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Author Gudmundsdottir, S.L.; Flanders, W.D.; Augestad, L.B. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and cardiovascular risk factors at menopause: the Nord-Trondelag health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society Abbreviated Journal Climacteric  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 438-446  
  Keywords Adult; Blood Glucose/analysis; Blood Pressure; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology; Cholesterol, HDL/blood; *Exercise; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; *Menopause; Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Premenopause/physiology; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Triglycerides/blood; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Lowered physical activity levels may partially explain changes in metabolic risk factors in women after menopause. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the association between physical activity and metabolic risk factors at baseline and after 11 years, as well as the change in that association over time in women who were premenopausal and >/= 40 years at baseline. METHODS: Subjects in a Norwegian population-based health survey answered questionnaires and had body and serum measurements during 1995-1997 (HUNT 2) and in a follow-up study during 2006-2008 (HUNT 3). Repeated-measures analyses were used to estimate the association between physical activity and metabolic factors, adjusting for age, smoking status, education, alcohol intake, and parity. Adjustment for hormonal treatment and medication was made, as appropriate. RESULTS: In women remaining premenopausal, a higher physical activity score in HUNT 3 was associated with lower weight (p < 0.01) and waist-hip ratio (p < 0.01) and higher high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in HUNT 3 (p < 0.01). In women that were postmenopausal by the time of follow-up, a higher physical activity score in HUNT 3 was associated with lower weight (p < 0.01), waist-hip ratio (p < 0.01), triglycerides (p < 0.01), and higher total cholesterol (p < 0.05), HDL cholesterol (p < 0.01), and diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.05) in HUNT 3. The association of total physical activity score with weight and waist-hip ratio was stronger in HUNT 3 than in HUNT 2 (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Increased physical activity may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes and use of pharmacological management in women of menopausal age.  
  Address Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1369-7137 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23347190 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1450  
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Author Kvaloy, K.; Holmen, J.; Hveem, K.; Holmen, T.L. url  doi
  Title Genetic Effects on Longitudinal Changes from Healthy to Adverse Weight and Metabolic Status – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication PLoS One Abbreviated Journal PloS one  
  Volume 10 Issue 10 Pages e0139632  
  Keywords HUNT2; HUNT3; Adolescent; Adult; Apolipoproteins A/genetics; Blood Glucose/analysis; Blood Pressure; Body Mass Index; Cholesterol, HDL/blood; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X/blood/*etiology/genetics; Middle Aged; Overweight/blood/*complications/*genetics; *Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Proteins/genetics; Receptors, Dopamine D2/genetics; Triglycerides/blood; Weight Gain; Young Adult  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION: The complexity of obesity and onset and susceptibility of cardio-metabolic disorders are still poorly understood and is addressed here through studies of genetic influence on weight gain and increased metabolic risk longitudinally. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Twenty seven previously identified obesity, eating disorder or metabolic risk susceptibility SNPs were tested for association with weight or metabolically related traits longitudinally in 3999 adults participating both in the HUNT2 (1995-97) and HUNT3 (2006-08) surveys. Regression analyses were performed with changes from normal weight to overweight/obesity or from metabolically healthy to adverse developments with regards to blood pressure, glucose, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides or metabolic syndrome as outcomes. Additionally, a sub-sample of 1380 adolescents was included for testing association of nine SNPs with longitudinal weight gain into young adulthood. RESULTS: The most substantial effect on BMI-based weight gain from normal to overweight/obesity in adults was observed for the DRD2 variant (rs6277)(OR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.69-0.90, P = 3.9x10-4, adj. P = 0.015). DRD2 was not associated with BMI on a cross-sectional level. In the adolescent sample, FTO (rs1121980) was associated with change to overweight at adulthood in the combined male-female sample (OR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.09-1.49, P = 3.0x10-3, adj. P = 0.019) and in females (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.23-1.91, P = 1.8x10-4, adj. P = 0.003). When testing for association to longitudinal adverse developments with regard to blood pressure, blood lipids and glucose, only rs964184 (ZNF259/APOA5) was significantly associated to unfavourable triglyceride changes (OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.36-2.03, P = 5.7x10-7, adj. P = 0.001). Pleiotropic effects on metabolic traits, however, were observed for several genetic loci cross-sectionally, ZNF259/APOA5, LPL and GRB14 being the most important. CONCLUSIONS: DRD2 exhibits effects on weight gain from normal weight to overweight/obesity in adults, while, FTO is associated to weight gain from adolescence to young adulthood. Unhealthy longitudinal triglyceride development is strongly affected by ZNF259/APOA. Our main finding, linking the DRD2 variant directly to the longitudinal weight gain observed, has not previously been identified. It suggests a genetic pre-disposition involving the dopaminergic signalling pathways known to play a role in food reward and satiety linked mechanisms.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegi Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Kvaloy, KirstiHolmen, JosteinHveem, KristianHolmen, Turid Lingaaseng2015/10/09 06:00PLoS One. 2015 Oct 7;10(10):e0139632. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0139632. eCollection 2015. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Kvaloy2015 Serial 1833  
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Author Rangul, V.; Bauman, A.; Holmen, T.L.; Midthjell, K. url  doi
  Title Is physical activity maintenance from adolescence to young adulthood associated with reduced CVD risk factors, improved mental health and satisfaction with life: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 144  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Blood Pressure; Body Composition; Body Mass Index; Cardiovascular Diseases/*prevention & control; Cholesterol, HDL/blood; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Status; Health Surveys; Humans; *Life Style; Linear Models; Logistic Models; Longitudinal Studies; Male; *Mental Health; *Motor Activity; Norway; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Self Report; Triglycerides/blood; Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effect maintaining physical activity throughout adolescence has on cardiovascular risk factors and health status in early adulthood. This ten-year prospective longitudinal study investigated whether differences in physical activity patterns from adolescence to young-adulthood showed different associations with subsequent cardio-metabolic risk factors and mental health in young-adulthood. METHODS: Based on the second and third Norwegian Nord-Trondelag Health Surveys (HUNT2 and 3), we included 1869 individuals (838 males) participating in Young-HUNT (1995-97), aged 13-19 years and followed-up at HUNT3 (2006-08), aged 23-31. Self-reported physical activity (PA), mental health and perceived health were recorded, along with measurements of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, glucose, triglycerides, resting heart rate (HR) and blood pressure. We used separate linear regressions models to investigate associations between physical activity and each CVD risk factor, and logistic regression analysis to examine PA patterns and subsequent mental health. Physically active maintainers were compared to inactive maintainers. Adopters (inactive as adolescents and physically active as young adults) were compared to inactive maintainers and to those who discontinued activity (relapsers). RESULTS: Active maintainers had significantly lower HR, compared to all other PA patterns. Active maintaining men had significantly lower WC than relapsers and inactive maintainers. When adjusted for age and gender, WC, BMI, HR, diastolic blood pressure and HDL-C showed significant differences comparing active maintaining to other PA patterns. Comparing inactive maintainers against adopters, only HR was significantly lower. Male adopters did not differ significantly in CVD risk compared to inactive maintainers and relapsers. Among females adopting was associated with lower HR and TC compared to inactive maintainers. Active maintainers showed better mental health than inactive maintainers. Active maintaining males had an increased likelihood of good mental health compared to adopters. Active maintaining females reported greater satisfaction with life compared to adopters. CONCLUSIONS: Those who maintained their physical activity from adolescence to young adulthood demonstrated a significantly lower CVD risk and better mental health, compared to inactive maintainers. Compared to inactivity maintainers and relapsers, adopting physical activity was not significantly associated with lowered CVD risk. Adopting physical activity between adolescence and young adulthood may not necessarily protect against mental distress.  
  Address Nord-Trondelag University College, Levanger, Norway. vegar.rangul@hint.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23241306; PMC3541207 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1568  
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Author Wu, Y.; Waite, L.L.; Jackson, A.U.; Sheu, W.H.-H.; Buyske, S.; Absher, D.; Arnett, D.K.; Boerwinkle, E.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Carty, C.L.; Cheng, I.; Cochran, B.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Dumitrescu, L.; Eaton, C.B.; Franceschini, N.; Guo, X.; Henderson, B.E.; Hindorff, L.A.; Kim, E.; Kinnunen, L.; Komulainen, P.; Lee, W.-J.; Le Marchand, L.; Lin, Y.; Lindstrom, J.; Lingaas-Holmen, O.; Mitchell, S.L.; Narisu, N.; Robinson, J.G.; Schumacher, F.; Stancakova, A.; Sundvall, J.; Sung, Y.-J.; Swift, A.J.; Wang, W.-C.; Wilkens, L.; Wilsgaard, T.; Young, A.M.; Adair, L.S.; Ballantyne, C.M.; Buzkova, P.; Chakravarti, A.; Collins, F.S.; Duggan, D.; Feranil, A.B.; Ho, L.-T.; Hung, Y.-J.; Hunt, S.C.; Hveem, K.; Juang, J.-M.J.; Kesaniemi, A.Y.; Kuusisto, J.; Laakso, M.; Lakka, T.A.; Lee, I.-T.; Leppert, M.F.; Matise, T.C.; Moilanen, L.; Njolstad, I.; Peters, U.; Quertermous, T.; Rauramaa, R.; Rotter, J.I.; Saramies, J.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uusitupa, M.; Wang, T.-D.; Boehnke, M.; Haiman, C.A.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Kooperberg, C.; Assimes, T.L.; Crawford, D.C.; Hsiung, C.A.; North, K.E.; Mohlke, K.L. url  doi
  Title Trans-ethnic fine-mapping of lipid loci identifies population-specific signals and allelic heterogeneity that increases the trait variance explained Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication PLoS Genetics Abbreviated Journal PLoS Genet  
  Volume 9 Issue 3 Pages e1003379  
  Keywords African Americans/genetics; Apolipoproteins A/*genetics; Cholesterol, HDL/blood/genetics; Cholesterol, LDL/blood/genetics; European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; *Genome-Wide Association Study; Humans; Lipoproteins, HDL/blood/genetics; Lipoproteins, LDL/blood/genetics; Proprotein Convertases/*genetics; Serine Endopeptidases/*genetics; Triglycerides/blood/genetics  
  Abstract Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified ~100 loci associated with blood lipid levels, but much of the trait heritability remains unexplained, and at most loci the identities of the trait-influencing variants remain unknown. We conducted a trans-ethnic fine-mapping study at 18, 22, and 18 GWAS loci on the Metabochip for their association with triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), respectively, in individuals of African American (n = 6,832), East Asian (n = 9,449), and European (n = 10,829) ancestry. We aimed to identify the variants with strongest association at each locus, identify additional and population-specific signals, refine association signals, and assess the relative significance of previously described functional variants. Among the 58 loci, 33 exhibited evidence of association at P<1 x 10(-4) in at least one ancestry group. Sequential conditional analyses revealed that ten, nine, and four loci in African Americans, Europeans, and East Asians, respectively, exhibited two or more signals. At these loci, accounting for all signals led to a 1.3- to 1.8-fold increase in the explained phenotypic variance compared to the strongest signals. Distinct signals across ancestry groups were identified at PCSK9 and APOA5. Trans-ethnic analyses narrowed the signals to smaller sets of variants at GCKR, PPP1R3B, ABO, LCAT, and ABCA1. Of 27 variants reported previously to have functional effects, 74% exhibited the strongest association at the respective signal. In conclusion, trans-ethnic high-density genotyping and analysis confirm the presence of allelic heterogeneity, allow the identification of population-specific variants, and limit the number of candidate SNPs for functional studies.  
  Address Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1553-7390 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23555291; PMC3605054 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1385  
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