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Author Folling, I.S.; Kulseng, B.; Midthjell, K.; Rangul, V.; Helvik, A.-S. url  doi
  Title Individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes invited to a lifestyle program: characteristics of participants versus non-participants (the HUNT Study) and 24-month follow-up of participants (the VEND-RISK Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care  
  Volume 5 Issue 1 Pages e000368  
  Keywords Findrisc; lifestyle programme; non-participants; primary health care; type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus is possible through lifestyle programs, but the effect depends on the program's content, resources, and setting. Lifestyle programs are often confronted with high rates of non-participation and attrition. This study invited individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes to a lifestyle program in the Norwegian primary healthcare setting. The aims were to investigate possible differences in characteristics between participants and non-participants and to study the effect of the lifestyle program at 24-month follow-up for participants. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Individuals identified at high risk for type 2 diabetes during the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3) from two municipalities (n=332) were invited to a lifestyle program (the VEND-RISK Study). A cross-sectional design was used to explore if the participants' characteristics differed from non-participants. A non-randomized, single-arm, pre-post examination was used to examine the effect of the lifestyle program on participants' characteristics at 24-month follow-up. RESULTS: Of all individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes invited to the lifestyle program, 86% (287/332) declined to participate. Non-participating women had fewer years of education (p<0.001), compared with participating women. For men, no differences were seen between non-participants and participants. Among all participants (n=45) at 24-month follow-up, none had developed type 2 diabetes, and HbA1c (p<0.001) had decreased significantly. There was a small reduction in mean body mass index from baseline to 24 months that was not statistically significant. For women, waist circumference (-4.0 cm, p<0.001) decreased significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Future research regarding individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes in the primary healthcare lifestyle program should focus on how to promote recruitment of women with low education. Participants attending this study's lifestyle program improved their cardiometabolic markers. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT01135901; Results.  
  Address St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2052-4897 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28878932; PMCID:PMC5574427 Approved no  
  Call Number (down) HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1899  
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Author Jolle, A.; Asvold, B.O.; Holmen, J.; Carlsen, S.M.; Tuomilehto, J.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Midthjell, K. url  doi
  Title Basic lifestyle advice to individuals at high risk of type 2 diabetes: a 2-year population-based diabetes prevention study. The DE-PLAN intervention in the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages e000509  
  Keywords lifestyle change(s); prevention; screening; type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract Objective: Among individuals at high risk for diabetes identified through a population survey, we performed an intervention study with basic lifestyle advice aiming to prevent diabetes. Research design and methods: Among 50 806 participants in the HUNT3 Survey (2006-2008), 5297 individuals with Finnish Diabetes Risc Score (FINDRISC >/=15 were invited to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and an education session with lifestyle advice, and 2634 (49.7%) attended. Among them, 2380 people without diabetes were included in the prevention study with repeated examinations and education sessions after 6, 12, and 24 months. We examined participation, diabetes incidence, glycemia, and adiposity during follow-up. Results: Of 2380 participants, 1212 (50.9%) participated in >/=3 of the four examinations. Diabetes was detected in 3.5%, 3.1%, and 4.0% of individuals at the 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month examinations, respectively, indicating a 10.3% 2-year diabetes incidence. Mean (95% CI) increases from baseline to 2-year follow-up were 0.30 (0.29 to 0.32) percentage points (3.3 (3.2 to 3.5) mmol/mol) for Hemoglobin A1c, 0.13 (0.10 to 0.16) mmol/L for fasting serum-glucose, 0.46 (0.36 to 0.56) mmol/L for 2-hour OGTT s-glucose, 0.30 (0.19 to 0.40) kg/m(2) forbody mass index (BMI) (all p<0.001) and -0.5 (-0.9 to -0.2) cm for waist circumference (p=0.004), with broadly similar estimates by baseline age, sex, education, depressive symptoms, BMI, physical activity, and family history of diabetes. Only 206 (8.7%) participants had evidence of >5% weight loss during follow-up; their fasting and 2-hour s-glucose did not increase, and HbA1c increased less than in other participants. Conclusion: Basic lifestyle advice given to high-risk individuals during three group sessions with 6-month intervals was not effective in reducing 2-year diabetes risk.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2052-4897 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29765613; PMCID:PMC5950645 Approved no  
  Call Number (down) HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2107  
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Author Heuch, I.; Heuch, I.; Hagen, K.; Sorgjerd, E.P.; Asvold, B.O.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Is chronic low back pain a risk factor for diabetes? The Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care  
  Volume 6 Issue 1 Pages e000569  
  Keywords Hunt; cohort; diabetes; low back pain; musculoskeletal disorder  
  Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the risk of diabetes associated with the presence or absence of chronic low back pain, considering both cross-sectional and cohort data. Research design and methods: Analyses were based on the Norwegian HUNT2 and HUNT3 surveys of Nord-Trondelag County. The prevalence of diabetes was compared in groups with and without chronic low back pain among 45 157 participants aged 30-69 years. Associations between low back pain at baseline and risk of diabetes were examined in an 11-year follow-up of 30 380 individuals with no baseline diagnosis of diabetes. The comorbidity between diabetes and low back pain was assessed at the end of follow-up. All analyses were carried out considering generalized linear models incorporating adjustment for other relevant risk factors. Results: Cross-sectional analyses did not reveal any association between low back pain and diabetes. With adjustment for age, body mass index, physical activity and smoking, the cohort study of women showed a significant association between low back pain at baseline and risk of diabetes (RR 1.30; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.54, p=0.003). The association differed between age groups (p=0.015), with a stronger association in relatively young women. In men, no association was found in the whole age range (RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.86 to 1.21, p=0.82). No association was observed between diabetes and chronic low back pain at the end of follow-up. Conclusion: Among younger women, those with chronic low back pain may have an increased risk of diabetes.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2052-4897 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30397493; PMCID:PMC6203062 Approved no  
  Call Number (down) HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2097  
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