toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Amorim, A.B.; Ferreira, P.H.; Ferreira, M.L.; Lier, R.; Simic, M.; Pappas, E.; Zadro, J.R.; Mork, P.J.; Nilsen, T.I. url  doi
  Title Influence of family history on prognosis of spinal pain and the role of leisure time physical activity and body mass index: a prospective study using family-linkage data from the Norwegian HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 10 Pages e022785  
  Keywords chronic pain; family study; low back pain; neck pain; obesity; physical activity  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To investigate the influence of parental chronic spinal pain on prognosis of chronic spinal pain in adult offspring, and whether offspring physical activity level and body mass index (BMI) modified this association. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: We used family-linked longitudinal data from the Norwegian HUNT study collected in HUNT2 (1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008). PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1529 offspring who reported spinal pain in HUNT2 were linked with parental data and followed up in HUNT3. OUTCOMES: We estimated relative risk (RR) with 95% CI for recovery from chronic spinal pain, and also from activity limiting spinal pain, in offspring related to chronic spinal pain in parents. We also investigated whether offspring leisure time physical activity and BMI modified these intergenerational associations in spinal pain. RESULTS: A total of 540 (35%) offspring were defined as recovered after approximately 11 years of follow-up. Offspring with both parents reporting chronic spinal pain were less likely to recover from chronic spinal pain (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.99) and activity limiting spinal pain (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.94), compared with offspring of parents without chronic spinal pain. Analyses stratified by BMI and physical activity showed no strong evidence of effect modification on these associations. However, offspring who were overweight/obese and with both parents reporting chronic spinal pain had particularly low probability of recovery from activity limiting spinal pain, compared with those who were normal weight and had parents without chronic spinal pain (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.84). CONCLUSION: Offspring with chronic spinal pain are less likely to recover if they have parents with chronic spinal pain, particularly if offspring are overweight/obese.  
  Address Clinic of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30341129; PMCID:PMC6196861 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2069  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Fredheim, O.M.S.; Mahic, M.; Skurtveit, S.; Dale, O.; Romundstad, P.; Borchgrevink, P.C. url  doi
  Title Chronic pain and use of opioids: a population-based pharmacoepidemiological study from the Norwegian prescription database and the Nord-Trondelag health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 155 Issue 7 Pages 1213-1221  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adult; Aged; Analgesics, Opioid/*therapeutic use; Benzodiazepines/*therapeutic use; Chronic Pain/*drug therapy; Cohort Studies; Cross-Sectional Studies; Databases, Factual; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Motor Activity; Norway; Pain Measurement; Pharmacoepidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Severity of Illness Index; Chronic nonmalignant pain; Epidemiology; HUNT; Opioid; Pharmacoepidemiology  
  Abstract In previous studies on prescription patterns of opioids, accurate data on pain are missing, and previous epidemiological studies of pain lack accurate data on opioid use. The present linkage study, which investigates the relationship between pain and opioid use, is based on accurate individual data from the complete national Norwegian prescription database and the Nord-Trondelag health study 3, which includes about 46,000 people. Baseline data were collected in 2006 to 2008, and the cohort was followed up for 3 years. Of 14,477 people who reported chronic nonmalignant pain, 85% did not use opioids at all, 3% used opioids persistently, and 12% used opioids occasionally. Even in the group reporting severe or very severe chronic pain, the number not using opioids (2680) was far higher than the number who used opioids persistently (304). However, three quarters of people using opioids persistently reported strong or very strong pain in spite of the medication. Risk factors for the people with chronic pain who were not persistent opioid users at baseline to use opioids persistently 3 years later were occasional use of opioids, prescription of >100 defined daily doses per year of benzodiazepines, physical inactivity, reports of strong pain intensity, and prescription of drugs from 8 or more Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical groups. The study showed that most people having chronic nonmalignant pain are not using opioids, even if the pain is strong or very strong. However, the vast majority of patients with persistent opioid use report strong or very strong pain in spite of opioid treatment.  
  Address Pain and Palliation Research Group, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; National Competence Centre for Complex Symptom Disorders, Department of Pain and Complex Disorders, St. Olav University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24637039 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1672  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Heuch, I.; Heuch, I.; Hagen, K.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Body mass index as a risk factor for developing chronic low back pain: a follow-up in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Spine Abbreviated Journal Spine (Phila Pa 1976)  
  Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 133-139  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; *Body Mass Index; Chronic Pain; Cohort Studies; Comorbidity; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Low Back Pain/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Population Surveillance; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN: A population-based, prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether overweight, obesity, or more generally an elevated body mass index (BMI) increase the probability of experiencing chronic low back pain (LBP) after an 11-year period, both among participants with and without LBP at baseline. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Chronic LBP is a common disabling disorder in modern society. Cross-sectional studies suggest an association between an elevated BMI and LBP, but it is not clear whether this is a causal relationship. METHODS: Data were obtained from the community-based HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008) studies of an entire Norwegian county. Participants were 8733 men and 10,149 women, aged 30 to 69 years, who did not have chronic LBP at baseline, and 2669 men and 3899 women with LBP at baseline. After 11 years, both groups indicated whether they currently had chronic LBP, defined as pain persisting for at least 3 months continuously during the last year. RESULTS: A significant positive association was found between BMI and risk of LBP among persons without LBP at baseline. The odds ratio for BMI 30 or more versus BMI less than 25 was 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.67) for men and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.03-1.46) for women, in analyses adjusted for age, education, work status, physical activity at work and in leisure time, smoking, blood pressure, and serum lipid levels. A significant positive association was also established between BMI and recurrence of LBP among women. LBP status at baseline had negligible influence on subsequent change in BMI. CONCLUSION: High values of BMI may predispose to chronic LBP 11 years later, both in individuals with and without LBP. The association between BMI and LBP is not explained by an effect of LBP on later change in BMI.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingrid.heuch@uus.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0362-2436 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22718225 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1443  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult: family linkage data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication JAMA Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal JAMA Pediatr  
  Volume 167 Issue 1 Pages 61-69  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Chronic Pain/economics/*etiology/psychology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Family/psychology; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Norway; Odds Ratio; *Parents/psychology; Psychology; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine a possible association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult and to explore whether a relationship could be explained by socioeconomic and psychosocial factors or may be affected by differences in family structure. DESIGN: Unselected, population-based, cross-sectional study. SETTING: Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. PARTICIPANTS: All inhabitants of Nord-Trondelag County who were 13 years or older were invited to enroll in the study. In total, 8200 of 10 485 invitees (78.2%) participated in the investigation. Among 7913 participants in the target age group (age range, 13-18 years), 7373 (93.2%) completed the pain questions. The final study population consisted of 5370 adolescents or young adults for whom one or both parents participated in the adult survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was chronic nonspecific pain in adolescents and young adults, defined as pain in at least 1 location, unrelated to any known disease or injury, experienced at least once a week during the past 3 months. Chronic multisite pain was defined as chronic pain in at least 3 locations. RESULTS: Maternal chronic pain was associated with chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.8). Paternal chronic pain was associated with increased odds of pain in adolescents and young adults. The odds of chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults increased when both parents reported pain. Adjustments for socioeconomic and psychosocial factors did not change the results, although differences in family structure did. Among offspring living primarily with their mothers, clear associations were observed between maternal pain and pain in adolescents and young adults, but no association was found with paternal pain. CONCLUSIONS: Parental chronic pain is associated with chronic nonspecific pain and especially with chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults. Family structure influences the relationship, indicating that family pain models and shared environmental factors are important in the origin of chronic pain.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. gry.b.hoftun@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23403843 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1441  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with adolescent chronic non-specific pain, chronic multisite pain, and chronic pain with high disability: the Young-HUNT Study 2008 Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Journal of Pain : Official Journal of the American Pain Society Abbreviated Journal J Pain  
  Volume 13 Issue 9 Pages 874-883  
  Keywords Adolescent; Anxiety/epidemiology; Chronic Pain/*epidemiology/*physiopathology/psychology; Depression/epidemiology; *Disabled Persons; Female; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Norway; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Prevalence; Psychology; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Factors  
  Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the association of chronic pain with different lifestyle factors and psychological symptoms in a large, unselected adolescent population. Pain was evaluated as chronic non-specific pain, chronic multisite pain, and in additional analyses, chronic pain with high disability. The study was performed during 2006 to 2008 in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. Adolescents aged 13 to 18 years were invited to participate. The response rate was 78%. The final study population consisted of 7,373. Sedentary behavior and pain were associated only in girls. In both sexes, overweight and obesity were associated with increased odds of pain. Whereas both smoking and alcohol intoxication showed strong associations with pain, the associations were attenuated after adjustments for psychosocial factors. Symptoms of anxiety and depression showed the strongest associations with pain (odds ratio 4.1 in girls and 3.7 in boys). The odds of pain increased gradually by number of unfavorable lifestyle factors reported. This study revealed consistent associations between lifestyle factors, anxiety and depression, and chronic pain, including multisite pain and pain with high disability. The consistency across the different pain categories suggests common underlying explanatory mechanisms, and despite the cross-sectional design, the study indicates several modifiable targets in the management of adolescent chronic pain. PERSPECTIVE: This study showed a clear and consistent relation between different lifestyle factors, anxiety and depression, and the pain categories chronic non-specific pain, multisite pain, and also pain with high disability. Independent of causality, it underlines the importance of a broad perspective when studying, preventing, and treating chronic pain in adolescents.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. gry.b.hoftun@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1526-5900 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22832694 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1531  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Iversen, J.M.; Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Adolescent chronic pain and association to perinatal factors: linkage of Birth Registry data with the Young-HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Eur J Pain Abbreviated Journal European journal of pain  
  Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages 567-575  
  Keywords HUNT3; Young-HUNT; Adolescent; Age Factors; *Birth Weight; Chronic Pain/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Male; Pregnancy; *Registries; Sex Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Time Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the associations of birthweight, gestation and 5-min Apgar score with self-reported chronic nonspecific pain in a large, unselected adolescent population. METHODS: The third population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) included 8200 adolescents aged 13-19 years, constituting 78.2% of adolescents in Nord-Trondelag County. In the target age group, 13-18 years, data on pain frequency from 10 localizations were available from 7373 adolescents. Chronic nonspecific pain was defined as pain at least once a week during the last 3 months, not related to any known disease or injury. Chronic multisite pain was defined as chronic pain in at least three localizations, and chronic daily pain was defined as chronic pain almost every day. Perinatal data were retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, and data were available for 7120 of the 7373 adolescents. Covariates included adolescent and maternal general health measures from the HUNT study. RESULTS: We found no consistent association between preterm birth and chronic pain and no clear association between birthweight and chronic pain complaints in adolescence. Post-term birth in boys and a low 5-min Apgar score in both sexes tended to increase the reporting of chronic pain in adolescence. CONCLUSIONS: Perinatal factors, and especially preterm birth and low birthweight, did not seem to have a major impact on pain complaints in adolescence.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian Uni Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Iversen, J MHoftun, G BRomundstad, P RRygg, MengEnglandLondon, England2014/08/21 06:00Eur J Pain. 2015 Apr;19(4):567-75. doi: 10.1002/ejp.581. Epub 2014 Aug 20. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Iversen2015a Serial 1824  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kaasboll, J.; Lydersen, S.; Indredavik, M.S. url  doi
  Title Psychological symptoms in children of parents with chronic pain-the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 153 Issue 5 Pages 1054-1062  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adolescent Behavior/psychology; Anxiety/*diagnosis/psychology; Child of Impaired Parents/*psychology; Chronic Pain/*psychology; Depression/*diagnosis/psychology; Female; Health Status; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Norway; Questionnaires; Sex Factors  
  Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between parental chronic pain and anxiety, depression, and conduct problems in adolescents. The current study was based on cross-sectional surveys performed during 2006 to 2008 from the Nord Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3 and Young-HUNT 3). The sample consisted of 3227 adolescents aged 13 to 18 years for whom information was available on parental chronic pain and health statuses. Separate analyses were conducted for girls and boys. The results indicated that if both parents experienced chronic pain, there was an increased risk of symptoms of anxiety and depression in girls (OR=2.17, CI=1.36-3.45, P=.001) and boys (OR=2.33, CI=1.17-4.63, P=.016) compared with children for whom neither parent had chronic pain. Girls had an increased risk of conduct problems in school if their mothers had chronic pain (OR=1.33, CI=1.02-1.74, P=.034). These results remained after adjusting for the possible effects of confounding factors and parental mental health. The results suggest that the presence of both maternal and paternal chronic pain is a high risk factor for internalizing symptoms in both girls and boys. The present study offers insights that should prove useful in clinical work and further large-scale research.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. jannike.kaasboll@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22444189 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1535  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kaasboll, J.; Lydersen, S.; Ranoyen, I.; Nilsen, W.; Indredavik, M.S. url  doi
  Title Parental chronic pain and internalizing symptoms in offspring: the role of adolescents' social competence – the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Pain Research Abbreviated Journal J Pain Res  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 2915-2928  
  Keywords adolescents; anxiety; chronic pain; depression; sex differences; social competence  
  Abstract Background: A growing body of research suggests that the children of parents with chronic pain are at risk for internalizing symptoms. The mechanisms of such associations have not been as thoroughly examined. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adolescents' social competence mediates the association between parental chronic pain and offspring internalizing symptoms as well as whether these associations are moderated by adolescent gender. Methods: The current study was based on cross-sectional data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3), a Norwegian population-based health survey conducted in 2006-2008. The present sample comprised adolescents who had both parents participating (n=9,681). Structural equation modeling was used for the data analysis. Results: Our results indicated that the association between concurrent maternal and paternal chronic pain and offspring's symptoms of anxiety and depression was partly mediated by low social competence for girls (b(SE)=0.060 [0.030], P=0.043) but not for boys (b(SE)=-0.059 [0.040], P=0.146). This suggests that these associations are moderated by offspring gender. Conclusion: The study extends the existing literature on the possible pathways between parental chronic pain and internalizing symptoms in the offspring. Identifying protective factors in the pathways between parental chronic pain and mental distress in children could guide measures that promote the wellbeing of the child and family of chronic pain sufferers.  
  Address Department of Children and Youth, Division of Mental Health Care, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1178-7090 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30538531; PMCID:PMC6254984 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2108  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kaasboll, J.; Ranoyen, I.; Nilsen, W.; Lydersen, S.; Indredavik, M.S. url  doi
  Title Associations between parental chronic pain and self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion in adolescent girls and boys--family linkage data from the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC public health  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 817  
  Keywords Young-HUNT; HUNT3; Adolescent; Chronic Pain/*psychology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Family Relations; Fathers; Female; Humans; Male; Mothers; *Parents; Resilience, Psychological; Risk Factors; *Self Concept; Self Report; Sex Factors; *Social Skills  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Parental chronic pain has been associated with adverse outcomes in offspring. However, knowledge on individual and family resilience factors in adolescent offspring of chronic pain sufferers is scarce. This study thus aimed to investigate the associations between parental chronic pain and self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion levels reported by adolescent girls and boys. METHODS: Based on cross-sectional surveys from the Nord Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT 3 study), the study used independent self-reports from adolescents aged 13 to 18 years (n = 3227) and their parents and conducted separate linear regression analyses for girls and boys. RESULTS: Concurrent maternal and paternal chronic pain was associated with reduced self-esteem, social competence, and family cohesion in girls. Moreover, maternal chronic pain was associated with higher social competence in boys and reduced self-esteem in girls. The majority of the observed associations were significantly different between girls and boys. Paternal chronic pain was not found to be associated with child outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that the presence of both maternal and paternal chronic pain could be a potential risk factor for lower levels of individual and family resilience factors reported by girls. Further research on the relationship between parental pain and sex-specific offspring characteristics, including positive resilience factors, is warranted. The study demonstrates the importance of targeting the entire family in chronic pain care.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare (RKBU) of Central Norway, Facult Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Kaasboll, JannikeRanoyen, IngunnNilsen, WendyLydersen, StianIndredavik, Marit SengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2015/08/25 06:00BMC Public Health. 2015 Aug 22;15:817. doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-2164-9. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Kaasboll2015 Serial 1829  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kvalheim, S.; Sandven, I.; Hagen, K.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Smoking as a risk factor for chronic musculoskeletal complaints is influenced by age. The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 154 Issue 7 Pages 1073-1079  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Arthralgia/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Chronic Pain/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Comorbidity; Educational Status; Female; Humans; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Sex Distribution; Smoking/*epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract Chronic musculoskeletal complaints (MSCs) are among the major health problems, and cross-sectional studies suggest an association between smoking and MSCs. The causal relationship, however, is not known. The present study is designed to assess the association between smoking and chronic MSCs, and is based on data from a large longitudinal cohort study of all inhabitants 20years in Nord-Trondelag County (Helse Undersokelsen i Nord-Trondelag -HUNT), conducted in 1995-97 (HUNT 2) and 2006-08 (HUNT 3). The study population consisted of 15,134 subjects without chronic MSCs and valid exposure data on smoking at baseline (HUNT 2). The outcome was defined as presence of chronic MSCs at follow-up (HUNT 3). The results show that smoking at baseline represents a 20% increased risk (IRR=1.20, 95% CI 1.14-1.27, P=0.0001) for chronic MSCs at follow-up. The risk for chronic MSCs by daily smoking decreased with increasing age up to 50years; after this, there was no significant association. The results show that modifiable risk factors like smoking should be included in public health intervention programs for MSCs.  
  Address Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. synnovkk@medisin.uio.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23623251 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1434  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Landmark, T.; Romundstad, P.; Dale, O.; Borchgrevink, P.C.; Kaasa, S. url  doi
  Title Estimating the prevalence of chronic pain: validation of recall against longitudinal reporting (the HUNT pain study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Pain Abbreviated Journal Pain  
  Volume 153 Issue 7 Pages 1368-1373  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Chronic Pain/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Mental Recall/*physiology; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; *Pain Measurement; Prevalence; Questionnaires; Reproducibility of Results; Young Adult  
  Abstract Methods for classifying chronic pain in population studies are highly variable, and prevalence estimates ranges from 11% to 64%. Limited knowledge about the persistence of pain and the validity of recall questions defining chronic pain make findings difficult to interpret and compare. The primary aim of the current study was to characterize the persistence of pain in the general population and to validate recall measures against longitudinal reporting of pain. A random sample of 6419 participants from a population study (the HUNT 3 study in Norway) was invited to report pain on the SF-8 verbal pain rating scale every 3 months over a 12-month period and to report pain lasting more than 6 months at 12-month follow-up. Complete data were obtained from 3364 participants. Pain reporting was highly stable (intraclass correlation 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.67), and the prevalence of chronic pain varied considerably according to level of severity and persistence: 31% reported mild pain or more, whereas 2% reported severe pain on 4 of 4 consecutive measurements. When defined as moderate pain or more on at least 3 of 4 consecutive measurements, the prevalence was 26%. Compared with the longitudinal classification, a cross-sectional measure of moderate pain or more during the last week on the SF-8 scale presented a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 84%, and a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 90% when combined with a 6-month recall question. Thus pain reporting in the general population is stable and cross-sectional measures may give valid prevalence estimates of chronic pain.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. tormod.landmark@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22575226 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1539  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Hveem, K.; Janszky, I. url  doi
  Title Insomnia and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein: the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Psychosomatic Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychosom Med  
  Volume 74 Issue 5 Pages 543-553  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; C-Reactive Protein/analysis/*metabolism; Chronic Pain/epidemiology; Coronary Disease/*epidemiology; Epidemiologic Methods; Female; Humans; Inflammation/epidemiology/*metabolism; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Sex Distribution; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/*epidemiology/metabolism; Stress, Psychological/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To explore the hypothesis that insomnia may increase the risk of coronary heart disease through inflammatory mechanisms. METHODS: The association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) with self-reported symptoms of insomnia was examined. Participants were 8547 men and nonpregnant women who answered one or more insomnia-related questions and who had available hsCRP measurements in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. In multivariable linear regression analyses of the logarithm of hsCRP, we adjusted for established cardiovascular risk factors, psychosocial distress, chronic pain, and chronic somatic disorders. RESULTS: Among men, difficulties initiating sleep and nonrestorative sleep were associated with increasing hsCRP levels after adjusting for age (B = 0.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.01-0.14, p for trend = .02 and B = 0.09, 95% CI = 0.02-0.15, p for trend = .006), but after multivariable adjustment, the associations were attenuated (B = 0.03, 95% CI = -0.03 to 0.09, p for trend = .30 and B = 0.06, 95% CI = -0.00 to 0.12, p for trend = .05). HsCRP was not associated with other insomnia-related symptoms. In women, there was no evidence for any association of symptoms of insomnia with hsCRP levels. Results indicated sex differences in the association between sleep characteristics and CRP (difficulties maintaining sleep, p interaction = .018; cumulative number of symptoms of insomnia, p interaction = .014; and symptoms of insomnia influencing work performance, p interaction = .039). CONCLUSIONS: There were no consistent associations between symptoms of insomnia and hsCRP levels. Our results do not support the hypothesis that inflammation, as reflected by elevated levels of hsCRP, is an important factor linking insomnia to coronary heart disease.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NO-7489, Norway. lars.e.laugsand@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-3174 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22685243 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1543  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: