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Author (up) Heuch, I.; Heuch, I.; Hagen, K.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Body mass index as a risk factor for developing chronic low back pain: a follow-up in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Spine Abbreviated Journal Spine (Phila Pa 1976)  
  Volume 38 Issue 2 Pages 133-139  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; *Body Mass Index; Chronic Pain; Cohort Studies; Comorbidity; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Low Back Pain/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Obesity/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Population Surveillance; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors  
  Abstract STUDY DESIGN: A population-based, prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether overweight, obesity, or more generally an elevated body mass index (BMI) increase the probability of experiencing chronic low back pain (LBP) after an 11-year period, both among participants with and without LBP at baseline. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Chronic LBP is a common disabling disorder in modern society. Cross-sectional studies suggest an association between an elevated BMI and LBP, but it is not clear whether this is a causal relationship. METHODS: Data were obtained from the community-based HUNT 2 (1995-1997) and HUNT 3 (2006-2008) studies of an entire Norwegian county. Participants were 8733 men and 10,149 women, aged 30 to 69 years, who did not have chronic LBP at baseline, and 2669 men and 3899 women with LBP at baseline. After 11 years, both groups indicated whether they currently had chronic LBP, defined as pain persisting for at least 3 months continuously during the last year. RESULTS: A significant positive association was found between BMI and risk of LBP among persons without LBP at baseline. The odds ratio for BMI 30 or more versus BMI less than 25 was 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.67) for men and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.03-1.46) for women, in analyses adjusted for age, education, work status, physical activity at work and in leisure time, smoking, blood pressure, and serum lipid levels. A significant positive association was also established between BMI and recurrence of LBP among women. LBP status at baseline had negligible influence on subsequent change in BMI. CONCLUSION: High values of BMI may predispose to chronic LBP 11 years later, both in individuals with and without LBP. The association between BMI and LBP is not explained by an effect of LBP on later change in BMI.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ingrid.heuch@uus.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0362-2436 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22718225 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1443  
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