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Author (up) Hoftun, G.B.; Romundstad, P.R.; Rygg, M. url  doi
  Title Association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult: family linkage data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication JAMA Pediatrics Abbreviated Journal JAMA Pediatr  
  Volume 167 Issue 1 Pages 61-69  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Chronic Pain/economics/*etiology/psychology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Family/psychology; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Norway; Odds Ratio; *Parents/psychology; Psychology; Questionnaires; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine a possible association of parental chronic pain with chronic pain in the adolescent and young adult and to explore whether a relationship could be explained by socioeconomic and psychosocial factors or may be affected by differences in family structure. DESIGN: Unselected, population-based, cross-sectional study. SETTING: Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. PARTICIPANTS: All inhabitants of Nord-Trondelag County who were 13 years or older were invited to enroll in the study. In total, 8200 of 10 485 invitees (78.2%) participated in the investigation. Among 7913 participants in the target age group (age range, 13-18 years), 7373 (93.2%) completed the pain questions. The final study population consisted of 5370 adolescents or young adults for whom one or both parents participated in the adult survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was chronic nonspecific pain in adolescents and young adults, defined as pain in at least 1 location, unrelated to any known disease or injury, experienced at least once a week during the past 3 months. Chronic multisite pain was defined as chronic pain in at least 3 locations. RESULTS: Maternal chronic pain was associated with chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.8). Paternal chronic pain was associated with increased odds of pain in adolescents and young adults. The odds of chronic nonspecific pain and chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults increased when both parents reported pain. Adjustments for socioeconomic and psychosocial factors did not change the results, although differences in family structure did. Among offspring living primarily with their mothers, clear associations were observed between maternal pain and pain in adolescents and young adults, but no association was found with paternal pain. CONCLUSIONS: Parental chronic pain is associated with chronic nonspecific pain and especially with chronic multisite pain in adolescents and young adults. Family structure influences the relationship, indicating that family pain models and shared environmental factors are important in the origin of chronic pain.  
  Address Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. gry.b.hoftun@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23403843 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1441  
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