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Author (up) Cuypers, K.; Krokstad, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Skjei Knudtsen, M.; Bygren, L.O.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title Patterns of receptive and creative cultural activities and their association with perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life among adults: the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 66 Issue 8 Pages 698-703  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology/*psychology; Creativity; Cross-Sectional Studies; *Cultural Characteristics; Depressive Disorder/epidemiology/*psychology; Female; *Health Status; Humans; Interpersonal Relations; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; *Personal Satisfaction; Poverty/statistics & numerical data; Quality of Life/psychology; Questionnaires; *Self Concept; Sex Distribution; Social Participation/*psychology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Cultural participation has been used both in governmental health policies and as medical therapy, based on the assumption that cultural activities will improve health. Previous population studies and a human intervention study have shown that religious, social and cultural activities predict increased survival rate. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between cultural activity and perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life in both genders. METHODS: The study is based on the third population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (2006-2008), including 50,797 adult participants from Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. Data on cultural activities, both receptive and creative, perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life were collected by comprehensive questionnaires. RESULTS: The logistic regression models, adjusted for relevant cofactors, show that participation in receptive and creative cultural activities was significantly associated with good health, good satisfaction with life, low anxiety and depression scores in both genders. Especially in men, attending receptive, rather than creative, cultural activities was more strongly associated with all health-related outcomes. Statistically significant associations between several single receptive, creative cultural activities and the health-related outcome variables were revealed. CONCLUSION: This population-based study suggests gender-dependent associations between cultural participation and perceived health, anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life. The results support hypotheses on the effect of cultural activities in health promotion and healthcare, but further longitudinal and experimental studies are warranted to establish a reliable cause-effect relationship.  
  Address Nord-Trondelag Health Study Research Center, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Skjesol Ostre, Asenfjord 7632, Norway. kjcuype@online.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21609946 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1512  
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Author (up) De Ridder, K.A.A.; Pape, K.; Johnsen, R.; Westin, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title School dropout: a major public health challenge: a 10-year prospective study on medical and non-medical social insurance benefits in young adulthood, the Young-HUNT 1 Study (Norway) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 66 Issue 11 Pages 995-1000  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Status; Humans; Insurance, Health/*statistics & numerical data/utilization; Logistic Models; Male; Norway; Prospective Studies; Public Health; Risk Factors; Self Report; Social Problems; Social Security/*statistics & numerical data/utilization; *Socioeconomic Factors; Student Dropouts/*statistics & numerical data; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: School and work participation in adolescence and young adulthood are important for future health and socioeconomic status. The authors studied the association between self-rated health in adolescents, high school dropout and long-term receipt of medical and non-medical social insurance benefits in young adulthood. METHODS: Self-rated health in adolescence was assessed in 8795 adolescents participating in the Norwegian Young-HUNT Study (1995-1997). Linkages to the National Education Database and the National Insurance Administration allowed identification of school dropout and receipt of long-term medical and non-medical benefits during a 10-year follow-up (1998-2007). The data were explored by descriptive statistics and by multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 17% was registered as being high school dropouts at age 24. The predicted 5-year risk of receiving benefits between ages 24-28 was 21% (95% CI 20% to 23%). High school dropouts had a 5-year risk of receiving benefits of 44% (95% CI 41 to 48) compared with 16% (95% CI 15 to 17) in those who completed high school (adjusted for self-rated health, parental education and sex). There was a 27% school dropout rate in adolescents who reported poor health compared with 16% in those who reported good health. The predicted 5-year risk of receiving any long-term social insurance benefits in adolescents who reported poor health was 33% (95% CI 30 to 37) compared with 20% (95% CI 19 to 21) in those who reported good health. CONCLUSION: The strong association between poor self-rated health in adolescence, high school dropout and reduced work integration needs attention and suggests preventive measures on an individual as well as on a societal level.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. karin.de.ridder@ntnu.no  
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  Notes PMID:22315238 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1518  
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Author (up) Evensen, M.; Lyngstad, T.H.; Melkevik, O.; Reneflot, A.; Mykletun, A. url  doi
  Title Adolescent mental health and earnings inequalities in adulthood: evidence from the Young-HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 71 Issue 2 Pages 201-206  
  Keywords Employment; Inequalities; Longitudinal Studies; Mental Health; Social and life-course epidemiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that adolescent mental health problems are associated with lower employment probabilities and risk of unemployment. The evidence on how earnings are affected is much weaker, and few have addressed whether any association reflects unobserved characteristics and whether the consequences of mental health problems vary across the earnings distribution. METHODS: A population-based Norwegian health survey linked to administrative registry data (N=7885) was used to estimate how adolescents' mental health problems (separate indicators of internalising, conduct, and attention problems and total sum scores) affect earnings (>/=30 years) in young adulthood. We used linear regression with fixed-effects models comparing either students within schools or siblings within families. Unconditional quantile regressions were used to explore differentials across the earnings distribution. RESULTS: Mental health problems in adolescence reduce average earnings in adulthood, and associations are robust to control for observed family background and school fixed effects. For some, but not all mental health problems, associations are also robust in sibling fixed-effects models, where all stable family factors are controlled. Further, we found much larger earnings loss below the 25th centile. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent mental health problems reduce adult earnings, especially among individuals in the lower tail of the earnings distribution. Preventing mental health problems in adolescence may increase future earnings.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway  
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  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27531845 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1905  
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Author (up) Kvamme, J.-M.; Holmen, J.; Wilsgaard, T.; Florholmen, J.; Midthjell, K.; Jacobsen, B.K. url  doi
  Title Body mass index and mortality in elderly men and women: the Tromso and HUNT studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 66 Issue 7 Pages 611-617  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Body Mass Index; Female; Humans; Male; Mortality/*trends; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Questionnaires; Registries  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The impact of body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (WC) on mortality in elderly individuals is controversial and previous research has largely focused on obesity. METHODS: With special attention to the lower BMI categories, associations between BMI and both total and cause-specific mortality were explored in 7604 men and 9107 women aged >/= 65 years who participated in the Tromso Study (1994-1995) or the North-Trondelag Health Study (1995-1997). A Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age, marital status, education and smoking was used to estimate HRs for mortality in different BMI categories using the BMI range of 25-27.5 as a reference. The impact of each 2.5 kg/m(2) difference in BMI on mortality in individuals with BMI < 25.0 and BMI >/= 25.0 was also explored. Furthermore, the relations between WC and mortality were assessed. RESULTS: We identified 7474 deaths during a mean follow-up of 9.3 years. The lowest mortality was found in the BMI range 25-29.9 and 25-32.4 in men and women, respectively. Mortality was increased in all BMI categories below 25 and was moderately increased in obese individuals. U-shaped relationships were also found between WC and total mortality. About 40% of the excess mortality in the lower BMI range in men was explained by mortality from respiratory diseases. CONCLUSIONS: BMI below 25 in elderly men and women was associated with increased mortality. A modest increase in mortality was found with increasing BMI among obese men and women. Overweight individuals (BMI 25-29.9) had the lowest mortality.  
  Address Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso, Norway. jan-magnus.kvamme@uit.no  
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  Notes PMID:21321065; PMC3368492 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1537  
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Author (up) Larose, T.L.; Chen, Y.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with vitamin D deficiency in a Norwegian population: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 68 Issue 2 Pages 165-170  
  Keywords Endocrinology; Epidemiology; Lifestyle  
  Abstract Vitamin D deficiency occurs worldwide. Winter season and high Body Mass Index (BMI) are associated with low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D). We estimated the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in a Norwegian adult population and examined factors associated with vitamin D deficiency. A cohort of 25, 616 adults (19-55 years) who participated in both the second and third Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008)) was established in a previous study. A 10% random sample of the cohort population was recruited for serum 25(OH)D measurements (n=2584), which was used for the current cross-sectional study. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as serum 25(OH)D level <50 nmol/L. The overall prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 40%, but varied by season (winter: 64%; summer: 20%). Winter season (adjusted prevalence ratio (PR): 3.16, 95% CI 2.42 to 4.12) and obesity (BMI >/=30.0 kg/m2) (PR: 1.74, 95% CI 1.45 to 2.10) were strongly associated with prevalent vitamin D deficiency. Current smoking also demonstrated an increased PR (1.41, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.65). Daily intake of cod liver oil (PR: 0.60, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.77), increased physical activity (PR: 0.80, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.95) and more frequent alcohol consumption (PR: 0.76, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.95) were associated with a reduced PR. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was high in Norwegian adults. Winter season, high BMI and current smoking were positively associated, and intake of cod liver oil, increased physical activity and more frequent alcohol consumption were inversely associated with vitamin D deficiency.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, , Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes PMID:24197920 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1498  
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Author (up) Morkedal, B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Vatten, L.J. url  doi
  Title Mortality from ischaemic heart disease: age-specific effects of blood pressure stratified by body-mass index: the HUNT cohort study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 65 Issue 9 Pages 814-819  
  Keywords HUNT1; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Blood Pressure/*physiology; *Body Mass Index; Cause of Death; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Ischemia/*mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Blood pressure is positively associated with ischaemic heart disease (IHD) mortality, but the strength of the association declines with age, and may differ between lean and obese people. OBJECTIVE: To study the association of blood pressure with IHD mortality stratified by attained age (<65 and >/=65 years) and by body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: General population with baseline measurements in 1984-1986. Participants 34,633 men and 36,749 women. MEASUREMENTS, Standardised measurements of blood pressure and BMI conducted by trained personnel, and information on potentially confounding factors was retrieved from self-administered questionnaires. Information on deaths from IHD was obtained from the Causes of Death Registry in Norway from baseline until the end of 2004. RESULTS: During 2 years of follow-up, 2,529 men and 1,719 women had died from IHD. The association of blood pressure with IHD mortality was stronger in people younger than 65 years than in older age groups (p for interaction, 0.001), and the association was further modified by BMI (p for interaction, 0.001). In this age group, the RR of death from IHD associated with systolic pressure >/=160 mm Hg in lean (BMI<25) people was 5.8 (95% CI 3.8 to 8.7) compared with the reference (systolic pressure 120-139 mm Hg and BMI <25), and in overweight (BMI 25-29) and obese (BMI>/=30) people, the corresponding relative risks were 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.5) and 1.6 (95% CI 0.9 to 2.8), respectively. CONCLUSION: The association of blood pressure with IHD mortality is modified by age and body mass index.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:20466710 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1669  
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Author (up) Vik, K.L.; Romundstad, P.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title Tracking of cardiovascular risk factors across generations: family linkage within the population-based HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 67 Issue 7 Pages 564-570  
  Keywords Blood Pressure; Epidemiology; Exercise; Lipids; Obesity  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Parent-offspring studies have shown that cardiovascular risk factors cluster within families. However, most studies have assessed the offspring cardiovascular risk factor level at a young age, and whether an association persists into the offspring's adult life is less clear. This study linked information between parents and their adult offspring to investigate the intergenerational association of anthropometric measures, blood pressure, blood lipid levels and physical activity. METHODS: The study population consisted of parent and adult offspring pairs (11,931 fathers-sons, 12,563 fathers-daughters, 15,626 mothers-sons and 16,449 mothers-daughters) who participated in the second and third cross-sectional waves of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 2, 1995-1997 and HUNT 3, 2006-2008). A general linear model and logistic regression were used to estimate the association between the parent and offspring risk factor levels. RESULTS: All continuously measured cardiovascular risk factors under study showed a statistically significant positive association between parents and offspring, except the waist-hip ratio. Adjusted coefficients from linear regression ranged from 0.09 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.11) for waist circumference to 0.29 (95% CI 0.27 to 0.32) for body weight. Moreover, offspring were two to three times more likely to be obese, have a high cholesterol level, or hypertension when comparing extreme categories of the corresponding parental risk factor level. Physically active parents had a lower risk of having physically inactive offspring. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggested that cardiovascular risk factors track across generations and persist into the offspring's adult life.  
  Address Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim Norway. kirsti.lund.vik@svt.ntnu.no  
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  Notes PMID:23661719 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1389  
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