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Author (up) Cai, Y.; Hansell, A.L.; Blangiardo, M.; Burton, P.R.; de Hoogh, K.; Doiron, D.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; Hveem, K.; Mbatchou, S.; Morley, D.W.; Stolk, R.P.; Zijlema, W.L.; Elliott, P.; Hodgson, S. url  doi
  Title Long-term exposure to road traffic noise, ambient air pollution, and cardiovascular risk factors in the HUNT and lifelines cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume 38 Issue 29 Pages 2290-2296  
  Keywords Air pollution; Blood glucose; Blood lipids; Systemic inflammation; Traffic noise  
  Abstract Aims: Blood biochemistry may provide information on associations between road traffic noise, air pollution, and cardiovascular disease risk. We evaluated this in two large European cohorts (HUNT3, Lifelines). Methods and results: Road traffic noise exposure was modelled for 2009 using a simplified version of the Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe (CNOSSOS-EU). Annual ambient air pollution (PM10, NO2) at residence was estimated for 2007 using a Land Use Regression model. The statistical platform DataSHIELD was used to pool data from 144 082 participants aged >/=20 years to enable individual-level analysis. Generalized linear models were fitted to assess cross-sectional associations between pollutants and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), blood lipids and for (Lifelines only) fasting blood glucose, for samples taken during recruitment in 2006-2013. Pooling both cohorts, an inter-quartile range (IQR) higher day-time noise (5.1 dB(A)) was associated with 1.1% [95% confidence interval (95% CI: 0.02-2.2%)] higher hsCRP, 0.7% (95% CI: 0.3-1.1%) higher triglycerides, and 0.5% (95% CI: 0.3-0.7%) higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL); only the association with HDL was robust to adjustment for air pollution. An IQR higher PM10 (2.0 microg/m3) or NO2 (7.4 microg/m3) was associated with higher triglycerides (1.9%, 95% CI: 1.5-2.4% and 2.2%, 95% CI: 1.6-2.7%), independent of adjustment for noise. Additionally for NO2, a significant association with hsCRP (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.5-3.3%) was seen. In Lifelines, an IQR higher noise (4.2 dB(A)) and PM10 (2.4 microg/m3) was associated with 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.3%) and 0.6% (95% CI: 0.4-0.7%) higher fasting glucose respectively, with both remaining robust to adjustment for air/noise pollution. Conclusion: Long-term exposures to road traffic noise and ambient air pollution were associated with blood biochemistry, providing a possible link between road traffic noise/air pollution and cardio-metabolic disease risk.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, W2 1PG, London, UK  
  Corporate Author BioSHaRE Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28575405 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1895  
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Author (up) Gustad, L.T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.; Dalen, H.; Bjerkeset, O. url  doi
  Title Symptoms of anxiety and depression and risk of acute myocardial infarction: the HUNT 2 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume 35 Issue 21 Pages 1394-1403  
  Keywords HUNT2; Acute myocardial infarction; Anxiety; Depression; Epidemiology; Prospective; Risk  
  Abstract AIMS: The nature of the association of depression and anxiety with risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unclear. We aimed to study the prospective association of single and recurrent self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression with a risk of AMI in a large Norwegian population based cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the second wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995-97) baseline data on anxiety and depression symptoms, sociodemographic variables, health status including cardiovascular risk factors and common chronic disorders were registered for 57,953 adult men and women free of cardiovascular disease. The cohort was followed up during a mean (SD) 11.4 (2.9) years for a first AMI from baseline through 2008. A total of 2111 incident AMIs occurred, either identified at hospitals or by the National Cause of Death Registry. The multi-adjusted hazard ratios were 1.31 (95% CI 1.03-1.66) for symptoms of depression and 1.25 (CI 0.99-1.57) for anxiety. Two episodes of mixed symptoms of anxiety and depression (MSAD), reported 10 years apart, increased the risk for AMI by 52% (11-108%). After exclusion of the first 5 years of follow-up, the association of depression symptoms with AMI risk was attenuated. Relative risk for AMI with anxiety symptoms and MSAD weakened when participants with chronic disorders were excluded. CONCLUSION: Self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety, especially if recurrent, were moderately associated with the risk of incident AMI. We had some indications that these associations might partly reflect reverse causation or confounding from common chronic diseases.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway Department of Research and Development, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24057077; PMC4043317 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1643  
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Author (up) Gustad, L.T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.; Dalen, H.; Bjerkeset, O. url  doi
  Title Symptoms of anxiety and depression and risk of acute myocardial infarction: the HUNT 2 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Acute myocardial infarction; Anxiety; Depression; Epidemiology; Prospective; Risk  
  Abstract AIMS: The nature of the association of depression and anxiety with risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unclear. We aimed to study the prospective association of single and recurrent self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression with a risk of AMI in a large Norwegian population based cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the second wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995-97) baseline data on anxiety and depression symptoms, sociodemographic variables, health status including cardiovascular risk factors and common chronic disorders were registered for 57 953 adult men and women free of cardiovascular disease. The cohort was followed up during a mean (SD) 11.4 (2.9) years for a first AMI from baseline through 2008. A total of 2111 incident AMIs occurred, either identified at hospitals or by the National Cause of Death Registry. The multi-adjusted hazard ratios were 1.31 (95% CI 1.03-1.66) for symptoms of depression and 1.25 (CI 0.99-1.57) for anxiety. Two episodes of mixed symptoms of anxiety and depression (MSAD), reported 10 years apart, increased the risk for AMI by 52% (11-108%). After exclusion of the first 5 years of follow-up, the association of depression symptoms with AMI risk was attenuated. Relative risk for AMI with anxiety symptoms and MSAD weakened when participants with chronic disorders were excluded. CONCLUSION: Self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety, especially if recurrent, were moderately associated with the risk of incident AMI. We had some indications that these associations might partly reflect reverse causation or confounding from common chronic diseases.  
  Address Department of Internal Medicine, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Kirkegata 2, 7600 Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24057077 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1448  
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Author (up) Halvorsen, S.; Ghanima, W.; Fride Tvete, I.; Hoxmark, C.; Falck, P.; Solli, O.; Jonasson, C. url  doi
  Title A nationwide registry study to compare bleeding rates in patients with atrial fibrillation being prescribed oral anticoagulants Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Heart Journal. Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 28-36  
  Keywords Apixaban; Atrial fibrillation; Bleeding; Dabigatran; Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; Oral anticoagulants; Rivaroxaban; Warfarin  
  Abstract AIMS: We aimed to evaluate bleeding risk in clinical practice in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) being prescribed dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban compared with warfarin. METHODS: Using nationwide registries (Norwegian Patient Registry and Norwegian Prescription Database), we identified AF patients with a first prescription of oral anticoagulants between January 2013 and June 2015. Patients were followed until discontinuation or switching of oral anticoagulants, death, or end of follow-up. The primary endpoint was major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding. RESULTS: In total 32 675 AF patients were identified (58% men, median age 74 years): 11 427 patients used warfarin, 7925 dabigatran, 6817 rivaroxaban, and 6506 apixaban. After a median follow-up of 173 days (25th, 75th percentile 84, 340), 2081 (6.37%) patients experienced a first major or CRNM bleeding. Using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for baseline characteristics, use of apixaban [hazard ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.80, P < 0.001] and dabigatran (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.84, P < 0.001) were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin whereas use of rivaroxaban was not (HR: 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.17, P = 0.400). Use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were associated with higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas use of apixaban and dabigatran were associated with lower risk of intracranial bleeding, compared with warfarin. CONCLUSION: In this nationwide cohort study in AF patients, apixaban and dabigatran were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban and dabigatran compared with warfarin.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2055-6845 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27680880; PMCID:PMC5216196 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1920  
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Author (up) Laugsand, L.E.; Strand, L.B.; Platou, C.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I. url  doi
  Title Insomnia and the risk of incident heart failure: a population study Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume 35 Issue 21 Pages 1382-1393  
  Keywords Heart failure; Insomnia; Prospective study; HUNT2  
  Abstract AIMS: Insomnia is highly prevalent among heart failure patients, but only a few small studies have investigated insomnia symptoms and risk of heart failure. We aimed to assess the prospective association between self-reported insomnia symptoms and the risk of incident heart failure in a large Norwegian cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: Baseline data on insomnia symptoms, including difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep and having non-restorative sleep, socio-demographic variables, and health status, including established cardiovascular risk factors, were collected from 54 279 men and women 20-89 years of age who participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health study (HUNT) between 1995 and 1997 and were free from known heart failure at baseline. The cohort was followed for incident heart failure from baseline through 2008. We used Cox proportional hazard models to assess the association of baseline insomnia symptoms with the risk of heart failure. A total of 1412 cases of heart failure occurred during a mean follow-up of 11.3 years (SD = 2.9 years), either identified at hospitals or by the National Cause of Death Registry. There was a dose-dependent association between the number of insomnia symptoms and risk of heart failure. The multi-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.96 (0.57-1.61), 1.35 (0.72-2.50), and 4.53 (1.99-10.31) for people with one, two, and three insomnia symptoms, compared with people with none of the symptoms (P for trend 0.021). CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia is associated with an increased risk of incident heart failure. If our results are confirmed by others and causation is proved, evaluation of insomnia symptoms might have consequences for cardiovascular prevention.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim N-7491, Norway Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23462728 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1619  
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Author (up) Letnes, J.M.; Dalen, H.; Vesterbekkmo, E.K.; Wisloff, U.; Nes, B.M. url  doi
  Title Peak oxygen uptake and incident coronary heart disease in a healthy population: the HUNT Fitness Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Aims: The majority of previous research on the association between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is based on indirect assessment of CRF in clinically referred predominantly male populations. Therefore, our aim was to examine the associations between VO2peak measured by the gold-standard method of cardiopulmonary exercise testing and fatal and non-fatal coronary heart disease (CHD) in a healthy and fit population. Methods and results: Data on VO2peak from 4527 adults (51% women) with no previous history of cardiovascular or lung disease, cancer, and hypertension or use of antihypertensive medications participating in a large population-based health-study (The HUNT3 Study), were linked to hospital registries and the cause of death registry. Average VO2peak was 36.0 mL/kg/min and 44.4 mL/kg/min among women and men, and 83.5% had low 10-year risk of CVD at baseline. Average follow-up was 8.8 years, and 147 participants reached the primary endpoint. Multi-adjusted Cox-regression showed 15% lower risk for the primary endpoint per one-MET (metabolic equivalent task) higher VO2peak [hazard ratio (HR) 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.93], with similar results across sex. The highest quartile of VO2peak had 48% lower risk of event compared with the lowest quartile (multi-adjusted HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.33-0.82). Oxygen pulse and ventilatory equivalents of oxygen and carbon dioxide also showed significant predictive value for the primary endpoint. Conclusion: VO2peak was strongly and inversely associated with CHD across the whole fitness continuum in a low-risk population sample. Increasing VO2peak may have substantial benefits in reducing the burden of CHD.  
  Address Clinic of Cardiology, St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30496487 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2128  
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Author (up) Markovitz, A.R.; Stuart, J.J.; Horn, J.; Williams, P.L.; Rimm, E.B.; Missmer, S.A.; Tanz, L.J.; Haug, E.B.; Fraser, A.; Timpka, S.; Klykken, B.; Dalen, H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rich-Edwards, J.W.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Does pregnancy complication history improve cardiovascular disease risk prediction? Findings from the HUNT study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Aim: To evaluate whether history of pregnancy complications [pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, preterm delivery, or small for gestational age (SGA)] improves risk prediction for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods and results: This population-based, prospective cohort study linked data from the HUNT Study, Medical Birth Registry of Norway, validated hospital records, and Norwegian Cause of Death Registry. Using an established CVD risk prediction model (NORRISK 2), we predicted 10-year risk of CVD (non-fatal myocardial infarction, fatal coronary heart disease, and non-fatal or fatal stroke) based on established risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, total and HDL-cholesterol, smoking, anti-hypertensives, and family history of myocardial infarction). We evaluated whether adding pregnancy complication history improved model fit, calibration, discrimination, and reclassification. Among 18 231 women who were parous, >/=40 years of age, and CVD-free at start of follow-up, 39% had any pregnancy complication history and 5% experienced a CVD event during a median follow-up of 8.2 years. While pre-eclampsia and SGA were associated with CVD in unadjusted models (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.44-2.65 for pre-eclampsia and HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.18-1.81 for SGA), only pre-eclampsia remained associated with CVD after adjusting for established risk factors (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.16-2.17). Adding pregnancy complication history to the established prediction model led to small improvements in discrimination (C-index difference 0.004, 95% CI 0.002-0.006) and reclassification (net reclassification improvement 0.02, 95% CI 0.002-0.05). Conclusion: Pre-eclampsia independently predicted CVD after controlling for established risk factors; however, adding pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, preterm delivery, and SGA made only small improvements to CVD prediction among this representative sample of parous Norwegian women.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Prinsesse Kristinas gate 3, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30596987 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2133  
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