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Author Asvold, B.O.; Midthjell, K.; Krokstad, S.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Prolonged sitting may increase diabetes risk in physically inactive individuals: an 11 year follow-up of the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 60 Issue 5 Pages (down) 830-835  
  Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology/metabolism; Exercise/physiology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Epidemiology; Sedentary lifestyle; Type 2 diabetes mellitus  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We examined the association between sitting time and diabetes incidence, overall and by strata of leisure-time physical activity and BMI. METHODS: We followed 28,051 adult participants of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a population-based study, for diabetes incidence from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 and estimated HRs of any diabetes by categories of self-reported total daily sitting time at baseline. RESULTS: Of 28,051 participants, 1253 (4.5%) developed diabetes during 11 years of follow-up. Overall, sitting >/=8 h/day was associated with a 17% (95% CI 2, 34) higher risk of developing diabetes compared with sitting </=4 h/day, adjusted for age, sex and education. However, the association was attenuated to a non-significant 9% (95% CI -5, 26) increase in risk after adjustment for leisure-time physical activity and BMI. The association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by leisure-time physical activity (p Interaction = 0.01). Among participants with low leisure-time physical activity (</=2 h light activity per week and no vigorous activity), sitting 5-7 h/day and >/=8 h/day were associated with a 26% (95% CI 2, 57) and 30% (95% CI 5, 61) higher risk of diabetes, respectively, compared with sitting </=4 h/day. There was no corresponding association among participants with high leisure-time physical activity (>/=3 h light activity or >0 h vigorous activity per week). There was no statistical evidence that the association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by obesity (p Interaction = 0.65). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that total sitting time has little association with diabetes risk in the population as a whole, but prolonged sitting may contribute to an increased diabetes risk among physically inactive people.  
  Address School of Public Health, Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia  
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  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28054097 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1879  
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Author Hjort, R.; Ahlqvist, E.; Carlsson, P.-O.; Grill, V.; Groop, L.; Martinell, M.; Rasouli, B.; Rosengren, A.; Tuomi, T.; Asvold, B.O.; Carlsson, S. url  doi
  Title Overweight, obesity and the risk of LADA: results from a Swedish case-control study and the Norwegian HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 61 Issue 6 Pages (down) 1333-1343  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Autoantibodies/blood; Body Mass Index; Case-Control Studies; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology; Female; Humans; Insulin Resistance; Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism; Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults/*complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*complications/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Overweight/*complications/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sweden; Young Adult; *Andis; *ANDiU; *Body mass index; *Case-control study; *Estrid; *HUNT Study; *Lada; *Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults; *Prospective study; *Type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Excessive weight is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but its role in the promotion of autoimmune diabetes is not clear. We investigated the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) in relation to overweight/obesity in two large population-based studies. METHODS: Analyses were based on incident cases of LADA (n = 425) and type 2 diabetes (n = 1420), and 1704 randomly selected control participants from a Swedish case-control study and prospective data from the Norwegian HUNT Study including 147 people with LADA and 1,012,957 person-years of follow-up (1984-2008). We present adjusted ORs and HRs with 95% CI. RESULTS: In the Swedish data, obesity was associated with an increased risk of LADA (OR 2.93, 95% CI 2.17, 3.97), which was even stronger for type 2 diabetes (OR 18.88, 95% CI 14.29, 24.94). The association was stronger in LADA with low GAD antibody (GADA; <median) (OR 4.25; 95% CI 2.76, 6.52) but present also in LADA with high GADA (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.42, 3.24). In the Swedish data, obese vs normal weight LADA patients had lower GADA levels, better beta cell function, and were more likely to have low-risk HLA-genotypes. The combination of overweight and family history of diabetes (FHD) conferred an OR of 4.57 (95% CI 3.27, 6.39) for LADA and 24.51 (95% CI 17.82, 33.71) for type 2 diabetes. Prospective data from HUNT indicated even stronger associations; HR for LADA was 6.07 (95% CI 3.76, 9.78) for obesity and 7.45 (95% CI 4.02, 13.82) for overweight and FHD. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Overweight/obesity is associated with increased risk of LADA, particularly when in combination with FHD. These findings support the hypothesis that, even in the presence of autoimmunity, factors linked to insulin resistance, such as excessive weight, could promote onset of diabetes.  
  Address Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 171 77, Stockholm, Sweden  
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  Notes PMID:29589073 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2098  
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Author Sorgjerd, E.P.; Skorpen, F.; Kvaloy, K.; Midthjell, K.; Grill, V. url  doi
  Title Time dynamics of autoantibodies are coupled to phenotypes and add to the heterogeneity of autoimmune diabetes in adults: the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 55 Issue 5 Pages (down) 1310-1318  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Autoantibodies/*blood/*immunology; C-Peptide/blood/immunology; Cation Transport Proteins/immunology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/*blood/genetics/*immunology; Female; Glutamate Decarboxylase/immunology; HLA Antigens/genetics/immunology; Haplotypes; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prediabetic State/blood/genetics/immunology; Prevalence; Receptor-Like Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Class 8/immunology; Risk  
  Abstract AIMS: The aetiology of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), assessed by autoimmune markers, is insufficiently clarified. We cross-sectionally investigated the prevalence and prospectively the prediabetic and postdiabetic presence of antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), insulinoma-associated protein 2 and zinc transporter 8 in LADA and in type 1 diabetes. METHODS: We included 208 'classic' type 1, 161 LADA and 302 type 2 diabetic cases from the second (HUNT2: 1995-1997) and third (HUNT3: 2006-2008) Nord-Trondelag health surveys. Prospective data were available for 59 type 1, 44 LADA and 302 type 2 diabetic cases followed from HUNT2 to HUNT3. From HUNT3, 24 type 1 diabetic and 31 LADA incident cases were available. RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, 90% of LADA cases were positive for only one antibody (10% multiple-antibodypositive). Prospectively, 59% of GADA-positive LADA patients in HUNT2 were no longer positive in HUNT3. LADA patients who became negative possessed less frequently risk HLA haplotypes and were phenotypically more akin to those with type 2 diabetes than to those who stayed positive. Still, those losing positivity differed from those with type 2 diabetes by lower C-peptide levels (p = 0.009). Of incident LADA cases in HUNT3, 64% were already antibody-positive in HUNT2, i.e. before diabetes diagnosis. These incident LADA cases were phenotypically more akin to type 1 diabetes than were those who did not display positivity in HUNT2. CONCLUSION/INTERPRETATION: The pattern of antibodies, the postdiabetic loss or persistence as well as the prediabetic absence or presence of antibodies influence LADA phenotypes. Time-dependent presence or absence of antibodies adds new modalities to the heterogeneity of LADA.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, HUNT Research Centre, Forskningsveien 2, 7600 Levanger, Norway. elin.pettersen@ntnu.no  
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  Notes PMID:22297581 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1579  
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Author Forsen L, Meyer HE, Midthjell K, Edna TH   
  Title Diabetes mellitus and the incidence of hip fracture. Results from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey. Type Journal Article
  Year 1999 Publication Diabetologia 1999 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 42 Issue Pages (down) 920-5.  
  Keywords HUNT1  
  Abstract <p>National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.</p> <h3>Aims/hypotesis:</h3> <p>To study if people with Type I (insulin-dependent) or Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus have increased risk of hip fracture.</p> <h3>Methods:</h3> <p>The study population consisted of 35,444 people 50 years of age and older, attending a health screening in a Norwegian county. They were followed up with respect to hip fracture for 9 years, and 1643 new hip fractures were recorded.</p> <h3>Results:</h3> <p>The relative risk of hip fracture for women with Type I diabetes compared with women without diabetes was 6.9 (95% confidence interval 2.2-21.6) adjusted for age, body mass index and daily smoking. The relative risk for men was nearly the same, but not statistically significant. Among women 50-74 years of age with Type II diabetes for more than 5 years, the relative risk was 1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.9). This increased risk persisted when insulin-treated women were excluded from the analysis. After additional adjustment for possible medical consequences of diabetes (impaired vision, impaired motor abilities and history of stroke) the relative risk among women 50-75 years of age with Type II diabetes was reduced to 1.5 (95% confidence interval 0.9-2.5).</p> <h3>Conclusion/interpretation:</h3> <p>We found an increased risk of hip fracture in women younger than 75 years with Type I diabetes or with Type II diabetes of long duration. In older men, there was an increased risk associated with Type II diabetes of shorter duration. Whether the increased risk is attributed to reduced bone mass or to factors associated with falling has not been determined.</p>  
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  Notes HUNT_ID:142. HUNT1 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 141  
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Author Carlsson S, Midthjell K, Grill V   
  Title Smoking is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes but a decreased risk of autoimmune diabetes in adults: an 11-year follow-up of incidence of diabetes in the Nord-Trøndelag study Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Diabetologia 2004 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 47 Issue Pages (down) 1953-6  
  Keywords HUNT1; HUNT2  
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  Notes HUNT_ID:485. HUNT1, HUNT2 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 470  
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Author Carlsson S, Midthjell K, Tesfamarian MY, Grill V   
  Title Age, overweight and physical inactivity increase the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: results from the Nord-Trøndelag health study Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Diabetologia 2006 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume [Epub ahead of print] Issue Pages (down)  
  Keywords HUNT1; HUNT2  
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  Notes HUNT_ID:779. HUNT1, HUNT2 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 761  
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Author Hertel JK, Johansson S, Raeder H, Midthjell K, Lyssenko V, Groop L, Molven A, Njolstad PR   
  Title Genetic analysis of recently identified type 2 diabetes loci in 1,638 unselected patients with type 2 diabetes and 1,858 control participants from a Norwegian population-based cohort (the HUNT study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Diabetologia 2008 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 51 Issue Pages (down) 971-7  
  Keywords HUNT2  
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  Notes HUNT_ID:945. HUNT2 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 920  
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Author Hildrum B, Mykletun A, Dahl AA, Midthjell K   
  Title Metabolic syndrome and risk of mortality in middle-aged versus elderly individuals: the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Diabetologia 2009 (published online 05 Febr 2009) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (down)  
  Keywords HUNT2  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recent reviews indicate that the metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality, but evidence is scarce in elderly individuals. We therefore examined the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and mortality rates among individuals aged 40-59, 60-74 and 75-89 years. We also examined whether the syndrome was associated with mortality rates over and above the Framingham risk score. METHODS: We studied prospectively 6,748 men and women who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Norway, from 1995 to 1997 (HUNT 2) and defined the metabolic syndrome by the International Diabetes Federation criteria. RESULTS: During 53,617 person-years of follow-up (mean per person, 7.9 years), 955 individuals died, of whom 585 died from cardiovascular disease. Among individuals who were 40-59 years of age at baseline, the presence of the metabolic syndrome was associated with increased relative risk of cardiovascular and total mortality (age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratios 3.97 [95% CI: 2.00-7.88] and 2.06 [1.35-3.13], respectively, equivalent to population-attributable risks of 20.7 and 14.2%, respectively). The Framingham risk score accounted for less than one-third of the effect of metabolic syndrome on mortality rates. After the age of 60 years, the metabolic syndrome was not associated with increased mortality rates. We found a significant interaction between the metabolic syndrome and age on the relative risk of mortality. Results were confirmed in a sub-sample without cardiovascular disease at baseline. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for mortality, over and above the Framingham risk score, in middle-aged, but not in elderly individuals.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title Metabolsk syndrom og risiko for død hos middelaldrende og eldre deltakere i HUNT 2  
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  Notes HUNT_ID:950. HUNT2 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 925  
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Author Olsson L, Pettesen E, Ahlbom A, Carlsson S, Midthjell K, Grill V   
  Title No effect by the common gene variant rs10830963 of the melatonin receptor 1B on the association between sleep disturbances and type 2 diabetes: resuts from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Diabetologia 2011 Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 54 Issue Pages (down) 1375-8  
  Keywords HUNT1; HUNT2  
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  Notes HUNT_ID:1105. HUNT1, HUNT2 Approved no  
  Call Number Serial 1067  
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Author Moe, B.; Augestad, L.B.; Flanders, W.D.; Dalen, H.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title The adverse association of diabetes with risk of first acute myocardial infarction is modified by physical activity and body mass index: prospective data from the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume Issue Pages (down)  
  Keywords HUNT2  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Diabetes increases the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and effective means for primary prevention are warranted. We prospectively examined the joint association of diabetes and leisure-time physical activity, as well as of diabetes and BMI, with the risk of AMI. METHODS: A total of 55,534 men and women in the Norwegian HUNT Study were followed-up for first AMI by hospital admission registries and the Cause of Death Registry. Cox proportional adjusted HRs with 95% CIs were estimated. RESULTS: Overall, 1,887 incident AMIs occurred during 12.3 years. Compared with inactive people without diabetes, inactive people with diabetes had an HR of 2.37 (95% CI 1.58, 3.57), whereas the HR among highly active persons with diabetes was 1.04 (95% CI 0.62, 1.74). Normal-weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m2) persons with diabetes had an HR of 1.60 (95% CI 1.05, 2.44) and obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) persons with diabetes had an HR of 2.55 (95% CI 1.97, 3.29) compared with normal-weight persons without diabetes. The data suggest biological interaction between diabetes and physical activity, with a relative excess risk of inactivity and diabetes of 1.43 (95% CI 0.08, 2.78). For obesity and diabetes, the excess risk due to interaction was smaller (0.67; 95% CI -0.24, 1.58). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Body weight and, in particular, physical activity modified the association between diabetes and risk of first AMI. This highlights the potential importance of physical activity and weight maintenance in primary prevention of AMI among people with diabetes.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491, Trondheim, Norway, borge.moe@ntnu.no  
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  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:25297571 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1654  
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