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Author Hoff, M.; Gulati, A.M.; Romundstad, P.R.; Kavanaugh, A.; Haugeberg, G. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and incidence rates of psoriatic arthritis in central Norway: data from the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases Abbreviated Journal Ann Rheum Dis  
  Volume 74 Issue 1 Pages 60-64  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adult; Aged; Arthritis, Psoriatic/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Young Adult; Epidemiology; Psoriatic Arthritis; Treatment  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: A wide range in the prevalence (<0.01-0.25%) and incidence (0.5-23.1/100 000) of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is reported. The main objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and incidence of PsA in central Norway. METHOD: The patients were recruited from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3, a population study carried out in 2006-2008. All 94 194 inhabitants aged >20 years were invited and 50 806 (54%) responded. The study consisted of a questionnaire (Q1) and a brief medical examination. Q1 included questions if the persons suffered from psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Patients with self-reported psoriasis further answered a specific questionnaire on psoriasis including a questionnaire concerning PsA. In order to identify patients with PsA we used the following criteria: Persons reporting they had or may have PsA; persons answering that they had psoriasis and RA; and persons answering that they had psoriasis and AS. Using this approach, 1278 patients were identified. Hospital files were evaluated by a rheumatologist according to a predefined protocol to verify the diagnosis of PsA. RESULTS: 338 patients, 144 men and 194 women, were verified to have PsA. The prevalence of PsA was 6.7 (95% CI 5.9 to 7.4) per 1000 inhabitants >20 years with no significant difference between men and women. In the 9-year period of 2000-2008, a total of 188 patients were diagnosed with PsA, which give an incidence rate of 41.3/100 000 (35.8-47.6). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of PsA in central Norway appears to be higher than previously reported. The reason for this is unknown and may include environmental factors, life style factors and genetic differences.  
  Address Department of Rheumatology, Hospital of Southern Norway Trust, Kristiansand, Norway Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-4967 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23962458 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1681  
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Author Mauseth, S.A.; Skurtveit, S.; Langhammer, A.; Spigset, O. url  doi
  Title Incidence of and factors associated with anticholinergic drug use among Norwegian women with urinary incontinence Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Urogynecology Journal Abbreviated Journal Int Urogynecol J  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Anticholinergic drugs; Drug treatment; Epidemiology; Health survey; Prescription patterns; Urinary incontinence  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aims of this study were to investigate patterns of prescribing anticholinergic drugs among women with urinary incontinence (UI) and to identify factors associated with prescription of these drugs. METHODS: We analysed questionnaire data on UI from 21,735 women older than 20 years who participated in a cross-sectional population-based study in Nord-Trondelag county, Norway (the HUNT study). These data were linked at the individual level to a national prescription database, and analysed using a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among the women with UI, 4.5% had been prescribed an anticholinergic drug during the previous 12 months. Prescription was most frequent in women with urge UI (10.5%) and mixed UI (7.0%). Of women with UI without treatment with an anticholinergic drug, 1.8% obtained such a prescription during the subsequent 12 months, corresponding to 3.1% of women with urge UI and 3.0% of women with mixed UI. Characteristics significantly associated with starting treatment were age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe or very severe symptoms, consumption of four or more cups of coffee per day, and having visited a doctor for UI. No association was found with marital status, parity, smoking, alcohol, body mass index or anxiety/depression. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study, 4.5% of women with UI were prescribed an anticholinergic drug, and the 12-month incidence of starting treatment was 1.8%. Age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe symptoms, high coffee consumption and having visited a doctor for UI were factors associated with first-time drug prescription.  
  Address Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olav University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0937-3462 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29103164 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1954  
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Author Mauseth, S.A.; Skurtveit, S.; Langhammer, A.; Spigset, O. url  doi
  Title Incidence of and factors associated with anticholinergic drug use among Norwegian women with urinary incontinence Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication International Urogynecology Journal Abbreviated Journal Int Urogynecol J  
  Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 489-495  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cholinergic Antagonists/*therapeutic use; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Middle Aged; Practice Patterns, Physicians'/*statistics & numerical data; Urinary Incontinence/*drug therapy; Anticholinergic drugs; Drug treatment; Epidemiology; Health survey; Prescription patterns; Urinary incontinence  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aims of this study were to investigate patterns of prescribing anticholinergic drugs among women with urinary incontinence (UI) and to identify factors associated with prescription of these drugs. METHODS: We analysed questionnaire data on UI from 21,735 women older than 20 years who participated in a cross-sectional population-based study in Nord-Trondelag county, Norway (the HUNT study). These data were linked at the individual level to a national prescription database, and analysed using a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among the women with UI, 4.5% had been prescribed an anticholinergic drug during the previous 12 months. Prescription was most frequent in women with urge UI (10.5%) and mixed UI (7.0%). Of women with UI without treatment with an anticholinergic drug, 1.8% obtained such a prescription during the subsequent 12 months, corresponding to 3.1% of women with urge UI and 3.0% of women with mixed UI. Characteristics significantly associated with starting treatment were age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe or very severe symptoms, consumption of four or more cups of coffee per day, and having visited a doctor for UI. No association was found with marital status, parity, smoking, alcohol, body mass index or anxiety/depression. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study, 4.5% of women with UI were prescribed an anticholinergic drug, and the 12-month incidence of starting treatment was 1.8%. Age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe symptoms, high coffee consumption and having visited a doctor for UI were factors associated with first-time drug prescription.  
  Address Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olav University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0937-3462 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29103164 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2134  
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Author Mauseth, S.A.; Skurtveit, S.; Skovlund, E.; Langhammer, A.; Spigset, O. url  doi
  Title Medication use and association with urinary incontinence in women: Data from the Norwegian Prescription Database and the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Neurourology and Urodynamics Abbreviated Journal Neurourol Urodyn  
  Volume 37 Issue 4 Pages 1448-1457  
  Keywords Hunt; Norwegian Prescription Database; drug treatment; health survey; incontinence type; prescription patterns; urinary incontinence  
  Abstract AIMS: To investigate the association between medication use and urinary incontinence (UI) in women. METHODS: In a cross-sectional population-based study we analyzed questionnaire data on UI, including type and severity, from 21 735 women included in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) in Norway. These data were linked to data on filled prescriptions retrieved from the Norwegian Prescription Database. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to calculate the odds for having UI related to the number of filled prescriptions for selected drug groups during the 6 months prior to participation in HUNT, after adjustment for numerous confounding factors. RESULTS: Significant associations with UI were found for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and lamotrigine with OR 1.52 (1.30-1.78) and 2.73 (1.59-4.68) for two or more filled prescriptions. Both for SSRIs and lamotrigine, the associations were pronounced for mixed UI, whereas there were no clear-cut increased risk of stress UI and urgency UI. The relations were strongest in women with the most severe symptoms. One filled prescription of antipsychotics, but not two or more, was also found to be related to UI with OR 1.91 (1.35-2.71). No associations were found for benzodiazepines, zopiclone/zolpidem, beta blockers, and diuretics. CONCLUSIONS: The odds for having UI were found to be about 1.5-fold in women using SSRIs and almost threefold in women using lamotrigine. The association with lamotrigine has not been reported previously, and should be further evaluated in future studies.  
  Address Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olav University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-2467 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29336066 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2135  
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Author Ness-Jensen, E.; Hveem, K.; El-Serag, H.; Lagergren, J. url  doi
  Title Lifestyle Intervention in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of the American Gastroenterological Association Abbreviated Journal Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acid Regurgitation; GERD; Heartburn; Therapy; Treatment  
  Abstract BACKGROUND & AIMS: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects up to 30% of adults in Western populations and is increasing in prevalence. GERD is associated with lifestyle factors, particularly obesity and tobacco smoking, which also threatens the patient's general health. GERD carries the risk of several adverse outcomes and there is widespread use of potent acid-inhibitors, which are associated with long-term adverse effects. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the role of lifestyle intervention in the treatment of GERD. METHODS: Literature searches were performed in PubMed (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1980), and the Cochrane Library (no start date) to October 1, 2014. Meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), and prospective observational studies were included. RESULTS: Weight loss was followed by decreased time with esophageal acid exposure in 2 RCTs (from 5.6% to 3.7% and from 8.0% to 5.5%), and reduced reflux symptoms in prospective observational studies. Tobacco smoking cessation reduced reflux symptoms in normal-weight individuals in a large prospective cohort study (odds ratio, 5.67). In RCTs, late evening meals increased time with supine acid exposure compared with early meals (5.2% point change), and head-of-the-bed elevation decreased time with supine acid exposure compared with a flat position (from 21% to 15%). CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss and tobacco smoking cessation should be recommended to GERD patients who are obese and smoke, respectively. Avoiding late evening meals and head-of-the-bed elevation is effective in nocturnal GERD.  
  Address Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Section of Gastrointestinal Cancer, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1542-3565 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25956834 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1719  
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Author Ness-Jensen, E.; Lindam, A.; Lagergren, J.; Hveem, K. url  doi
  Title Weight loss and reduction in gastroesophageal reflux. A prospective population-based cohort study: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The American Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Am J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 108 Issue 3 Pages 376-382  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Body Mass Index; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/*epidemiology/etiology; Health Surveys; Heartburn/*epidemiology/etiology; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Questionnaires; Smoking; Treatment Outcome; *Weight Loss  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: High body mass index (BMI) is an established risk factor of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). The aim of this study was to clarify if weight loss reduces GERS. METHODS: The study was part of the Nord-Trondelag health study (the HUNT study), a prospective population-based cohort study conducted in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. All residents of the county from 20 years of age were invited. In 1995-1997 (HUNT 2) and 2006-2009 (HUNT 3), 58,869 and 44,997 individuals, respectively, responded to a questionnaire on heartburn and acid regurgitation. Among these, 29,610 individuals (61% response rate) participated at both times and were included in the present study. The association between weight loss and reduction of GERS was calculated using logistic regression. The analyses were stratified by antireflux medication and the results adjusted for sex, age, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, education, and physical exercise. RESULTS: Weight loss was dose-dependently associated with a reduction of GERS and an increased treatment success with antireflux medication. Among individuals with >3.5 units decrease in BMI, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of loss of any (minor or severe) GERS was 1.98 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.45-2.72) when using no or less than weekly antireflux medication, and 3.95 (95% CI 2.03-7.65) when using at least weekly antireflux medication. The corresponding ORs of loss of severe GERS was 0.90 (95% CI 0.32-2.55) and 3.11 (95% CI 1.13-8.58). CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss was dose-dependently associated with both a reduction of GERS and an increased treatment success with antireflux medication in the general population.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway. eivind.ness-jensen@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9270 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23358462 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1409  
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Author Nordfjaern, T. url  doi
  Title A population-based cohort study of anxiety, depression, sleep and alcohol outcomes among benzodiazepine and z-hypnotic users Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Addictive Behaviors Abbreviated Journal Addict Behav  
  Volume 37 Issue 10 Pages 1151-1157  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Alcohol Drinking/*epidemiology; Anxiety Disorders/chemically induced/drug therapy/*epidemiology; Benzodiazepines/*adverse effects; Depressive Disorder/chemically induced/*epidemiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypnotics and Sedatives/*adverse effects; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Self Report; Sleep Disorders/chemically induced/drug therapy/*epidemiology; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to examine anxiety, depression, sleep and alcohol outcomes among individuals who were prescribed benzodiazepines or z-hypnotics in a Norwegian population-based sample (n = 58,967). METHODS: This 13 year historical cohort study obtained baseline measures of self-report anxiety, depression, sleep difficulties and alcohol use from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2, 1995-1997). Information about outcomes was collected from the third wave (HUNT 3, 2006-2008) of the same epidemiological study. Prescription records of benzodiazepines and z-hypnotics were obtained from the Norwegian prescription database (NorPD, 2004-2008) and were linked to the HUNT 2 and HUNT 3 questionnaire data. RESULTS: Among the 58,967 respondents who were eligible for the study, 13,774 (23%) received at least one prescription of benzodiazepines or z-hypnotics in the period 2004-2008. Benzodiazepine use was associated with a higher risk of severe anxiety, depression and sleep outcomes. The assumption that benzodiazepine use is prospectively associated with a higher risk of problematic alcohol use was not supported. CONCLUSIONS: Consideration and discussion of the future place of benzodiazepines in treatment of anxiety and sleep difficulties in Norway could be warranted. Benzodiazepines may be efficient in reducing symptoms in the short term, but evidence from this long temporal follow-up study indicates limited positive influences in the long term.  
  Address The Drug and Alcohol Treatment Health Trust in Central Norway, Department of Research and Development, Trondheim, Norway. trond.nordfjern@rus-midt.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4603 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22704915 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1563  
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Author Quanjer, P.H.; Ruppel, G.L.; Langhammer, A.; Krishna, A.; Mertens, F.; Johannessen, A.; Menezes, A.M.B.; Wehrmeister, F.C.; Perez-Padilla, R.; Swanney, M.P.; Tan, W.C.; Bourbeau, J. url  doi
  Title Bronchodilator Response in FVC Is Larger and More Relevant Than in FEV1 in Severe Airflow Obstruction Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Chest Abbreviated Journal Chest  
  Volume 151 Issue 5 Pages 1088-1098  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Airway Obstruction/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Asthma/*diagnosis/physiopathology; *Bronchodilator Agents; Canada; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/*physiology; Healthy Volunteers; Humans; Latin America; Male; Middle Aged; Netherlands; New Zealand; Norway; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Treatment Outcome; United States; Vital Capacity/*physiology; Young Adult; airways obstruction; asthma; bronchodilator responsiveness; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; respiratory physiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Recommendations on interpreting tests of bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR) are conflicting. We investigated the dependence of BDR criteria on sex, age, height, ethnicity, and severity of respiratory impairment. METHODS: BDR test data were available from clinical patients in the Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United States (n = 15,278; female subjects, 51.7%) and from surveys in Canada, Norway, and five Latin-American countries (n = 16,250; female subjects, 54.7%). BDR calculated according to FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC was expressed as absolute change, a percentage of the baseline level (% baseline), a percentage of the predicted value (% predicted), and z score. RESULTS: Change (Delta) in FEV1 and FVC, in milliliters, was unrelated to the baseline value but was biased toward age, height, sex, and level of airways obstruction; DeltaFEV1 was significantly lower in African Americans. In 1,106 subjects with low FEV1 (200-1,621 mL) the FEV1 increased by 12% to 44.7% relative to baseline but < 200 mL. Expressing BDR as a percentage of the predicted value or as a z score attenuated the bias and made the 200-mL criterion redundant, but reduced positive responses by half. DeltaFEV1 % baseline increased with the level of airflow obstruction but decreased with severe obstruction when expressed as z scores or % predicted; DeltaFVC, however expressed, increased with the level of airflow obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Expressing FEV1 responsiveness as % baseline spuriously suggests that responsiveness increases with the severity of respiratory impairment. Expressing change in FEV1 or FVC as % predicted or as z scores eliminates this artifact and renders the required 200-mL minimum increase redundant. In severe airways obstruction DeltaFVC should be critically evaluated as an index of clinically important relief of hyperinflation, with implications for bronchodilator drug trials.  
  Address Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-3692 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28040521 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1971  
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