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Author (up) De Ridder, K.A.A.; Pape, K.; Johnsen, R.; Westin, S.; Holmen, T.L.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title School dropout: a major public health challenge: a 10-year prospective study on medical and non-medical social insurance benefits in young adulthood, the Young-HUNT 1 Study (Norway) Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 66 Issue 11 Pages 995-1000  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Health Status; Humans; Insurance, Health/*statistics & numerical data/utilization; Logistic Models; Male; Norway; Prospective Studies; Public Health; Risk Factors; Self Report; Social Problems; Social Security/*statistics & numerical data/utilization; *Socioeconomic Factors; Student Dropouts/*statistics & numerical data; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: School and work participation in adolescence and young adulthood are important for future health and socioeconomic status. The authors studied the association between self-rated health in adolescents, high school dropout and long-term receipt of medical and non-medical social insurance benefits in young adulthood. METHODS: Self-rated health in adolescence was assessed in 8795 adolescents participating in the Norwegian Young-HUNT Study (1995-1997). Linkages to the National Education Database and the National Insurance Administration allowed identification of school dropout and receipt of long-term medical and non-medical benefits during a 10-year follow-up (1998-2007). The data were explored by descriptive statistics and by multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 17% was registered as being high school dropouts at age 24. The predicted 5-year risk of receiving benefits between ages 24-28 was 21% (95% CI 20% to 23%). High school dropouts had a 5-year risk of receiving benefits of 44% (95% CI 41 to 48) compared with 16% (95% CI 15 to 17) in those who completed high school (adjusted for self-rated health, parental education and sex). There was a 27% school dropout rate in adolescents who reported poor health compared with 16% in those who reported good health. The predicted 5-year risk of receiving any long-term social insurance benefits in adolescents who reported poor health was 33% (95% CI 30 to 37) compared with 20% (95% CI 19 to 21) in those who reported good health. CONCLUSION: The strong association between poor self-rated health in adolescence, high school dropout and reduced work integration needs attention and suggests preventive measures on an individual as well as on a societal level.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. karin.de.ridder@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22315238 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1518  
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