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Author Brunes, A.; Gudmundsdottir, S.L.; Augestad, L.B.   
  Title Gender-specific associations between leisure-time physical activity and symptoms of anxiety: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol Abbreviated Journal Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology  
  Volume 50 Issue 3 Pages 419-427  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*diagnosis/epidemiology/psychology; Anxiety Disorders/*diagnosis/psychology; Exercise/*psychology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Leisure Activities/*psychology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Prospective Studies; Sex Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Young Adult; HUNT2; HUNT3  
  Abstract PURPOSE: The underlying goal of the study was to examine gender-specific effects of leisure-time physical activity on the development of symptoms of anxiety. METHODS: The second wave of a prospective cohort survey (HUNT 2) was conducted during 1995-1997 in the county of Nord-Trondelag, Norway, with a follow-up in 2006-2008 (HUNT 3). The sample consisted of 12,796 women and 11,195 men with an age range of 19-85 years. A binomial model with a log-link function and generalized linear model analysis with gamma distribution was used to assess the association between physical activity and anxiety symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale anxiety subscale, HADS-A). RESULTS: A total of 1,211 (9.5 %) women and 650 (5.8 %) men developed HADS-defined anxiety (>/=8 on the HADS-A scale). Men who scored in the middle tertile of the calculated physical activity index developed significantly fewer cases of HADS-defined anxiety compared with men in the lowest tertile (p  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Neuroscience, The Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Editor  
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  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Brunes2015 Serial 1797  
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Author de Ridder, K.; Pape, K.; Krokstad, S.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Health in adolescence and subsequent receipt of social insurance benefits – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen Abbreviated Journal Tidsskrift for den Norske laegeforening  
  Volume 135 Issue 10 Pages 942-948  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Cost of Illness; Female; Follow-Up Studies; *Health Status; Health Surveys; Humans; Insurance Benefits/statistics & numerical data; Insurance, Disability/*statistics & numerical data; Male; Norway; Registries; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors; Self Report; Sex Factors; Sick Leave; Social Security/*statistics & numerical data; Time Factors; Young Adult; Young-HUNT; HUNT2  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Long-term illness and work incapacity in young adulthood has consequences for both the individual and for society. The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between adolescent health and receipt of long-term sickness and disability benefits for young adults in their twenties. MATERIAL AND METHOD: An adolescent population of 8949 school students (aged 13-21 years) assessed their own health in the Young-HUNT1 Study (1995-1997). Health was measured by means of a questionnaire enquiring about chronic somatic illnesses, somatic symptoms, symptoms of anxiety and depression, sleep disturbance, poor concentration, self-reported health and smoking, and by measuring height and weight. Information about receipt of long-term benefits was retrieved from the FD-Trygd registry for the period 1998-2008 and defined as receipt of sickness benefit (>180 days/year), medical/vocational rehabilitation benefit and disability pension in the age group 20-29 years. We investigated the relationship between adolescent health and long-term social insurance benefits with logistic regression, adjusted for sex, age, follow-up time, mother's education and family composition. Siblings with different exposure and outcome were investigated to adjust for all familial factors shared by siblings. RESULTS: Each of the health measures was associated with an increased risk of long-term benefit. For example, adolescents who reported one or more somatic illnesses or poor concentration had a 5.4 and 3.4 percentage point higher risk, respectively, of receiving long-term benefits at the age of 20-29 years than adolescents who did not report somatic illness or poor concentration. Moreover the risk increased with an increase in the number of health problems. Sibling analyses supported these associations. INTERPRETATION: Health in adolescence is an indicator of increased vulnerability in the transition to the labour market. Preventing health selection during this transition should be a priority for welfare policy.  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Institutt for samfunnsmedisin Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet og Folkehelseinstitutt, Editor  
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  Notes de Ridder, KarinPape, KristineKrokstad, SteinarBjorngaard, Johan HakonengnorNorway2015/06/04 06:00Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Jun 2;135(10):942-8. doi: 10.4045/tidsskr.14.0261. eCollection 2015 Jun 2. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ deRidder2015 Serial 1802  
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Author Derdikman-Eiron, R.; Hjemdal, O.; Lydersen, S.; Bratberg, G.H.; Indredavik, M.S. url  doi
  Title Adolescent predictors and associates of psychosocial functioning in young men and women: 11 year follow-up findings from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Psychology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Psychol  
  Volume 54 Issue 2 Pages 95-101  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Anxiety/psychology; Depression/psychology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; *Mental Health; *Personal Satisfaction; Questionnaires; *Self Concept; Self Report; Sex Factors; *Social Adjustment; *Social Support; Socioeconomic Factors  
  Abstract The aim of this paper was to investigate whether psychosocial functioning in adulthood (e.g., friends support, cohabitation, community connectedness and work satisfaction) could be predicted by mental health, subjective well-being, social relations and behavior problems in adolescence, and whether gender was a moderator in these associations. Data were obtained from a major population-based Norwegian study, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), in which 517 men and 819 women completed an extensive self-report questionnaires at baseline (mean age 14.4 years) and at follow-up (mean age 26.9 years). Community connectedness as well as work satisfaction were predicted by subjective well-being. Cohabitation was predicted by male gender and frequency of meeting friends in adolescence, and friends support was predicted by frequency of meeting friends. Gender had a minor effect as a moderator. Frequency of meeting friends and subjective well-being seemed to be the strongest adolescent predictors of psychosocial functioning in young adulthood. These findings may have implications both for prevention and intervention in adolescence, as well as for future research.  
  Address The Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, RBUP, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. ruth.derdikman@ntnu.no  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5564 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23350873 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1454  
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Author Derdikman-Eiron, R.; Indredavik, M.S.; Bakken, I.J.; Bratberg, G.H.; Hjemdal, O.; Colton, M. url  doi
  Title Gender differences in psychosocial functioning of adolescents with symptoms of anxiety and depression: longitudinal findings from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol  
  Volume 47 Issue 11 Pages 1855-1863  
  Keywords Adaptation, Psychological; Adolescent; Anxiety Disorders/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology; Child Behavior Disorders/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology; Depression/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology; Depressive Disorder/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Norway; Personality Tests/statistics & numerical data; Quality of Life/psychology; Questionnaires; Self Concept; Sex Characteristics; Sex Factors; Social Adjustment  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To explore longitudinally gender differences in the associations between psychosocial functioning, subjective well-being and self-esteem among adolescents with and without symptoms of anxiety and depression. METHODS: Data were obtained from a major population-based Norwegian study, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, in which 1,092 boys and 1,262 girls (86% of all invited) completed an extensive self-report questionnaire at baseline (mean age 14.4 years) and at follow-up (mean age 18.4 years). RESULTS: Gender was a moderator variable in the associations between symptoms of anxiety and depression and impairment, meaning that boys' functioning was impaired to a larger extent than girls' functioning. A statistically significant interaction effect between gender and symptoms of anxiety and depression was found at follow-up in terms of subjective well-being (p < 0.05), self-esteem (p < 0.05), academic problems (p < 0.01), behaviour problems (p < 0.01) and frequency of meeting friends (p < 0.001). Onset of symptoms between baseline and follow-up was associated with less frequent meetings with friends among boys, but not among girls. After remission of symptoms, boys still had more behaviour and academic problems, less frequently met friends and reported lower subjective well-being and self-esteem than boys who had no symptoms at both time points. No similar differences were found among the girls. CONCLUSION: Previous and ongoing symptoms of anxiety and depression had more negative consequences for boys than for girls. These findings may contribute to improved assessment and intervention methods tailored differently for each gender.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, The Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (RBUP), Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491, Trondheim, Norway. ruth.derdikman@ntnu.no  
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  ISSN 0933-7954 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:22382555 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1521  
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Author Engdahl, B.; Tambs, K.; Hoffman, H.J. url  doi
  Title Otoacoustic emissions, pure-tone audiometry, and self-reported hearing Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Audiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Audiol  
  Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 74-82  
  Keywords Acoustic Stimulation; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Audiometry, Pure-Tone; Auditory Threshold; *Disability Evaluation; Factor Analysis, Statistical; Female; *Hearing; Hearing Disorders/*diagnosis/physiopathology/psychology; Humans; Linear Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous; Predictive Value of Tests; Principal Component Analysis; *Self Report; Sex Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to describe the association between otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), pure-tone thresholds, and self-reported hearing disability. DESIGN: A population-based cohort of 4202 adults was examined with air conduction pure-tone audiometry, transient OAE (TEOAE), and distortion product OAE (DPOAE). Participants completed 15 self-report items on hearing disability. RESULTS: Correlation coefficients in the range of 0.3 to 0.5 were observed between OAE (TEOAE, and DPOAE) and self-reported hearing depending on age and sex. Pure-tone average hearing thresholds generally predicted self-reported hearing slightly better than did the OAE measures. Adding TEOAE and DPOAE as predictors in a multivariate model together with the scores from pure-tone audiometry did not predict self-reported hearing better than did pure-tone audiometry alone. The relationship between OAE and self-reported hearing was stronger in men than in women and became more manifest with age, a trend also stronger in men. CONCLUSIONS: OAEs were shown to be a valid measure of self-reported hearing disability of the general population but added no additional information to what pure-tone hearing thresholds had already captured.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. bo.engdahl@fhi.no  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1499-2027 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23216196 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1453  
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Author Fanidi, A.; Muller, D.C.; Yuan, J.-M.; Stevens, V.L.; Weinstein, S.J.; Albanes, D.; Prentice, R.; Thomsen, C.A.; Pettinger, M.; Cai, Q.; Blot, W.J.; Wu, J.; Arslan, A.A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; McCullough, M.L.; Le Marchand, L.; Wilkens, L.R.; Haiman, C.A.; Zhang, X.; Han, J.; Stampfer, M.J.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Giovannucci, E.; Giles, G.G.; Hodge, A.M.; Severi, G.; Johansson, M.; Grankvist, K.; Langhammer, A.; Krokstad, S.; Naess, M.; Wang, R.; Gao, Y.-T.; Butler, L.M.; Koh, W.-P.; Shu, X.-O.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Li, H.; Zheng, W.; Lan, Q.; Visvanathan, K.; Bolton, J.H.; Ueland, P.M.; Midttun, O.; Ulvik, A.; Caporaso, N.E.; Purdue, M.; Ziegler, R.G.; Freedman, N.D.; Buring, J.E.; Lee, I.-M.; Sesso, H.D.; Gaziano, J.M.; Manjer, J.; Ericson, U.; Relton, C.; Brennan, P.; Johansson, M. url  doi
  Title Circulating Folate, Vitamin B6, and Methionine in Relation to Lung Cancer Risk in the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the National Cancer Institute Abbreviated Journal J Natl Cancer Inst  
  Volume 110 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Asia/epidemiology; Australia/epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Cotinine/blood; Europe/epidemiology; Female; Folic Acid/*blood; Humans; Incidence; Lung Neoplasms/blood/*epidemiology; Male; Methionine/*blood; Middle Aged; Prospective Studies; Protective Factors; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Smoking/blood/epidemiology; United States/epidemiology; Vitamin B 6/*blood  
  Abstract Background: Circulating concentrations of B vitamins and factors related to one-carbon metabolism have been found to be strongly inversely associated with lung cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The extent to which these associations are present in other study populations is unknown. Methods: Within 20 prospective cohorts from the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium, a nested case-control study was designed including 5364 incident lung cancer case patients and 5364 control subjects who were individually matched to case patients by age, sex, cohort, and smoking status. Centralized biochemical analyses were performed to measure circulating concentrations of vitamin B6, folate, and methionine, as well as cotinine as an indicator of recent tobacco exposure. The association between these biomarkers and lung cancer risk was evaluated using conditional logistic regression models. Results: Participants with higher circulating concentrations of vitamin B6 and folate had a modestly decreased risk of lung cancer risk overall, the odds ratios when comparing the top and bottom fourths (OR 4vs1 ) being 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.78 to 1.00) and 0.86 (95% CI = 0.74 to 0.99), respectively. We found stronger associations among men (vitamin B6: OR 4vs1 = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.89; folate: OR 4vs1 = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.61 to 0.93) and ever smokers (vitamin B6: OR 4vs1 = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.67 to 0.91; folate: OR 4vs1 = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.73 to 1.03). We further noted that the association of folate was restricted to Europe/Australia and Asia, whereas no clear association was observed for the United States. Circulating concentrations of methionine were not associated with lung cancer risk overall or in important subgroups. Conclusions: Although confounding by tobacco exposure or reverse causation cannot be ruled out, these study results are compatible with a small decrease in lung cancer risk in ever smokers who avoid low concentrations of circulating folate and vitamin B6.  
  Address Genetic Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, UK; Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA; Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Inc., Atlanta, GA; Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics and Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; Health Promotion Sciences, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN; International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD; Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Population Health and Environmental Medicine and Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; Epidemiology Program, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Division of Preventive Medicine, and Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology and Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Australia; Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Molecular end Epidemiology Unit, HuGeF, Human Genetics Foundation, Torino, Italy; Inserm (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale), Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Villejuif, France; Umea, University, Umea, Sweden; HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway; Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China; Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore; Department of Epidemiology, George W Comstock Center for Public Health Research and Prevention Health Monitoring Unit, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD; Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway; Boston VA Medical Center, Boston, MA; Department of Surgery, Skane University Hospital Malmo, Lund University, Malmo, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmo, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
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  ISSN 0027-8874 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28922778; PMCID:PMC5989622 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2081  
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Author Fleiner, H.F.; Bjoro, T.; Midthjell, K.; Grill, V.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Prevalence of Thyroid Dysfunction in Autoimmune and Type 2 Diabetes: The Population-Based HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication J Clin Endocrinol Metab Abbreviated Journal The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism  
  Volume 101 Issue 2 Pages 669-677  
  Keywords Adult; Age of Onset; Aged; Cross-Sectional Studies; Databases, Factual; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*complications/*epidemiology; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Hyperthyroidism/complications/epidemiology; Hypothyroidism/complications/epidemiology; Iodide Peroxidase/blood/immunology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Sex Factors; Thyroid Diseases/*complications/*epidemiology; Thyroid Hormones/blood  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Associations between autoimmune diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease are known but insufficiently characterized. Some evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes may also be associated with hypothyroidism. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to investigate associations of autoimmune and type 2 diabetes with the prevalence of hypo- and hyperthyroidism. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a cross-sectional, population-based study of adults in two surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health (HUNT) Study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 34 235 participants of HUNT2 (1995-1997) and 48 809 participants of HUNT3 (2006-2008) participated in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of hypo- and hyperthyroidism was estimated, assessed by self-report, serum measurements, and linkage with the Norwegian Prescription Database. RESULTS: In HUNT2, autoimmune diabetes was associated with a higher age-adjusted prevalence of hypothyroidism among both women (prevalence ratio 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-2.47) and men (prevalence ratio 2.71, 95% CI 1.76-4.19), compared with having no diabetes. For hyperthyroidism, the corresponding cumulative prevalence ratios were 2.12 (95% CI 1.36-3.32) in women and 2.54 (95% CI 1.24-5.18) in men with autoimmune diabetes. The age-adjusted excess prevalence of hypothyroidism ( approximately 6 percentage points) and the presence of thyroid peroxidase antibodies (8-10 percentage points) associated with autoimmune diabetes was similar in women and men. Type 2 diabetes was not associated with the prevalence of hypothyroidism. In HUNT3, associations were broadly similar to those in HUNT2. CONCLUSIONS: Autoimmune diabetes, but not type 2 diabetes, was strongly and gender neutrally associated with an increased prevalence of hypo- and hyperthyroidism and the presence of thyroid peroxidase antibodies. Increased surveillance for hypothyroidism appears not necessary in patients with type 2 diabetes.  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine (H.F.F., V.G.), Norwegian University of Science Editor  
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  Notes Fleiner, Hanne FBjoro, TrineMidthjell, KristianGrill, ValdemarAsvold, Bjorn OengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't2015/11/20 06:00J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Feb;101(2):669-77. doi: 10.1210/jc.2015-3235. Epub 2015 Nov 19. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Fleiner2016 Serial 1738  
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Author Fossa, S.D.; Dahl, A.A.; Langhammer, A.; Weedon-Fekjaer, H. url  doi
  Title Cancer patients' participation in population-based health surveys: findings from the HUNT studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Res Notes Abbreviated Journal BMC research notes  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages 649  
  Keywords HUNT1; HUNT2; HUNT3; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Health Surveys/*methods/*statistics & numerical data; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasms/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Patient Participation/*statistics & numerical data; Registries/statistics & numerical data; Sex Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The magnitude of participation bias due to non-participation should be considered for cancer patients invited to population-based surveys. We studied participation rates among persons with and without cancer in a large population based study, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). METHODS: Citizens 20 years or above living in the Nord-Trondelag County of Norway have been invited three times to comprehensive health surveys. The invitation files with data on sex, invitation date and participation were linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. In a first step unadjusted crude participation rates (participants/invited persons) were estimated for cancer patients (CaPts) and non-cancer persons (NonCaPers), followed by logistic regression analyses with adjustment for age and sex. To evaluate the “practical” significance of the estimated odds ratios in the cancer diagnosis group, relative risks were also estimated comparing the observed rates to the estimated rates under the counterfactual assumption of no earlier cancer diagnosis among CaPts. RESULTS: Overall 3 % of the participants in the three HUNT studies were CaPts and 59 % of them had been diagnosed with their first life-time cancer >5 years prior to each survey. In each of the three HUNT surveys crude participation rates were similar for CaPts and NonCaPers. Adjusted for sex and age, CaPts' likelihood to participate in HUNT1 (1984-86) and HUNT2 (1995-97), but not in HUNT3 (2006-2008), was statistically significantly reduced compared to NonCaPers, equaling a relative risk of 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The lowest odds ratio emerged for CaPts diagnosed during the last 2 years preceding a HUNT invitation. Only one-third of CaPts participating in a survey also participated in the subsequent survey compared to approximately two-thirds of NonCaPers, and 11 % of CaPts participated in all three HUNT surveys compared to 37 % of NonCaPers. CONCLUSION: In the three HUNT surveys no or only minor participation bias exist as to CaPts' participation rates. In longitudinal studies selection bias as to long-term cancer survivorship should be taken into account, the percentage of repeatedly participating CaPts diminishing more strongly than among NonCaPers.  
  Address  
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  Publisher Place of Publication National Advisory Unit for Late Effects after Cancer Therapy, Oslo University Hospital, Radium Hospi Editor  
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  Notes Fossa, Sophie DDahl, Alv ALanghammer, ArnulfWeedon-Fekjaer, HaraldengEngland2015/11/07 06:00BMC Res Notes. 2015 Nov 5;8:649. doi: 10.1186/s13104-015-1635-5. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Fossa2015 Serial 1809  
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Author Grav, S.; Stordal, E.; Romild, U.K.; Hellzen, O. url  doi
  Title The relationship among neuroticism, extraversion, and depression in the HUNT Study: in relation to age and gender Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Issues in Mental Health Nursing Abbreviated Journal Issues Ment Health Nurs  
  Volume 33 Issue 11 Pages 777-785  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety Disorders/*epidemiology/*nursing/psychology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depressive Disorder/*epidemiology/*nursing/psychology; *Extraversion (Psychology); Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Personality Inventory/statistics & numerical data; Psychometrics; Sex Factors; Statistics as Topic; Young Adult  
  Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between personality and depression in a general population in relation to gender and age. The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (2006-2008), a large cross-sectional survey, was used. The sample consists of 35,832 men (16,104) and women (19,728) aged 20-89 years, living in the Nord-Trondelag County of Norway, with valid ratings on the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ). This study demonstrates a relationship between depression and both neuroticism and extraversion in a general population. Older people score low more often on Extraversion (E) than younger people. Interactions were observed between neuroticism and age, gender, and extraversion with depression. The interaction term indicates a high score on Neuroticism (N) enhanced by introversion, older age, and being a male with depression. The findings suggest that health professionals may need to put extra effort into the care of patients with low extraversion and high neuroticism, in order to help those patients avoid depression.  
  Address Nord-Trondelag Univercity College, Namsos, Norway  
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  ISSN 0161-2840 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23146012 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1526  
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Author Haugland, S.H.; Holmen, T.L.; Ravndal, E.; Bratberg, G.H. url  doi
  Title Parental alcohol misuse and hazardous drinking among offspring in a general teenage population: gender-specific findings from the Young-HUNT 3 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 13 Issue Pages 1140  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adolescent Behavior/*psychology; Adult; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology/*psychology; Alcoholic Intoxication/epidemiology; Fathers/*psychology; Female; Humans; Male; Mothers/*psychology; Norway/epidemiology; *Risk-Taking; Self Report; Sex Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Parental alcohol misuse may negatively affect drinking behaviours among offspring, but it is unclear to what extent influences are gender-specific and dependent upon the actual drinking behaviour measured. The aim of this study was to investigate whether hazardous drinking among Norwegian teenage boys (N = 2538) and girls (N = 2494) was associated with paternal and maternal alcohol misuse (CAGE). METHODS: Definitions of hazardous drinking among offspring were based on self-reported alcohol consumption (in litres a year), frequency of drinking, and frequency of drunkenness. Based on this information, two composite measures of hazardous drinking were also constructed. Cross-sectional data from the Norwegian Young-HUNT 3 survey (2006-2008) were linked to information from biological parents who participated in the adult part of the HUNT study. RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses showed that both boys and girls with alcohol misusing fathers were more likely to report high levels of alcohol intake compared to others of the same age and gender. This was contrary to boys with misusing mothers, who reported less alcohol consumption than other boys. Among girls, but not boys, high frequency of drunkenness was associated with maternal as well as paternal misuse. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that adolescent hazardous drinking is more prevalent among boys and girls with alcohol misusing parents versus those whose parents do not misuse alcohol. However, findings were gender specific and varied depending on the drinking outcomes under investigation. More evidence-based knowledge in this field is of great importance for better understanding the possible role paternal and maternal alcohol misuse may play in the development of hazardous alcohol drinking patterns among adolescent boys and girls.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian, University of Science and Technology, Forskningsveien 2, Levanger 7600, Norway. siri.h.haugland@ntnu.no  
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  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24314020; PMC3866523 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1445  
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Author Haugland, S.H.; Strandheim, A.; Bratberg, G. url  doi
  Title Is high-risk use of intoxicants more common among adolescents who have seen their parents intoxicated? Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Tidsskrift for den Norske Laegeforening : Tidsskrift for Praktisk Medicin, ny Raekke Abbreviated Journal Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen  
  Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 410-413  
  Keywords Adolescent; *Adolescent Behavior; Alcohol Drinking/psychology; Alcoholic Intoxication/psychology; Female; Humans; Male; *Parents; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Self Report; Sex Factors; *Substance-Related Disorders/etiology/psychology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Young people's alcohol consumption is related to their parents' alcohol consumption, but little focus has been placed on whether there is a connection with parental intoxication. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the experience of seeing their parents intoxicated is associated with young people's alcohol consumption and experimenting with drugs in their teens. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The study is prospective and based on data from 2,399 teenagers who took part in the Ung-HUNT 1 study in 1995-1997 and the Ung-HUNT 2 study in 2000-2001. Self-reported questionnaire data and analysis by means of logistic regression, stratified by gender, were used. RESULTS: Having been drunk > 10 times was associated with having seen their parents intoxicated among boys (OR 3.7; 95% CI 2.7-5.1 and girls (OR 2.0; 1.5-2.6). Drinking alcohol weekly or more frequently was associated with parental intoxication among boys (OR 2.2; 1.6-3.0), but not girls unless they had seen their parents drunk many times (OR 2.4; 1.1-5.2). Experimenting with drugs was associated with parental intoxication among both boys (OR 2.6; 1.7-3.9) and girls (OR 1.6; 1.1-2.2). INTERPRETATION: Repeated intoxication, frequent alcohol consumption and experimenting with drugs by teenagers were associated with seeing their parents intoxicated. There are other explanatory factors for which the study was unable to control, and interpretation of the results should take this into account.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. siri.h.haugland@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Norwegian Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0029-2001 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22353832 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1529  
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Author Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with adolescent chronic non-specific pain, chronic multisite pain, and chronic pain with high disability: the Young-HUNT Study 2008 Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Journal of Pain : Official Journal of the American Pain Society Abbreviated Journal J Pain  
  Volume 13 Issue 9 Pages 874-883  
  Keywords Adolescent; Anxiety/epidemiology; Chronic Pain/*epidemiology/*physiopathology/psychology; Depression/epidemiology; *Disabled Persons; Female; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Norway; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Prevalence; Psychology; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Factors  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the association of chronic pain with different lifestyle factors and psychological symptoms in a large, unselected adolescent population. Pain was evaluated as chronic non-specific pain, chronic multisite pain, and in additional analyses, chronic pain with high disability. The study was performed during 2006 to 2008 in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. Adolescents aged 13 to 18 years were invited to participate. The response rate was 78%. The final study population consisted of 7,373. Sedentary behavior and pain were associated only in girls. In both sexes, overweight and obesity were associated with increased odds of pain. Whereas both smoking and alcohol intoxication showed strong associations with pain, the associations were attenuated after adjustments for psychosocial factors. Symptoms of anxiety and depression showed the strongest associations with pain (odds ratio 4.1 in girls and 3.7 in boys). The odds of pain increased gradually by number of unfavorable lifestyle factors reported. This study revealed consistent associations between lifestyle factors, anxiety and depression, and chronic pain, including multisite pain and pain with high disability. The consistency across the different pain categories suggests common underlying explanatory mechanisms, and despite the cross-sectional design, the study indicates several modifiable targets in the management of adolescent chronic pain. PERSPECTIVE: This study showed a clear and consistent relation between different lifestyle factors, anxiety and depression, and the pain categories chronic non-specific pain, multisite pain, and also pain with high disability. Independent of causality, it underlines the importance of a broad perspective when studying, preventing, and treating chronic pain in adolescents.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. gry.b.hoftun@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1526-5900 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22832694 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1531  
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Author Iversen, J.M.; Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Adolescent chronic pain and association to perinatal factors: linkage of Birth Registry data with the Young-HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Eur J Pain Abbreviated Journal European journal of pain  
  Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages 567-575  
  Keywords HUNT3; Young-HUNT; Adolescent; Age Factors; *Birth Weight; Chronic Pain/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Male; Pregnancy; *Registries; Sex Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Time Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the associations of birthweight, gestation and 5-min Apgar score with self-reported chronic nonspecific pain in a large, unselected adolescent population. METHODS: The third population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) included 8200 adolescents aged 13-19 years, constituting 78.2% of adolescents in Nord-Trondelag County. In the target age group, 13-18 years, data on pain frequency from 10 localizations were available from 7373 adolescents. Chronic nonspecific pain was defined as pain at least once a week during the last 3 months, not related to any known disease or injury. Chronic multisite pain was defined as chronic pain in at least three localizations, and chronic daily pain was defined as chronic pain almost every day. Perinatal data were retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, and data were available for 7120 of the 7373 adolescents. Covariates included adolescent and maternal general health measures from the HUNT study. RESULTS: We found no consistent association between preterm birth and chronic pain and no clear association between birthweight and chronic pain complaints in adolescence. Post-term birth in boys and a low 5-min Apgar score in both sexes tended to increase the reporting of chronic pain in adolescence. CONCLUSIONS: Perinatal factors, and especially preterm birth and low birthweight, did not seem to have a major impact on pain complaints in adolescence.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian Uni Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Iversen, J MHoftun, G BRomundstad, P RRygg, MengEnglandLondon, England2014/08/21 06:00Eur J Pain. 2015 Apr;19(4):567-75. doi: 10.1002/ejp.581. Epub 2014 Aug 20. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Iversen2015a Serial 1824  
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Author Kaasboll, J.; Lydersen, S.; Indredavik, M.S. url  doi
  Title Psychological symptoms in children of parents with chronic pain-the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 153 Issue 5 Pages 1054-1062  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adolescent Behavior/psychology; Anxiety/*diagnosis/psychology; Child of Impaired Parents/*psychology; Chronic Pain/*psychology; Depression/*diagnosis/psychology; Female; Health Status; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Norway; Questionnaires; Sex Factors  
  Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between parental chronic pain and anxiety, depression, and conduct problems in adolescents. The current study was based on cross-sectional surveys performed during 2006 to 2008 from the Nord Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3 and Young-HUNT 3). The sample consisted of 3227 adolescents aged 13 to 18 years for whom information was available on parental chronic pain and health statuses. Separate analyses were conducted for girls and boys. The results indicated that if both parents experienced chronic pain, there was an increased risk of symptoms of anxiety and depression in girls (OR=2.17, CI=1.36-3.45, P=.001) and boys (OR=2.33, CI=1.17-4.63, P=.016) compared with children for whom neither parent had chronic pain. Girls had an increased risk of conduct problems in school if their mothers had chronic pain (OR=1.33, CI=1.02-1.74, P=.034). These results remained after adjusting for the possible effects of confounding factors and parental mental health. The results suggest that the presence of both maternal and paternal chronic pain is a high risk factor for internalizing symptoms in both girls and boys. The present study offers insights that should prove useful in clinical work and further large-scale research.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. jannike.kaasboll@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22444189 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1535  
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Author Kaasboll, J.; Ranoyen, I.; Nilsen, W.; Lydersen, S.; Indredavik, M.S. url  doi
  Title Associations between parental chronic pain and self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion in adolescent girls and boys--family linkage data from the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC public health  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 817  
  Keywords Young-HUNT; HUNT3; Adolescent; Chronic Pain/*psychology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Family Relations; Fathers; Female; Humans; Male; Mothers; *Parents; Resilience, Psychological; Risk Factors; *Self Concept; Self Report; Sex Factors; *Social Skills  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Parental chronic pain has been associated with adverse outcomes in offspring. However, knowledge on individual and family resilience factors in adolescent offspring of chronic pain sufferers is scarce. This study thus aimed to investigate the associations between parental chronic pain and self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion levels reported by adolescent girls and boys. METHODS: Based on cross-sectional surveys from the Nord Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT 3 study), the study used independent self-reports from adolescents aged 13 to 18 years (n = 3227) and their parents and conducted separate linear regression analyses for girls and boys. RESULTS: Concurrent maternal and paternal chronic pain was associated with reduced self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion in girls. Moreover, maternal chronic pain was associated with higher social competence in boys and reduced self-esteem in girls. The majority of the observed associations were significantly different between girls and boys. Paternal chronic pain was not found to be associated with child outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that the presence of both maternal and paternal chronic pain could be a potential risk factor for lower levels of individual and family resilience factors reported by girls. Further research on the relationship between parental pain and sex-specific offspring characteristics, including positive resilience factors, is warranted. The study demonstrates the importance of targeting the entire family in chronic pain care.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare (RKBU) of Central Norway, Facult Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Kaasboll, JannikeRanoyen, IngunnNilsen, WendyLydersen, StianIndredavik, Marit SengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2015/08/25 06:00BMC Public Health. 2015 Aug 22;15:817. doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-2164-9. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Kaasboll2015 Serial 1829  
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Author Kvestad, E.; Czajkowski, N.; Krog, N.H.; Engdahl, B.; Tambs, K. url  doi
  Title Heritability of hearing loss Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) Abbreviated Journal Epidemiology  
  Volume 23 Issue 2 Pages 328-331  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Audiometry; Auditory Threshold; Female; Gene-Environment Interaction; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/epidemiology; Hearing Loss/epidemiology/etiology/*genetics; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Sex Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Hearing impairment is one of the most common permanent disabilities in the western world. Although hearing ability normally declines with age, there is great individual variation in age of onset, progression, and severity, indicating that individual susceptibility plays a role. The aim of the present study was to explore the relative importance of genetic and environmental effects in the etiology of impaired hearing. METHODS: From August 1995 to June 1997, the total adult population of Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, was invited to take part in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. The survey included as an integrated project the Nord-Trondelag Hearing Loss Study with pure-tone audiometry assessment of the standard frequencies 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 kHz on 51,574 participants aged 20 to 101 years. We obtained information from Statistics Norway identifying 11,263 sibling pairs. After age stratification, we assessed similarity in hearing thresholds between siblings using polychoric correlations. The contribution of genetic effects in hearing ability was calculated. RESULTS: The upper limit of the heritability of hearing loss was 0.36. We found little evidence for sex differences in the relative importance of genetic effects. CONCLUSIONS: There is a substantial genetic contribution to individual variation in hearing thresholds.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ellen.kvestad@fhi.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1044-3983 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22249243 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1538  
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Author Landmark, T.; Romundstad, P.R.; Borchgrevink, P.C.; Kaasa, S.; Dale, O. url  doi
  Title Longitudinal associations between exercise and pain in the general population--the HUNT pain study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 8 Issue 6 Pages e65279  
  Keywords Age Factors; Exercise/*physiology; Humans; Linear Models; Longitudinal Studies; Pain/*physiopathology/*psychology; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Sex Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Population-based studies have reported conflicting findings on the relationship between physical activity and pain, and most studies reporting a relationship are cross sectional. Temporal relationships are therefore difficult to infer and associations may be subject to confounding from a variety of other factors. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between exercise and pain longitudinally and to use within subjects analyses to remove between subjects confounding. METHODS: In the population-based HUNT 3 study, participants reported both pain and level of exercise. A random sub-sample of 6419 participants was in addition invited to report their last week pain and exercise every three months over a 12 month period (five measurements in total). We used multilevel mixed effects linear regression analyses to prospectively estimate the association between regular levels of exercise (measured in HUNT 3) and subsequent longitudinal reporting of pain. We also estimated within-subjects associations (i.e. the variation in pain as a function of variation in exercise, over time, within individuals) to avoid confounding from between subject factors. RESULTS: Among those invited to participate (N = 6419), 4219 subjects returned at least two questionnaires. Compared with subjects who reported no or light exercise, those who reported moderate levels of exercise or more at baseline, reported less pain in repeated measures over a 12 month period in analyses adjusted for age, sex,education and smoking. Adjusting for baseline level of pain distinctly attenuated the findings. Within subjects, an increase in exercise was accompanied by a concurrent reduction in intensity of pain. However, we found no indication that exercise level at one occasion was related to pain reporting three months later. CONCLUSION: This longitudinal population-based study indicates that exercise is associated with lower level of pain and that this association is close in time.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. tormod.landmark@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23776464; PMC3680414 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1431  
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Author Lysberg, F.; Gjerstad, P.L.; Smastuen, M.C.; Innstrand, S.T.; Hoie, M.M.; Arild Espnes, G. url  doi
  Title Has life satisfaction in Norway increased over a 20-year period? Exploring age and gender differences in a prospective longitudinal study, HUNT Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 132-140  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; *Personal Satisfaction; Prospective Studies; Sex Factors; Young Adult; HUNT study; Life satisfaction; age groups; gender; generations; happiness; well-being  
  Abstract AIM: The aim of the present study was to investigate the change in overall life satisfaction for different age groups and between genders over a 20-year period. METHODS: Data from 1984 to 2008 were extracted from a large prospective longitudinal health study of Nord-Trondelag (HUNT), Norway. The study included more than 176,000 participants ranging from 20 to 70+ years of age. Data were analysed using logistic regression and adjusted for gender. RESULTS: The analyses revealed an increase in life satisfaction for all age groups from 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) to 1995-1997 (HUNT 2), with the highest levels being reached at 2006-2008 (HUNT 3). For all age groups, the data showed an increase of about 20% for the period from 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) to 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). From 1995-1997 (HUNT 2) to 2006-2008 (HUNT 3), the increase in overall life satisfaction was 16% for the younger age groups, and about 32% for the older age groups (40-69 and 70+ years). Women's scores for overall life satisfaction were higher for nearly all age groups when compared to men using HUNT 3 as a reference. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest an increase in life satisfaction for all age groups from 1984 to 2008, especially for the older age group (40-69 and 70+ years). The data indicate that women score higher on life satisfaction for most age groups as compared to men.  
  Address 2 NTNU Center for Health Promotion Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29199917 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2129  
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Author Madssen, E.; Vatten, L.; Nilsen, T.I.; Midthjell, K.; Wiseth, R.; Dale, A.C. url  doi
  Title Abnormal glucose regulation and gender-specific risk of fatal coronary artery disease in the HUNT 1 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal : SCJ Abbreviated Journal Scand Cardiovasc J  
  Volume 46 Issue 4 Pages 219-225  
  Keywords Aged; Blood Glucose/*metabolism; Confidence Intervals; Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology/metabolism/*mortality; Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism; Female; Health Status Indicators; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Registries; Risk Assessment/methods; Sex Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To assess fatal coronary artery disease (CAD) by gender and glucose regulation status. DESIGN: 47,951 people were followed up according to fatal CAD identified in the National Cause of Death Registry. Gender-effects of fatal CAD in people with impaired glucose regulation (IGR), newly diagnosed diabetes (NDM) or known diabetes (KDM) compared with people with normal glucose regulation (NGR) were calculated using Cox regression. RESULTS: Using NGR as reference, the hazard ratios (HR, 95% confidence intervals) associated with IGR was 1.2 (0.8-1.9) for women and 1.2 (0.9-1.6) for men. The corresponding HRs were 1.6 (1.2-2.2) and 1.4 (1.1.-1.9) for NDM, and 2.5 (2.1-2.8) and 1.8 (1.6-2.1) for KDM. The gender-difference in mortality varied by category (P(interaction) = 0.003). Using women as the reference, the HRs for men were 2.1 (2.0-2.3) for NGR, 1.8 (1.0-3.3) for IGR, 1.6 (1.0-2.5) for NDM, and 1.2 (1.0-1.5) for KDM. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes mellitus, but not IGR, was associated with fatal CAD in both genders. The known gender-difference in CAD mortality was attenuated in people with abnormal glucose regulation, evident already in people with IGR.  
  Address Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1401-7431 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22303857 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1549  
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Author Morkedal, B.; Vatten, L.J.; Romundstad, P.R.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.   
  Title Risk of myocardial infarction and heart failure among metabolically healthy but obese individuals: HUNT (Nord-Trondelag Health Study), Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication J Am Coll Cardiol Abbreviated Journal Journal of the American College of Cardiology  
  Volume 63 Issue 11 Pages 1071-1078  
  Keywords HUNT2; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; *Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; *Cause of Death; Female; Heart Failure/*etiology/mortality/physiopathology; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction/*etiology/mortality/physiopathology; Obesity/*complications/diagnosis/metabolism; Obesity, Morbid/complications/diagnosis; Prognosis; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Factors; Survival Rate; Time Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study sought to investigate whether obesity in the absence of metabolic abnormalities might be a relatively benign condition in relation to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND: The results of previous studies are conflicting for AMI and largely unknown for HF, and the role of the duration of obesity has not been investigated. METHODS: In a population-based prospective cohort study, a total of 61,299 men and women free of cardiovascular disease were classified according to body mass index (BMI) and metabolic status at baseline. BMI also was measured 10 and 30 years before baseline for 27,196 participants. RESULTS: During 12 years of follow-up, 2,547 participants had a first AMI, and 1,201 participants had a first HF. Compared with being normal weight (BMI <25 kg/m(2)) and metabolically healthy, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for AMI was 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 1.4) among obese (BMI >/=30 kg/m(2)) and metabolically healthy participants and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.7 to 2.3) among obese and metabolically unhealthy participants. We found similar results for severe (BMI >/=35 kg/m(2)), long-lasting (>30 years), and abdominal obesity stratified for metabolic status. For HF, the HRs associated with obesity were 1.7 (95% CI: 1.3 to 2.3) and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.4 to 2.2) for metabolically healthy and unhealthy participants, respectively. Severe and long-lasting obesity were particularly harmful in relation to HF, regardless of metabolic status. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to AMI, obesity without metabolic abnormalities did not confer substantial excess risk, not even for severe or long-lasting obesity. For HF, even metabolically healthy obesity was associated with increased risk, particularly for long-lasting or severe obesity.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Tr Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Morkedal2014 Serial 1610  
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Author Nes, B.M.; Gutvik, C.R.; Lavie, C.J.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI) for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Promotion of Physical Activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The American Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Med  
  Volume 130 Issue 3 Pages 328-336  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Algorithms; Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality/*prevention & control; *Exercise; Female; Health Promotion/*methods; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment/*methods; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Young Adult; Activity tracking; Cardiovascular disease mortality; Physical activity; Prevention  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To derive and validate a single metric of activity tracking that associates with lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. METHODS: We derived an algorithm, Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI), using the HUNT Fitness Study (n = 4631), and validated it in the general HUNT population (n = 39,298) aged 20-74 years. The PAI was divided into three sex-specific groups (</=50, 51-99, and >/=100), and the inactive group (0 PAI) was used as the referent. Hazard ratios for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: After >1 million person-years of observations during a mean follow-up time of 26.2 (SD 5.9) years, there were 10,062 deaths, including 3867 deaths (2207 men and 1660 women) from cardiovascular disease. Men and women with a PAI level >/=100 had 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-27%) and 23% (95% CI, 4%-38%) reduced risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, respectively, compared with the inactive groups. Obtaining >/=100 PAI was associated with significantly lower risk for cardiovascular disease mortality in all prespecified age groups, and in participants with known cardiovascular disease risk factors (all P-trends <.01). Participants who did not obtain >/=100 PAI had increased risk of dying regardless of meeting the physical activity recommendations. CONCLUSION: PAI may have a huge potential to motivate people to become and stay physically active, as it is an easily understandable and scientifically proven metric that could inform potential users of how much physical activity is needed to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular disease death.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9343 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27984009 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1964  
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Author Ness-Jensen, E.; Gottlieb-Vedi, E.; Wahlin, K.; Lagergren, J. url  doi
  Title All-cause and cancer-specific mortality in GORD in a population-based cohort study (the HUNT study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Gut Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 67 Issue 2 Pages 209-215  
  Keywords Adenocarcinoma/*mortality; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cause of Death; Esophageal Neoplasms/*mortality; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/epidemiology/*mortality; Head and Neck Neoplasms/mortality; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/*mortality; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Factors; Young Adult; *acid-related diseases; *adenocarcinoma; *cancer; *epidemiology; *gastroesophageal reflux disease  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Gastro-oesophageal reflux is a public health concern which could have associated oesophageal complications, including adenocarcinoma, and possibly also head-and-neck and lung cancers. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that reflux increases all-cause and cancer-specific mortalities in an unselected cohort. DESIGN: The Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT), a Norwegian population-based cohort study, was used to identify individuals with and without reflux in 1995-1997 and 2006-2008, with follow-up until 2014. All-cause mortality and cancer-specific mortality were assessed from the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry and Cancer Registry. Multivariable Cox regression was used to calculate HRs with 95% CIs for mortality with adjustments for potential confounders. RESULTS: We included 4758 participants with severe reflux symptoms and 51 381 participants without reflux symptoms, contributing 60 323 and 747 239 person-years at risk, respectively. Severe reflux was not associated with all-cause mortality, overall cancer-specific mortality or mortality in cancer of the head-and-neck or lung. However, for men with severe reflux a sixfold increase in oesophageal adenocarcinoma-specific mortality was found (HR 6.09, 95% CI 2.33 to 15.93) and the mortality rate was 0.27 per 1000 person-years. For women, the corresponding mortality was not significantly increased (HR 3.68, 95% CI 0.88 to 15.27) and the mortality rate was 0.05 per 1000 person-years. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with severe reflux symptoms do not seem to have increased all-cause mortality or overall cancer-specific mortality. Although the absolute risk is small, individuals with severe reflux symptoms have a clearly increased oesophageal adenocarcinoma-specific mortality.  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Molecular medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.Medical Department, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway.Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, London, UK. Editor  
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  Notes Ness-Jensen, EivindGottlieb-Vedi, EivindWahlin, KarlLagergren, JesperengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEnglandGut. 2018 Feb;67(2):209-215. doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2016-312514. Epub 2016 Oct 27. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Ness-Jensen2018 Serial 2065  
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Author Ness-Jensen, E.; Gottlieb-Vedi, E.; Wahlin, K.; Lagergren, J. url  doi
  Title All-cause and cancer-specific mortality in GORD in a population-based cohort study (the HUNT study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Gut Abbreviated Journal Gut  
  Volume 67 Issue 2 Pages 209-215  
  Keywords Adenocarcinoma/*mortality; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cause of Death; Esophageal Neoplasms/*mortality; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/epidemiology/*mortality; Head and Neck Neoplasms/mortality; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/*mortality; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Factors; Young Adult; *Acid-Related Diseases; *Adenocarcinoma; *Cancer; *Epidemiology; *Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Gastro-oesophageal reflux is a public health concern which could have associated oesophageal complications, including adenocarcinoma, and possibly also head-and-neck and lung cancers. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that reflux increases all-cause and cancer-specific mortalities in an unselected cohort. DESIGN: The Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT), a Norwegian population-based cohort study, was used to identify individuals with and without reflux in 1995-1997 and 2006-2008, with follow-up until 2014. All-cause mortality and cancer-specific mortality were assessed from the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry and Cancer Registry. Multivariable Cox regression was used to calculate HRs with 95% CIs for mortality with adjustments for potential confounders. RESULTS: We included 4758 participants with severe reflux symptoms and 51 381 participants without reflux symptoms, contributing 60 323 and 747 239 person-years at risk, respectively. Severe reflux was not associated with all-cause mortality, overall cancer-specific mortality or mortality in cancer of the head-and-neck or lung. However, for men with severe reflux a sixfold increase in oesophageal adenocarcinoma-specific mortality was found (HR 6.09, 95% CI 2.33 to 15.93) and the mortality rate was 0.27 per 1000 person-years. For women, the corresponding mortality was not significantly increased (HR 3.68, 95% CI 0.88 to 15.27) and the mortality rate was 0.05 per 1000 person-years. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with severe reflux symptoms do not seem to have increased all-cause mortality or overall cancer-specific mortality. Although the absolute risk is small, individuals with severe reflux symptoms have a clearly increased oesophageal adenocarcinoma-specific mortality.  
  Address Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, London, UK  
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