toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Record Links
Author (up) Gronskag, A.B.; Romundstad, P.; Forsmo, S.; Langhammer, A.; Schei, B. url  doi
  Title Excess mortality after hip fracture among elderly women in Norway. The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA Abbreviated Journal Osteoporos Int  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 1807-1811  
  Keywords Absorptiometry, Photon; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Bone Density; Case-Control Studies; Comorbidity; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Hip Fractures/*mortality; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; Life Style; Norway/epidemiology; Radius/radiography; Risk Factors; Time Factors  
  Abstract We wanted to study mortality after hip fractures among elderly women in Norway. We found that excess mortality was highest short time after hip fracture, but persisted for several years after the fracture. The excess mortality was not explained by pre-fracture medical conditions. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the present study was to investigate short and long term mortality after hip fracture, and to evaluate how comorbidity, bone mineral density, and lifestyle factors affect the survival after hip fractures. METHODS: The study cohort emerges from a population-based health survey in the county of Nord-Trondelag, Norway. Women aged 65 or more at participation at the health survey who sustained a hip fracture after attending the health survey are cases in this study (n = 781). A comparison cohort was constructed based on participants at HUNT 2 with no history of hip fractures (n = 3, 142). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to evaluate crude survival, and Cox regression analyses were used to study age-adjusted hazard ratios for mortality and for multivariable analyses involving relevant covariates. RESULTS: Mean length of follow-up after fracture was 2.8 years. Within the first 3 months of follow-up, 78 (10.0%) of the hip fracture patients died, compared to only 39 (1.7%) in the control group. HR for mortality 3 months after hip fracture was 6.5 (95% CI 4.2-9.6). For the entire follow-up period women who sustained a hip fracture had an HR for mortality of 1.9 (95% CI 1.6-2.3), compared with women without a hip fracture. CONCLUSIONS: We found that elderly women who sustained a hip fracture had increased mortality risk. The excess mortality was highest short time after the fracture, but persisted for several years after the fracture, and was not explained by pre-fracture medical conditions.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, PB 8905, 7491, Trondheim, Norway. anna.b.gronskag@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0937-941X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22068386 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1587  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: