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Author Amorim, A.B.; Ferreira, P.H.; Ferreira, M.L.; Lier, R.; Simic, M.; Pappas, E.; Zadro, J.R.; Mork, P.J.; Nilsen, T.I. url  doi
  Title Influence of family history on prognosis of spinal pain and the role of leisure time physical activity and body mass index: a prospective study using family-linkage data from the Norwegian HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 8 Issue 10 Pages e022785  
  Keywords chronic pain; family study; low back pain; neck pain; obesity; physical activity  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To investigate the influence of parental chronic spinal pain on prognosis of chronic spinal pain in adult offspring, and whether offspring physical activity level and body mass index (BMI) modified this association. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: We used family-linked longitudinal data from the Norwegian HUNT study collected in HUNT2 (1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008). PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1529 offspring who reported spinal pain in HUNT2 were linked with parental data and followed up in HUNT3. OUTCOMES: We estimated relative risk (RR) with 95% CI for recovery from chronic spinal pain, and also from activity limiting spinal pain, in offspring related to chronic spinal pain in parents. We also investigated whether offspring leisure time physical activity and BMI modified these intergenerational associations in spinal pain. RESULTS: A total of 540 (35%) offspring were defined as recovered after approximately 11 years of follow-up. Offspring with both parents reporting chronic spinal pain were less likely to recover from chronic spinal pain (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.99) and activity limiting spinal pain (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.94), compared with offspring of parents without chronic spinal pain. Analyses stratified by BMI and physical activity showed no strong evidence of effect modification on these associations. However, offspring who were overweight/obese and with both parents reporting chronic spinal pain had particularly low probability of recovery from activity limiting spinal pain, compared with those who were normal weight and had parents without chronic spinal pain (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.84). CONCLUSION: Offspring with chronic spinal pain are less likely to recover if they have parents with chronic spinal pain, particularly if offspring are overweight/obese.  
  Address Clinic of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30341129; PMCID:PMC6196861 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2069  
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Author Berndt, S.I.; Gustafsson, S.; Magi, R.; Ganna, A.; Wheeler, E.; Feitosa, M.F.; Justice, A.E.; Monda, K.L.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Esko, T.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gentilini, D.; Jackson, A.U.; Luan, J.'an; Randall, J.C.; Vedantam, S.; Willer, C.J.; Winkler, T.W.; Wood, A.R.; Workalemahu, T.; Hu, Y.-J.; Lee, S.H.; Liang, L.; Lin, D.-Y.; Min, J.L.; Neale, B.M.; Thorleifsson, G.; Yang, J.; Albrecht, E.; Amin, N.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Cadby, G.; den Heijer, M.; Eklund, N.; Fischer, K.; Goel, A.; Hottenga, J.-J.; Huffman, J.E.; Jarick, I.; Johansson, A.; Johnson, T.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Konig, I.R.; Kristiansson, K.; Kutalik, Z.; Lamina, C.; Lecoeur, C.; Li, G.; Mangino, M.; McArdle, W.L.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Ngwa, J.S.; Nolte, I.M.; Paternoster, L.; Pechlivanis, S.; Perola, M.; Peters, M.J.; Preuss, M.; Rose, L.M.; Shi, J.; Shungin, D.; Smith, A.V.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Surakka, I.; Teumer, A.; Trip, M.D.; Tyrer, J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vandenput, L.; Waite, L.L.; Zhao, J.H.; Absher, D.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Atalay, M.; Attwood, A.P.; Balmforth, A.J.; Basart, H.; Beilby, J.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Brambilla, P.; Bruinenberg, M.; Campbell, H.; Chasman, D.I.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Connell, J.M.; Cookson, W.O.; de Faire, U.; de Vegt, F.; Dei, M.; Dimitriou, M.; Edkins, S.; Estrada, K.; Evans, D.M.; Farrall, M.; Ferrario, M.M.; Ferrieres, J.; Franke, L.; Frau, F.; Gejman, P.V.; Grallert, H.; Gronberg, H.; Gudnason, V.; Hall, A.S.; Hall, P.; Hartikainen, A.-L.; Hayward, C.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Heath, A.C.; Hebebrand, J.; Homuth, G.; Hu, F.B.; Hunt, S.E.; Hypponen, E.; Iribarren, C.; Jacobs, K.B.; Jansson, J.-O.; Jula, A.; Kahonen, M.; Kathiresan, S.; Kee, F.; Khaw, K.-T.; Kivimaki, M.; Koenig, W.; Kraja, A.T.; Kumari, M.; Kuulasmaa, K.; Kuusisto, J.; Laitinen, J.H.; Lakka, T.A.; Langenberg, C.; Launer, L.J.; Lind, L.; Lindstrom, J.; Liu, J.; Liuzzi, A.; Lokki, M.-L.; Lorentzon, M.; Madden, P.A.; Magnusson, P.K.; Manunta, P.; Marek, D.; Marz, W.; Mateo Leach, I.; McKnight, B.; Medland, S.E.; Mihailov, E.; Milani, L.; Montgomery, G.W.; Mooser, V.; Muhleisen, T.W.; Munroe, P.B.; Musk, A.W.; Narisu, N.; Navis, G.; Nicholson, G.; Nohr, E.A.; Ong, K.K.; Oostra, B.A.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Palotie, A.; Peden, J.F.; Pedersen, N.; Peters, A.; Polasek, O.; Pouta, A.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Prokopenko, I.; Putter, C.; Radhakrishnan, A.; Raitakari, O.; Rendon, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Rudan, I.; Saaristo, T.E.; Sambrook, J.G.; Sanders, A.R.; Sanna, S.; Saramies, J.; Schipf, S.; Schreiber, S.; Schunkert, H.; Shin, S.-Y.; Signorini, S.; Sinisalo, J.; Skrobek, B.; Soranzo, N.; Stancakova, A.; Stark, K.; Stephens, J.C.; Stirrups, K.; Stolk, R.P.; Stumvoll, M.; Swift, A.J.; Theodoraki, E.V.; Thorand, B.; Tregouet, D.-A.; Tremoli, E.; Van der Klauw, M.M.; van Meurs, J.B.J.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Viikari, J.; Virtamo, J.; Vitart, V.; Waeber, G.; Wang, Z.; Widen, E.; Wild, S.H.; Willemsen, G.; Winkelmann, B.R.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zillikens, M.C.; Amouyel, P.; Boehm, B.O.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boomsma, D.I.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chanock, S.J.; Cupples, L.A.; Cusi, D.; Dedoussis, G.V.; Erdmann, J.; Eriksson, J.G.; Franks, P.W.; Froguel, P.; Gieger, C.; Gyllensten, U.; Hamsten, A.; Harris, T.B.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hicks, A.A.; Hingorani, A.; Hinney, A.; Hofman, A.; Hovingh, K.G.; Hveem, K.; Illig, T.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Jockel, K.-H.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, S.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Kuh, D.; Laakso, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Levinson, D.F.; Martin, N.G.; Metspalu, A.; Morris, A.D.; Nieminen, M.S.; Njolstad, I.; Ohlsson, C.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Ouwehand, W.H.; Palmer, L.J.; Penninx, B.; Power, C.; Province, M.A.; Psaty, B.M.; Qi, L.; Rauramaa, R.; Ridker, P.M.; Ripatti, S.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Snieder, H.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Spector, T.D.; Stefansson, K.; Tonjes, A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Uusitupa, M.; van der Harst, P.; Vollenweider, P.; Wallaschofski, H.; Wareham, N.J.; Watkins, H.; Wichmann, H.-E.; Wilson, J.F.; Abecasis, G.R.; Assimes, T.L.; Barroso, I.; Boehnke, M.; Borecki, I.B.; Deloukas, P.; Fox, C.S.; Frayling, T.; Groop, L.C.; Haritunian, T.; Heid, I.M.; Hunter, D.; Kaplan, R.C.; Karpe, F.; Moffatt, M.F.; Mohlke, K.L.; O'Connell, J.R.; Pawitan, Y.; Schadt, E.E.; Schlessinger, D.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Strachan, D.P.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; van Duijn, C.M.; Visscher, P.M.; Di Blasio, A.M.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Lindgren, C.M.; Morris, A.P.; Meyre, D.; Scherag, A.; McCarthy, M.I.; Speliotes, E.K.; North, K.E.; Loos, R.J.F.; Ingelsson, E. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 45 Issue 5 Pages 501-512  
  Keywords *Anthropometry; Body Height/*genetics; Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; *Genetic Predisposition to Disease; *Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Meta-Analysis as Topic; Obesity/*genetics; Phenotype; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/*genetics; *Quantitative Trait Loci; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups.  
  Address US Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23563607 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1466  
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Author Bjornland, T.; Langaas, M.; Grill, V.; Mostad, I.L. url  doi
  Title Assessing gene-environment interaction effects of FTO, MC4R and lifestyle factors on obesity using an extreme phenotype sampling design: Results from the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175071  
  Keywords Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; *Gene-Environment Interaction; Humans; *Life Style; Obesity/*genetics; *Phenotype; Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4/*genetics; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess the influence of age, gender and lifestyle factors on the effect of the obesity-promoting alleles of FTO and MCR4. METHODS: The HUNT study comprises health information on the population of Nord-Trondelag county, Norway. Extreme phenotype participants (gender-wise lower and upper quartiles of waist-hip-ratio and BMI >/= 35 kg/m2) in the third survey, HUNT3 (2006-08), were genotyped for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs9939609 (FTO) and rs17782313 (MC4R); 25686 participants were successfully genotyped. Extreme sampling was chosen to increase power to detect genetic and gene-environment effects on waist-hip-ratio and BMI. Statistical inference was based on linear regression models and a missing-covariate likelihood approach for the extreme phenotype sampling design. Environmental factors were physical activity, diet (artificially sweetened beverages) and smoking. Longitudinal analysis was performed using material from HUNT2 (1995-97). RESULTS: Cross-sectional and longitudinal genetic effects indicated stronger genetic associations with obesity in young than in old, as well as differences between women and men. We observed larger genetic effects among physically inactive compared to active individuals. This interaction was age-dependent and seen mainly in 20-40 year olds. We observed a greater FTO effect among men with a regular intake of artificially sweetened beverages, compared to non-drinkers. Interaction analysis of smoking was mainly inconclusive. CONCLUSIONS: In a large all-adult and area-based population survey the effects of obesity-promoting minor-alleles of FTO and MCR4, and interactions with life style factors are age- and gender-related. These findings appear relevant when designing individualized treatment for and prophylaxis against obesity.  
  Address Department of Clinical Nutrition and Speech-Language Therapy, Clinic of Clinical Services, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28384342; PMCID:PMC5383228 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1884  
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Author Brumpton, B.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.; Chen, Y.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title General and abdominal obesity and incident asthma in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 41 Issue 2 Pages 323-329  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*complications/*epidemiology; Body Mass Index; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Models, Statistical; Norway; Obesity/*complications/*epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Smoking; Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract Measures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference define general obesity and abdominal obesity respectively. While high BMI has been established as a risk factor for asthma in adults, waist circumference has seldom been investigated. To determine the association between BMI, waist circumference and incident asthma in adults, we conducted a prospective study (n=23,245) in a population living in Nord-Trondelag, Norway in 1995-2008. Baseline BMI and waist circumference were measured and categorised as general obesity (BMI >/=30.0 kg.m(2)) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference >/=88 cm in females and >/=102 cm in males). Incident asthma was self-reported new-onset cases during an 11-yr follow-up period. Odds ratios for asthma associated with obesity were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. General obesity was a risk factor for asthma in females (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.52-2.52) and males (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.30-2.59). In females, after additional adjustment for BMI, abdominal obesity remained a risk factor for asthma development (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.04-2.05). Abdominal obesity seems to increase the risk of incident asthma in females in addition to BMI, indicating that using both measures of BMI and waist circumference in females may be a superior clinical assessment for asthma risk than any measure alone.  
  Address Dept. of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. ben.brumpton@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22653771 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1461  
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Author Cuypers, K.; De Ridder, K.; Kvaloy, K.; Knudtsen, M.S.; Krokstad, S.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L. url  doi
  Title Leisure time activities in adolescence in the presence of susceptibility genes for obesity: risk or resilience against overweight in adulthood? The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 820  
  Keywords Adolescent; Body Mass Index; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics; Genotype; Humans; *Leisure Activities; Male; Norway; Obesity/*genetics/*prevention & control; Overweight/genetics/prevention & control; Population Surveillance; Questionnaires; Waist Circumference/physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Environment, health behavior, and genetic background are important in the development of obesity. Adolescents spend substantial part of daily leisure time on cultural and social activities, but knowledge about the effects of participation in such activities on weight is limited. METHODS: A number of 1450 adolescents from the Norwegian HUNT study (1995-97) were followed-up in 2006-08 as young adults. Phenotypic data on lifestyle and anthropometric measures were assessed using questionnaires and standardized clinical examinations. Genotypic information on 12 established obesity-susceptibility loci were available for analyses. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the associations between cultural and social activities in adolescence and adiposity measures in young adulthood. In addition, interaction effects of a genetic predisposition score by leisure time activities were tested. RESULTS: In girls, participation in cultural activities was negatively associated with waist circumference (WC) (B = -0.04, 95%CI: -0.08 to -0.00) and with waist-hip ratio (WHR) (B = -0.058, 95%CI: -0.11 to -0.01). However, participation in social activities was positively associated with WC (B = 0.040, CI: 0.00 to 0.08) in girls and with BMI (B = 0.027, CI: 0.00 to 0.05) in boys. The effect of the obesity-susceptibility genetic variants on anthropometric measures was lower in adolescents with high participation in cultural activities compared to adolescents with low participation. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the effects of cultural activities on body fat are different from the effects of participation in social activities. The protective influence of cultural activities in female adolescents against overweight in adulthood and their moderating effect on obesity-susceptibility genes suggest that even cultural activities may be useful in public health strategies against obesity.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian, University of Science and Technology, Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway. koenraad.cuypers@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22998931; PMC3491037 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1511  
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Author Egan, K.B.; Ettinger, A.S.; DeWan, A.T.; Holford, T.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Bracken, M.B. url  doi
  Title General, but not abdominal, overweight increases odds of asthma among Norwegian adolescents: the Young-HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992) Abbreviated Journal Acta Paediatr  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Young-HUNT; HUNT2; Adolescents; Asthma; Body mass index; Obesity; Overweight; Waist circumference  
  Abstract AIM: The aim of this analysis was to examine the association between asthma and general and abdominal weight status, defined by age- and sex-specific cut-offs for body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in adolescents. METHODS: Participants aged 12-19 years in the Young-HUNT (YH) Study (YH1 1995-1997: n = 8222; YH3 2006-2008: n = 7403) completed self-administered questionnaires in school as part of a series of cross-sectional, population-based studies conducted in Nord-Trondelag, Norway. Weight, height and WC were measured. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) for asthma, defined by self-reported physician diagnosis, were calculated. Potential effect modifiers evaluated included sex and pubertal development status (PDS). RESULTS: Asthma was reported by 11.8% of the adolescents in YH1 and 17.0% in YH3. Asthma odds significantly increased for adolescents with general (OR = 1.33; 95%CI: 1.13, 1.56), but not abdominal, overweight and increased for adolescents with general (OR = 1.34; 95%CI: 1.02, 1.75) or abdominal obesity (OR = 1.36; 95%CI: 1.16, 1.60). Underweight had no association with asthma regardless of weight assessment type, and PDS did not meaningfully influence the associations between asthma and weight. CONCLUSION: Overweight and obesity both increased the odds of asthma in 12-19 year-old Norwegians. WC did not add further information to that already provided by BMI to improve our understanding of the association between asthma and weight.  
  Address Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA; Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New Haven, CT, USA; Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0803-5253 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25131148 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1639  
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Author Egan, K.B.; Ettinger, A.S.; DeWan, A.T.; Holford, T.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Bracken, M.B. url  doi
  Title Longitudinal associations between asthma and general and abdominal weight status among Norwegian adolescents and young adults: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Pediatr Obes Abbreviated Journal Pediatric obesity  
  Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages 345-352  
  Keywords Adiposity; Adolescent; Adult; Asthma/epidemiology/etiology/*physiopathology; Body Mass Index; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity, Abdominal/complications/epidemiology/*physiopathology; Odds Ratio; Overweight; Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In adolescents the temporal directionality to the asthma and adiposity association remains unclear. Asthma may be a consequence of obesity; however, asthma may increase adiposity. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the associations between (i) baseline weight status and subsequent asthma and (ii) baseline asthma and subsequent weight status after 4 and 11 years of follow-up (N = 1543 and N = 1596, respectively) using data from three, sequentially enrolled population-based surveys of Norwegians aged 12-30 years from 1995 to 2008. METHODS: Weight status was defined as general (body mass index) or abdominal (waist circumference) underweight, normal weight, overweight or obesity. Self-report physician-diagnosed asthma defined asthma status. RESULTS: Over the longitudinal 11-year follow-up, baseline generally overweight or abdominally obese adolescents had increased risk of asthma. Likewise, baseline asthmatics had increased risk of general overweight or abdominal obesity. After sex stratification, these associations were stronger in males. Generally (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32, 2.73) or abdominally (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.13, 2.44) overweight males were at increased risk of asthma. Baseline asthmatic males were also at increased risk of general (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.54, 2.98) and abdominal (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.27, 2.47) overweight. CONCLUSIONS: Among Norwegian adolescents, a bidirectional association of asthma and adiposity was observed in males. Each baseline condition increased the risk of the other condition over time. No association was observed in females.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.Center Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Egan, K BEttinger, A SDeWan, A THolford, T RHolmen, T LBracken, M BengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2014/11/19 06:00Pediatr Obes. 2015 Oct;10(5):345-52. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.271. Epub 2014 Nov 18. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Egan2015 Serial 1803  
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Author Graff, M.; Scott, R.A.; Justice, A.E.; Young, K.L.; Feitosa, M.F.; Barata, L.; Winkler, T.W.; Chu, A.Y.; Mahajan, A.; Hadley, D.; Xue, L.; Workalemahu, T.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; den Hoed, M.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Qi, Q.; Ngwa, J.S.; Renstrom, F.; Quaye, L.; Eicher, J.D.; Hayes, J.E.; Cornelis, M.; Kutalik, Z.; Lim, E.; Luan, J.'an; Huffman, J.E.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, W.; Griffin, P.J.; Haller, T.; Ahmad, S.; Marques-Vidal, P.M.; Bien, S.; Yengo, L.; Teumer, A.; Smith, A.V.; Kumari, M.; Harder, M.N.; Justesen, J.M.; Kleber, M.E.; Hollensted, M.; Lohman, K.; Rivera, N.V.; Whitfield, J.B.; Zhao, J.H.; Stringham, H.M.; Lyytikainen, L.-P.; Huppertz, C.; Willemsen, G.; Peyrot, W.J.; Wu, Y.; Kristiansson, K.; Demirkan, A.; Fornage, M.; Hassinen, M.; Bielak, L.F.; Cadby, G.; Tanaka, T.; Magi, R.; van der Most, P.J.; Jackson, A.U.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Vitart, V.; Marten, J.; Navarro, P.; Bellis, C.; Pasko, D.; Johansson, A.; Snitker, S.; Cheng, Y.-C.; Eriksson, J.; Lim, U.; Aadahl, M.; Adair, L.S.; Amin, N.; Balkau, B.; Auvinen, J.; Beilby, J.; Bergman, R.N.; Bergmann, S.; Bertoni, A.G.; Blangero, J.; Bonnefond, A.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Borja, J.B.; Brage, S.; Busonero, F.; Buyske, S.; Campbell, H.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Corre, T.; Smith, G.D.; Delgado, G.E.; Dueker, N.; Dorr, M.; Ebeling, T.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Esko, T.; Faul, J.D.; Fu, M.; Faerch, K.; Gieger, C.; Glaser, S.; Gong, J.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Grallert, H.; Grammer, T.B.; Grarup, N.; van Grootheest, G.; Harald, K.; Hastie, N.D.; Havulinna, A.S.; Hernandez, D.; Hindorff, L.; Hocking, L.J.; Holmens, O.L.; Holzapfel, C.; Hottenga, J.J.; Huang, J.; Huang, T.; Hui, J.; Huth, C.; Hutri-Kahonen, N.; James, A.L.; Jansson, J.-O.; Jhun, M.A.; Juonala, M.; Kinnunen, L.; Koistinen, H.A.; Kolcic, I.; Komulainen, P.; Kuusisto, J.; Kvaloy, K.; Kahonen, M.; Lakka, T.A.; Launer, L.J.; Lehne, B.; Lindgren, C.M.; Lorentzon, M.; Luben, R.; Marre, M.; Milaneschi, Y.; Monda, K.L.; Montgomery, G.W.; De Moor, M.H.M.; Mulas, A.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Musk, A.W.; Mannikko, R.; Mannisto, S.; Narisu, N.; Nauck, M.; Nettleton, J.A.; Nolte, I.M.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Olden, M.; Ong, K.K.; Padmanabhan, S.; Paternoster, L.; Perez, J.; Perola, M.; Peters, A.; Peters, U.; Peyser, P.A.; Prokopenko, I.; Puolijoki, H.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rankinen, T.; Rasmussen-Torvik, L.J.; Rawal, R.; Ridker, P.M.; Rose, L.M.; Rudan, I.; Sarti, C.; Sarzynski, M.A.; Savonen, K.; Scott, W.R.; Sanna, S.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Sidney, S.; Silbernagel, G.; Smith, B.H.; Smith, J.A.; Snieder, H.; Stancakova, A.; Sternfeld, B.; Swift, A.J.; Tammelin, T.; Tan, S.-T.; Thorand, B.; Thuillier, D.; Vandenput, L.; Vestergaard, H.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vohl, M.-C.; Volker, U.; Waeber, G.; Walker, M.; Wild, S.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zillikens, M.C.; Zubair, N.; Haiman, C.A.; Lemarchand, L.; Gyllensten, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Hofman, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Perusse, L.; Wilson, J.F.; Hayward, C.; Polasek, O.; Cucca, F.; Hveem, K.; Hartman, C.A.; Tonjes, A.; Bandinelli, S.; Palmer, L.J.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Rauramaa, R.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Salomaa, V.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.; Lehtimaki, T.; Mangino, M.; Laakso, M.; Bouchard, C.; Martin, N.G.; Kuh, D.; Liu, Y.; Linneberg, A.; Marz, W.; Strauch, K.; Kivimaki, M.; Harris, T.B.; Gudnason, V.; Volzke, H.; Qi, L.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Chambers, J.C.; Kooner, J.S.; Froguel, P.; Kooperberg, C.; Vollenweider, P.; Hallmans, G.; Hansen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Metspalu, A.; Wareham, N.J.; Langenberg, C.; Weir, D.R.; Porteous, D.J.; Boerwinkle, E.; Chasman, D.I.; Abecasis, G.R.; Barroso, I.; McCarthy, M.I.; Frayling, T.M.; O'Connell, J.R.; van Duijn, C.M.; Boehnke, M.; Heid, I.M.; Mohlke, K.L.; Strachan, D.P.; Fox, C.S.; Liu, C.-T.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Klein, R.J.; Johnson, A.D.; Borecki, I.B.; Franks, P.W.; North, K.E.; Cupples, L.A.; Loos, R.J.F.; Kilpelainen, T.O. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity – A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults Type Meta-Analysis
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS Genetics Abbreviated Journal PLoS Genet  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages e1006528  
  Keywords Adiposity/*genetics/physiology; Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; Epigenomics; *Exercise; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Male; Obesity/*genetics/physiopathology; Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.  
  Address The Department of Preventive Medicine, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States of America  
  Corporate Author PAGE Consortium Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1553-7390 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28448500; PMCID:PMC5407576 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1909  
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Author Heuch, I.; Heuch, I.; Hagen, K.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Body mass index as a risk factor for developing chronic low back pain: a follow-up in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Spine Abbreviated Journal Spine (Phila Pa 1976)  
  Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 133-139  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; *Body Mass Index; Chronic Pain; Cohort Studies; Comorbidity; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Low Back Pain/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Population Surveillance; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN: A population-based, prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether overweight, obesity, or more generally an elevated body mass index (BMI) increase the probability of experiencing chronic low back pain (LBP) after an 11-year period, both among participants with and without LBP at baseline. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Chronic LBP is a common disabling disorder in modern society. Cross-sectional studies suggest an association between an elevated BMI and LBP, but it is not clear whether this is a causal relationship. METHODS: Data were obtained from the community-based HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008) studies of an entire Norwegian county. Participants were 8733 men and 10,149 women, aged 30 to 69 years, who did not have chronic LBP at baseline, and 2669 men and 3899 women with LBP at baseline. After 11 years, both groups indicated whether they currently had chronic LBP, defined as pain persisting for at least 3 months continuously during the last year. RESULTS: A significant positive association was found between BMI and risk of LBP among persons without LBP at baseline. The odds ratio for BMI 30 or more versus BMI less than 25 was 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.67) for men and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.03-1.46) for women, in analyses adjusted for age, education, work status, physical activity at work and in leisure time, smoking, blood pressure, and serum lipid levels. A significant positive association was also established between BMI and recurrence of LBP among women. LBP status at baseline had negligible influence on subsequent change in BMI. CONCLUSION: High values of BMI may predispose to chronic LBP 11 years later, both in individuals with and without LBP. The association between BMI and LBP is not explained by an effect of LBP on later change in BMI.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingrid.heuch@uus.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0362-2436 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22718225 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1443  
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Author Hjort, R.; Ahlqvist, E.; Carlsson, P.-O.; Grill, V.; Groop, L.; Martinell, M.; Rasouli, B.; Rosengren, A.; Tuomi, T.; Asvold, B.O.; Carlsson, S. url  doi
  Title Overweight, obesity and the risk of LADA: results from a Swedish case-control study and the Norwegian HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 61 Issue 6 Pages 1333-1343  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Autoantibodies/blood; Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Insulin Resistance; Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism; Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults/*complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*complications/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Overweight/*complications/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sweden; Young Adult; *Andis; *ANDiU; *Body mass index; *Case-control study; *Estrid; *HUNT Study; *Lada; *Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults; *Prospective study; *Type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Excessive weight is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but its role in the promotion of autoimmune diabetes is not clear. We investigated the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) in relation to overweight/obesity in two large population-based studies. METHODS: Analyses were based on incident cases of LADA (n = 425) and type 2 diabetes (n = 1420), and 1704 randomly selected control participants from a Swedish case-control study and prospective data from the Norwegian HUNT Study including 147 people with LADA and 1,012,957 person-years of follow-up (1984-2008). We present adjusted ORs and HRs with 95% CI. RESULTS: In the Swedish data, obesity was associated with an increased risk of LADA (OR 2.93, 95% CI 2.17, 3.97), which was even stronger for type 2 diabetes (OR 18.88, 95% CI 14.29, 24.94). The association was stronger in LADA with low GAD antibody (GADA; <median) (OR 4.25; 95% CI 2.76, 6.52) but present also in LADA with high GADA (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.42, 3.24). In the Swedish data, obese vs normal weight LADA patients had lower GADA levels, better beta cell function, and were more likely to have low-risk HLA-genotypes. The combination of overweight and family history of diabetes (FHD) conferred an OR of 4.57 (95% CI 3.27, 6.39) for LADA and 24.51 (95% CI 17.82, 33.71) for type 2 diabetes. Prospective data from HUNT indicated even stronger associations; HR for LADA was 6.07 (95% CI 3.76, 9.78) for obesity and 7.45 (95% CI 4.02, 13.82) for overweight and FHD. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Overweight/obesity is associated with increased risk of LADA, particularly when in combination with FHD. These findings support the hypothesis that, even in the presence of autoimmunity, factors linked to insulin resistance, such as excessive weight, could promote onset of diabetes.  
  Address Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29589073 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2098  
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Author Locke, A.E.; Kahali, B.; Berndt, S.I.; Justice, A.E.; Pers, T.H.; Day, F.R.; Powell, C.; Vedantam, S.; Buchkovich, M.L.; Yang, J.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Esko, T.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gustafsson, S.; Kutalik, Z.; Luan, J.'an; Magi, R.; Randall, J.C.; Winkler, T.W.; Wood, A.R.; Workalemahu, T.; Faul, J.D.; Smith, J.A.; Hua Zhao, J.; Zhao, W.; Chen, J.; Fehrmann, R.; Hedman, A.K.; Karjalainen, J.; Schmidt, E.M.; Absher, D.; Amin, N.; Anderson, D.; Beekman, M.; Bolton, J.L.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Buyske, S.; Demirkan, A.; Deng, G.; Ehret, G.B.; Feenstra, B.; Feitosa, M.F.; Fischer, K.; Goel, A.; Gong, J.; Jackson, A.U.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Kristiansson, K.; Lim, U.; Lotay, V.; Mangino, M.; Mateo Leach, I.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Medland, S.E.; Nalls, M.A.; Palmer, C.D.; Pasko, D.; Pechlivanis, S.; Peters, M.J.; Prokopenko, I.; Shungin, D.; Stancakova, A.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Ju Sung, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Teumer, A.; Trompet, S.; van der Laan, S.W.; van Setten, J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Wang, Z.; Yengo, L.; Zhang, W.; Isaacs, A.; Albrecht, E.; Arnlov, J.; Arscott, G.M.; Attwood, A.P.; Bandinelli, S.; Barrett, A.; Bas, I.N.; Bellis, C.; Bennett, A.J.; Berne, C.; Blagieva, R.; Bluher, M.; Bohringer, S.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Bottcher, Y.; Boyd, H.A.; Bruinenberg, M.; Caspersen, I.H.; Ida Chen, Y.-D.; Clarke, R.; Warwick Daw, E.; de Craen, A.J.M.; Delgado, G.; Dimitriou, M.; Doney, A.S.F.; Eklund, N.; Estrada, K.; Eury, E.; Folkersen, L.; Fraser, R.M.; Garcia, M.E.; Geller, F.; Giedraitis, V.; Gigante, B.; Go, A.S.; Golay, A.; Goodall, A.H.; Gordon, S.D.; Gorski, M.; Grabe, H.-J.; Grallert, H.; Grammer, T.B.; Grassler, J.; Gronberg, H.; Groves, C.J.; Gusto, G.; Haessler, J.; Hall, P.; Haller, T.; Hallmans, G.; Hartman, C.A.; Hassinen, M.; Hayward, C.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Helmer, Q.; Hengstenberg, C.; Holmen, O.; Hottenga, J.-J.; James, A.L.; Jeff, J.M.; Johansson, A.; Jolley, J.; Juliusdottir, T.; Kinnunen, L.; Koenig, W.; Koskenvuo, M.; Kratzer, W.; Laitinen, J.; Lamina, C.; Leander, K.; Lee, N.R.; Lichtner, P.; Lind, L.; Lindstrom, J.; Sin Lo, K.; Lobbens, S.; Lorbeer, R.; Lu, Y.; Mach, F.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Mahajan, A.; McArdle, W.L.; McLachlan, S.; Menni, C.; Merger, S.; Mihailov, E.; Milani, L.; Moayyeri, A.; Monda, K.L.; Morken, M.A.; Mulas, A.; Muller, G.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Musk, A.W.; Nagaraja, R.; Nothen, M.M.; Nolte, I.M.; Pilz, S.; Rayner, N.W.; Renstrom, F.; Rettig, R.; Ried, J.S.; Ripke, S.; Robertson, N.R.; Rose, L.M.; Sanna, S.; Scharnagl, H.; Scholtens, S.; Schumacher, F.R.; Scott, W.R.; Seufferlein, T.; Shi, J.; Vernon Smith, A.; Smolonska, J.; Stanton, A.V.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Stirrups, K.; Stringham, H.M.; Sundstrom, J.; Swertz, M.A.; Swift, A.J.; Syvanen, A.-C.; Tan, S.-T.; Tayo, B.O.; Thorand, B.; Thorleifsson, G.; Tyrer, J.P.; Uh, H.-W.; Vandenput, L.; Verhulst, F.C.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Verweij, N.; Vonk, J.M.; Waite, L.L.; Warren, H.R.; Waterworth, D.; Weedon, M.N.; Wilkens, L.R.; Willenborg, C.; Wilsgaard, T.; Wojczynski, M.K.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zhang, Q.; Brennan, E.P.; Choi, M.; Dastani, Z.; Drong, A.W.; Eriksson, P.; Franco-Cereceda, A.; Gadin, J.R.; Gharavi, A.G.; Goddard, M.E.; Handsaker, R.E.; Huang, J.; Karpe, F.; Kathiresan, S.; Keildson, S.; Kiryluk, K.; Kubo, M.; Lee, J.-Y.; Liang, L.; Lifton, R.P.; Ma, B.; McCarroll, S.A.; McKnight, A.J.; Min, J.L.; Moffatt, M.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Murabito, J.M.; Nicholson, G.; Nyholt, D.R.; Okada, Y.; Perry, J.R.B.; Dorajoo, R.; Reinmaa, E.; Salem, R.M.; Sandholm, N.; Scott, R.A.; Stolk, L.; Takahashi, A.; Tanaka, T.; Van't Hooft, F.M.; Vinkhuyzen, A.A.E.; Westra, H.-J.; Zheng, W.; Zondervan, K.T.; Heath, A.C.; Arveiler, D.; Bakker, S.J.L.; Beilby, J.; Bergman, R.N.; Blangero, J.; Bovet, P.; Campbell, H.; Caulfield, M.J.; Cesana, G.; Chakravarti, A.; Chasman, D.I.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Crawford, D.C.; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Cusi, D.; Danesh, J.; de Faire, U.; den Ruijter, H.M.; Dominiczak, A.F.; Erbel, R.; Erdmann, J.; Eriksson, J.G.; Farrall, M.; Felix, S.B.; Ferrannini, E.; Ferrieres, J.; Ford, I.; Forouhi, N.G.; Forrester, T.; Franco, O.H.; Gansevoort, R.T.; Gejman, P.V.; Gieger, C.; Gottesman, O.; Gudnason, V.; Gyllensten, U.; Hall, A.S.; Harris, T.B.; Hattersley, A.T.; Hicks, A.A.; Hindorff, L.A.; Hingorani, A.D.; Hofman, A.; Homuth, G.; Kees Hovingh, G.; Humphries, S.E.; Hunt, S.C.; Hypponen, E.; Illig, T.; Jacobs, K.B.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Jockel, K.-H.; Johansen, B.; Jousilahti, P.; Wouter Jukema, J.; Jula, A.M.; Kaprio, J.; Kastelein, J.J.P.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, S.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Knekt, P.; Kooner, J.S.; Kooperberg, C.; Kovacs, P.; Kraja, A.T.; Kumari, M.; Kuusisto, J.; Lakka, T.A.; Langenberg, C.; Le Marchand, L.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lyssenko, V.; Mannisto, S.; Marette, A.; Matise, T.C.; McKenzie, C.A.; McKnight, B.; Moll, F.L.; Morris, A.D.; Morris, A.P.; Murray, J.C.; Nelis, M.; Ohlsson, C.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Ong, K.K.; Madden, P.A.F.; Pasterkamp, G.; Peden, J.F.; Peters, A.; Postma, D.S.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Price, J.F.; Qi, L.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rankinen, T.; Rao, D.C.; Rice, T.K.; Ridker, P.M.; Rioux, J.D.; Ritchie, M.D.; Rudan, I.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Saramies, J.; Sarzynski, M.A.; Schunkert, H.; Schwarz, P.E.H.; Sever, P.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Sinisalo, J.; Stolk, R.P.; Strauch, K.; Tonjes, A.; Tregouet, D.-A.; Tremblay, A.; Tremoli, E.; Virtamo, J.; Vohl, M.-C.; Volker, U.; Waeber, G.; Willemsen, G.; Witteman, J.C.; Zillikens, M.C.; Adair, L.S.; Amouyel, P.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Assimes, T.L.; Bochud, M.; Boehm, B.O.; Boerwinkle, E.; Bornstein, S.R.; Bottinger, E.P.; Bouchard, C.; Cauchi, S.; Chambers, J.C.; Chanock, S.J.; Cooper, R.S.; de Bakker, P.I.W.; Dedoussis, G.; Ferrucci, L.; Franks, P.W.; Froguel, P.; Groop, L.C.; Haiman, C.A.; Hamsten, A.; Hui, J.; Hunter, D.J.; Hveem, K.; Kaplan, R.C.; Kivimaki, M.; Kuh, D.; Laakso, M.; Liu, Y.; Martin, N.G.; Marz, W.; Melbye, M.; Metspalu, A.; Moebus, S.; Munroe, P.B.; Njolstad, I.; Oostra, B.A.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Pedersen, N.L.; Perola, M.; Perusse, L.; Peters, U.; Power, C.; Quertermous, T.; Rauramaa, R.; Rivadeneira, F.; Saaristo, T.E.; Saleheen, D.; Sattar, N.; Schadt, E.E.; Schlessinger, D.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Snieder, H.; Spector, T.D.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stumvoll, M.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Uusitupa, M.; van der Harst, P.; Walker, M.; Wallaschofski, H.; Wareham, N.J.; Watkins, H.; Weir, D.R.; Wichmann, H.-E.; Wilson, J.F.; Zanen, P.; Borecki, I.B.; Deloukas, P.; Fox, C.S.; Heid, I.M.; O'Connell, J.R.; Strachan, D.P.; Stefansson, K.; van Duijn, C.M.; Abecasis, G.R.; Franke, L.; Frayling, T.M.; McCarthy, M.I.; Visscher, P.M.; Scherag, A.; Willer, C.J.; Boehnke, M.; Mohlke, K.L.; Lindgren, C.M.; Beckmann, J.S.; Barroso, I.; North, K.E.; Ingelsson, E.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Loos, R.J.F.; Speliotes, E.K. url  doi
  Title Genetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 518 Issue 7538 Pages 197-206  
  Keywords HUNT3; obesity; genetics  
  Abstract Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in up to 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 x 10(-8)), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for approximately 2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous system in obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, and Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA  
  Corporate Author International Endogene Consortium Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25673413 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1673  
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Author Magnusson, M.; Sorensen, T.I.; Olafsdottir, S.; Lehtinen-Jacks, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Heitmann, B.L.; Lissner, L. url  doi
  Title Social Inequalities in Obesity Persist in the Nordic Region Despite Its Relative Affluence and Equity Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Curr Obes Rep Abbreviated Journal Current obesity reports  
  Volume 3 Issue Pages 1-15  
  Keywords Adolescents; Adults; Bmi; Children; Denmark; Education; Egalitarian; Finland; Gender; Gini coefficient; Iceland; Income; Inequality; Nordic countries; Nordic region; Norway; Obesity; Obesogenic; Occupation; Overweight; Secular trends; Social gradient; Social inequalities; Socioeconomic position; Socioeconomic status; Sweden  
  Abstract Social inequalities in overweight and obesity (OWOB) have persisted in the affluent and reputedly egalitarian Nordic countries. In this review we examine associations between socioeconomic position (SEP) and OWOB, and secular trends in such associations. Determinants and possible causes of the relations are discussed together with opportunities to cope with OWOB as a public health problem. The findings show a persisting inverse social gradient. An interaction between SEP and gender is noted for adults in Denmark, Finland and Iceland and for children in Sweden. There are overall tendencies for increased inequality, however no consistent trend for an increased social gradient in OWOB. Reasons that increased inequality does not unequivocally mirror in a steepened social gradient in obesity may include methodological questions as well as societal efforts to counteract obesity. Multi-level efforts are needed to prevent OWOB.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Box 454, 405 30 Gothen Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2162-4968 (Print) ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Magnusson, MariaSorensen, Thorkild I AOlafsdottir, SteingerdurLehtinen-Jacks, SusannaHolmen, Turid LingaasHeitmann, Berit LilienthalLissner, LaurenReviewCurr Obes Rep. 2014 Jan 7;3:1-15. eCollection 2014. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Magnusson2014 Serial 1608  
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Author Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title Cross-sectional and prospective cohort study of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and obesity in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 175 Issue 10 Pages 1029-1036  
  Keywords Adult; Biological Markers/blood; Body Mass Index; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Hydroxycholecalciferols/blood/*deficiency; Incidence; Linear Models; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/blood/epidemiology/*etiology; Odds Ratio; Prevalence; Prospective Studies; Vitamin D Deficiency/blood/*complications; Waist Circumference  
  Abstract Experimental studies suggest that vitamin D modulates the activity of adipocytes. The authors examined baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level in relation to prevalent and cumulative incident obesity in Norway. A cohort of 25,616 adults aged 19-55 years participated in both the second and third surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008)). Serum 25(OH)D levels measured at baseline and anthropometric measurements taken at both baseline and follow-up were available for a random sample of 2,460 subjects. Overall, 40% of the 2,460 subjects had a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L, and 37% had a level of 50.0-74.9 nmol/L. The prevalence and cumulative incidence of obesity, defined as body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) >/=30, were 12% and 15%, respectively. Lower serum 25(OH)D level was associated with a higher prevalence of obesity. In the 2,165 subjects with baseline BMI less than 30, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was associated with a significantly increased odds ratio for incident obesity during follow-up (adjusted odds ratio = 1.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.24, 2.41). When prevalent and incident obesity were classified according to waist circumference (>/=88 cm for women, >/=102 cm for men), similar results were obtained. In addition to prevalent obesity, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was significantly associated with new-onset obesity in adults.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. xiao-mei.mai@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22312120 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1551  
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Author Midthjell, K.; Lee, C.M.Y.; Langhammer, A.; Krokstad, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Hveem, K.; Colagiuri, S.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title Trends in overweight and obesity over 22 years in a large adult population: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Clinical Obesity Abbreviated Journal Clin Obes  
  Volume 3 Issue 1-2 Pages 12-20  
  Keywords Gender differences; Norway; obesity; overweight  
  Abstract Some reports indicate that the obesity epidemic may be slowing down or halting. We followed body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in a large adult population in Norway (n = 90 000) from 1984-1986 (HUNT1) through 1995-1997 (HUNT2) to 2006-2008 (HUNT3) to study whether this is occurring in Norway. Height and weight were measured with standardized and identical methods in all three surveys; WC was also measured in HUNT2 and HUNT3. In the three surveys, mean BMI increased from 25.3 to 26.5 and 27.5 kg m-2 in men and from 25.1 to 26.2 and 26.9 kg m-2 in women. Increase in prevalence of obesity (BMI >/= 30 kg m-2) was greater in men (from 7.7 to 14.4 and 22.1%) compared with women (from 13.3 to 18.3 and 23.1%). In contrast, women had a greater increase in abdominal obesity (WC >/= 102 cm for men and WC >/= 88 cm for women). There was a continuous shift in the distribution curve of BMI and WC to the right, demonstrating that the increase in body weight was occurring in all weight groups, but the increase of obesity was greatest in the youngest age groups. Our data showed no signs of a halt in the increase of obesity in this representative Norwegian population.  
  Address Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, HUNT Research Centre, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1758-8103 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23935708; PMC3734732 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1422  
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Author Moe, B.; Nilsen, T.I.   
  Title Cancer risk in people with diabetes: Does physical activity and adiposity modify the association? Prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication J Diabetes Complications Abbreviated Journal Journal of diabetes and its complications  
  Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 176-179  
  Keywords *Adiposity; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Body Mass Index; Cohort Studies; Diabetes Complications/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Incidence; Male; Middle Aged; Motor Activity; Neoplasms/complications/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*physiopathology; Overweight/*physiopathology; Prevalence; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Young Adult; Cancer risk; Diabetes; Epidemiology; Leisure time physical exercise  
  Abstract AIMS: To examine whether physical activity and adiposity modify the increased risk of cancer associated with diabetes. METHODS: We prospectively examined the association of diabetes and risk of cancer among 73,726 persons stratified by physical activity and body mass index (BMI). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated from Cox regression. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 22.0 years, 9572 people were diagnosed with incident cancer. There was no clear association between diabetes and cancer risk in those reporting high levels of physical activity (>/=2.0h per week) (HR 0.93; 95% CI: 0.70-1.24) or those with a normal weight (BMI  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Tr Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Moe2015b Serial 1847  
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Author Moholdt, T.; Lavie, C.J.; Nauman, J. url  doi
  Title Sustained Physical Activity, Not Weight Loss, Associated With Improved Survival in Coronary Heart Disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the American College of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal J Am Coll Cardiol  
  Volume 71 Issue 10 Pages 1094-1101  
  Keywords Hunt; body mass index; exercise; mortality; myocardial infarction; obesity paradox  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Individuals with coronary heart disease (CHD) are recommended to be physically active and to maintain a healthy weight. There is a lack of data on how long-term changes in body mass index (BMI) and physical activity (PA) relate to mortality in this population. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine the associations among changes in BMI, PA, and mortality in individuals with CHD. METHODS: The authors studied 3,307 individuals (1,038 women) with CHD from the HUNT (Nord-Trondelag Health Study) with examinations in 1985, 1996, and 2007, followed until the end of 2014. They calculated the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality according to changes in BMI and PA, and estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age, smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, alcohol, and self-reported health. RESULTS: There were 1,493 deaths during 30 years of follow-up (55% from CVD, median 15.7 years). Weight loss, classified as change in BMI <-0.10 kg/m(2)/year, associated with increased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR: 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12 to 1.50). Weight gain, classified as change in BMI >/=0.10 kg/m(2)/year, was not associated with increased mortality (adjusted HR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.87 to 1.09). Weight loss only associated with increased risk in those who were normal weight at baseline (adjusted HR: 1.38; 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.72). There was a lower risk for all-cause mortality in participants who maintained low PA (adjusted HR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.67 to 0.97) or high PA (adjusted HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.50 to 0.83), compared with participants who were inactive over time. CVD mortality associations were similar as for all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The study observed no mortality risk reductions associated with weight loss in individuals with CHD, and reduced mortality risk associated with weight gain in individuals who were normal weight at baseline. Sustained PA, however, was associated with substantial risk reduction.  
  Address Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-1097 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29519349 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2137  
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Author Morkedal, B.; Vatten, L.J.; Romundstad, P.R.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.   
  Title Risk of myocardial infarction and heart failure among metabolically healthy but obese individuals: HUNT (Nord-Trondelag Health Study), Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication J Am Coll Cardiol Abbreviated Journal Journal of the American College of Cardiology  
  Volume 63 Issue 11 Pages 1071-1078  
  Keywords HUNT2; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; *Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; *Cause of Death; Female; Heart Failure/*etiology/mortality/physiopathology; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction/*etiology/mortality/physiopathology; Obesity/*complications/diagnosis/metabolism; Obesity, Morbid/complications/diagnosis; Prognosis; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Severity of Illness Index; Sex Factors; Survival Rate; Time Factors  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study sought to investigate whether obesity in the absence of metabolic abnormalities might be a relatively benign condition in relation to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND: The results of previous studies are conflicting for AMI and largely unknown for HF, and the role of the duration of obesity has not been investigated. METHODS: In a population-based prospective cohort study, a total of 61,299 men and women free of cardiovascular disease were classified according to body mass index (BMI) and metabolic status at baseline. BMI also was measured 10 and 30 years before baseline for 27,196 participants. RESULTS: During 12 years of follow-up, 2,547 participants had a first AMI, and 1,201 participants had a first HF. Compared with being normal weight (BMI <25 kg/m(2)) and metabolically healthy, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for AMI was 1.1 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9 to 1.4) among obese (BMI >/=30 kg/m(2)) and metabolically healthy participants and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.7 to 2.3) among obese and metabolically unhealthy participants. We found similar results for severe (BMI >/=35 kg/m(2)), long-lasting (>30 years), and abdominal obesity stratified for metabolic status. For HF, the HRs associated with obesity were 1.7 (95% CI: 1.3 to 2.3) and 1.7 (95% CI: 1.4 to 2.2) for metabolically healthy and unhealthy participants, respectively. Severe and long-lasting obesity were particularly harmful in relation to HF, regardless of metabolic status. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to AMI, obesity without metabolic abnormalities did not confer substantial excess risk, not even for severe or long-lasting obesity. For HF, even metabolically healthy obesity was associated with increased risk, particularly for long-lasting or severe obesity.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Tr Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Morkedal2014 Serial 1610  
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Author Mostad, I.L.; Langaas, M.; Grill, V. url  doi
  Title Central obesity is associated with lower intake of whole-grain bread and less frequent breakfast and lunch: results from the HUNT study, an adult all-population survey Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism = Physiologie Appliquee, Nutrition et Metabolisme Abbreviated Journal Appl Physiol Nutr Metab  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords HUNT; all-population survey; apport alimentaire; central obesity; dietary intake; enquête globale; fréquence des repas; meal frequency; nutrition epidemiology; obésité abdominale; pain de grains entiers; ratio taille/hanche; waist/hip ratio; whole-grain bread; épidémiologie de l’alimentation; HUNT3  
  Abstract All-population and area-based investigations of diet in central obesity are scarce. We used cross-sectional data from 50 339 individuals who responded to the HUNT3 survey of 2006-2008, which recruited from all county-residing adults 20 years and older, to investigate whether those with central obesity eat and drink differently than others. Answers to dietary questions were recoded and analyzed with multiple linear regression, using waist/hip ratio (WHR), age, and sex as explanatory variables. Frequencies of consumption or amounts of food, beverages, and meals were compared among WHR quartiles. Central obesity was present in the quartile with the highest WHR, WHR4 (WHR >/= 0.917 for women and 0.981 for men) but not in the quartile with the lowest WHR, WHR1 (WHR < 0.817 for women and 0.895 for men). Dietary variables differed markedly by age and sex. After adjustment for these factors and for multiple testing, we found significant differences between WHR4 and WHR1 for 19 of 30 dietary variables. Central obesity was associated with a lower intake of any bread, and of whole-grain bread in particular. Intake of fruits and berries, vegetables, and pasta and rice was less, and intake of sausages and hamburgers and boiled potatoes was more frequent. Intake of alcohol, tea, and fruit juice was lower in those with central obesity, whereas intake of sugar-free soft drinks and coffee was higher. The frequency of breakfast and lunch was lower and of nightly meals was higher in those with central obesity. In conclusion, in this large area-based population, central obesity was associated with differences in dietary habits, some of which (such as decreased consumption of whole-grain bread and increased intake of sugar-free drinks) are of possible clinical significance.  
  Address a Department of Clinical Nutrition, Clinic of Clinical Service, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Box 3250 Sluppen, NO-7006 Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1715-5320 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24833275 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1604  
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Author Paulsen, J.; Askim, A.; Mohus, R.M.; Mehl, A.; Dewan, A.; Solligard, E.; Damas, J.K.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Associations of obesity and lifestyle with the risk and mortality of bloodstream infection in a general population: a 15-year follow-up of 64 027 individuals in the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 1573-1581  
  Keywords Bacteraemia; alcohol drinking; exercise; obesity; sepsis; smoking  
  Abstract Background: Bloodstream infections (BSI) cause considerable morbidity and mortality, and primary prevention should be a priority. Lifestyle factors are of particular interest since they represent a modifiable target. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study among participants in the population-based Norwegian HUNT2 Survey, where 64 027 participants were followed from 1995-97 through 2011 by linkage to prospectively recorded information on BSI at local and regional hospitals. The exposures were: baseline body mass index (BMI) measurements; and self-reported smoking habits, leisure time physical activity and alcohol intake. The outcomes were hazard ratios (HR) of BSI and BSI mortality. Results: During 810 453 person-years and median follow-up of 14.8 years, 1844 (2.9%) participants experienced at least one BSI and 396 (0.62%) died from BSI. Compared with normal weight participants (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2), the age- and sex-adjusted risk of a first-time BSI was 31% [95% confidence interval (CI) 14-51%] higher at BMI 30.0-34.9 kg/m2, 87% (95% CI 50-135%) higher at BMI 35.0-39.9 kg/m2 and 210% (95% CI 117-341%) higher at BMI >/= 40.0 kg/m2. The risk of BSI mortality was similarly increased. Compared with never-smokers, current smokers had 51% (95% CI 34-70%) and 75% (95% CI 34-129%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively. Physically inactive participants had 71% (95% CI 42-107%) and 108% (95% CI 37-216%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively, compared with the most physically active. Conclusions: Obesity, smoking and physical inactivity carry increased risk of BSI and BSI mortality.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28637260 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1969  
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Author Sardahaee, F.S.; Holmen, T.L.; Micali, N.; Kvaloy, K. url  doi
  Title Effects of single genetic variants and polygenic obesity risk scores on disordered eating in adolescents – The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Appetite Abbreviated Journal Appetite  
  Volume 118 Issue Pages 8-16  
  Keywords Adolescents; Comt; Disordered eating; Eat-12; Hunt; Obesity polygenic risk score  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Improving the understanding of the role of genetic risk on disordered eating (DE). METHODS: A case-control study including 1757 (F: 979, M: 778) adolescents (aged 13-19 years) from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), an ethnically homogenous Norwegian population based study. Cases and controls were defined using a shortened version of the Eating Attitude Test. Logistic regression was employed to test for associations between DE phenotypes and 24 obesity and eating disorder susceptibility SNPs, and the joint effect of a subset of these in a genetic risk score (GRS). RESULTS: COMT was shown to be associated with poor appetite/undereating (OR: 0.6, CI 95%: 0.43-0.83, p = 0.002). Independent of obesity associations, the weighted GRS was associated to overeating in 13-15 year old females (OR: 2.07, CI 95%: 1.14-3.76, p = 0.017). Additionally, a significant association was observed between the GRS and loss of control over eating in the total sample (OR: 1.62, CI 95%: 1.01-2.61, p = 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: The COMT variant (rs4680) was associated with poor appetite/undereating. Our study further confirms prior findings that obesity risk also confers risk for loss of control over eating; and overeating amongst girls.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Research and Development, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Health Trust, Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: kirsti.kvaloy@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-6663 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference