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Author (up) Brumpton, B.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.; Chen, Y.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title The associations of anxiety and depression symptoms with weight change and incident obesity: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Obesity (2005) Abbreviated Journal Int J Obes (Lond)  
  Volume 37 Issue 9 Pages 1268-1274  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations of anxiety and depression symptoms with weight change and incident obesity in men and women. DESIGN: We conducted a prospective cohort study using the Norwegian Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). SUBJECTS: The study cohort included 25 180 men and women, 19-55 years of age from the second survey of the HUNT (1995-1997). MEASUREMENTS: Anxiety and depression symptoms were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Weight change was determined for the study period of an average 11 years. Incident obesity was new-onset obesity classified as having a body mass index of >/=30.0 kg m(2) at follow-up. The associations of anxiety or depression with weight change in kilograms (kg) was estimated using linear regression models. Risk ratios (RRs) for incident obesity associated with anxiety or depression were estimated using log-binomial regression. RESULTS: In men, any anxiety or depression was associated with an average 0.81 kg (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27-1.34) larger weight change after 11 years compared with those without such symptoms (mean weight change: 5.04 versus 4.24 kg). Women with any anxiety or depression had an average 0.98 kg (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49-1.47) larger weight change compared with those without such symptoms (mean weight change: 5.02 versus 4.04 kg). Participants with any anxiety or depression had a significantly elevated cumulative incidence of obesity (men: RR 1.37, 95% CI 1.13-1.65; women: RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.00-1.40). CONCLUSION: We found that symptoms of anxiety and depression were associated with larger weight change and an increased cumulative incidence of obesity in both men and women.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0307-0565 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23229732 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1462  
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