LD with as yet unidentified causal variant(s).  
  Address Department of Genetics, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, United States of America  
  Corporate Author FINNPEC Study Group Thesis  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22432041; PMC3303857 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1534  
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Author (up) Landmark, T.; Romundstad, P.; Dale, O.; Borchgrevink, P.C.; Kaasa, S. url  doi
  Title Estimating the prevalence of chronic pain: validation of recall against longitudinal reporting (the HUNT pain study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 153 Issue 7 Pages 1368-1373  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Chronic Pain/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Mental Recall/*physiology; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; *Pain Measurement; Prevalence; Questionnaires; Reproducibility of Results; Young Adult  
  Abstract Methods for classifying chronic pain in population studies are highly variable, and prevalence estimates ranges from 11% to 64%. Limited knowledge about the persistence of pain and the validity of recall questions defining chronic pain make findings difficult to interpret and compare. The primary aim of the current study was to characterize the persistence of pain in the general population and to validate recall measures against longitudinal reporting of pain. A random sample of 6419 participants from a population study (the HUNT 3 study in Norway) was invited to report pain on the SF-8 verbal pain rating scale every 3 months over a 12-month period and to report pain lasting more than 6 months at 12-month follow-up. Complete data were obtained from 3364 participants. Pain reporting was highly stable (intraclass correlation 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.67), and the prevalence of chronic pain varied considerably according to level of severity and persistence: 31% reported mild pain or more, whereas 2% reported severe pain on 4 of 4 consecutive measurements. When defined as moderate pain or more on at least 3 of 4 consecutive measurements, the prevalence was 26%. Compared with the longitudinal classification, a cross-sectional measure of moderate pain or more during the last week on the SF-8 scale presented a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 84%, and a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 90% when combined with a 6-month recall question. Thus pain reporting in the general population is stable and cross-sectional measures may give valid prevalence estimates of chronic pain.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. tormod.landmark@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3959 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:22575226 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1539  
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Author (up) Loe, H.; Nes, B.M.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Predicting VO2peak from Submaximal- and Peak Exercise Models: The HUNT 3 Fitness Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PloS one  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages e0144873  
  Keywords Adult; Body Weight; *Exercise Test; Female; Heart Rate; Humans; Linear Models; Male; Middle Aged; *Models, Biological; Norway; Oxygen Consumption/*physiology; Reproducibility of Results  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) is seldom assessed in health care settings although being inversely linked to cardiovascular risk and all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to develop VO2peak prediction models for men and women based on directly measured VO2peak from a large healthy population. METHODS: VO2peak prediction models based on submaximal- and peak performance treadmill work were derived from multiple regression analysis. 4637 healthy men and women aged 20-90 years were included. Data splitting was used to generate validation and cross-validation samples. RESULTS: The accuracy for the peak performance models were 10.5% (SEE = 4.63 mLkg(-1)min(-1)) and 11.5% (SEE = 4.11 mLkg(-1)min(-1)) for men and women, respectively, with 75% and 72% of the variance explained. For the submaximal performance models accuracy were 14.1% (SEE = 6.24 mLkg(-1)min(-1)) and 14.4% (SEE = 5.17 mLkg(-1)min(-1)) for men and women, respectively, with 55% and 56% of the variance explained. The validation and cross-validation samples displayed SEE and variance explained in agreement with the total sample. Cross-classification between measured and predicted VO2peak accurately classified 91% of the participants within the correct or nearest quintile of measured VO2peak. CONCLUSION: Judicious use of the exercise prediction models presented in this study offers valuable information in providing a fairly accurate assessment of VO2peak, which may be beneficial for risk stratification in health care settings.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegi Editor  
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  Notes Loe, HenrikNes, Bjarne MWisloff, UlrikengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't2016/01/23 06:00PLoS One. 2016 Jan 21;11(1):e0144873. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0144873. eCollection 2016. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Loe2016 Serial 1767  
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Author (up) Nielsen, J.B.; Fritsche, L.G.; Zhou, W.; Teslovich, T.M.; Holmen, O.L.; Gustafsson, S.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Schmidt, E.M.; Beaumont, R.; Wolford, B.N.; Lin, M.; Brummett, C.M.; Preuss, M.H.; Refsgaard, L.; Bottinger, E.P.; Graham, S.E.; Surakka, I.; Chu, Y.; Skogholt, A.H.; Dalen, H.; Boyle, A.P.; Oral, H.; Herron, T.J.; Kitzman, J.; Jalife, J.; Svendsen, J.H.; Olesen, M.S.; Njolstad, I.; Lochen, M.-L.; Baras, A.; Gottesman, O.; Marcketta, A.; O'Dushlaine, C.; Ritchie, M.D.; Wilsgaard, T.; Loos, R.J.F.; Frayling, T.M.; Boehnke, M.; Ingelsson, E.; Carey, D.J.; Dewey, F.E.; Kang, H.M.; Abecasis, G.R.; Hveem, K.; Willer, C.J. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide Study of Atrial Fibrillation Identifies Seven Risk Loci and Highlights Biological Pathways and Regulatory Elements Involved in Cardiac Development Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Human Genetics Abbreviated Journal Am J Hum Genet  
  Volume 102 Issue 1 Pages 103-115  
  Keywords Atrial Fibrillation/*genetics; *Genetic Loci; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease; *Genome-Wide Association Study; Heart/*embryology; Humans; Inheritance Patterns/genetics; Multifactorial Inheritance/genetics; Organ Specificity/genetics; Physical Chromosome Mapping; Quantitative Trait Loci/genetics; Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid/*genetics; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; *Cdkn2c; *Dmrta2; *Gwas; *Ttn; *atrial fibrillation; *cardiomyopathy; *fetal; *genetic risk score; *heart; *pathway  
  Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure, and premature death. The pathogenesis of AF remains poorly understood, which contributes to the current lack of highly effective treatments. To understand the genetic variation and biology underlying AF, we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6,337 AF individuals and 61,607 AF-free individuals from Norway, including replication in an additional 30,679 AF individuals and 278,895 AF-free individuals. Through genotyping and dense imputation mapping from whole-genome sequencing, we tested almost nine million genetic variants across the genome and identified seven risk loci, including two novel loci. One novel locus (lead single-nucleotide variant [SNV] rs12614435; p = 6.76 x 10(-18)) comprised intronic and several highly correlated missense variants situated in the I-, A-, and M-bands of titin, which is the largest protein in humans and responsible for the passive elasticity of heart and skeletal muscle. The other novel locus (lead SNV rs56202902; p = 1.54 x 10(-11)) covered a large, gene-dense chromosome 1 region that has previously been linked to cardiac conduction. Pathway and functional enrichment analyses suggested that many AF-associated genetic variants act through a mechanism of impaired muscle cell differentiation and tissue formation during fetal heart development.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Center for Statistical Genetics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491, Norway; Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Electronic address: cristen@umich.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9297 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29290336; PMCID:PMC5777936 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2143  
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