toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (up) Brunes, A.; Flanders, W.D.; Augestad, L.B. url  doi
  Title Self-reported visual impairment, physical activity and all-cause mortality: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 45 Issue 1 Pages 33-41  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; *Self Report; Vision Disorders/*epidemiology; *All-cause mortality; *HUNT study; *physical activity; *prospective cohort study; *self-reported; *visual impairment  
  Abstract AIMS: To examine the associations of self-reported visual impairment and physical activity (PA) with all-cause mortality. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 65,236 Norwegians aged 20 years who had participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Of these participants, 11,074 (17.0%) had self-reported visual impairment (SRVI). The participants' data were linked to Norway's Cause of Death Registry and followed throughout 2012. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were assessed using Cox regression analyses with age as the time-scale. The Cox models were fitted for restricted age groups (<60, 60-84, 85 years). RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 14.5 years, 13,549 deaths were identified. Compared with adults with self-reported no visual impairment, the multivariable hazard ratios among adults with SRVI were 2.47 (95% CI 1.94-3.13) in those aged <60 years, 1.22 (95% CI 1.13-1.33) in those aged 60-84 years and 1.05 (95% CI 0.96-1.15) in those aged 85 years. The strength of the associations remained similar or stronger after additionally controlling for PA. When examining the joint associations, the all-cause mortality risk of SRVI was higher for those who reported no PA than for those who reported weekly hours of PA. We found a large, positive departure from additivity in adults aged <60 years, whereas the departure from additivity was small for the other age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Adults with SRVI reporting no PA were associated with an increased all-cause mortality risk. The associations attenuated with age.  
  Address 4 Department of Visual Impairment, Statped Mid-Norway, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27913690 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1893  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Dalen, J.D.; Huijts, T.; Krokstad, S.; Eikemo, T.A. url  doi
  Title Are there educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality in Norway? The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 40 Issue 7 Pages 641-647  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Diagnostic Self Evaluation; *Educational Status; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Mortality/*trends; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models  
  Abstract AIMS: The aim of this study was to test whether the association between self-rated health and mortality differs between educational groups in Norway, and to examine whether health problems and health-related behaviour can explain any of these differences within a previously unexplored contextual setting. METHODS: The study used data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 84-86 (HUNT) with a 20-year follow up. The analyses were performed for respondents between 25-101 years at baseline (n = 56,788). The association between self-rated health and mortality was tested using Cox regression. RESULTS: The results indicate that although self-rated health is associated with mortality there is no difference in the association between self-rated health and mortality between educational groups. Introducing health-related variables did not have an impact on the result. CONCLUSIONS: Given the small educational differences in the association between self-rated health and mortality, this supports the reliability of self-reported health as a measurement for objective health.  
  Address Norwegian University Science and Technology, NTNU Dragvoll, Institutt for sosiologi og statsvitenskap, Trondheim, Norway. joakim.dalen@samfunn.ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23042460 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1515  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Enmarker, I.; Hellzen, O.; Ekker, K.; Berg, A.-G. url  doi
  Title Health in older cat and dog owners: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT)-3 study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 40 Issue 8 Pages 718-724  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Animals; Blood Pressure; Body Mass Index; *Cats; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diagnostic Self Evaluation; *Dogs; Exercise; Female; *Health Status; Humans; Male; Marital Status/statistics & numerical data; Norway; Ownership/*statistics & numerical data; *Pets  
  Abstract AIM: The main objective was to compare older male and female cat, dog, and non-owners with regard to demographic and health-related characteristics. METHOD: Data in the present cross-sectional population study were drawn from HUNT-3 in Norway. A total of 12,297 persons (5631 men; 6666 women) between the ages of 65 and 101 years were included, of whom 2358 were pet owners. RESULTS: The main finding was that owning a dog demonstrated several health-related characteristics to a higher positive degree than both non-pet and cat ownership among the participants. Cat owners showed higher body mass index values and higher systolic blood pressure, and reported worse general health status. They also exercised to a lower degree than the others. CONCLUSIONS: As the result implies that older cat owners are negatively outstanding in many aspects of health compared with the dog owners, in the future, more focus must be put on the worse health of those. Further, there were more married male than female cat and dog owners. This probably depends on traditional cultural thinking; the man is the owner of the pet even if the woman lives with and cares about it. It is important to point out that different groups in the population might select different pets. Consequently, the findings showing a correlation between pet ownership and health may be owing to unrelated confounding factors.  
  Address Faculty of Health Sciences, Nord-Trondelag University College, Namsos, Norway. ingela.enmarker@hint.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23221913 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1523  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Grav, S.; Romild, U.; Hellzen, O.; Stordal, E. url  doi
  Title Association of personality, neighbourhood, and civic participation with the level of perceived social support: the HUNT study, a cross-sectional survey Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 41 Issue 6 Pages 579-586  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Consumer Participation/*statistics & numerical data; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Personality; Questionnaires; *Residence Characteristics; *Sense of Coherence; *Social Support; Young Adult; Perceived social support; civic participation and gender; extroversion; general population survey; neuroticism; sense of community  
  Abstract AIM: The aim of the current study was to examine the association of personality, neighbourhood, and civic participation with the level of perceived social support if needed. METHODS: The sample consists of a total of 35,797 men (16,035) and women (19,762) drawn from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 (HUNT3), aged 20-89, with a fully completed short version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) including a complete response to questions regarding perceived social support. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between the three-category outcomes (high, medium, and low) of perceived social support. RESULTS: The Chi-square test detected a significant (p < 0.001) association between personality, sense of community, civic participation, self-rated health, living arrangement, age groups, gender, and perceived social support, except between perceived social support and loss of social network, in which no significance was found. The crude and adjusted multinomial logistic regression models show a relation between medium and low scores on perceived social support, personality, and sources of social support. Interactions were observed between gender and self-rated health. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between the level of perceived social support and personality, sense of community in the neighbourhood, and civic participation. Even if the interaction between men and self-reported health decreases the odds for low and medium social support, health professionals should be aware of men with poor health and their lack of social support.  
  Address Department of Health Science, Nord-Trondelag University College, Namsos, Norway. siv.grav@hint.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23640173 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1451  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Lysberg, F.; Gjerstad, P.L.; Smastuen, M.C.; Innstrand, S.T.; Hoie, M.M.; Arild Espnes, G. url  doi
  Title Has life satisfaction in Norway increased over a 20-year period? Exploring age and gender differences in a prospective longitudinal study, HUNT Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 132-140  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; *Personal Satisfaction; Prospective Studies; Sex Factors; Young Adult; HUNT study; Life satisfaction; age groups; gender; generations; happiness; well-being  
  Abstract AIM: The aim of the present study was to investigate the change in overall life satisfaction for different age groups and between genders over a 20-year period. METHODS: Data from 1984 to 2008 were extracted from a large prospective longitudinal health study of Nord-Trondelag (HUNT), Norway. The study included more than 176,000 participants ranging from 20 to 70+ years of age. Data were analysed using logistic regression and adjusted for gender. RESULTS: The analyses revealed an increase in life satisfaction for all age groups from 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) to 1995-1997 (HUNT 2), with the highest levels being reached at 2006-2008 (HUNT 3). For all age groups, the data showed an increase of about 20% for the period from 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) to 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). From 1995-1997 (HUNT 2) to 2006-2008 (HUNT 3), the increase in overall life satisfaction was 16% for the younger age groups, and about 32% for the older age groups (40-69 and 70+ years). Women's scores for overall life satisfaction were higher for nearly all age groups when compared to men using HUNT 3 as a reference. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest an increase in life satisfaction for all age groups from 1984 to 2008, especially for the older age group (40-69 and 70+ years). The data indicate that women score higher on life satisfaction for most age groups as compared to men.  
  Address 2 NTNU Center for Health Promotion Research, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29199917 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2129  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Nilsen, S.M.; Ernstsen, L.; Krokstad, S.; Westin, S. url  doi
  Title Educational inequalities in disability pensioning – the impact of illness and occupational, psychosocial, and behavioural factors: The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages 133-141  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cost of Illness; *Disability Evaluation; Disabled Persons/*statistics & numerical data; *Educational Status; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Pensions/*statistics & numerical data; Proportional Hazards Models; Psychology; Sex Distribution; Socioeconomic Factors  
  Abstract AIMS: Socioeconomic inequalities in disability pensioning are well established, but we know little about the causes. The main aim of this study was to disentangle educational inequalities in disability pensioning in Norwegian women and men. METHODS: The baseline data consisted of 32,948 participants in the Norwegian Nord-Trondelag Health Study (1995-97), 25-66 years old, without disability pension, and in paid work. Additional analyses were made for housewives and unemployed/laid-off persons. Information on the occurrence of disability pension was obtained from the National Insurance Administration database up to 2008. Data analyses were performed using Cox regression. RESULTS: We found considerable educational inequalities in disability pensioning, and the incidence proportion by 2008 was higher in women (25-49 years 11%, 50-66 years 30%) than men (25-49 years 6%, 50-66 years 24%). Long-standing limiting illness and occupational, psychosocial, and behavioural factors were not sufficient to explain the educational inequalities: young men with primary education had a hazard ratio of 3.1 (95% CI 2.3-4.3) compared to young men with tertiary education. The corresponding numbers for young women were 2.7 (2.1-3.1). We found small educational inequalities in the oldest women in paid work and no inequalities in the oldest unemployed/laid-off women and housewives. CONCLUSIONS: Illness and occupational, psychosocial, and behavioural factors explained some of the educational inequalities in disability pensioning. However, considerable inequalities remain after accounting for these factors. The higher incidence of disability pensioning in women than men and the small or non-existing educational inequalities in the oldest women calls for a gender perspective in future research.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. sara.m.nilsen@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22314253 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1562  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Pape, K.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; De Ridder, K.A.A.; Westin, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Krokstad, S. url  doi
  Title Medical benefits in young Norwegians and their parents, and the contribution of family health and socioeconomic status. The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 41 Issue 5 Pages 455-462  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; *Child of Impaired Parents; Family Health; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Surveys; Humans; Insurance Benefits/*statistics & numerical data; Insurance, Disability/*statistics & numerical data; Male; Norway; *Parents; Registries; Risk Factors; Social Class; Social Welfare/*statistics & numerical data; Young Adult; Adolescents; family; health; longitudinal; population study; social insurance benefits; socioeconomic status  
  Abstract AIMS: Family and intergenerational perspectives might contribute to a better understanding of why young people in many European countries experience work impairment and end up being dependent on public benefits for life sustenance. The aim of this cohort study was to explore the relationship between the receipt of medical benefits in parents and their young adult offspring and the contributions of family health and family socioeconomic status. METHODS: Baseline information on the health of 7597 adolescents and their parents who participated in the HUNT Study 1995-1997 was linked to national registers to identify long-term receipt of medical benefits for parents (1992-1997) and adolescents as they entered adulthood (1998-2008). We used logistic regression to explore the association between parent and offspring receipt of medical benefits, adjusting for family health and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: Among adolescents, 13% received medical benefits from age 20-29. Adolescents whose parents had received medical benefits (26%) were more likely to receive such benefits themselves from age 20-29 compared with adolescents without benefit-receiving parents (age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.16, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.86-2.49). Adjustment for family health reduced this estimate considerably (to OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.38-1.99), whereas adjustment for family socioeconomic status had less impact. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescents whose parents receive medical benefits enter adult working life with an elevated risk of health-related work exclusion. Family health vulnerability appears to be a key to understanding this association, suggesting that more attention to intergenerational continuities of health could be a way to prevent welfare dependence in future generations.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. kristine.pape@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23508948 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1407  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Steinsbekk, A. url  doi
  Title Families' visits to practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine in a total population (the HUNT studies) Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 38 Issue 5 Suppl Pages 96-104  
  Keywords HUNT3; Young-HUNT; Adolescent; Adult; *Complementary Therapies/methods/statistics & numerical data/utilization; Family Characteristics; Fathers/psychology; Female; Health Status; Homeopathy; Humans; Life Style; Male; Mothers/psychology; Patient Acceptance of Health Care; Questionnaires; Self Concept; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract AIMS: To investigate characteristics of families with adolescent children who have visited practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). METHODS: The Nord-Trondelag Health Studies (HUNT) invited all inhabitants aged 13 years and older to a population-based study. The data of parents and adolescents were merged through the Norwegian family register. A family CAM visitor was a family where either the adolescent or the mother or father had visited a CAM practitioner in the previous year. The data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 7,888 adolescents with mother and/or fathers were included. The prevalence of families visiting CAM practitioners was 19.8%. The odds of a family visiting a CAM practitioner was significantly associated (p < 0.01) with a father with poor self-reported global health (adjusted odds ratio (adjOR) 3.0, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.7-5.3), who exercised (adjOR 1.3, 1.1-1.5) or smoked daily (adjOR 0.7, 0.6-0.8). Family CAM visits were also associated with the mother having a recent health complaint (adjOR 1.4, 1.1-1.7) or having fair global health (adjOR 1.6, 1.2-2.0), or with the adolescent, mother or father having visited a general practitioner during the past year (adolescent adjOR 1.3, 1.2-1.5; mother 1.7, 1.5-2.0; father 1.4, 1.2-1.6). For family visits to a homeopath, the strongest association was the mother having visited a general practitioner (adjOR 1.9, 1.4-2.5). For visits to chiropractors the strongest association was whether the father was currently working (adjOR 2.1, 1.2-3.8). CONCLUSIONS: The factor most strongly associated with families' visits to CAM practitioners was a father who had poor self-reported health.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. aslak.steinsbekk@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21062844 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1656  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Storeng, S.H.; Krokstad, S.; Westin, S.; Sund, E.R. url  doi
  Title Decennial trends and inequalities in healthy life expectancy: The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 124-131  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; *Health Status Disparities; Humans; Life Expectancy/*trends; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Socioeconomic Factors; Norway; chronic illness; education; healthy life expectancy; life expectancy; pensioning age; self-rated health; social determinants of health  
  Abstract AIMS: Norway is experiencing a rising life expectancy combined with an increasing dependency ratio – the ratio of those outside over those within the working force. To provide data relevant for future health policy we wanted to study trends in total and healthy life expectancy in a Norwegian population over three decades (1980s, 1990s and 2000s), both overall and across gender and educational groups. METHODS: Data were obtained from the HUNT Study, and the Norwegian Educational Database. We calculated total life expectancy and used the Sullivan method to calculate healthy life expectancies based on self-rated health and self-reported longstanding limiting illness. The change in health expectancies was decomposed into mortality and disability effects. RESULTS: During three consecutive decades we found an increase in life expectancy for 30-year-olds (~7 years) and expected lifetime in self-rated good health (~6 years), but time without longstanding limiting illness increased less (1.5 years). Women could expect to live longer than men, but the extra life years for females were spent in poor self-rated health and with longstanding limiting illness. Differences in total life expectancy between educational groups decreased, whereas differences in expected lifetime in self-rated good health and lifetime without longstanding limiting illness increased. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in total life expectancy was accompanied by an increasing number of years spent in good self-rated health but more years with longstanding limiting illness. This suggests increasing health care needs for people with chronic diseases, given an increasing number of elderly. Socioeconomic health inequalities remain a challenge for increasing pensioning age.  
  Address 4 Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29191110 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2162  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Storeng, S.H.; Krokstad, S.; Westin, S.; Sund, E.R. url  doi
  Title Decennial trends and inequalities in healthy life expectancy: The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 124-131  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; *Health Status Disparities; Humans; Life Expectancy/*trends; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Socioeconomic Factors; Norway; chronic illness; education; healthy life expectancy; life expectancy; pensioning age; self-rated health; social determinants of health  
  Abstract AIMS: Norway is experiencing a rising life expectancy combined with an increasing dependency ratio – the ratio of those outside over those within the working force. To provide data relevant for future health policy we wanted to study trends in total and healthy life expectancy in a Norwegian population over three decades (1980s, 1990s and 2000s), both overall and across gender and educational groups. METHODS: Data were obtained from the HUNT Study, and the Norwegian Educational Database. We calculated total life expectancy and used the Sullivan method to calculate healthy life expectancies based on self-rated health and self-reported longstanding limiting illness. The change in health expectancies was decomposed into mortality and disability effects. RESULTS: During three consecutive decades we found an increase in life expectancy for 30-year-olds (~7 years) and expected lifetime in self-rated good health (~6 years), but time without longstanding limiting illness increased less (1.5 years). Women could expect to live longer than men, but the extra life years for females were spent in poor self-rated health and with longstanding limiting illness. Differences in total life expectancy between educational groups decreased, whereas differences in expected lifetime in self-rated good health and lifetime without longstanding limiting illness increased. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in total life expectancy was accompanied by an increasing number of years spent in good self-rated health but more years with longstanding limiting illness. This suggests increasing health care needs for people with chronic diseases, given an increasing number of elderly. Socioeconomic health inequalities remain a challenge for increasing pensioning age.  
  Address 4 Faculty of Nursing and Health Sciences, Nord University, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29191110 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2174  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Stover, M.; Pape, K.; Johnsen, R.; Fleten, N.; Sund, E.R.; Ose, S.O.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Work environment and disability pension-- an 18-year follow-up study in a Norwegian working population Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 41 Issue 6 Pages 587-596  
  Keywords Adult; Disabled Persons/*statistics & numerical data; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Norway; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; *Social Environment; Socioeconomic Factors; *Workplace; Occupational Health; epidemiology; work disability; work environment; work exposures  
  Abstract AIMS: To investigate the associations between work environment indicators and health- related work disability. METHODS: A health survey of 5,749 working 40-42-year-old Norwegians from Nordland County were linked to a national register for disability pension during a follow-up of over 18 years. The risk for disability pension following various self-reported physical and psychosocial work environmental exposures (individual and cumulative) were estimated using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Both cumulative physical and psychosocial work environmental exposures were associated with an increased risk for disability pension, although this association was attenuated for most variables after adjusting for health and education. An increase in five poor psychosocial work environmental exposures was associated with a 22% increased risk for disability (adjusted hazard ratio, aHR, 1.22, 95% CI 1.04-1.44), whereas a similar increase in five poor physical work environmental exposures was associated with a 29% increased risk (aHR, 1.29, 95% CI 1.16-1.44). There were no indications of statistical interaction between either sex or education and work exposures. CONCLUSIONS: People who report a poor work environment are at a higher risk for subsequent work disability. This finding suggests that improving working conditions may be an area of intervention in order to reduce the number of people who leave the labour market with a disability pension.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Morten.stover@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23686367 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1396  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Vie, G.A.; Krokstad, S.; Johnsen, R.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title The Health Hazards of Marriage. A cohort study of work related disability within 12,500 Norwegian couples – the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 41 Issue 5 Pages 500-507  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Insurance, Disability/*statistics & numerical data; *Interpersonal Relations; Male; Middle Aged; Pensions/*statistics & numerical data; Prospective Studies; Registries; Risk; Spouses/*psychology; Young Adult; Family health; multilevel modeling; social epidemiology; work disability  
  Abstract AIMS: Work disability and sickness absence increase following partner's retirement, which similarities in spouses' health could explain. We therefore studied the risk of work disability within couples, taking account of baseline health, lifestyle and socioeconomic factors. METHODS: A cohort of 12,511 couples from the HUNT Study (aged 20-67 years in HUNT2, 1995-1997) was linked to national registries, identifying all new cases of disability pension up until December 2007. Data were analysed with discrete time multilevel logistic regression and Cox regression models. Partners' disability pension was included as a time-varying covariate. Follow-up time was split to examine the association dependent of time. Analyses were adjusted for age only, adjusted for health, and for lifestyle and education along with health. RESULTS: About 15% of an individual's propensity to receive a disability pension could be attributed couple similarity. There was an increased risk of work disability following the spouse's disability retirement [HR (hazard ratio) 1.43 (95% confidence interval 1.20-1.71) for men, HR 1.49 (95% confidence interval 1.28-1.74) for women]. The association was somewhat attenuated after adjustments for health, lifestyle and education. CONCLUSION: There was a substantial clustering of disability pensions within couples, which cannot be explained by similarities in health, lifestyle and education. This suggests partners influence each other's work ability. From a clinical perspective, the family situation needs to be taken into account when addressing health promotion and work participation.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. gunnhild.vie@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23524409 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1390  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Vikum, E.; Krokstad, S.; Holst, D.; Westin, S. url  doi
  Title Socioeconomic inequalities in dental services utilisation in a Norwegian county: the third Nord-Trondelag Health Survey Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 40 Issue 7 Pages 648-655  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Dental Health Services/*utilization; Educational Status; Female; Health Surveys; *Healthcare Disparities; Humans; Income/*statistics & numerical data; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Risk; Young Adult  
  Abstract AIM: To assess the level of socioeconomic inequity in dental care utilisation in Norway and enable comparison with recent international comparative studies. METHODS: We studied dental care utilisation among 17,136 men and 21,414 women in the third Nord-Trondelag Health Survey (2006-08). Respondents aged 20 years and above were included in the study, and analyses were also performed within subgroups of age and gender (20-39, 40-59, and >/=60 years). Income-related horizontal inequity was estimated by means of concentration indices. Education-related inequity was estimated as relative risks. RESULTS: We found consistent pro-rich income inequity among men and women of all ages. The level of income inequity was highest among men and women >/=60 years, and in this group the income gradient was steepest between the poorest and the middle quintiles. Pro-educated inequity was found exclusively among men and women >/=60 years. General attendance was high (77%). CONCLUSION: The overall level of income-related inequity in dental services utilisation was low compared to other European countries as reported in two recent international studies of socioeconomic inequalities in dental care utilisation. Pro-rich and pro-educated inequity is a public health challenge mainly in the older part of the population.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. eirikv@stud.ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23012325 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1584  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: