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Author Bauman, A.E.; Grunseit, A.C.; Rangul, V.; Heitmann, B.L. url  doi
  Title Physical activity, obesity and mortality: does pattern of physical activity have stronger epidemiological associations? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 788  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Hip circumference; Waist circumference  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Most studies of physical activity (PA) epidemiology use behaviour measured at a single time-point. We examined whether 'PA patterns' (consistently low, consistently high or inconsistent PA levels over time) showed different epidemiological relationships for anthropometric and mortality outcomes, compared to single time-point measure of PA. METHODS: Data were the Danish MONICA (MONItoring Trends and Determinants in CArdiovascular Disease) study over three waves 1982-3 (time 1), 1987-8 (time 2) and 1993-4 (time 3). Associations between leisure time single time-point PA levels at time 1 and time 3, and sport and active travel at times 1 and 2 with BMI, waist, hip circumference and mortality (death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD)) were compared to 'PA patterns' spanning multiple time points. PA pattern classified participants' PA as either 1) inactive or low PA at both time points; 2) moderate level PA at time 1 and high activity at time 3; or 3) a 'mixed PA pattern' indicating a varying levels of activity over time. Similarly, sport and active travel were also classified as indicating stable low, stable high and mixed patterns. RESULTS: The moderately and highly active groups for PA at times 1 and 3 had up to 1.7 cm lower increase in waist circumference compared with the inactive/low active group. Across 'PA patterns', 'active maintainers' had a 2.0 cm lower waist circumference than 'inactive/low maintainers'. Waist circumference was inversely related to sport but not active travel. CHD risk did not vary by activity levels at time 1, but was reduced significantly by 43% for high PA at time 3 (vs 'inactive' group) and among 'active maintainers' (vs 'inactive/low maintainers') by 62%. 'Sport pattern' showed stronger reductions in mortality for cardiovascular disease and CHD deaths among sport maintainers, than the single time point measures. CONCLUSIONS: PA patterns demonstrated a stronger association with a number of anthropometric and mortality outcomes than the single time-point measures. Operationalising PA as a sustained behavioural pattern may address some of the known under-estimation of risk for poor health in PA self-report measurements and better reflect exposure for epidemiological analysis of risk of health outcomes.  
  Address Copenhagen Center for Preventive Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen Capital Region, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28982371; PMCID:PMC5629749 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1880  
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Author Brumpton, B.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.; Chen, Y.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title General and abdominal obesity and incident asthma in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 41 Issue 2 Pages 323-329  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*complications/*epidemiology; Body Mass Index; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Models, Statistical; Norway; Obesity/*complications/*epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Smoking; Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract Measures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference define general obesity and abdominal obesity respectively. While high BMI has been established as a risk factor for asthma in adults, waist circumference has seldom been investigated. To determine the association between BMI, waist circumference and incident asthma in adults, we conducted a prospective study (n=23,245) in a population living in Nord-Trondelag, Norway in 1995-2008. Baseline BMI and waist circumference were measured and categorised as general obesity (BMI >/=30.0 kg.m(2)) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference >/=88 cm in females and >/=102 cm in males). Incident asthma was self-reported new-onset cases during an 11-yr follow-up period. Odds ratios for asthma associated with obesity were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. General obesity was a risk factor for asthma in females (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.52-2.52) and males (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.30-2.59). In females, after additional adjustment for BMI, abdominal obesity remained a risk factor for asthma development (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.04-2.05). Abdominal obesity seems to increase the risk of incident asthma in females in addition to BMI, indicating that using both measures of BMI and waist circumference in females may be a superior clinical assessment for asthma risk than any measure alone.  
  Address Dept. of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. ben.brumpton@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22653771 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1461  
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Author Chau, J.Y.; Grunseit, A.; Midthjell, K.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A.E.; van der Ploeg, H.P. url  doi
  Title Cross-sectional associations of total sitting and leisure screen time with cardiometabolic risk in adults. Results from the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport / Sports Medicine Australia Abbreviated Journal J Sci Med Sport  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 78-84  
  Keywords BMI; CMD; Cardiovascular diseases; Epidemiology; GGT; HDL; HUNT; Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway (HelseUndersøkelsen i Nord-Trøndelag); Physical activity; Sedentary lifestyle; WC; body mass index; cardiometabolic disease; gamma glutamyltransferase; high density lipoprotein; waist circumference  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine associations of total sitting time, TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use with cardiometabolic risk biomarkers in adults. DESIGN: Population based cross-sectional study. METHODS: Waist circumference, BMI, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, blood pressure, non-fasting glucose, gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) and triglycerides were measured in 48,882 adults aged 20 years or older from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Adjusted multiple regression models were used to test for associations between these biomarkers and self-reported total sitting time, TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use in the whole sample and by cardiometabolic disease status sub-groups. RESULTS: In the whole sample, reporting total sitting time >/=10 h/day was associated with poorer BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, non-fasting glucose, GGT and triglyceride levels compared to those reporting total sitting time <4h/day (all p<0.05). TV-viewing >/=4 h/day was associated with poorer BMI, waist circumference, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, GGT and triglycerides compared to TV-viewing <1h/day (all p<0.05). Leisure-time computer use >/=1 h/day was associated with poorer BMI, total cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, GGT and triglycerides compared with those reporting no leisure-time computing. Sub-group analyses by cardiometabolic disease status showed similar patterns in participants free of cardiometabolic disease, while similar albeit non-significant patterns were observed in those with cardiometabolic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Total sitting time, TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use are associated with poorer cardiometabolic risk profiles in adults. Reducing sedentary behaviour throughout the day and limiting TV-viewing and leisure-time computer use may have health benefits.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia; Department of Public and Occupational Health, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1878-1861 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23619159 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1496  
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Author Cuypers, K.; De Ridder, K.; Kvaloy, K.; Knudtsen, M.S.; Krokstad, S.; Holmen, J.; Holmen, T.L. url  doi
  Title Leisure time activities in adolescence in the presence of susceptibility genes for obesity: risk or resilience against overweight in adulthood? The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 820  
  Keywords Adolescent; Body Mass Index; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics; Genotype; Humans; *Leisure Activities; Male; Norway; Obesity/*genetics/*prevention & control; Overweight/genetics/prevention & control; Population Surveillance; Questionnaires; Waist Circumference/physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Environment, health behavior, and genetic background are important in the development of obesity. Adolescents spend substantial part of daily leisure time on cultural and social activities, but knowledge about the effects of participation in such activities on weight is limited. METHODS: A number of 1450 adolescents from the Norwegian HUNT study (1995-97) were followed-up in 2006-08 as young adults. Phenotypic data on lifestyle and anthropometric measures were assessed using questionnaires and standardized clinical examinations. Genotypic information on 12 established obesity-susceptibility loci were available for analyses. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the associations between cultural and social activities in adolescence and adiposity measures in young adulthood. In addition, interaction effects of a genetic predisposition score by leisure time activities were tested. RESULTS: In girls, participation in cultural activities was negatively associated with waist circumference (WC) (B = -0.04, 95%CI: -0.08 to -0.00) and with waist-hip ratio (WHR) (B = -0.058, 95%CI: -0.11 to -0.01). However, participation in social activities was positively associated with WC (B = 0.040, CI: 0.00 to 0.08) in girls and with BMI (B = 0.027, CI: 0.00 to 0.05) in boys. The effect of the obesity-susceptibility genetic variants on anthropometric measures was lower in adolescents with high participation in cultural activities compared to adolescents with low participation. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the effects of cultural activities on body fat are different from the effects of participation in social activities. The protective influence of cultural activities in female adolescents against overweight in adulthood and their moderating effect on obesity-susceptibility genes suggest that even cultural activities may be useful in public health strategies against obesity.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian, University of Science and Technology, Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway. koenraad.cuypers@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22998931; PMC3491037 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1511  
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Author Egan, K.B.; Ettinger, A.S.; DeWan, A.T.; Holford, T.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Bracken, M.B. url  doi
  Title General, but not abdominal, overweight increases odds of asthma among Norwegian adolescents: the Young-HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Acta Paediatrica (Oslo, Norway : 1992) Abbreviated Journal Acta Paediatr  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Young-HUNT; HUNT2; Adolescents; Asthma; Body mass index; Obesity; Overweight; Waist circumference  
  Abstract AIM: The aim of this analysis was to examine the association between asthma and general and abdominal weight status, defined by age- and sex-specific cut-offs for body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in adolescents. METHODS: Participants aged 12-19 years in the Young-HUNT (YH) Study (YH1 1995-1997: n = 8222; YH3 2006-2008: n = 7403) completed self-administered questionnaires in school as part of a series of cross-sectional, population-based studies conducted in Nord-Trondelag, Norway. Weight, height and WC were measured. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) for asthma, defined by self-reported physician diagnosis, were calculated. Potential effect modifiers evaluated included sex and pubertal development status (PDS). RESULTS: Asthma was reported by 11.8% of the adolescents in YH1 and 17.0% in YH3. Asthma odds significantly increased for adolescents with general (OR = 1.33; 95%CI: 1.13, 1.56), but not abdominal, overweight and increased for adolescents with general (OR = 1.34; 95%CI: 1.02, 1.75) or abdominal obesity (OR = 1.36; 95%CI: 1.16, 1.60). Underweight had no association with asthma regardless of weight assessment type, and PDS did not meaningfully influence the associations between asthma and weight. CONCLUSION: Overweight and obesity both increased the odds of asthma in 12-19 year-old Norwegians. WC did not add further information to that already provided by BMI to improve our understanding of the association between asthma and weight.  
  Address Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA; Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, New Haven, CT, USA; Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0803-5253 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25131148 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1639  
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Author Egan, K.B.; Ettinger, A.S.; DeWan, A.T.; Holford, T.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Bracken, M.B. url  doi
  Title Longitudinal associations between asthma and general and abdominal weight status among Norwegian adolescents and young adults: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Pediatr Obes Abbreviated Journal Pediatric obesity  
  Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages 345-352  
  Keywords Adiposity; Adolescent; Adult; Asthma/epidemiology/etiology/*physiopathology; Body Mass Index; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity, Abdominal/complications/epidemiology/*physiopathology; Odds Ratio; Overweight; Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: In adolescents the temporal directionality to the asthma and adiposity association remains unclear. Asthma may be a consequence of obesity; however, asthma may increase adiposity. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess the associations between (i) baseline weight status and subsequent asthma and (ii) baseline asthma and subsequent weight status after 4 and 11 years of follow-up (N = 1543 and N = 1596, respectively) using data from three, sequentially enrolled population-based surveys of Norwegians aged 12-30 years from 1995 to 2008. METHODS: Weight status was defined as general (body mass index) or abdominal (waist circumference) underweight, normal weight, overweight or obesity. Self-report physician-diagnosed asthma defined asthma status. RESULTS: Over the longitudinal 11-year follow-up, baseline generally overweight or abdominally obese adolescents had increased risk of asthma. Likewise, baseline asthmatics had increased risk of general overweight or abdominal obesity. After sex stratification, these associations were stronger in males. Generally (odds ratio [OR] 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.32, 2.73) or abdominally (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.13, 2.44) overweight males were at increased risk of asthma. Baseline asthmatic males were also at increased risk of general (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.54, 2.98) and abdominal (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.27, 2.47) overweight. CONCLUSIONS: Among Norwegian adolescents, a bidirectional association of asthma and adiposity was observed in males. Each baseline condition increased the risk of the other condition over time. No association was observed in females.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA.Center Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Egan, K BEttinger, A SDeWan, A THolford, T RHolmen, T LBracken, M BengResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tEngland2014/11/19 06:00Pediatr Obes. 2015 Oct;10(5):345-52. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.271. Epub 2014 Nov 18. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Egan2015 Serial 1803  
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Author Graff, M.; Scott, R.A.; Justice, A.E.; Young, K.L.; Feitosa, M.F.; Barata, L.; Winkler, T.W.; Chu, A.Y.; Mahajan, A.; Hadley, D.; Xue, L.; Workalemahu, T.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; den Hoed, M.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Qi, Q.; Ngwa, J.S.; Renstrom, F.; Quaye, L.; Eicher, J.D.; Hayes, J.E.; Cornelis, M.; Kutalik, Z.; Lim, E.; Luan, J.'an; Huffman, J.E.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, W.; Griffin, P.J.; Haller, T.; Ahmad, S.; Marques-Vidal, P.M.; Bien, S.; Yengo, L.; Teumer, A.; Smith, A.V.; Kumari, M.; Harder, M.N.; Justesen, J.M.; Kleber, M.E.; Hollensted, M.; Lohman, K.; Rivera, N.V.; Whitfield, J.B.; Zhao, J.H.; Stringham, H.M.; Lyytikainen, L.-P.; Huppertz, C.; Willemsen, G.; Peyrot, W.J.; Wu, Y.; Kristiansson, K.; Demirkan, A.; Fornage, M.; Hassinen, M.; Bielak, L.F.; Cadby, G.; Tanaka, T.; Magi, R.; van der Most, P.J.; Jackson, A.U.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Vitart, V.; Marten, J.; Navarro, P.; Bellis, C.; Pasko, D.; Johansson, A.; Snitker, S.; Cheng, Y.-C.; Eriksson, J.; Lim, U.; Aadahl, M.; Adair, L.S.; Amin, N.; Balkau, B.; Auvinen, J.; Beilby, J.; Bergman, R.N.; Bergmann, S.; Bertoni, A.G.; Blangero, J.; Bonnefond, A.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Borja, J.B.; Brage, S.; Busonero, F.; Buyske, S.; Campbell, H.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Corre, T.; Smith, G.D.; Delgado, G.E.; Dueker, N.; Dorr, M.; Ebeling, T.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Esko, T.; Faul, J.D.; Fu, M.; Faerch, K.; Gieger, C.; Glaser, S.; Gong, J.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Grallert, H.; Grammer, T.B.; Grarup, N.; van Grootheest, G.; Harald, K.; Hastie, N.D.; Havulinna, A.S.; Hernandez, D.; Hindorff, L.; Hocking, L.J.; Holmens, O.L.; Holzapfel, C.; Hottenga, J.J.; Huang, J.; Huang, T.; Hui, J.; Huth, C.; Hutri-Kahonen, N.; James, A.L.; Jansson, J.-O.; Jhun, M.A.; Juonala, M.; Kinnunen, L.; Koistinen, H.A.; Kolcic, I.; Komulainen, P.; Kuusisto, J.; Kvaloy, K.; Kahonen, M.; Lakka, T.A.; Launer, L.J.; Lehne, B.; Lindgren, C.M.; Lorentzon, M.; Luben, R.; Marre, M.; Milaneschi, Y.; Monda, K.L.; Montgomery, G.W.; De Moor, M.H.M.; Mulas, A.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Musk, A.W.; Mannikko, R.; Mannisto, S.; Narisu, N.; Nauck, M.; Nettleton, J.A.; Nolte, I.M.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Olden, M.; Ong, K.K.; Padmanabhan, S.; Paternoster, L.; Perez, J.; Perola, M.; Peters, A.; Peters, U.; Peyser, P.A.; Prokopenko, I.; Puolijoki, H.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rankinen, T.; Rasmussen-Torvik, L.J.; Rawal, R.; Ridker, P.M.; Rose, L.M.; Rudan, I.; Sarti, C.; Sarzynski, M.A.; Savonen, K.; Scott, W.R.; Sanna, S.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Sidney, S.; Silbernagel, G.; Smith, B.H.; Smith, J.A.; Snieder, H.; Stancakova, A.; Sternfeld, B.; Swift, A.J.; Tammelin, T.; Tan, S.-T.; Thorand, B.; Thuillier, D.; Vandenput, L.; Vestergaard, H.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vohl, M.-C.; Volker, U.; Waeber, G.; Walker, M.; Wild, S.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zillikens, M.C.; Zubair, N.; Haiman, C.A.; Lemarchand, L.; Gyllensten, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Hofman, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Perusse, L.; Wilson, J.F.; Hayward, C.; Polasek, O.; Cucca, F.; Hveem, K.; Hartman, C.A.; Tonjes, A.; Bandinelli, S.; Palmer, L.J.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Rauramaa, R.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Salomaa, V.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.; Lehtimaki, T.; Mangino, M.; Laakso, M.; Bouchard, C.; Martin, N.G.; Kuh, D.; Liu, Y.; Linneberg, A.; Marz, W.; Strauch, K.; Kivimaki, M.; Harris, T.B.; Gudnason, V.; Volzke, H.; Qi, L.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Chambers, J.C.; Kooner, J.S.; Froguel, P.; Kooperberg, C.; Vollenweider, P.; Hallmans, G.; Hansen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Metspalu, A.; Wareham, N.J.; Langenberg, C.; Weir, D.R.; Porteous, D.J.; Boerwinkle, E.; Chasman, D.I.; Abecasis, G.R.; Barroso, I.; McCarthy, M.I.; Frayling, T.M.; O'Connell, J.R.; van Duijn, C.M.; Boehnke, M.; Heid, I.M.; Mohlke, K.L.; Strachan, D.P.; Fox, C.S.; Liu, C.-T.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Klein, R.J.; Johnson, A.D.; Borecki, I.B.; Franks, P.W.; North, K.E.; Cupples, L.A.; Loos, R.J.F.; Kilpelainen, T.O. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity – A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults Type Meta-Analysis
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS Genetics Abbreviated Journal PLoS Genet  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages e1006528  
  Keywords Adiposity/*genetics/physiology; Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; Epigenomics; *Exercise; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Male; Obesity/*genetics/physiopathology; Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.  
  Address The Department of Preventive Medicine, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States of America  
  Corporate Author PAGE Consortium Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1553-7390 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28448500; PMCID:PMC5407576 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1909  
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Author Lin, Y.; Ness-Jensen, E.; Hveem, K.; Lagergren, J.; Lu, Y. url  doi
  Title Metabolic syndrome and esophageal and gastric cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Cancer Causes Control Abbreviated Journal Cancer causes & control  
  Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 1825-1834  
  Keywords HUNT3; Adenocarcinoma/epidemiology/*etiology; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/epidemiology/*etiology; Cohort Studies; Esophageal Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Female; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome X/*complications; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Stomach Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Waist Circumference/physiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The role of the metabolic syndrome in the etiology of esophageal and gastric cancer is unclear. METHODS: This was a large nationwide cohort study based on data from 11 prospective population-based cohorts in Norway with long-term follow-up, the Cohort of Norway (CONOR) and the third Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3). The metabolic syndrome was assessed by objective anthropometric and metabolic biochemical measures and was defined by the presence of at least three of the following five factors: increased waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension and high glucose. Newly diagnosed cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and gastric adenocarcinoma were identified from the Norwegian Cancer Registry. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for potential confounders. RESULT: Among 192,903 participants followed up for an average of 10.6 years, 62 developed esophageal adenocarcinoma, 64 had esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and 373 had gastric adenocarcinoma. The metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma (HR 1.44, 95 % CI 1.14-1.82), but not associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR 1.32, 95 % CI 0.77-2.26) or esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (HR 1.08, 95 % CI 0.64-1.83). Increased waist circumference was associated with an increased HR of esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR 2.48, 95 % CI 1.27-4.85). No significant association was found between any single component of the metabolic syndrome and risk of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma. High waist circumference (HR 1.71, 95 % CI 1.05-2.80), hypertension (HR 2.41, 95 % CI 1.44-4.03) and non-fasting glucose (HR 1.74, 95 % CI 1.18-2.56) were also related to an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in women, but not in men. CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in women. Of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome, high waist circumference was positively associated with risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Positive associations were also observed for women between high waist circumference, hypertension, high non-fasting glucose and risk of gastric adenocarcinoma. However, further evidence is warranted due to the limited number of cases and the inability to effectively identify gastric cardia adenocarcinoma.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Lin, YulanNess-Jensen, EivindHveem, KristianLagergren, JesperLu, YunxiaengNetherlands2015/10/10 06:00Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Dec;26(12):1825-34. doi: 10.1007/s10552-015-0675-4. Epub 2015 Oct 8. Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Lin2015 Serial 1840  
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Author Mai, X.-M.; Chen, Y.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title Cross-sectional and prospective cohort study of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and obesity in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 175 Issue 10 Pages 1029-1036  
  Keywords Adult; Biological Markers/blood; Body Mass Index; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Hydroxycholecalciferols/blood/*deficiency; Incidence; Linear Models; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/blood/epidemiology/*etiology; Odds Ratio; Prevalence; Prospective Studies; Vitamin D Deficiency/blood/*complications; Waist Circumference  
  Abstract Experimental studies suggest that vitamin D modulates the activity of adipocytes. The authors examined baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level in relation to prevalent and cumulative incident obesity in Norway. A cohort of 25,616 adults aged 19-55 years participated in both the second and third surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008)). Serum 25(OH)D levels measured at baseline and anthropometric measurements taken at both baseline and follow-up were available for a random sample of 2,460 subjects. Overall, 40% of the 2,460 subjects had a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L, and 37% had a level of 50.0-74.9 nmol/L. The prevalence and cumulative incidence of obesity, defined as body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) >/=30, were 12% and 15%, respectively. Lower serum 25(OH)D level was associated with a higher prevalence of obesity. In the 2,165 subjects with baseline BMI less than 30, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was associated with a significantly increased odds ratio for incident obesity during follow-up (adjusted odds ratio = 1.73, 95% confidence interval: 1.24, 2.41). When prevalent and incident obesity were classified according to waist circumference (>/=88 cm for women, >/=102 cm for men), similar results were obtained. In addition to prevalent obesity, a serum 25(OH)D level less than 50.0 nmol/L was significantly associated with new-onset obesity in adults.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. xiao-mei.mai@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22312120 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1551  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Myklestad, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Magnussen, E.B.; Salvesen, K.A.; Smith, G.D.; Romundstad, P.R. url  doi
  Title Offspring birth weight and cardiovascular risk in parents: a population-based HUNT 2 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 175 Issue 6 Pages 546-555  
  Keywords Adult; *Birth Weight; Blood Glucose/metabolism; Blood Pressure; Body Mass Index; Cardiovascular Diseases/*genetics; Female; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; *Infant, Low Birth Weight; Infant, Newborn; Lipids/blood; Male; Models, Statistical; Norway; *Parents; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Waist Circumference  
  Abstract Low birth weight is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in later life. The fetal insulin hypothesis suggests that shared genetic factors partly explain this association. If fetal genes predispose to both low birth weight and cardiovascular disease in adulthood, fathers of offspring with low birth weight should display an unfavorable profile of cardiovascular risk factors. To study this, the authors linked data on more than 14,000 parents, collected from the second Health Study of Nord Trondelag County, Norway (HUNT 2, 1995-1997), to offspring data from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry (1967-2005). Linear regression was used to study associations of offspring birth weight for gestational age with the parents' body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, and serum lipids. All analyses were adjusted for shared environment by means of the socioeconomic measures, lifestyle, and cardiovascular risk factors of the partner. The authors found that low offspring birth weight for gestational age was associated with increased paternal blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and unfavorable levels of glucose and lipids. For mothers, associations similar to those for fathers were found for blood pressure, whereas associations in the opposite direction were found for glucose, lipids, and body mass index. The paternal findings strengthen the genetic hypothesis.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norways. kirsti.myklestad@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22328703 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1556  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rangul, V.; Bauman, A.; Holmen, T.L.; Midthjell, K. url  doi
  Title Is physical activity maintenance from adolescence to young adulthood associated with reduced CVD risk factors, improved mental health and satisfaction with life: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 9 Issue Pages 144  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Blood Pressure; Body Composition; Body Mass Index; Cardiovascular Diseases/*prevention & control; Cholesterol, HDL/blood; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Status; Health Surveys; Humans; *Life Style; Linear Models; Logistic Models; Longitudinal Studies; Male; *Mental Health; *Motor Activity; Norway; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Self Report; Triglycerides/blood; Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effect maintaining physical activity throughout adolescence has on cardiovascular risk factors and health status in early adulthood. This ten-year prospective longitudinal study investigated whether differences in physical activity patterns from adolescence to young-adulthood showed different associations with subsequent cardio-metabolic risk factors and mental health in young-adulthood. METHODS: Based on the second and third Norwegian Nord-Trondelag Health Surveys (HUNT2 and 3), we included 1869 individuals (838 males) participating in Young-HUNT (1995-97), aged 13-19 years and followed-up at HUNT3 (2006-08), aged 23-31. Self-reported physical activity (PA), mental health and perceived health were recorded, along with measurements of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, glucose, triglycerides, resting heart rate (HR) and blood pressure. We used separate linear regressions models to investigate associations between physical activity and each CVD risk factor, and logistic regression analysis to examine PA patterns and subsequent mental health. Physically active maintainers were compared to inactive maintainers. Adopters (inactive as adolescents and physically active as young adults) were compared to inactive maintainers and to those who discontinued activity (relapsers). RESULTS: Active maintainers had significantly lower HR, compared to all other PA patterns. Active maintaining men had significantly lower WC than relapsers and inactive maintainers. When adjusted for age and gender, WC, BMI, HR, diastolic blood pressure and HDL-C showed significant differences comparing active maintaining to other PA patterns. Comparing inactive maintainers against adopters, only HR was significantly lower. Male adopters did not differ significantly in CVD risk compared to inactive maintainers and relapsers. Among females adopting was associated with lower HR and TC compared to inactive maintainers. Active maintainers showed better mental health than inactive maintainers. Active maintaining males had an increased likelihood of good mental health compared to adopters. Active maintaining females reported greater satisfaction with life compared to adopters. CONCLUSIONS: Those who maintained their physical activity from adolescence to young adulthood demonstrated a significantly lower CVD risk and better mental health, compared to inactive maintainers. Compared to inactivity maintainers and relapsers, adopting physical activity was not significantly associated with lowered CVD risk. Adopting physical activity between adolescence and young adulthood may not necessarily protect against mental distress.  
  Address Nord-Trondelag University College, Levanger, Norway. vegar.rangul@hint.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23241306; PMC3541207 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1568  
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Author Snekvik, I.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV Abbreviated Journal J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol  
  Volume 32 Issue 5 Pages 776-782  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Angina Pectoris/epidemiology; *Body Mass Index; C-Reactive Protein/*metabolism; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Overweight/epidemiology; Psoriasis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Severity of Illness Index; *Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Studies have examined the associations between psoriasis and cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors, but the results are conflicting, especially in the general population. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association of psoriasis, and in particular psoriasis severity, with objectively measured cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity in a large population-based cross-sectional study. METHODS: We linked data on 50 245 persons in the HUNT3 Study, Norway, with information from the National Prescription Database to obtain information on use of psoriasis medication. A total of 2894 persons reported to have psoriasis; 2643 were classified as mild; and 251 as moderate/severe psoriasis. We used linear and logistic regression to estimate adjusted associations with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors and morbidity. RESULTS: We observed a positive association between psoriasis and objective measures of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, but no clear association with blood pressure and blood lipids. People with moderate/severe psoriasis had an odds ratio for being overweight of 1.94 (95% CI 1.42, 2.67), whereas the odds ratio for metabolic syndrome was 1.91 (95% CI 1.47, 2.49). Psoriasis was also positively associated with self-reported diabetes, myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study, we found that psoriasis was positively associated with measures of adiposity, as well as with a clustering of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Overall, these associations were strongest for people with moderate/severe psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0926-9959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29397035 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2155  
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Author Snekvik, I.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV Abbreviated Journal J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol  
  Volume 32 Issue 5 Pages 776-782  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Angina Pectoris/epidemiology; *Body Mass Index; C-Reactive Protein/*metabolism; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology; Female; Humans; Male; Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Overweight/epidemiology; Psoriasis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Severity of Illness Index; *Waist Circumference; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Studies have examined the associations between psoriasis and cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors, but the results are conflicting, especially in the general population. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association of psoriasis, and in particular psoriasis severity, with objectively measured cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular morbidity in a large population-based cross-sectional study. METHODS: We linked data on 50 245 persons in the HUNT3 Study, Norway, with information from the National Prescription Database to obtain information on use of psoriasis medication. A total of 2894 persons reported to have psoriasis; 2643 were classified as mild; and 251 as moderate/severe psoriasis. We used linear and logistic regression to estimate adjusted associations with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease risk factors and morbidity. RESULTS: We observed a positive association between psoriasis and objective measures of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, but no clear association with blood pressure and blood lipids. People with moderate/severe psoriasis had an odds ratio for being overweight of 1.94 (95% CI 1.42, 2.67), whereas the odds ratio for metabolic syndrome was 1.91 (95% CI 1.47, 2.49). Psoriasis was also positively associated with self-reported diabetes, myocardial infarction and angina pectoris. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study, we found that psoriasis was positively associated with measures of adiposity, as well as with a clustering of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Overall, these associations were strongest for people with moderate/severe psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0926-9959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29397035 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2167  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Snekvik, I.; Smith, C.H.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Langan, S.M.; Modalsli, E.H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Obesity, Waist Circumference, Weight Change, and Risk of Incident Psoriasis: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Investigative Dermatology Abbreviated Journal J Invest Dermatol  
  Volume 137 Issue 12 Pages 2484-2490  
  Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Obesity/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Psoriasis/complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; *Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Although psoriasis has been associated with obesity, there are few prospective studies with objective measures. We prospectively examined the effect of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, and 10-year weight change on the risk of developing psoriasis among 33,734 people in the population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (i.e., HUNT), Norway. During follow-up, 369 incident psoriasis cases occurred. Relative risk (RR) of psoriasis was estimated by Cox regression. One standard deviation higher body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-hip ratio gave RRs of 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.34), 1.26 (95% CI = 1.15-1.39), and 1.18 (95% CI = 1.07-1.31), respectively. Compared with normal weight participants, obese people had an RR of 1.87 (95% CI = 1.38-2.52), whereas comparing the fourth with the first quartile of waist circumference gave an RR of 1.95 (95% CI = 1.46-2.61). One standard deviation higher weight change gave an RR of 1.20 (95% CI = 1.07-1.35), and people who increased their body weight by 10 kg or more had an RR of 1.72 (95% CI = 1.15-2.58) compared with being weight stable. In conclusion, obesity and high abdominal fat mass doubles the risk of psoriasis, and long-term weight gain substantially increases psoriasis risk. Preventing weight gain and promoting maintenance of a normal body weight could reduce incidence of psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Dermatology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway; Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-202X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28780086 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1988  
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