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Author (up) Kvamme, J.-M.; Holmen, J.; Wilsgaard, T.; Florholmen, J.; Midthjell, K.; Jacobsen, B.K. url  doi
  Title Body mass index and mortality in elderly men and women: the Tromso and HUNT studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 66 Issue 7 Pages 611-617  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Body Mass Index; Female; Humans; Male; Mortality/*trends; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Questionnaires; Registries  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The impact of body mass index (BMI; kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (WC) on mortality in elderly individuals is controversial and previous research has largely focused on obesity. METHODS: With special attention to the lower BMI categories, associations between BMI and both total and cause-specific mortality were explored in 7604 men and 9107 women aged >/= 65 years who participated in the Tromso Study (1994-1995) or the North-Trondelag Health Study (1995-1997). A Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for age, marital status, education and smoking was used to estimate HRs for mortality in different BMI categories using the BMI range of 25-27.5 as a reference. The impact of each 2.5 kg/m(2) difference in BMI on mortality in individuals with BMI < 25.0 and BMI >/= 25.0 was also explored. Furthermore, the relations between WC and mortality were assessed. RESULTS: We identified 7474 deaths during a mean follow-up of 9.3 years. The lowest mortality was found in the BMI range 25-29.9 and 25-32.4 in men and women, respectively. Mortality was increased in all BMI categories below 25 and was moderately increased in obese individuals. U-shaped relationships were also found between WC and total mortality. About 40% of the excess mortality in the lower BMI range in men was explained by mortality from respiratory diseases. CONCLUSIONS: BMI below 25 in elderly men and women was associated with increased mortality. A modest increase in mortality was found with increasing BMI among obese men and women. Overweight individuals (BMI 25-29.9) had the lowest mortality.  
  Address Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso, Norway. jan-magnus.kvamme@uit.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21321065; PMC3368492 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1537  
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