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Author Aarhus, L.; Tambs, K.; Kvestad, E.; Engdahl, B. url  doi
  Title Childhood Otitis Media: A Cohort Study With 30-Year Follow-Up of Hearing (The HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Ear Hear Abbreviated Journal Ear and hearing  
  Volume 36 Issue 3 Pages 302-308  
  Keywords Acute Disease; Adolescent; Adult; Audiometry, Pure-Tone; Child; Chronic Disease; Cohort Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Hearing Loss/*epidemiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Otitis Media/epidemiology; Otitis Media with Effusion/*epidemiology; Otitis Media, Suppurative/*epidemiology; Recurrence; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To study the extent to which otitis media (OM) in childhood is associated with adult hearing thresholds. Furthermore, to study whether the effects of OM on adult hearing thresholds are moderated by age or noise exposure. DESIGN: Population-based cohort study of 32,786 participants who had their hearing tested by pure-tone audiometry in primary school and again at ages ranging from 20 to 56 years. Three thousand sixty-six children were diagnosed with hearing loss; the remaining sample had normal childhood hearing. RESULTS: Compared with participants with normal childhood hearing, those diagnosed with childhood hearing loss caused by otitis media with effusion (n = 1255), chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM; n = 108), or hearing loss after recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM; n = 613) had significantly increased adult hearing thresholds in the whole frequency range (2 dB/17-20 dB/7-10 dB, respectively). The effects were adjusted for age, sex, and noise exposure. Children diagnosed with hearing loss after rAOM had somewhat improved hearing thresholds as adults. The effects of CSOM and hearing loss after rAOM on adult hearing thresholds were larger in participants tested in middle adulthood (ages 40 to 56 years) than in those tested in young adulthood (ages 20 to 40 years). Eardrum pathology added a marginally increased risk of adult hearing loss (1-3 dB) in children with otitis media with effusion or hearing loss after rAOM. The study could not reveal significant differences in the effect of self-reported noise exposure on adult hearing thresholds between the groups with OM and the group with normal childhood hearing. CONCLUSIONS: This cohort study indicates that CSOM and rAOM in childhood are associated with adult hearing loss, underlining the importance of optimal treatment in these conditions. It appears that ears with a subsequent hearing loss after OM in childhood age at a faster rate than those without; however this should be confirmed by studies with several follow-up tests through adulthood.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, Nydalen, Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Aarhus, LisaTambs, KristianKvestad, EllenEngdahl, BoengN01 DC62104/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/N01-DC-6-2104/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/Research Support, N.I.H., ExtramuralResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't2014/11/18 06:00Ear Hear. 2015 May-Jun;36(3):302-8. doi: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000118. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Aarhus2015c Serial 1791  
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Author Almkvist, O.; Bosnes, O.; Bosnes, I.; Stordal, E. url  doi
  Title Selective impact of disease on short-term and long-term components of self-reported memory: a population-based HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages e013586  
  Keywords Hunt; disease; health; long-term memory; short-term memory; subjective memory  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Subjective memory is commonly considered to be a unidimensional measure. However, theories of performance-based memory suggest that subjective memory could be divided into more than one dimension. OBJECTIVE: To divide subjective memory into theoretically related components of memory and explore the relationship to disease. METHODS: In this study, various aspects of self-reported memory were studied with respect to demographics and diseases in the third wave of the HUNT epidemiological study in middle Norway. The study included all individuals 55 years of age or older, who responded to a nine-item questionnaire on subjective memory and questionnaires on health (n=18 633). RESULTS: A principle component analysis of the memory items resulted in two memory components; the criterion used was an eigenvalue above 1, which accounted for 54% of the total variance. The components were interpreted as long-term memory (LTM; the first component; 43% of the total variance) and short-term memory (STM; the second component; 11% of the total variance). Memory impairment was significantly related to all diseases (except Bechterew's disease), most strongly to brain infarction, heart failure, diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and whiplash. For most diseases, the STM component was more affected than the LTM component; however, in cancer, the opposite pattern was seen. CONCLUSIONS: Subjective memory impairment as measured in HUNT contained two components, which were differentially associated with diseases.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28490551; PMCID:PMC5566596 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1874  
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Author Alsnes, I.V.; Vatten, L.J.; Fraser, A.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Rich-Edwards, J.; Romundstad, P.R.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Hypertension in Pregnancy and Offspring Cardiovascular Risk in Young Adulthood: Prospective and Sibling Studies in the HUNT Study (Nord-Trondelag Health Study) in Norway Type Multicenter Study
  Year 2017 Publication Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) Abbreviated Journal Hypertension  
  Volume 69 Issue 4 Pages 591-598  
  Keywords Adult; Blood Pressure/*physiology; Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology/physiopathology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Incidence; Infant, Newborn; Norway/epidemiology; Pregnancy; *Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular; Prospective Studies; *Registries; Risk Factors; Siblings; adolescent; blood pressure; cardiovascular disease; mother; preeclampsia  
  Abstract Women with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are at increased lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease. We examined the offspring's cardiovascular risk profile in young adulthood and their siblings' cardiovascular risk profile. From the HUNT study (Nord-Trondelag Health Study) in Norway, 15 778 participants (mean age: 29 years), including 210 sibling groups, were linked to information from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Blood pressure, anthropometry, serum lipids, and C-reactive protein were assessed. Seven hundred and six participants were born after exposure to maternal hypertension in pregnancy: 336 mothers had gestational hypertension, 343 had term preeclampsia, and 27 had preterm preeclampsia. Offspring whose mothers had hypertension in pregnancy had 2.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure, 1.5 (0.9-2.1) mm Hg higher diastolic blood pressure, 0.66 (0.31-1.01) kg/m2 higher body mass index, and 1.49 (0.65-2.33) cm wider waist circumference, compared with offspring of normotensive pregnancies. Similar differences were observed for gestational hypertension and term preeclampsia. Term preeclampsia was also associated with higher concentrations of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.14 mmol/L, 0.03-0.25) and triglycerides (0.13 mmol/L, 0.06-0.21). Siblings born after a normotensive pregnancy had nearly identical risk factor levels as siblings born after maternal hypertension. Offspring born after maternal hypertension in pregnancy have a more adverse cardiovascular risk profile in young adulthood than offspring of normotensive pregnancies. Their siblings, born after a normotensive pregnancy, have a similar risk profile, suggesting that shared genes or lifestyle may account for the association, rather than an intrauterine effect. All children of mothers who have experienced hypertension in pregnancy may be at increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease.  
  Address From the Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (I.V.A., L.J.V., J.H.B., J.R.-E., P.R.R., B.O.A.); MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol and School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, United Kingdom (A.F.); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Connors Center for Women's Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (J.R.-E.); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (J.R.-E.); Department of Epidemiology, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (L.J.V., J.R.-E.); and Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway (B.O.A.)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0194-911X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28223467 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1875  
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Author Anttila, V.; Winsvold, B.S.; Gormley, P.; Kurth, T.; Bettella, F.; McMahon, G.; Kallela, M.; Malik, R.; de Vries, B.; Terwindt, G.; Medland, S.E.; Todt, U.; McArdle, W.L.; Quaye, L.; Koiranen, M.; Ikram, M.A.; Lehtimaki, T.; Stam, A.H.; Ligthart, L.; Wedenoja, J.; Dunham, I.; Neale, B.M.; Palta, P.; Hamalainen, E.; Schurks, M.; Rose, L.M.; Buring, J.E.; Ridker, P.M.; Steinberg, S.; Stefansson, H.; Jakobsson, F.; Lawlor, D.A.; Evans, D.M.; Ring, S.M.; Farkkila, M.; Artto, V.; Kaunisto, M.A.; Freilinger, T.; Schoenen, J.; Frants, R.R.; Pelzer, N.; Weller, C.M.; Zielman, R.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Martin, N.G.; Borck, G.; Gobel, H.; Heinze, A.; Heinze-Kuhn, K.; Williams, F.M.K.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Pouta, A.; van den Ende, J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Hofman, A.; Amin, N.; Hottenga, J.-J.; Vink, J.M.; Heikkila, K.; Alexander, M.; Muller-Myhsok, B.; Schreiber, S.; Meitinger, T.; Wichmann, H.E.; Aromaa, A.; Eriksson, J.G.; Traynor, B.J.; Trabzuni, D.; Rossin, E.; Lage, K.; Jacobs, S.B.R.; Gibbs, J.R.; Birney, E.; Kaprio, J.; Penninx, B.W.; Boomsma, D.I.; van Duijn, C.; Raitakari, O.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Zwart, J.-A.; Cherkas, L.; Strachan, D.P.; Kubisch, C.; Ferrari, M.D.; van den Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M.; Dichgans, M.; Wessman, M.; Smith, G.D.; Stefansson, K.; Daly, M.J.; Nyholt, D.R.; Chasman, D.I.; Palotie, A. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine Type Meta-Analysis
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 45 Issue 8 Pages 912-917  
  Keywords Cerebellum/metabolism; Computational Biology; Frontal Lobe/metabolism; *Genetic Loci; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease; *Genome-Wide Association Study; Humans; Migraine Disorders/*genetics; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Quantitative Trait Loci; HUNT3  
  Abstract Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and 95,425 population-matched controls. We identified 12 loci associated with migraine susceptibility (P<5x10(-8)). Five loci are new: near AJAP1 at 1p36, near TSPAN2 at 1p13, within FHL5 at 6q16, within C7orf10 at 7p14 and near MMP16 at 8q21. Three of these loci were identified in disease subgroup analyses. Brain tissue expression quantitative trait locus analysis suggests potential functional candidate genes at four loci: APOA1BP, TBC1D7, FUT9, STAT6 and ATP5B.  
  Address Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Cambridge, UK. anttila@atgu.mgh.harvard.edu  
  Corporate Author International Headache Genetics Consortium Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23793025 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1341  
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Author Asvold, B.O.; Bjoro, T.; Platou, C.; Vatten, L.J. url  doi
  Title Thyroid function and the risk of coronary heart disease: 12-year follow-up of the HUNT study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Clinical Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Clin Endocrinol (Oxf)  
  Volume 77 Issue 6 Pages 911-917  
  Keywords Aged; Coronary Disease/blood/etiology/*mortality; Female; Heart Failure/blood/epidemiology; Hospitalization; Humans; Hypothyroidism/blood/complications; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction/blood/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Reference Values; Risk Factors; Thyrotropin/*blood; Thyroxine/blood; Triiodothyronine/blood  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: In a mortality follow-up of the HUNT Study, serum TSH within the reference range was positively associated with the risk of coronary death in women. We now aimed to confirm the association of high serum TSH with the risk of coronary heart disease, using hospital-based diagnoses of myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Prospective population-based study with linkage to hospital information on myocardial infarction and to the national Cause of Death Registry. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 26, 707 people without previously known thyroid or cardiovascular disease or diabetes at baseline. MEASUREMENTS: Hazard ratios (HR) of coronary death and HRs of hospitalization with a first-time acute myocardial infarction, by baseline thyroid function. RESULTS: During 12, years of follow-up, 960 (3.6%) participants had been hospitalized with first-time myocardial infarction and 558 (2.1%) had died from coronary heart disease. High TSH within the reference range was associated with increased risk of coronary death in women (P(trend) 0.005), but not in men. The risk of coronary death was also increased among women with subclinical hypothyroidism or subclinical hyperthyroidism, compared to women with TSH of 0.50-1.4 mU/l. However, thyroid function was not associated with the risk of being hospitalized with myocardial infarction. CONCLUSIONS: High serum TSH was associated with increased mortality from coronary heart disease in women, but we found no association of thyroid function with the risk of being hospitalized with myocardial infarction. Thus, the morbidity finding does not confirm the suggestion that low thyroid function within the clinically normal range is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. bjorn.o.asvold@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-0664 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22724581 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1506  
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Author Asvold, B.O.; Vatten, L.J.; Midthjell, K.; Bjoro, T. url  doi
  Title Serum TSH within the reference range as a predictor of future hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism: 11-year follow-up of the HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 97 Issue 1 Pages 93-99  
  Keywords Asymptomatic Diseases; Cohort Studies; Diagnostic Techniques, Endocrine/*standards; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hyperthyroidism/blood/*diagnosis/etiology; Hypothyroidism/blood/*diagnosis/etiology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Prognosis; Reference Values; Risk Factors; Thyrotropin/*blood; Time Factors  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Serum TSH in the upper part of the reference range may sometimes be a response to autoimmune thyroiditis in early stage and may therefore predict future hypothyroidism. Conversely, relatively low serum TSH could predict future hyperthyroidism. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to assess TSH within the reference range and subsequent risk of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a prospective population-based study with linkage to the Norwegian Prescription Database. SUBJECTS: A total of 10,083 women and 5,023 men without previous thyroid disease who had a baseline TSH of 0.20-4.5 mU/liter and who participated at a follow-up examination 11 yr later. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Predicted probabilities of developing hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism during follow-up, by categories of baseline TSH, were estimated. RESULTS: During 11 yr of follow-up, 3.5% of women and 1.3% of men developed hypothyroidism, and 1.1% of women and 0.6% of men developed hyperthyroidism. In both sexes, the baseline TSH was positively associated with the risk of subsequent hypothyroidism. The risk increased gradually from TSH of 0.50-1.4 mU/liter [women, 1.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-1.4; men, 0.3%, 95% CI 0.1-0.6] to a TSH of 4.0-4.5 mU/liter (women, 31.5%, 95% CI 24.6-39.3; men, 14.7%, 95% CI 7.7-26.2). The risk of hyperthyroidism was higher in women with a baseline TSH of 0.20-0.49 mU/liter (3.9%, 95% CI 1.8-8.4) than in women with a TSH of 0.50-0.99 mU/liter (1.4%, 95% CI 0.9-2.1) or higher ( approximately 1.0%). CONCLUSION: TSH within the reference range is positively and strongly associated with the risk of future hypothyroidism. TSH at the lower limit of the reference range may be associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Postboks 8905 MTFS, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway. bjorn.o.asvold@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22049180 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1507  
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Author Bauman, A.E.; Grunseit, A.C.; Rangul, V.; Heitmann, B.L. url  doi
  Title Physical activity, obesity and mortality: does pattern of physical activity have stronger epidemiological associations? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 788  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Hip circumference; Waist circumference  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Most studies of physical activity (PA) epidemiology use behaviour measured at a single time-point. We examined whether 'PA patterns' (consistently low, consistently high or inconsistent PA levels over time) showed different epidemiological relationships for anthropometric and mortality outcomes, compared to single time-point measure of PA. METHODS: Data were the Danish MONICA (MONItoring Trends and Determinants in CArdiovascular Disease) study over three waves 1982-3 (time 1), 1987-8 (time 2) and 1993-4 (time 3). Associations between leisure time single time-point PA levels at time 1 and time 3, and sport and active travel at times 1 and 2 with BMI, waist, hip circumference and mortality (death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD)) were compared to 'PA patterns' spanning multiple time points. PA pattern classified participants' PA as either 1) inactive or low PA at both time points; 2) moderate level PA at time 1 and high activity at time 3; or 3) a 'mixed PA pattern' indicating a varying levels of activity over time. Similarly, sport and active travel were also classified as indicating stable low, stable high and mixed patterns. RESULTS: The moderately and highly active groups for PA at times 1 and 3 had up to 1.7 cm lower increase in waist circumference compared with the inactive/low active group. Across 'PA patterns', 'active maintainers' had a 2.0 cm lower waist circumference than 'inactive/low maintainers'. Waist circumference was inversely related to sport but not active travel. CHD risk did not vary by activity levels at time 1, but was reduced significantly by 43% for high PA at time 3 (vs 'inactive' group) and among 'active maintainers' (vs 'inactive/low maintainers') by 62%. 'Sport pattern' showed stronger reductions in mortality for cardiovascular disease and CHD deaths among sport maintainers, than the single time point measures. CONCLUSIONS: PA patterns demonstrated a stronger association with a number of anthropometric and mortality outcomes than the single time-point measures. Operationalising PA as a sustained behavioural pattern may address some of the known under-estimation of risk for poor health in PA self-report measurements and better reflect exposure for epidemiological analysis of risk of health outcomes.  
  Address Copenhagen Center for Preventive Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen Capital Region, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28982371; PMCID:PMC5629749 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1880  
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Author Berndt, S.I.; Gustafsson, S.; Magi, R.; Ganna, A.; Wheeler, E.; Feitosa, M.F.; Justice, A.E.; Monda, K.L.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Esko, T.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gentilini, D.; Jackson, A.U.; Luan, J.'an; Randall, J.C.; Vedantam, S.; Willer, C.J.; Winkler, T.W.; Wood, A.R.; Workalemahu, T.; Hu, Y.-J.; Lee, S.H.; Liang, L.; Lin, D.-Y.; Min, J.L.; Neale, B.M.; Thorleifsson, G.; Yang, J.; Albrecht, E.; Amin, N.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Cadby, G.; den Heijer, M.; Eklund, N.; Fischer, K.; Goel, A.; Hottenga, J.-J.; Huffman, J.E.; Jarick, I.; Johansson, A.; Johnson, T.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Konig, I.R.; Kristiansson, K.; Kutalik, Z.; Lamina, C.; Lecoeur, C.; Li, G.; Mangino, M.; McArdle, W.L.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Ngwa, J.S.; Nolte, I.M.; Paternoster, L.; Pechlivanis, S.; Perola, M.; Peters, M.J.; Preuss, M.; Rose, L.M.; Shi, J.; Shungin, D.; Smith, A.V.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Surakka, I.; Teumer, A.; Trip, M.D.; Tyrer, J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vandenput, L.; Waite, L.L.; Zhao, J.H.; Absher, D.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Atalay, M.; Attwood, A.P.; Balmforth, A.J.; Basart, H.; Beilby, J.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Brambilla, P.; Bruinenberg, M.; Campbell, H.; Chasman, D.I.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Connell, J.M.; Cookson, W.O.; de Faire, U.; de Vegt, F.; Dei, M.; Dimitriou, M.; Edkins, S.; Estrada, K.; Evans, D.M.; Farrall, M.; Ferrario, M.M.; Ferrieres, J.; Franke, L.; Frau, F.; Gejman, P.V.; Grallert, H.; Gronberg, H.; Gudnason, V.; Hall, A.S.; Hall, P.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Hayward, C.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Heath, A.C.; Hebebrand, J.; Homuth, G.; Hu, F.B.; Hunt, S.E.; Hypponen, E.; Iribarren, C.; Jacobs, K.B.; Jansson, J.-O.; Jula, A.; Kahonen, M.; Kathiresan, S.; Kee, F.; Khaw, K.-T.; Kivimaki, M.; Koenig, W.; Kraja, A.T.; Kumari, M.; Kuulasmaa, K.; Kuusisto, J.; Laitinen, J.H.; Lakka, T.A.; Langenberg, C.; Launer, L.J.; Lind, L.; Lindstrom, J.; Liu, J.; Liuzzi, A.; Lokki, M.-L.; Lorentzon, M.; Madden, P.A.; Magnusson, P.K.; Manunta, P.; Marek, D.; Marz, W.; Mateo Leach, I.; McKnight, B.; Medland, S.E.; Mihailov, E.; Milani, L.; Montgomery, G.W.; Mooser, V.; Muhleisen, T.W.; Munroe, P.B.; Musk, A.W.; Narisu, N.; Navis, G.; Nicholson, G.; Nohr, E.A.; Ong, K.K.; Oostra, B.A.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Palotie, A.; Peden, J.F.; Pedersen, N.; Peters, A.; Polasek, O.; Pouta, A.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Prokopenko, I.; Putter, C.; Radhakrishnan, A.; Raitakari, O.; Rendon, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Rudan, I.; Saaristo, T.E.; Sambrook, J.G.; Sanders, A.R.; Sanna, S.; Saramies, J.; Schipf, S.; Schreiber, S.; Schunkert, H.; Shin, S.-Y.; Signorini, S.; Sinisalo, J.; Skrobek, B.; Soranzo, N.; Stancakova, A.; Stark, K.; Stephens, J.C.; Stirrups, K.; Stolk, R.P.; Stumvoll, M.; Swift, A.J.; Theodoraki, E.V.; Thorand, B.; Tregouet, D.-A.; Tremoli, E.; Van der Klauw, M.M.; van Meurs, J.B.J.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Viikari, J.; Virtamo, J.; Vitart, V.; Waeber, G.; Wang, Z.; Widen, E.; Wild, S.H.; Willemsen, G.; Winkelmann, B.R.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zillikens, M.C.; Amouyel, P.; Boehm, B.O.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boomsma, D.I.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chanock, S.J.; Cupples, L.A.; Cusi, D.; Dedoussis, G.V.; Erdmann, J.; Eriksson, J.G.; Franks, P.W.; Froguel, P.; Gieger, C.; Gyllensten, U.; Hamsten, A.; Harris, T.B.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hicks, A.A.; Hingorani, A.; Hinney, A.; Hofman, A.; Hovingh, K.G.; Hveem, K.; Illig, T.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Jockel, K.-H.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, S.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Kuh, D.; Laakso, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Levinson, D.F.; Martin, N.G.; Metspalu, A.; Morris, A.D.; Nieminen, M.S.; Njolstad, I.; Ohlsson, C.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Palmer, L.J.; Penninx, B.; Power, C.; Province, M.A.; Psaty, B.M.; Qi, L.; Rauramaa, R.; Ridker, P.M.; Ripatti, S.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Snieder, H.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Spector, T.D.; Stefansson, K.; Tonjes, A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Uusitupa, M.; van der Harst, P.; Vollenweider, P.; Wallaschofski, H.; Wareham, N.J.; Watkins, H.; Wichmann, H.-E.; Wilson, J.F.; Abecasis, G.R.; Assimes, T.L.; Barroso, I.; Boehnke, M.; Borecki, I.B.; Deloukas, P.; Fox, C.S.; Frayling, T.; Groop, L.C.; Haritunian, T.; Heid, I.M.; Hunter, D.; Kaplan, R.C.; Karpe, F.; Moffatt, M.F.; Mohlke, K.L.; O'Connell, J.R.; Pawitan, Y.; Schadt, E.E.; Schlessinger, D.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Strachan, D.P.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; van Duijn, C.M.; Visscher, P.M.; Di Blasio, A.M.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Lindgren, C.M.; Morris, A.P.; Meyre, D.; Scherag, A.; McCarthy, M.I.; Speliotes, E.K.; North, K.E.; Loos, R.J.F.; Ingelsson, E. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 45 Issue 5 Pages 501-512  
  Keywords *Anthropometry; Body Height/*genetics; Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease; *Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Meta-Analysis as Topic; Obesity/*genetics; Phenotype; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/*genetics; *Quantitative Trait Loci; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.  
  Address US Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23563607 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1466  
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Author Bhatta, L.; Leivseth, L.; Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Brumpton, B.M. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008: The HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Respiratory Medicine Abbreviated Journal Respir Med  
  Volume 138 Issue Pages 50-56  
  Keywords Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Disease Progression; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/physiology; Forecasting; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Distribution; Spirometry/methods; Vital Capacity/physiology; *Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; *Incidence; *Norway; *Prevalence; *Symptoms; *Trends  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality across the world and new estimates of prevalence and trend are of great importance. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and trend of COPD from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 in Norwegian adults >/=40 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: COPD was assessed using a fixed-ratio and lower limit of normal (LLN) criteria. Pre-bronchodilator spirometry was performed during 1995-1997 (n=7158) and 2006-2008 (n=8788). The prevalence of COPD was weighted using the inverse probability of selection and predicted probability of response. RESULTS: The prevalence of pre-bronchodilator COPD was 16.7% in 1995-1997 and 14.8% in 2006-2008 using fixed-ratio criteria, and 10.4% in 1995-1997 and 7.3% in 2006-2008 using LLN criteria. The prevalence of LLN COPD was higher among men (13.0% in 1995-1997, 7.7% in 2006-2008) than women (8.0% in 1995-1997, 6.9% in 2006-2008). From 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, the prevalence decreased among men but remained relatively stable among women. Over the 11-year period, the cumulative incidence of pre-bronchodilator COPD using LLN criteria was 3.3% and 2.7% among men and women respectively. The prevalence of self-reported asthma and respiratory symptoms increased. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence declined in men but not in women from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008, and was consistently higher among men than women.  
  Address Department of Thoracic Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0954-6111 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29724393 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2072  
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Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Gunnell, D.; Elvestad, M.B.; Davey Smith, G.; Skorpen, F.; Krokan, H.; Vatten, L.; Romundstad, P. url  doi
  Title The causal role of smoking in anxiety and depression: a Mendelian randomization analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Psychological Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychol Med  
  Volume 43 Issue 4 Pages 711-719  
  Keywords Adult; Alleles; Anxiety Disorders/*epidemiology/genetics; Body Mass Index; Causality; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15/genetics; Depressive Disorder/*epidemiology/genetics; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/epidemiology/genetics; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; *Mendelian Randomization Analysis; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics; Pregnancy; Prevalence; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Receptors, Nicotinic/*genetics; Self Report; Smoking/*epidemiology/genetics/psychology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is strongly associated with mental illness but the causal direction of the association is uncertain. We investigated the causal relationship between smoking and symptoms of anxiety and depression in the Norwegian HUNT study using the rs1051730 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant located in the nicotine acetylcholine receptor gene cluster on chromosome 15 as an instrumental variable for smoking phenotypes. Among smokers, this SNP is robustly associated with smoking quantity and nicotine dependence. Method In total, 53 601 participants were genotyped for the rs1051730 SNP and provided information on smoking habits and symptoms of anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). RESULTS: Self-reported smoking was positively associated with the prevalence of both anxiety and depression, and the measured polymorphism was positively associated with being a current smoker and the number of cigarettes smoked in current smokers. In the sample as a whole, risk of anxiety increased with each affected T allele [odds ratio (OR) 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.09, p = 0.002] but there was no association with depression (p = 0.31). However, we found no clear association of the polymorphism with either anxiety (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.97-1.09, p = 0.34) or depression (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95-1.09, p = 0.62) among smokers. CONCLUSIONS: As there was no association of the smoking-related rs1051730 SNP with anxiety and depression among smokers, the results suggest that smoking is not a cause of anxiety and depression.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. johan.h.bjorngaard@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-2917 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22687325 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1465  
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Author Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) Abbreviated Journal Respirology  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 278-283  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*physiopathology; Cohort Studies; Disease Progression; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Physical Exertion; Sedentary Lifestyle; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vital Capacity; *forced expiratory volume in 1 s; *forced vital capacity; *leisure time; *peak expiratory flow; *prospective  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: People with asthma may seek advice about physical activity. However, the benefits of leisure time physical activity on lung function are unclear. We investigated the association between leisure time physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study in Norway, we used multiple linear regressions to estimate the annual mean decline in lung function (and 95% CI) in 1329 people with asthma over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. The durations of light and hard physical activity per week in the last year were collected by questionnaire. Inactive participants did not report any light or hard activity, while active participants reported light or hard activity. RESULTS: The mean decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was 37 mL/year among inactive participants and 32 mL/year in active participants (difference: -5 mL/year (95% CI: -13 to 3)). The mean decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 33 mL/year among inactive participants and 31 mL/year in active participants (difference: -2 mL/year (95% CI: -11 to 7)). The mean decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio was 0.36%/year among inactive participants and 0.22%/year in active participants (difference: -0.14%/year (95% CI: -0.27 to -0.01)). The mean decline in peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 14 mL/year among the inactive participants and 10 mL/year in active participants (difference: -4 mL/year (95% CI: -9 to 1)). CONCLUSION: We observed slightly less decline in lung function in physically active than inactive participants with asthma, particularly for FEV1 , FEV1 /FVC ratio and PEF.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1323-7799 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696634 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1892  
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Author Cai, Y.; Hodgson, S.; Blangiardo, M.; Gulliver, J.; Morley, D.; Fecht, D.; Vienneau, D.; de Hoogh, K.; Key, T.; Hveem, K.; Elliott, P.; Hansell, A.L. url  doi
  Title Road traffic noise, air pollution and incident cardiovascular disease: A joint analysis of the HUNT, EPIC-Oxford and UK Biobank cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environment International Abbreviated Journal Environ Int  
  Volume 114 Issue Pages 191-201  
  Keywords Air Pollutants/*analysis; Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology; Environmental Exposure/*analysis; Humans; *Noise; Norway/epidemiology; United Kingdom/epidemiology; *Air pollution; *Cardiovascular disease; *Ischemic heart disease; *Road traffic noise; *Stroke  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the effects of long-term exposure to road traffic noise and air pollution on incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in three large cohorts: HUNT, EPIC-Oxford and UK Biobank. METHODS: In pooled complete-case sample of the three cohorts from Norway and the United Kingdom (N=355,732), 21,081 incident all CVD cases including 5259 ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 2871 cerebrovascular cases were ascertained between baseline (1993-2010) and end of follow-up (2008-2013) through medical record linkage. Annual mean 24-hour weighted road traffic noise (Lden) and air pollution (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter</=10mum [PM10], </=2.5mum [PM2.5] and nitrogen dioxide [NO2]) exposure at baseline address was modelled using a simplified version of the Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe (CNOSSOS-EU) and European-wide Land Use Regression models. Individual-level covariate data were harmonised and physically pooled across the three cohorts. Analysis was via Cox proportional hazard model with mutual adjustments for both noise and air pollution and potential confounders. RESULTS: No significant associations were found between annual mean Lden and incident CVD, IHD or cerebrovascular disease in the overall population except that the association with incident IHD was significant among current-smokers. In the fully adjusted models including adjustment for Lden, an interquartile range (IQR) higher PM10 (4.1mug/m3) or PM2.5 (1.4mug/m3) was associated with a 5.8% (95%CI: 2.5%-9.3%) and 3.7% (95%CI: 0.2%-7.4%) higher risk for all incident CVD respectively. No significant associations were found between NO2 and any of the CVD outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: We found suggestive evidence of a possible association between road traffic noise and incident IHD, consistent with current literature. Long-term particulate air pollution exposure, even at concentrations below current European air quality standards, was significantly associated with incident CVD.  
  Address MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Directorate of Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0160-4120 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29518662 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2076  
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Author Chau, J.Y.; Grunseit, A.; Midthjell, K.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A.E.; van der Ploeg, H.P. url  doi
  Title Cross-sectional associations of total sitting and leisure screen time with cardiometabolic risk in adults. Results from the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport / Sports Medicine Australia Abbreviated Journal J Sci Med Sport  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 78-84  
  Keywords BMI; CMD; Cardiovascular diseases; Epidemiology; GGT; HDL; HUNT; Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway (HelseUndersøkelsen i Nord-Trøndelag); Physical activity; Sedentary lifestyle; WC; body mass index; cardiometabolic disease; gamma glutamyltransferase; high density lipoprotein; waist circumference  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine associations of total sitting time, TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use with cardiometabolic risk biomarkers in adults. DESIGN: Population based cross-sectional study. METHODS: Waist circumference, BMI, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, blood pressure, non-fasting glucose, gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) and triglycerides were measured in 48,882 adults aged 20 years or older from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Adjusted multiple regression models were used to test for associations between these biomarkers and self-reported total sitting time, TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use in the whole sample and by cardiometabolic disease status sub-groups. RESULTS: In the whole sample, reporting total sitting time >/=10 h/day was associated with poorer BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, non-fasting glucose, GGT and triglyceride levels compared to those reporting total sitting time <4h/day (all p<0.05). TV-viewing >/=4 h/day was associated with poorer BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, GGT and triglycerides compared to TV-viewing <1h/day (all p<0.05). Leisure-time computer use >/=1 h/day was associated with poorer BMI, total cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, GGT and triglycerides compared with those reporting no leisure-time computing. Sub-group analyses by cardiometabolic disease status showed similar patterns in participants free of cardiometabolic disease, while similar albeit non-significant patterns were observed in those with cardiometabolic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Total sitting time, TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use are associated with poorer cardiometabolic risk profiles in adults. Reducing sedentary behaviour throughout the day and limiting TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use may have health benefits.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia; Department of Public and Occupational Health, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1878-1861 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23619159 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1496  
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Author Chau, J.Y.; Grunseit, A.; Midthjell, K.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A.E.; Van der Ploeg, H.P.   
  Title Sedentary behaviour and risk of mortality from all-causes and cardiometabolic diseases in adults: evidence from the HUNT3 population cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Br J Sports Med Abbreviated Journal British journal of sports medicine  
  Volume 49 Issue 11 Pages 737-742  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adult; Age Distribution; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Metabolic Diseases/*mortality; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Sex Distribution; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Sedentary behaviour is a potential risk factor for chronic-ill health and mortality, that is, independent of health-enhancing physical activity. Few studies have investigated the risk of mortality associated with multiple contexts of sedentary behaviour. OBJECTIVE: To examine the prospective associations of total sitting time, TV-viewing time and occupational sitting with mortality from all causes and cardiometabolic diseases. METHODS: Data from 50,817 adults aged >/=20 years from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 (HUNT3) in 2006-2008 were linked to the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry up to 31 December 2010. Cox proportional hazards models examined all-cause and cardiometabolic disease-related mortality associated with total sitting time, TV-viewing and occupational sitting, adjusting for multiple potential confounders including physical activity. RESULTS: After mean follow-up of 3.3 years (137,315.8 person-years), 1068 deaths were recorded of which 388 were related to cardiometabolic diseases. HRs for all-cause mortality associated with total sitting time were 1.12 (95% CI 0.89 to 1.42), 1.18 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.57) and 1.65 (95% CI 1.24 to 2.21) for total sitting time 4-  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Aus Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Chau2015 Serial 1798  
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Author Cuypers, K.; De Ridder, K.; Kvaloy, K.; Knudtsen, M.S.; Krokstad, S.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L. url  doi
  Title Leisure time activities in adolescence in the presence of susceptibility genes for obesity: risk or resilience against overweight in adulthood? The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 820  
  Keywords Adolescent; Body Mass Index; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics; Genotype; Humans; *Leisure Activities; Male; Norway; Obesity/*genetics/*prevention & control; Overweight/genetics/prevention & control; Population Surveillance; Questionnaires; Waist Circumference/physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Environment, health behavior, and genetic background are important in the development of obesity. Adolescents spend substantial part of daily leisure time on cultural and social activities, but knowledge about the effects of participation in such activities on weight is limited. METHODS: A number of 1450 adolescents from the Norwegian HUNT study (1995-97) were followed-up in 2006-08 as young adults. Phenotypic data on lifestyle and anthropometric measures were assessed using questionnaires and standardized clinical examinations. Genotypic information on 12 established obesity-susceptibility loci were available for analyses. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the associations between cultural and social activities in adolescence and adiposity measures in young adulthood. In addition, interaction effects of a genetic predisposition score by leisure time activities were tested. RESULTS: In girls, participation in cultural activities was negatively associated with waist circumference (WC) (B = -0.04, 95%CI: -0.08 to -0.00) and with waist-hip ratio (WHR) (B = -0.058, 95%CI: -0.11 to -0.01). However, participation in social activities was positively associated with WC (B = 0.040, CI: 0.00 to 0.08) in girls and with BMI (B = 0.027, CI: 0.00 to 0.05) in boys. The effect of the obesity-susceptibility genetic variants on anthropometric measures was lower in adolescents with high participation in cultural activities compared to adolescents with low participation. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the effects of cultural activities on body fat are different from the effects of participation in social activities. The protective influence of cultural activities in female adolescents against overweight in adulthood and their moderating effect on obesity-susceptibility genes suggest that even cultural activities may be useful in public health strategies against obesity.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian, University of Science and Technology, Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway. koenraad.cuypers@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22998931; PMC3491037 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1511  
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Author Dastani, Z.; Hivert, M.-F.; Timpson, N.; Perry, J.R.B.; Yuan, X.; Scott, R.A.; Henneman, P.; Heid, I.M.; Kizer, J.R.; Lyytikainen, L.-P.; Fuchsberger, C.; Tanaka, T.; Morris, A.P.; Small, K.; Isaacs, A.; Beekman, M.; Coassin, S.; Lohman, K.; Qi, L.; Kanoni, S.; Pankow, J.S.; Uh, H.-W.; Wu, Y.; Bidulescu, A.; Rasmussen-Torvik, L.J.; Greenwood, C.M.T.; Ladouceur, M.; Grimsby, J.; Manning, A.K.; Liu, C.-T.; Kooner, J.; Mooser, V.E.; Vollenweider, P.; Kapur, K.A.; Chambers, J.; Wareham, N.J.; Langenberg, C.; Frants, R.; Willems-Vandijk, K.; Oostra, B.A.; Willems, S.M.; Lamina, C.; Winkler, T.W.; Psaty, B.M.; Tracy, R.P.; Brody, J.; Chen, I.; Viikari, J.; Kahonen, M.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Evans, D.M.; St Pourcain, B.; Sattar, N.; Wood, A.R.; Bandinelli, S.; Carlson, O.D.; Egan, J.M.; Bohringer, S.; van Heemst, D.; Kedenko, L.; Kristiansson, K.; Nuotio, M.-L.; Loo, B.-M.; Harris, T.; Garcia, M.; Kanaya, A.; Haun, M.; Klopp, N.; Wichmann, H.-E.; Deloukas, P.; Katsareli, E.; Couper, D.J.; Duncan, B.B.; Kloppenburg, M.; Adair, L.S.; Borja, J.B.; Wilson, J.G.; Musani, S.; Guo, X.; Johnson, T.; Semple, R.; Teslovich, T.M.; Allison, M.A.; Redline, S.; Buxbaum, S.G.; Mohlke, K.L.; Meulenbelt, I.; Ballantyne, C.M.; Dedoussis, G.V.; Hu, F.B.; Liu, Y.; Paulweber, B.; Spector, T.D.; Slagboom, P.E.; Ferrucci, L.; Jula, A.; Perola, M.; Raitakari, O.; Florez, J.C.; Salomaa, V.; Eriksson, J.G.; Frayling, T.M.; Hicks, A.A.; Lehtimaki, T.; Smith, G.D.; Siscovick, D.S.; Kronenberg, F.; van Duijn, C.; Loos, R.J.F.; Waterworth, D.M.; Meigs, J.B.; Dupuis, J.; Richards, J.B.; Voight, B.F.; Scott, L.J.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Dina, C.; Welch, R.P.; Zeggini, E.; Huth, C.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; Thorleifsson, G.; McCulloch, L.J.; Ferreira, T.; Grallert, H.; Amin, N.; Wu, G.; Willer, C.J.; Raychaudhuri, S.; McCarroll, S.A.; Hofmann, O.M.; Segre, A.V.; van Hoek, M.; Navarro, P.; Ardlie, K.; Balkau, B.; Benediktsson, R.; Bennett, A.J.; Blagieva, R.; Boerwinkle, E.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Bostrom, K.B.; Bravenboer, B.; Bumpstead, S.; Burtt, N.P.; Charpentier, G.; Chines, P.S.; Cornelis, M.; Crawford, G.; Doney, A.S.F.; Elliott, K.S.; Elliott, A.L.; Erdos, M.R.; Fox, C.S.; Franklin, C.S.; Ganser, M.; Gieger, C.; Grarup, N.; Green, T.; Griffin, S.; Groves, C.J.; Guiducci, C.; Hadjadj, S.; Hassanali, N.; Herder, C.; Isomaa, B.; Jackson, A.U.; Johnson, P.R.V.; Jorgensen, T.; Kao, W.H.L.; Kong, A.; Kraft, P.; Kuusisto, J.; Lauritzen, T.; Li, M.; Lieverse, A.; Lindgren, C.M.; Lyssenko, V.; Marre, M.; Meitinger, T.; Midthjell, K.; Morken, M.A.; Narisu, N.; Nilsson, P.; Owen, K.R.; Payne, F.; Petersen, A.-K.; Platou, C.; Proenca, C.; Prokopenko, I.; Rathmann, W.; Rayner, N.W.; Robertson, N.R.; Rocheleau, G.; Roden, M.; Sampson, M.J.; Saxena, R.; Shields, B.M.; Shrader, P.; Sigurdsson, G.; Sparso, T.; Strassburger, K.; Stringham, H.M.; Sun, Q.; Swift, A.J.; Thorand, B.; Tichet, J.; Tuomi, T.; van Dam, R.M.; van Haeften, T.W.; van Herpt, T.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Walters, G.B.; Weedon, M.N.; Wijmenga, C.; Witteman, J.; Bergman, R.N.; Cauchi, S.; Collins, F.S.; Gloyn, A.L.; Gyllensten, U.; Hansen, T.; Hide, W.A.; Hitman, G.A.; Hofman, A.; Hunter, D.J.; Hveem, K.; Laakso, M.; Morris, A.D.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Rudan, I.; Sijbrands, E.; Stein, L.D.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uitterlinden, A.; Walker, M.; Watanabe, R.M.; Abecasis, G.R.; Boehm, B.O.; Campbell, H.; Daly, M.J.; Hattersley, A.T.; Pedersen, O.; Barroso, I.; Groop, L.; Sladek, R.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Wilson, J.F.; Illig, T.; Froguel, P.; van Duijn, C.M.; Stefansson, K.; Altshuler, D.; Boehnke, M.; McCarthy, M.I.; Soranzo, N.; Wheeler, E.; Glazer, N.L.; Bouatia-Naji, N.; Magi, R.; Randall, J.; Elliott, P.; Rybin, D.; Dehghan, A.; Hottenga, J.J.; Song, K.; Goel, A.; Lajunen, T.; Doney, A.; Cavalcanti-Proenca, C.; Kumari, M.; Timpson, N.J.; Zabena, C.; Ingelsson, E.; An, P.; O'Connell, J.; Luan, J.'an; Elliott, A.; McCarroll, S.A.; Roccasecca, R.M.; Pattou, F.; Sethupathy, P.; Ariyurek, Y.; Barter, P.; Beilby, J.P.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Bergmann, S.; Bochud, M.; Bonnefond, A.; Borch-Johnsen, K.; Bottcher, Y.; Brunner, E.; Bumpstead, S.J.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Chines, P.; Clarke, R.; Coin, L.J.M.; Cooper, M.N.; Crisponi, L.; Day, I.N.M.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Delplanque, J.; Fedson, A.C.; Fischer-Rosinsky, A.; Forouhi, N.G.; Franzosi, M.G.; Galan, P.; Goodarzi, M.O.; Graessler, J.; Grundy, S.; Gwilliam, R.; Hallmans, G.; Hammond, N.; Han, X.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Hayward, C.; Heath, S.C.; Hercberg, S.; Hillman, D.R.; Hingorani, A.D.; Hui, J.; Hung, J.; Kaakinen, M.; Kaprio, J.; Kesaniemi, Y.A.; Kivimaki, M.; Knight, B.; Koskinen, S.; Kovacs, P.; Kyvik, K.O.; Lathrop, G.M.; Lawlor, D.A.; Le Bacquer, O.; Lecoeur, C.; Li, Y.; Mahley, R.; Mangino, M.; Martinez-Larrad, M.T.; McAteer, J.B.; McPherson, R.; Meisinger, C.; Melzer, D.; Meyre, D.; Mitchell, B.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Naitza, S.; Neville, M.J.; Orru, M.; Pakyz, R.; Paolisso, G.; Pattaro, C.; Pearson, D.; Peden, J.F.; Pedersen, N.L.; Pfeiffer, A.F.H.; Pichler, I.; Polasek, O.; Posthuma, D.; Potter, S.C.; Pouta, A.; Province, M.A.; Rayner, N.W.; Rice, K.; Ripatti, S.; Rivadeneira, F.; Rolandsson, O.; Sandbaek, A.; Sandhu, M.; Sanna, S.; Sayer, A.A.; Scheet, P.; Seedorf, U.; Sharp, S.J.; Shields, B.; Sigurethsson, G.; Sijbrands, E.J.G.; Silveira, A.; Simpson, L.; Singleton, A.; Smith, N.L.; Sovio, U.; Swift, A.; Syddall, H.; Syvanen, A.-C.; Tonjes, A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; van Dijk, K.W.; Varma, D.; Visvikis-Siest, S.; Vitart, V.; Vogelzangs, N.; Waeber, G.; Wagner, P.J.; Walley, A.; Ward, K.L.; Watkins, H.; Wild, S.H.; Willemsen, G.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Yarnell, J.W.G.; Zelenika, D.; Zethelius, B.; Zhai, G.; Zhao, J.H.; Zillikens, M.C.; Borecki, I.B.; Meneton, P.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Nathan, D.M.; Williams, G.H.; Silander, K.; Bornstein, S.R.; Schwarz, P.; Spranger, J.; Karpe, F.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Cooper, C.; Serrano-Rios, M.; Lind, L.; Palmer, L.J.; Hu, F.B. 1st; Franks, P.W.; Ebrahim, S.; Marmot, M.; Kao, W.H.L.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Wright, A.F.; Stumvoll, M.; Hamsten, A.; Buchanan, T.A.; Valle, T.T.; Rotter, J.I.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Boomsma, D.I.; Cao, A.; Scuteri, A.; Schlessinger, D.; Uda, M.; Ruokonen, A.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Peltonen, L.; Mooser, V.; Sladek, R.; Musunuru, K.; Smith, A.V.; Edmondson, A.C.; Stylianou, I.M.; Koseki, M.; Pirruccello, J.P.; Chasman, D.I.; Johansen, C.T.; Fouchier, S.W.; Peloso, G.M.; Barbalic, M.; Ricketts, S.L.; Bis, J.C.; Feitosa, M.F.; Orho-Melander, M.; Melander, O.; Li, X.; Li, M.; Cho, Y.S.; Go, M.J.; Kim, Y.J.; Lee, J.-Y.; Park, T.; Kim, K.; Sim, X.; Ong, R.T.-H.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Lange, L.A.; Smith, J.D.; Ziegler, A.; Zhang, W.; Zee, R.Y.L.; Whitfield, J.B.; Thompson, J.R.; Surakka, I.; Spector, T.D.; Smit, J.H.; Sinisalo, J.; Scott, J.; Saharinen, J.; Sabatti, C.; Rose, L.M.; Roberts, R.; Rieder, M.; Parker, A.N.; Pare, G.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Nieminen, M.S.; Nickerson, D.A.; Montgomery, G.W.; McArdle, W.; Masson, D.; Martin, N.G.; Marroni, F.; Lucas, G.; Luben, R.; Lokki, M.-L.; Lettre, G.; Launer, L.J.; Lakatta, E.G.; Laaksonen, R.; Kyvik, K.O.; Konig, I.R.; Khaw, K.-T.; Kaplan, L.M.; Johansson, A.; Janssens, A.C.J.W.; Igl, W.; Hovingh, G.K.; Hengstenberg, C.; Havulinna, A.S.; Hastie, N.D.; Harris, T.B.; Haritunians, T.; Hall, A.S.; Groop, L.C.; Gonzalez, E.; Freimer, N.B.; Erdmann, J.; Ejebe, K.G.; Doring, A.; Dominiczak, A.F.; Demissie, S.; Deloukas, P.; de Faire, U.; Crawford, G.; Chen, Y.-der I.; Caulfield, M.J.; Boekholdt, S.M.; Assimes, T.L.; Quertermous, T.; Seielstad, M.; Wong, T.Y.; Tai, E.-S.; Feranil, A.B.; Kuzawa, C.W.; Taylor, H.A.J.; Gabriel, S.B.; Holm, H.; Gudnason, V.; Krauss, R.M.; Ordovas, J.M.; Munroe, P.B.; Kooner, J.S.; Tall, A.R.; Hegele, R.A.; Kastelein, J.J.P.; Schadt, E.E.; Strachan, D.P.; Reilly, M.P.; Samani, N.J.; Schunkert, H.; Cupples, L.A.; Sandhu, M.S.; Ridker, P.M.; Rader, D.J.; Kathiresan, S. url  doi
  Title Novel loci for adiponectin levels and their influence on type 2 diabetes and metabolic traits: a multi-ethnic meta-analysis of 45,891 individuals Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication PLoS Genetics Abbreviated Journal PLoS Genet  
  Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages e1002607  
  Keywords Adiponectin/*blood/genetics; African Americans; Asian Continental Ancestry Group; Cholesterol, HDL/genetics; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*genetics; European Continental Ancestry Group; Female; Gene Expression; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; *Genome-Wide Association Study; Glucose Tolerance Test; Humans; Insulin Resistance/genetics; Male; Metabolic Networks and Pathways; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Circulating levels of adiponectin, a hormone produced predominantly by adipocytes, are highly heritable and are inversely associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and other metabolic traits. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in 39,883 individuals of European ancestry to identify genes associated with metabolic disease. We identified 8 novel loci associated with adiponectin levels and confirmed 2 previously reported loci (P = 4.5x10(-8)-1.2x10(-43)). Using a novel method to combine data across ethnicities (N = 4,232 African Americans, N = 1,776 Asians, and N = 29,347 Europeans), we identified two additional novel loci. Expression analyses of 436 human adipocyte samples revealed that mRNA levels of 18 genes at candidate regions were associated with adiponectin concentrations after accounting for multiple testing (p<3x10(-4)). We next developed a multi-SNP genotypic risk score to test the association of adiponectin decreasing risk alleles on metabolic traits and diseases using consortia-level meta-analytic data. This risk score was associated with increased risk of T2D (p = 4.3x10(-3), n = 22,044), increased triglycerides (p = 2.6x10(-14), n = 93,440), increased waist-to-hip ratio (p = 1.8x10(-5), n = 77,167), increased glucose two hours post oral glucose tolerance testing (p = 4.4x10(-3), n = 15,234), increased fasting insulin (p = 0.015, n = 48,238), but with lower in HDL-cholesterol concentrations (p = 4.5x10(-13), n = 96,748) and decreased BMI (p = 1.4x10(-4), n = 121,335). These findings identify novel genetic determinants of adiponectin levels, which, taken together, influence risk of T2D and markers of insulin resistance.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, Jewish General Hospital, Lady Davis Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada  
  Corporate Author GLGC Consortium Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1553-7390 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22479202; PMC3315470 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1516  
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Author Ferreira, M.A.; Vonk, J.M.; Baurecht, H.; Marenholz, I.; Tian, C.; Hoffman, J.D.; Helmer, Q.; Tillander, A.; Ullemar, V.; van Dongen, J.; Lu, Y.; Ruschendorf, F.; Esparza-Gordillo, J.; Medway, C.W.; Mountjoy, E.; Burrows, K.; Hummel, O.; Grosche, S.; Brumpton, B.M.; Witte, J.S.; Hottenga, J.-J.; Willemsen, G.; Zheng, J.; Rodriguez, E.; Hotze, M.; Franke, A.; Revez, J.A.; Beesley, J.; Matheson, M.C.; Dharmage, S.C.; Bain, L.M.; Fritsche, L.G.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Balliu, B.; Nielsen, J.B.; Zhou, W.; Hveem, K.; Langhammer, A.; Holmen, O.L.; Loset, M.; Abecasis, G.R.; Willer, C.J.; Arnold, A.; Homuth, G.; Schmidt, C.O.; Thompson, P.J.; Martin, N.G.; Duffy, D.L.; Novak, N.; Schulz, H.; Karrasch, S.; Gieger, C.; Strauch, K.; Melles, R.B.; Hinds, D.A.; Hubner, N.; Weidinger, S.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Jansen, R.; Jorgenson, E.; Lee, Y.-A.; Boomsma, D.I.; Almqvist, C.; Karlsson, R.; Koppelman, G.H.; Paternoster, L. url  doi
  Title Shared genetic origin of asthma, hay fever and eczema elucidates allergic disease biology Type Meta-Analysis
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 49 Issue 12 Pages 1752-1757  
  Keywords Asthma/*genetics; Eczema/*genetics; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics; Genome-Wide Association Study/methods; Humans; Hypersensitivity/*genetics; Phenotype; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal/*genetics; Risk Factors  
  Abstract Asthma, hay fever (or allergic rhinitis) and eczema (or atopic dermatitis) often coexist in the same individuals, partly because of a shared genetic origin. To identify shared risk variants, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS; n = 360,838) of a broad allergic disease phenotype that considers the presence of any one of these three diseases. We identified 136 independent risk variants (P < 3 x 10(-8)), including 73 not previously reported, which implicate 132 nearby genes in allergic disease pathophysiology. Disease-specific effects were detected for only six variants, confirming that most represent shared risk factors. Tissue-specific heritability and biological process enrichment analyses suggest that shared risk variants influence lymphocyte-mediated immunity. Six target genes provide an opportunity for drug repositioning, while for 36 genes CpG methylation was found to influence transcription independently of genetic effects. Asthma, hay fever and eczema partly coexist because they share many genetic risk variants that dysregulate the expression of immune-related genes.  
  Address MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
  Corporate Author LifeLines Cohort Study Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29083406 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1903  
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Author Fimland, M.S.; Vie, G.; Holtermann, A.; Krokstad, S.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title Occupational and leisure-time physical activity and risk of disability pension: prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Occupational and Environmental Medicine Abbreviated Journal Occup Environ Med  
  Volume 75 Issue 1 Pages 23-28  
  Keywords Adult; Disability Evaluation; *Disabled Persons; *Exercise; Female; Humans; *Leisure Activities; Lifting; Male; Mental Disorders; Middle Aged; *Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology/prevention & control; Norway; *Occupational Exposure; *Pensions; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Walking; *Work; Public health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To prospectively investigate the association between occupational physical activity (OPA) and disability pension due to musculoskeletal cause, mental cause or any cause. We also examined the combined association of OPA and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) with disability pension. METHODS: A population-based cohort study in Norway on 32 362 persons aged 20-65 years with questionnaire data on OPA and LTPA that were followed up for incident disability pension through the National Insurance Database. We used Cox regression to estimate adjusted HRs with 95% CIs. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 9.3 years, 3837 (12%) received disability pension. Compared with people with mostly sedentary work, those who performed much walking, much walking and lifting, and heavy physical work had HRs of 1.26 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.38), 1.44 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.58) and 1.48 (95% CI 1.33 to 1.70), respectively. These associations were stronger for disability pension due to musculoskeletal disorders, whereas there was no clear association between OPA and risk of disability pension due to mental disorders. People with high OPA and low LTPA had a HR of 1.77 (95% CI 1.58 to 1.98) for overall disability pension and HR of 2.56 (95% CI 2.10 to 3.11) for disability pension due to musculoskeletal disorders, versus low OPA and high LTPA. CONCLUSIONS: We observed a positive association between OPA and risk of disability pension due to all causes and musculoskeletal disorders, but not for mental disorders. Physical activity during leisure time reduced some, but not all of the unfavourable effect of physically demanding work on risk of disability pension.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1351-0711 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28698178 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1898  
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Author Fleiner, H.F.; Bjoro, T.; Midthjell, K.; Grill, V.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Prevalence of Thyroid Dysfunction in Autoimmune and Type 2 Diabetes: The Population-Based HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication J Clin Endocrinol Metab Abbreviated Journal The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism  
  Volume 101 Issue 2 Pages 669-677  
  Keywords Adult; Age of Onset; Aged; Cross-Sectional Studies; Databases, Factual; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*complications/*epidemiology; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Hyperthyroidism/complications/epidemiology; Hypothyroidism/complications/epidemiology; Iodide Peroxidase/blood/immunology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Sex Factors; Thyroid Diseases/*complications/*epidemiology; Thyroid Hormones/blood  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Associations between autoimmune diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease are known but insufficiently characterized. Some evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes may also be associated with hypothyroidism. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to investigate associations of autoimmune and type 2 diabetes with the prevalence of hypo- and hyperthyroidism. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a cross-sectional, population-based study of adults in two surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health (HUNT) Study. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 34 235 participants of HUNT2 (1995-1997) and 48 809 participants of HUNT3 (2006-2008) participated in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of hypo- and hyperthyroidism was estimated, assessed by self-report, serum measurements, and linkage with the Norwegian Prescription Database. RESULTS: In HUNT2, autoimmune diabetes was associated with a higher age-adjusted prevalence of hypothyroidism among both women (prevalence ratio 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-2.47) and men (prevalence ratio 2.71, 95% CI 1.76-4.19), compared with having no diabetes. For hyperthyroidism, the corresponding cumulative prevalence ratios were 2.12 (95% CI 1.36-3.32) in women and 2.54 (95% CI 1.24-5.18) in men with autoimmune diabetes. The age-adjusted excess prevalence of hypothyroidism ( approximately 6 percentage points) and the presence of thyroid peroxidase antibodies (8-10 percentage points) associated with autoimmune diabetes was similar in women and men. Type 2 diabetes was not associated with the prevalence of hypothyroidism. In HUNT3, associations were broadly similar to those in HUNT2. CONCLUSIONS: Autoimmune diabetes, but not type 2 diabetes, was strongly and gender neutrally associated with an increased prevalence of hypo- and hyperthyroidism and the presence of thyroid peroxidase antibodies. Increased surveillance for hypothyroidism appears not necessary in patients with type 2 diabetes.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine (H.F.F., V.G.), Norwegian University of Science Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Fleiner, Hanne FBjoro, TrineMidthjell, KristianGrill, ValdemarAsvold, Bjorn OengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't2015/11/20 06:00J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Feb;101(2):669-77. doi: 10.1210/jc.2015-3235. Epub 2015 Nov 19. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Fleiner2016 Serial 1738  
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Author Gabin, J.M.; Saltvedt, I.; Tambs, K.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title The association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and incident Alzheimer disease in patients 60 years and older: The HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Immunity & Ageing : I & A Abbreviated Journal Immun Ageing  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 4  
  Keywords Alzheimer disease; Epidemiology; High sensitivity C-reactive protein; Low-grade inflammation  
  Abstract Background: With ageing, long-standing inflammation can be destructive, contributing to development of several disorders, among these Alzheimer's disease (AD). C-reactive protein (CRP) is a relatively stable peripheral inflammatory marker, but in previous studies the association between highly sensitive CRP (hsCRP) and AD have shown inconsistent results. This study examines the association between AD and hsCRP in blood samples taken up to 15 years prior to the diagnoses of 52 persons with AD amongst a total of 2150 persons >/=60 years of age. Results: Data from Norway's Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2) and the Health and Memory Study (HMS) were linked. The participants had an average age of 73 years, and diagnosed with AD up to 15 years [mean 8.0 (+/-3.9)] following hsCRP measurement. Logistic regression models showed an adverse association between hsCRP and AD in participants aged 60-70.5 (odds ratio: 2.37, 95% CI: 1.01-5.58). Conversely, in participants aged 70.6-94, there was an inverse association between hsCRP and AD (odds ratio: 0.39, 95% CI: 0.19-0.84). When applying multivariate models the findings were significant in individuals diagnosed 0.4-7 years after the hsCRP was measured; and attenuated when AD was diagnosed more than seven years following hsCRP measurement. Conclusions: Our study is in line with previous studies indicating a shift in the association between hsCRP and AD by age: in adults (60-70.5 years) there is an adverse association, while in seniors (>70.6 years) there is an inverse association. If our findings can be replicated, a focus on why a more active peripheral immune response may have a protective role in individuals >/=70 years should be further examined.  
  Address 1HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600 Levanger, Norway.0000 0001 1516 2393grid.5947.f  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition