toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author url  doi
  Title Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015: a pooled analysis of 1479 population-based measurement studies with 19.1 million participants Type Comment
  Year 2017 Publication Lancet (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Lancet  
  Volume 389 Issue 10064 Pages 37-55  
  Keywords Bayes Theorem; *Blood Pressure; *Global Health; Humans; Prevalence; Risk Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. METHODS: For this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure. FINDINGS: We pooled 1479 studies that had measured the blood pressures of 19.1 million adults. Global age-standardised mean systolic blood pressure in 2015 was 127.0 mm Hg (95% credible interval 125.7-128.3) in men and 122.3 mm Hg (121.0-123.6) in women; age-standardised mean diastolic blood pressure was 78.7 mm Hg (77.9-79.5) for men and 76.7 mm Hg (75.9-77.6) for women. Global age-standardised prevalence of raised blood pressure was 24.1% (21.4-27.1) in men and 20.1% (17.8-22.5) in women in 2015. Mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure decreased substantially from 1975 to 2015 in high-income western and Asia Pacific countries, moving these countries from having some of the highest worldwide blood pressure in 1975 to the lowest in 2015. Mean blood pressure also decreased in women in central and eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and, more recently, central Asia, Middle East, and north Africa, but the estimated trends in these super-regions had larger uncertainty than in high-income super-regions. By contrast, mean blood pressure might have increased in east and southeast Asia, south Asia, Oceania, and sub-Saharan Africa. In 2015, central and eastern Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and south Asia had the highest blood pressure levels. Prevalence of raised blood pressure decreased in high-income and some middle-income countries; it remained unchanged elsewhere. The number of adults with raised blood pressure increased from 594 million in 1975 to 1.13 billion in 2015, with the increase largely in low-income and middle-income countries. The global increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure is a net effect of increase due to population growth and ageing, and decrease due to declining age-specific prevalence. INTERPRETATION: During the past four decades, the highest worldwide blood pressure levels have shifted from high-income countries to low-income countries in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa due to opposite trends, while blood pressure has been persistently high in central and eastern Europe. FUNDING: Wellcome Trust.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC) Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0140-6736 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27863813; PMCID:PMC5220163 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1897  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Daneshvar, F.; Weinreich, M.; Daneshvar, D.; Sperling, M.; Salmane, C.; Yacoub, H.; Gabriels, J.; McGinn, T.; Smith, M.C. url  doi
  Title Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Internal Medicine Residents: Are Future Physicians Becoming Deconditioned? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Graduate Medical Education Abbreviated Journal J Grad Med Educ  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 97-101  
  Keywords *Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Cross-Sectional Studies; Education, Medical, Graduate; Exercise/*psychology; Female; Habits; Humans; Internal Medicine/*education; *Internship and Residency; Male; New York; Surveys and Questionnaires; Time Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND : Previous studies have shown a falloff in physicians' physical activity from medical school to residency. Poor fitness may result in stress, increase resident burnout, and contribute to mortality from cardiovascular disease and other causes. Physicians with poor exercise habits are also less likely to counsel patients about exercise. Prior studies have reported resident physical activity but not cardiorespiratory fitness age. OBJECTIVE : The study was conducted in 2 residency programs (3 hospitals) to assess internal medicine residents' exercise habits as well as their cardiorespiratory fitness age. METHODS : Data regarding physical fitness levels and exercise habits were collected in an anonymous cross-sectional survey. Cardiopulmonary fitness age was determined using fitness calculator based on the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). RESULTS : Of 199 eligible physicians, 125 (63%) responded to the survey. Of respondents, 11 (9%) reported never having exercised prior to residency and 45 (36%) reported not exercising during residency (P < .001). In addition, 42 (34%) reported exercising every day prior to residency, while only 5 (4%) reported exercising daily during residency (P < .001), with 99 (79%) participants indicating residency obligations as their main barrier to exercise. We found residents' calculated mean fitness age to be 5.6 years higher than their mean chronological age (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS : Internal medicine residents reported significant decreases in physical activity and fitness. Residents attributed time constraints due to training as a key barrier to physical activity.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1949-8357 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28261402; PMCID:PMC5330203 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1904  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Extracellular matrix markers and risk of myocardial infarction: The HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Preventive Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Prev Cardiol  
  Volume 24 Issue 11 Pages 1161-1167  
  Keywords Extracellular matrix; Ykl-40; case-control; myocardial infarction  
  Abstract Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling may influence atherosclerotic progression and plaque stability. We hypothesized that evaluation of extracellular matrix markers, with potentially different roles during atherogenesis, could provide information on underlying mechanisms and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. A total of 58,761 men and women, free of known cardiovascular disease, were followed for a first MI. During 11.3 years of follow-up, 1587 incident MIs were registered, and these cases were compared with 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. Circulating levels of the ECM proteins CD147 (ECM metalloproteinase inducer; EMMPRIN), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP: thrombospondin-5) and YKL-40 (chitinase-3-like-1) were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Results We found an inverse association between COMP (quartile (Q) 4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.98)) and YKL-40 (Q4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.77 (0.62-0.95)) with incidence of MI after full multivariable adjustment. Serum CD147 was not associated with MI risk in adjusted analysis. Conclusion High levels of COMP and YKL-40 were associated with lower risk of incident MI, suggesting a potential beneficial role in promoting plaque stability in individuals without incident cardiovascular disease.  
  Address (up) 12 Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2047-4873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28429960 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1999  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brunes, A.; Flanders, W.D.; Augestad, L.B. url  doi
  Title Self-reported visual impairment, physical activity and all-cause mortality: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 45 Issue 1 Pages 33-41  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; *Self Report; Vision Disorders/*epidemiology; *All-cause mortality; *HUNT study; *physical activity; *prospective cohort study; *self-reported; *visual impairment  
  Abstract AIMS: To examine the associations of self-reported visual impairment and physical activity (PA) with all-cause mortality. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 65,236 Norwegians aged 20 years who had participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Of these participants, 11,074 (17.0%) had self-reported visual impairment (SRVI). The participants' data were linked to Norway's Cause of Death Registry and followed throughout 2012. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were assessed using Cox regression analyses with age as the time-scale. The Cox models were fitted for restricted age groups (<60, 60-84, 85 years). RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 14.5 years, 13,549 deaths were identified. Compared with adults with self-reported no visual impairment, the multivariable hazard ratios among adults with SRVI were 2.47 (95% CI 1.94-3.13) in those aged <60 years, 1.22 (95% CI 1.13-1.33) in those aged 60-84 years and 1.05 (95% CI 0.96-1.15) in those aged 85 years. The strength of the associations remained similar or stronger after additionally controlling for PA. When examining the joint associations, the all-cause mortality risk of SRVI was higher for those who reported no PA than for those who reported weekly hours of PA. We found a large, positive departure from additivity in adults aged <60 years, whereas the departure from additivity was small for the other age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Adults with SRVI reporting no PA were associated with an increased all-cause mortality risk. The associations attenuated with age.  
  Address (up) 4 Department of Visual Impairment, Statped Mid-Norway, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27913690 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1893  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hansen, A.G.; Stovner, L.J.; Hagen, K.; Helvik, A.-S.; Thorstensen, W.M.; Nordgard, S.; Bugten, V.; Eggesbo, H.B. url  doi
  Title Paranasal sinus opacification in headache sufferers: A population-based imaging study (the HUNT study-MRI) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cephalalgia : an International Journal of Headache Abbreviated Journal Cephalalgia  
  Volume 37 Issue 6 Pages 509-516  
  Keywords Paranasal sinuses; headache; magnetic resonance imaging; migraine; opacification; sinus headache; tension headache  
  Abstract Background The association between headache and paranasal sinus disease is still unclear. Because of symptom overlap, the two conditions are not easily studied on the basis of symptoms alone. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether paranasal sinus opacification on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was associated with migraine, tension-type headache (TTH) or unclassified headache. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 844 randomly selected participants (442 women, age range 50-65 years, mean age 57.7 years). Based on 14 headache questions, participants were allocated to four mutually exclusive groups: migraine, TTH, unclassified headache or headache free. On MRI, opacifications as mucosal thickening, polyps/retention cysts and fluid in the five paired sinuses were measured and recorded if >/=1 mm. For each participant, opacification thickness was summed for each sinus and, in addition, a total sum of all sinuses was calculated. Opacification in each sinus was compared between headache-free participants and the headache groups using non-parametric tests, and the total sum was compared by logistical regression. Results No significant association was found between paranasal sinus opacification and headache in general, nor when headache was differentiated into migraine, TTH and unclassified headache. This was also true in separate analyses of mucosal thickening and fluid and of opacification from each paranasal sinus. Conclusion Migraine, TTH and unclassified headache were found not to be associated with an increased degree of paranasal sinus opacification at MRI.  
  Address (up) 5 Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0333-1024 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27215544 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1921  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomsen, L.C.V.; McCarthy, N.S.; Melton, P.E.; Cadby, G.; Austgulen, R.; Nygard, O.K.; Johnson, M.P.; Brennecke, S.; Moses, E.K.; Bjorge, L.; Iversen, A.-C. url  doi
  Title The antihypertensive MTHFR gene polymorphism rs17367504-G is a possible novel protective locus for preeclampsia Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal J Hypertens  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 132-139  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Alleles; Australia; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gene Frequency; Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Hypertension/genetics; Inflammation/genetics; Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)/*genetics; Norway; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Pre-Eclampsia/*genetics; Pregnancy; Protective Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Preeclampsia is a complex heterogeneous disease commonly defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy. Women experiencing preeclampsia have increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) later in life. Preeclampsia and CVD share risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms, including dysregulated inflammation and raised blood pressure. Despite commonalities, little is known about the contribution of shared genes (pleiotropy) to these diseases. This study aimed to investigate whether genetic risk factors for hypertension or inflammation are pleiotropic by also being associated with preeclampsia. METHODS: We genotyped 122 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in women with preeclampsia (n = 1006) and nonpreeclamptic controls (n = 816) from the Norwegian HUNT Study. SNPs were chosen on the basis of previously reported associations with either nongestational hypertension or inflammation in genome-wide association studies. The SNPs were tested for association with preeclampsia in a multiple logistic regression model. RESULTS: The minor (G) allele of the intronic SNP rs17367504 in the gene methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was associated with a protective effect on preeclampsia (odds ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.80) in the Norwegian cohort. This association did not replicate in an Australian preeclampsia case-control cohort (P = 0.68, odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.32, minor allele frequency = 0.15). CONCLUSION: MTHFR is important for regulating transmethylation processes and is involved in regulation of folate metabolism. The G allele of rs17367504 has previously been shown to protect against nongestational hypertension. Our study suggests a novel association between this allele and reduced risk for preeclampsia. This is the first study associating the minor (G) allele of a SNP within the MTHFR gene with a protective effect on preeclampsia, and in doing so identifying a possible pleiotropic protective effect on preeclampsia and hypertension.  
  Address (up) aDepartment of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Haukeland University Hospital bDepartment of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway cCentre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia dDepartment of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim eDepartment of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway fSouth Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, Texas, USA gDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville hPregnancy Research Centre, Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria iFaculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0263-6352 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27755385; PMCID:PMC5131692 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1996  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Theofylaktopoulou, D.; Midttun, O.; Ueland, P.M.; Meyer, K.; Fanidi, A.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Prentice, R.; Pettinger, M.; Thomson, C.A.; Giles, G.G.; Hodge, A.; Cai, Q.; Blot, W.J.; Wu, J.; Johansson, M.; Hultdin, J.; Grankvist, K.; Stevens, V.L.; McCullough, M.M.; Weinstein, S.J.; Albanes, D.; Ziegler, R.; Freedman, N.D.; Langhammer, A.; Hveem, K.; Naess, M.; Sesso, H.D.; Gaziano, J.M.; Buring, J.E.; Lee, I.-M.; Severi, G.; Zhang, X.; Stampfer, M.J.; Han, J.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Le Marchand, L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Wang, R.; Butler, L.M.; Koh, W.-P.; Gao, Y.-T.; Rothman, N.; Ericson, U.; Sonestedt, E.; Visvanathan, K.; Jones, M.R.; Relton, C.; Brennan, P.; Johansson, M.; Ulvik, A. url  doi
  Title Impaired functional vitamin B6 status is associated with increased risk of lung cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid; Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium; functional vitamin B6 marker; pyridoxal 5'-phosphate  
  Abstract Circulating vitamin B6 levels have been found to be inversely associated with lung cancer. Most studies have focused on the B6 form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a direct biomarker influenced by inflammation and other factors. Using a functional B6 marker allows further investigation of the potential role of vitamin B6 status in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. We prospectively evaluated the association of the functional marker of vitamin B6 status, the 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid (HK:XA) ratio, with risk of lung cancer in a nested case-control study consisting of 5,364 matched case-control pairs from the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between HK:XA and lung cancer, and random effect models to combine results from different cohorts and regions. High levels of HK:XA, indicating impaired functional B6 status, were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, the odds ratio comparing the fourth and the first quartiles (OR4thvs.1st ) was 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.41). Stratified analyses indicated that this association was primarily driven by cases diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. Notably, the risk associated with HK:XA was approximately 50% higher in groups with a high relative frequency of squamous cell carcinoma, i.e., men, former and current smokers. This risk of squamous cell carcinoma was present in both men and women regardless of smoking status.  
  Address (up) Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29238985 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2011  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hjerkind, K.V.; Stenehjem, J.S.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title Adiposity, physical activity and risk of diabetes mellitus: prospective data from the population-based HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e013142  
  Keywords *Adiposity; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Body Mass Index; Comorbidity; Diabetes Mellitus/*epidemiology; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Young Adult; *Epidemiology; *Public Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Physical activity may counteract the adverse effects of adiposity on cardiovascular mortality; however, the evidence of a similar effect on diabetes is sparse. This study examines whether physical activity may compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk. METHODS: The study population consisted of 38 231 individuals aged 20 years or more who participated in two consecutive waves of the prospective longitudinal Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway: in 1984-1986 and in 1995-1997. A Poisson regression model with SEs derived from robust variance was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios of diabetes between categories of body mass index and physical activity. RESULTS: Risk of diabetes increased both with increasing body mass (Ptrend <0.001) and with decreasing physical activity level (Ptrend <0.001 in men and 0.01 in women). Combined analyses showed that men who were both obese and had low activity levels had a risk ratio of 17 (95% CI 9.52 to 30) compared to men who were normal weight and highly active, whereas obese men who reported high activity had a risk ratio of 13 (95% CI 6.92 to 26). Corresponding analysis in obese women produced risk ratios of 15 (95% CI 9.18 to 25) and 13 (95% CI 7.42 to 21) among women reporting low and high activity levels, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that overweight and obesity are associated with a substantially increased risk of diabetes, particularly among those who also reported being physically inactive. High levels of physical activity were associated with a lower risk of diabetes within all categories of body mass index, but there was no clear evidence that being physically active could entirely compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk.  
  Address (up) Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28093432; PMCID:PMC5253523 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1929  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, D.J.; Peloso, G.M.; Yu, H.; Butterworth, A.S.; Wang, X.; Mahajan, A.; Saleheen, D.; Emdin, C.; Alam, D.; Alves, A.C.; Amouyel, P.; Di Angelantonio, E.; Arveiler, D.; Assimes, T.L.; Auer, P.L.; Baber, U.; Ballantyne, C.M.; Bang, L.E.; Benn, M.; Bis, J.C.; Boehnke, M.; Boerwinkle, E.; Bork-Jensen, J.; Bottinger, E.P.; Brandslund, I.; Brown, M.; Busonero, F.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chambers, J.C.; Chasman, D.I.; Chen, Y.E.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Chowdhury, R.; Christensen, C.; Chu, A.Y.; Connell, J.M.; Cucca, F.; Cupples, L.A.; Damrauer, S.M.; Davies, G.; Deary, I.J.; Dedoussis, G.; Denny, J.C.; Dominiczak, A.; Dube, M.-P.; Ebeling, T.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Esko, T.; Farmaki, A.-E.; Feitosa, M.F.; Ferrario, M.; Ferrieres, J.; Ford, I.; Fornage, M.; Franks, P.W.; Frayling, T.M.; Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Fritsche, L.G.; Frossard, P.; Fuster, V.; Ganesh, S.K.; Gao, W.; Garcia, M.E.; Gieger, C.; Giulianini, F.; Goodarzi, M.O.; Grallert, H.; Grarup, N.; Groop, L.; Grove, M.L.; Gudnason, V.; Hansen, T.; Harris, T.B.; Hayward, C.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Holmen, O.L.; Huffman, J.; Huo, Y.; Hveem, K.; Jabeen, S.; Jackson, A.U.; Jakobsdottir, J.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Jensen, G.B.; Jorgensen, M.E.; Jukema, J.W.; Justesen, J.M.; Kamstrup, P.R.; Kanoni, S.; Karpe, F.; Kee, F.; Khera, A.V.; Klarin, D.; Koistinen, H.A.; Kooner, J.S.; Kooperberg, C.; Kuulasmaa, K.; Kuusisto, J.; Laakso, M.; Lakka, T.; Langenberg, C.; Langsted, A.; Launer, L.J.; Lauritzen, T.; Liewald, D.C.M.; Lin, L.A.; Linneberg, A.; Loos, R.J.F.; Lu, Y.; Lu, X.; Magi, R.; Malarstig, A.; Manichaikul, A.; Manning, A.K.; Mantyselka, P.; Marouli, E.; Masca, N.G.D.; Maschio, A.; Meigs, J.B.; Melander, O.; Metspalu, A.; Morris, A.P.; Morrison, A.C.; Mulas, A.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Munroe, P.B.; Neville, M.J.; Nielsen, J.B.; Nielsen, S.F.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Ordovas, J.M.; Mehran, R.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Orho-Melander, M.; Molony, C.M.; Muntendam, P.; Padmanabhan, S.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Pasko, D.; Patel, A.P.; Pedersen, O.; Perola, M.; Peters, A.; Pisinger, C.; Pistis, G.; Polasek, O.; Poulter, N.; Psaty, B.M.; Rader, D.J.; Rasheed, A.; Rauramaa, R.; Reilly, D.F.; Reiner, A.P.; Renstrom, F.; Rich, S.S.; Ridker, P.M.; Rioux, J.D.; Robertson, N.R.; Roden, D.M.; Rotter, J.I.; Rudan, I.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Sanna, S.; Sattar, N.; Schmidt, E.M.; Scott, R.A.; Sever, P.; Sevilla, R.S.; Shaffer, C.M.; Sim, X.; Sivapalaratnam, S.; Small, K.S.; Smith, A.V.; Smith, B.H.; Somayajula, S.; Southam, L.; Spector, T.D.; Speliotes, E.K.; Starr, J.M.; Stirrups, K.E.; Stitziel, N.; Strauch, K.; Stringham, H.M.; Surendran, P.; Tada, H.; Tall, A.R.; Tang, H.; Tardif, J.-C.; Taylor, K.D.; Trompet, S.; Tsao, P.S.; Tuomilehto, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; van Zuydam, N.R.; Varbo, A.; Varga, T.V.; Virtamo, J.; Waldenberger, M.; Wang, N.; Wareham, N.J.; Warren, H.R.; Weeke, P.E.; Weinstock, J.; Wessel, J.; Wilson, J.G.; Wilson, P.W.F.; Xu, M.; Yaghootkar, H.; Young, R.; Zeggini, E.; Zhang, H.; Zheng, N.S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, W.; Zhou, Y.; Zoledziewska, M.; Howson, J.M.M.; Danesh, J.; McCarthy, M.I.; Cowan, C.A.; Abecasis, G.; Deloukas, P.; Musunuru, K.; Willer, C.J.; Kathiresan, S. url  doi
  Title Exome-wide association study of plasma lipids in >300,000 individuals Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 49 Issue 12 Pages 1758-1766  
  Keywords Coronary Artery Disease/blood/genetics; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood/genetics; Exome/*genetics; Genetic Association Studies/*methods; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics; *Genetic Variation; Genotype; Humans; Lipids/*blood; Macular Degeneration/blood/genetics; Phenotype; Risk Factors  
  Abstract We screened variants on an exome-focused genotyping array in >300,000 participants (replication in >280,000 participants) and identified 444 independent variants in 250 loci significantly associated with total cholesterol (TC), high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and/or triglycerides (TG). At two loci (JAK2 and A1CF), experimental analysis in mice showed lipid changes consistent with the human data. We also found that: (i) beta-thalassemia trait carriers displayed lower TC and were protected from coronary artery disease (CAD); (ii) excluding the CETP locus, there was not a predictable relationship between plasma HDL-C and risk for age-related macular degeneration; (iii) only some mechanisms of lowering LDL-C appeared to increase risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D); and (iv) TG-lowering alleles involved in hepatic production of TG-rich lipoproteins (TM6SF2 and PNPLA3) tracked with higher liver fat, higher risk for T2D, and lower risk for CAD, whereas TG-lowering alleles involved in peripheral lipolysis (LPL and ANGPTL4) had no effect on liver fat but decreased risks for both T2D and CAD.  
  Address (up) Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA  
  Corporate Author VA Million Veteran Program Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29083408; PMCID:PMC5709146 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1943  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Webb, T.R.; Erdmann, J.; Stirrups, K.E.; Stitziel, N.O.; Masca, N.G.D.; Jansen, H.; Kanoni, S.; Nelson, C.P.; Ferrario, P.G.; Konig, I.R.; Eicher, J.D.; Johnson, A.D.; Hamby, S.E.; Betsholtz, C.; Ruusalepp, A.; Franzen, O.; Schadt, E.E.; Bjorkegren, J.L.M.; Weeke, P.E.; Auer, P.L.; Schick, U.M.; Lu, Y.; Zhang, H.; Dube, M.-P.; Goel, A.; Farrall, M.; Peloso, G.M.; Won, H.-H.; Do, R.; van Iperen, E.; Kruppa, J.; Mahajan, A.; Scott, R.A.; Willenborg, C.; Braund, P.S.; van Capelleveen, J.C.; Doney, A.S.F.; Donnelly, L.A.; Asselta, R.; Merlini, P.A.; Duga, S.; Marziliano, N.; Denny, J.C.; Shaffer, C.; El-Mokhtari, N.E.; Franke, A.; Heilmann, S.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Holmen, O.L.; Hveem, K.; Jansson, J.-H.; Jockel, K.-H.; Kessler, T.; Kriebel, J.; Laugwitz, K.L.; Marouli, E.; Martinelli, N.; McCarthy, M.I.; Van Zuydam, N.R.; Meisinger, C.; Esko, T.; Mihailov, E.; Escher, S.A.; Alver, M.; Moebus, S.; Morris, A.D.; Virtamo, J.; Nikpay, M.; Olivieri, O.; Provost, S.; AlQarawi, A.; Robertson, N.R.; Akinsansya, K.O.; Reilly, D.F.; Vogt, T.F.; Yin, W.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Kooperberg, C.; Jackson, R.D.; Stahl, E.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Strauch, K.; Varga, T.V.; Waldenberger, M.; Zeng, L.; Chowdhury, R.; Salomaa, V.; Ford, I.; Jukema, J.W.; Amouyel, P.; Kontto, J.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Ferrieres, J.; Saleheen, D.; Sattar, N.; Surendran, P.; Wagner, A.; Young, R.; Howson, J.M.M.; Butterworth, A.S.; Danesh, J.; Ardissino, D.; Bottinger, E.P.; Erbel, R.; Franks, P.W.; Girelli, D.; Hall, A.S.; Hovingh, G.K.; Kastrati, A.; Lieb, W.; Meitinger, T.; Kraus, W.E.; Shah, S.H.; McPherson, R.; Orho-Melander, M.; Melander, O.; Metspalu, A.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Peters, A.; Rader, D.J.; Reilly, M.P.; Loos, R.J.F.; Reiner, A.P.; Roden, D.M.; Tardif, J.-C.; Thompson, J.R.; Wareham, N.J.; Watkins, H.; Willer, C.J.; Samani, N.J.; Schunkert, H.; Deloukas, P.; Kathiresan, S. url  doi
  Title Systematic Evaluation of Pleiotropy Identifies 6 Further Loci Associated With Coronary Artery Disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of the American College of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal J Am Coll Cardiol  
  Volume 69 Issue 7 Pages 823-836  
  Keywords Case-Control Studies; Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology/*genetics; Female; Gene Frequency; *Genetic Loci; *Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Humans; Male; Odds Ratio; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; cholesteryl ester transfer protein; expression quantitative trait loci; genetics; genome-wide association; single nucleotide polymorphism  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have so far identified 56 loci associated with risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Many CAD loci show pleiotropy; that is, they are also associated with other diseases or traits. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to systematically test if genetic variants identified for non-CAD diseases/traits also associate with CAD and to undertake a comprehensive analysis of the extent of pleiotropy of all CAD loci. METHODS: In discovery analyses involving 42,335 CAD cases and 78,240 control subjects we tested the association of 29,383 common (minor allele frequency >5%) single nucleotide polymorphisms available on the exome array, which included a substantial proportion of known or suspected single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with common diseases or traits as of 2011. Suggestive association signals were replicated in an additional 30,533 cases and 42,530 control subjects. To evaluate pleiotropy, we tested CAD loci for association with cardiovascular risk factors (lipid traits, blood pressure phenotypes, body mass index, diabetes, and smoking behavior), as well as with other diseases/traits through interrogation of currently available genome-wide association study catalogs. RESULTS: We identified 6 new loci associated with CAD at genome-wide significance: on 2q37 (KCNJ13-GIGYF2), 6p21 (C2), 11p15 (MRVI1-CTR9), 12q13 (LRP1), 12q24 (SCARB1), and 16q13 (CETP). Risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.15 to 0.86, and odds ratio per copy of the risk allele ranged from 1.04 to 1.09. Of 62 new and known CAD loci, 24 (38.7%) showed statistical association with a traditional cardiovascular risk factor, with some showing multiple associations, and 29 (47%) showed associations at p < 1 x 10(-4) with a range of other diseases/traits. CONCLUSIONS: We identified 6 loci associated with CAD at genome-wide significance. Several CAD loci show substantial pleiotropy, which may help us understand the mechanisms by which these loci affect CAD risk.  
  Address (up) Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts  
  Corporate Author Myocardial Infarction Genetics and CARDIoGRAM Exome Consortia Investigators Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-1097 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28209224; PMCID:PMC5314135 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2030  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Johnsen, M.B.; Vie, G.A.; Winsvold, B.S.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Pedersen, L.M.; Hellevik, A.I.; Langhammer, A.; Furnes, O.; Flugsrud, G.B.; Skorpen, F.; Romundstad, P.R.; Storheim, K.; Nordsletten, L.; Zwart, J.A. url  doi
  Title The causal role of smoking on the risk of hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis: a Mendelian randomisation analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume 25 Issue 6 Pages 817-823  
  Keywords Epidemiology; Genetic variants; Osteoarthritis; Smoking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Smoking has been associated with a reduced risk of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and subsequent joint replacement. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the observed association is likely to be causal. METHOD: 55,745 participants of a population-based cohort were genotyped for the rs1051730 C > T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), a proxy for smoking quantity among smokers. A Mendelian randomization analysis was performed using rs1051730 as an instrument to evaluate the causal role of smoking on the risk of hip or knee replacement (combined as total joint replacement (TJR)). Association between rs1051730 T alleles and TJR was estimated by hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All analyses were adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: Smoking quantity (no. of cigarettes) was inversely associated with TJR (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.97-0.98). In the Mendelian randomization analysis, rs1051730 T alleles were associated with reduced risk of TJR among current smokers (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, per T allele), however we found no evidence of association among former (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88-1.07) and never smokers (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.89-1.06). Neither adjusting for body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular disease (CVD) nor accounting for the competing risk of mortality substantially changed the results. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that smoking may be causally associated with the reduced risk of TJR. Our findings add support to the inverse association found in previous observational studies. More research is needed to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms of this causal association.  
  Address (up) Communication and Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Disorders, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: j.a.zwart@medisin.uio.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28049019 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1934  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bauman, A.E.; Grunseit, A.C.; Rangul, V.; Heitmann, B.L. url  doi
  Title Physical activity, obesity and mortality: does pattern of physical activity have stronger epidemiological associations? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 788  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Hip circumference; Waist circumference  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Most studies of physical activity (PA) epidemiology use behaviour measured at a single time-point. We examined whether 'PA patterns' (consistently low, consistently high or inconsistent PA levels over time) showed different epidemiological relationships for anthropometric and mortality outcomes, compared to single time-point measure of PA. METHODS: Data were the Danish MONICA (MONItoring Trends and Determinants in CArdiovascular Disease) study over three waves 1982-3 (time 1), 1987-8 (time 2) and 1993-4 (time 3). Associations between leisure time single time-point PA levels at time 1 and time 3, and sport and active travel at times 1 and 2 with BMI, waist, hip circumference and mortality (death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD)) were compared to 'PA patterns' spanning multiple time points. PA pattern classified participants' PA as either 1) inactive or low PA at both time points; 2) moderate level PA at time 1 and high activity at time 3; or 3) a 'mixed PA pattern' indicating a varying levels of activity over time. Similarly, sport and active travel were also classified as indicating stable low, stable high and mixed patterns. RESULTS: The moderately and highly active groups for PA at times 1 and 3 had up to 1.7 cm lower increase in waist circumference compared with the inactive/low active group. Across 'PA patterns', 'active maintainers' had a 2.0 cm lower waist circumference than 'inactive/low maintainers'. Waist circumference was inversely related to sport but not active travel. CHD risk did not vary by activity levels at time 1, but was reduced significantly by 43% for high PA at time 3 (vs 'inactive' group) and among 'active maintainers' (vs 'inactive/low maintainers') by 62%. 'Sport pattern' showed stronger reductions in mortality for cardiovascular disease and CHD deaths among sport maintainers, than the single time point measures. CONCLUSIONS: PA patterns demonstrated a stronger association with a number of anthropometric and mortality outcomes than the single time-point measures. Operationalising PA as a sustained behavioural pattern may address some of the known under-estimation of risk for poor health in PA self-report measurements and better reflect exposure for epidemiological analysis of risk of health outcomes.  
  Address (up) Copenhagen Center for Preventive Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen Capital Region, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28982371; PMCID:PMC5629749 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1880  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lie, T.M.; Bomme, M.; Hveem, K.; Hansen, J.M.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title Snus and risk of gastroesophageal reflux. A population-based case-control study: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 193-198  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/*epidemiology; Heartburn/etiology; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Tobacco Use/*epidemiology; Tobacco, Smokeless/*adverse effects; Young Adult; Health surveys; oral tobacco; smokeless tobacco; snuff  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Tobacco smoking is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux, but whether other tobacco products increase the risk is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if snus increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was based on the third Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT3), a population-based study of all adult residents in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, performed in 2006-2009. The association between self-reported severe heartburn/regurgitation and snus use was assessed by logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared to never snus users, daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS (OR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.93), while previous snus users and those using <2 boxes of snus/month had an increased risk (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.46 and OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, respectively). There was no association between age when starting using snus and GERS. Snus users who started using snus to quit or cut down on cigarette smoking, who started using both snus and cigarettes or cigarettes alone had an increased risk of GERS. Snus users <30 years of age had an increased risk of GERS (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.16), while those aged between 50-60 and 60-70 years had a reduced risk (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93 and OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28-0.94, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS. However, previous snus users and subgroups of snus users had an increased risk of GERS indicating reverse causality, such that snus use could increase the risk of GERS.  
  Address (up) d Department of Medicine , Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust , Levanger , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5521 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27797289 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1942  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thorstensen, K.; Kvitland, M.A.; Irgens, W.O.; Asberg, A.; Borch-Iohnsen, B.; Moen, T.; Hveem, K. url  doi
  Title Iron loading in HFE p.C282Y homozygotes found by population screening: relationships to HLA-type and T-lymphocyte subsets Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation Abbreviated Journal Scand J Clin Lab Invest  
  Volume 77 Issue 7 Pages 477-485  
  Keywords Hla-A*03; Haplotypes; Mhc; homozygote; iron overload  
  Abstract Iron loading in p.C282Y homozygous HFE hemochromatosis subjects is highly variable, and it is unclear what factors cause this variability. Finding such factors could aid in predicting which patients are at highest risk and require closest follow-up. The degree of iron loading has previously been associated with certain HLA-types and with abnormally low CD8 + cell counts in peripheral blood. In 183 Norwegian, p.C282Y homozygotes (104 men, 79 women) originally found through population screening we determined HLA type and measured total T-lymphocytes, CD4 + and CD8 + cells, and compared this with data on iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous men, but not in homozygous women, we found that the presence of two HLA-A*03 alleles increased the iron load on average by approximately 2-fold compared to p.C282Y homozygous men carrying zero or one A*03 allele. On the other hand, the presence of two HLA-A*01 alleles, in male subjects, apparently reduced the iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous individuals, the iron loading was increased if the CD8 + cell number was below the 25 percentile or if the CD4 + cell number was above the 75 percentile. This effect appeared to be additive to the effect of the number of HLA-A*03 alleles. Our data indicate that homozygosity for the HLA-A*03 allele significantly increases the risk of excessive iron loading in Norwegian p.C282Y homozygous male patients. In addition, low CD8 + cell number or high CD4 + cell number further increases the risk of excessive iron loading.  
  Address (up) d HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28678636 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2013  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Steinshamn, S.; Mai, X.-M.; Brumpton, B.M. url  doi
  Title The Prevalence and Symptom Profile of Asthma-COPD Overlap: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Copd Abbreviated Journal Copd  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Acos; epidemiology; obstructive lung disease; spirometry  
  Abstract The concept of asthma and COPD as separate conditions has been questioned, and the term asthma-COPD overlap syndrome has been introduced. We assessed the prevalence, symptoms, and lifestyle factors of asthma-COPD overlap (ACO) in a large Norwegian population-based study. From 2006 to 2008, a total of 50,777 residents of Nord-Trondelag participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway. They completed questionnaires regarding respiratory symptoms, disease status, and medication use. We estimated the prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of ACO. Additionally, spirometry was used to estimate the prevalence of ACO in a subgroup. The prevalence of self-reported ACO was 1.9%, and in age groups <40, 40-60 and >/=60 years it was 0.7%, 1.4%, and 3.2%, respectively. Among those reporting COPD, the proportion of ACO was 0.56. In the spirometry subgroup when ACO was defined as doctor diagnosed asthma ever and FEV1/FVC < 0.70, the prevalence of ACO was 2.0%. All respiratory symptoms, separately or in combination, as well as medication use were reported most frequently in those with ACO compared to the other groups. Strikingly, we observed a two-fold higher proportion of allergic rhinitis in ACO compared to COPD only. In this Norwegian population, the prevalence of self-reported ACO was 1.9%, and the corresponding proportion of ACO among those with COPD was 0.56. Participants with ACO generally had the highest proportions of respiratory symptoms compared to asthma or COPD.  
  Address (up) d K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1541-2563 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29257905 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1927  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Modalsli, E.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Snekvik, I.; Romundstad, P.R.; Naldi, L.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title The association between the clinical diversity of psoriasis and depressive symptoms: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV Abbreviated Journal J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol  
  Volume 31 Issue 12 Pages 2062-2068  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: While a number of observational hospital-based studies have reported an association between psoriasis and depression, less is known about the clinical diversity of psoriasis and depressive symptoms. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the associations of inverse psoriasis, psoriasis severity and psoriasis duration with depressive symptoms in a general population. METHODS: We linked data from the population-based third Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3) to the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD) and Statistics Norway. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Associations between psoriasis and depressive symptoms (HADS >/= 8) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Among 37 833 participants in HUNT3, we found a weak association between any psoriasis and the prevalence of depressive symptoms [fully adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-1.28]. The association with depressive symptoms was stronger when psoriasis was characterized by inverse anatomical distribution (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.02-1.70), requirement of systemic psoriasis medication (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.00-2.17) or long disease duration (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.09-1.64). Conversely, when there was no inverse psoriasis distribution, no requirement of systemic medication, or shorter disease duration, psoriasis was not meaningfully associated with depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION: Overall, depressive symptoms do not seem to be a major concern among subjects with psoriasis in a general Norwegian population. However, among subjects with inverse anatomical distribution, requirement of systemic psoriasis medication or long disease duration, depressive symptoms may be particularly important to address when evaluating the burden of psoriasis.  
  Address (up) Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0926-9959 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28662282 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1956  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Modalsli, E.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Langhammer, A.; Hoff, M.; Forsmo, S.; Naldi, L.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Psoriasis, fracture risk and bone mineral density: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The British Journal of Dermatology Abbreviated Journal Br J Dermatol  
  Volume 176 Issue 5 Pages 1162-1169  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: An association between psoriasis and osteoporosis has been reported. OBJECTIVES: To investigate, in a large prospective population-based Norwegian study, whether psoriasis is associated with increased risk of forearm or hip fracture; to investigate the cross-sectional association between psoriasis and bone mineral density (BMD) T-score in a subpopulation. METHODS: Hospital-derived fracture data from Nord-Trondelag County (1995-2013) were linked to psoriasis information, BMD measurements and lifestyle factors from the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2006-08 (HUNT3); socioeconomic data from the National Education Database; and use of medication from the Norwegian Prescription Database. RESULTS: Among 48 194 participants in HUNT3, we found no increased risk of forearm or hip fracture in 2804 patients with self-reported psoriasis [overall age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-1.31]. No clear association was found between psoriasis and mean BMD T-score; overall age- and sex-adjusted differences in total hip, femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD T-scores were 0.02 (95% CI -0.11 to 0.14), 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.17) and 0.07 (95% CI -0.09 to 0.24), respectively. No clear association was found between psoriasis and prevalent osteoporosis in either total hip, femoral neck or lumbar spine; overall age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio was 0.77 (95% CI 0.54-1.10). Associations did not change substantially after adjustment for education, smoking, systemic steroid use and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS: We found no association between psoriasis and risk of fracture. The study did not indicate reduced BMD T-score or higher prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with psoriasis.  
  Address (up) Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0963 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27718508 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1955  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Simic, A.; Hansen, A.F.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Midthjell, K.; Syversen, T.; Flaten, T.P. url  doi
  Title Trace element status in patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway: The HUNT3 Survey Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) Abbreviated Journal J Trace Elem Med Biol  
  Volume 41 Issue Pages 91-98  
  Keywords Aged; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*blood/diagnosis/epidemiology; Female; *Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Trace Elements/*blood; Case-control study; Hunt3; Trace elements; Type 2 diabetes; Whole blood  
  Abstract Several epidemiological studies have indicated that a number of trace elements may play a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D). We investigated the association between prevalent T2D and the concentrations of 25 trace elements in whole blood, and the relationships between T2D duration and blood levels of the trace elements that we found to be related to T2D prevalence. In this population based case-control study, 267 patients with self-reported T2D and 609 controls (frequency matched), were selected from the third Nord-Trondelag Health Survey. Trace element blood levels were determined by high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Multivariable conditional logistic regression and multivariable linear regression were used to estimate associations. The prevalence of T2D was positively associated with boron, calcium and silver, and inversely associated with indium, lead and magnesium (Ptrend<0.05). We found no statistical evidence for associations between blood levels of arsenic, bromine, cadmium, cesium, chromium, copper, gallium, gold, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, rubidium, selenium, strontium, tantalum, thallium, tin and zinc and T2D prevalence. After corrections for multiple testing, associations remained significant for calcium and lead (Qtrend<0.05), and borderline significant for magnesium, silver and boron. With increasing disease duration, higher calcium levels were observed (P<0.05). This study suggests an association between prevalent T2D and blood levels of boron, calcium, indium, lead, magnesium and silver.  
  Address (up) Department of Chemistry, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0946-672X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28347468 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1979  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Skaaby, T.; Taylor, A.E.; Jacobsen, R.K.; Paternoster, L.; Thuesen, B.H.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Larsen, S.C.; Zhou, A.; Wong, A.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Flexeder, C.; Mannisto, S.; Hardy, R.; Kuh, D.; Barry, S.J.; Tang Mollehave, L.; Cerqueira, C.; Friedrich, N.; Bonten, T.N.; Noordam, R.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Taube, C.; Jessen, L.E.; McConnachie, A.; Sattar, N.; Upton, M.N.; McSharry, C.; Bonnelykke, K.; Bisgaard, H.; Schulz, H.; Strauch, K.; Meitinger, T.; Peters, A.; Grallert, H.; Nohr, E.A.; Kivimaki, M.; Kumari, M.; Volker, U.; Nauck, M.; Volzke, H.; Power, C.; Hypponen, E.; Hansen, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Salomaa, V.; Grarup, N.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.R.; Skorpen, F.; Kaprio, J.; R Munafo, M.; Linneberg, A. url  doi
  Title Investigating the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in the CARTA consortium Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2224  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Observational studies on smoking and risk of hay fever and asthma have shown inconsistent results. However, observational studies may be biased by confounding and reverse causation. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants as markers of exposures to examine causal effects. We examined the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma by using the smoking-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968/rs1051730. We included 231,020 participants from 22 population-based studies. Observational analyses showed that current vs never smokers had lower risk of hay fever (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.61, 0.76; P < 0.001) and allergic sensitization (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.86; P < 0.001), but similar asthma risk (OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.09; P = 0.967). Mendelian randomization analyses in current smokers showed a slightly lower risk of hay fever (OR = 0.958, 95% CI: 0.920, 0.998; P = 0.041), a lower risk of allergic sensitization (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.02; P = 0.117), but higher risk of asthma (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.11; P = 0.020) per smoking-increasing allele. Our results suggest that smoking may be causally related to a higher risk of asthma and a slightly lower risk of hay fever. However, the adverse events associated with smoking limit its clinical significance.  
  Address (up) Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28533558; PMCID:PMC5440386 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1980  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bjornland, T.; Langaas, M.; Grill, V.; Mostad, I.L. url  doi
  Title Assessing gene-environment interaction effects of FTO, MC4R and lifestyle factors on obesity using an extreme phenotype sampling design: Results from the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175071  
  Keywords Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; *Gene-Environment Interaction; Humans; *Life Style; Obesity/*genetics; *Phenotype; Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4/*genetics; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess the influence of age, gender and lifestyle factors on the effect of the obesity-promoting alleles of FTO and MCR4. METHODS: The HUNT study comprises health information on the population of Nord-Trondelag county, Norway. Extreme phenotype participants (gender-wise lower and upper quartiles of waist-hip-ratio and BMI >/= 35 kg/m2) in the third survey, HUNT3 (2006-08), were genotyped for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs9939609 (FTO) and rs17782313 (MC4R); 25686 participants were successfully genotyped. Extreme sampling was chosen to increase power to detect genetic and gene-environment effects on waist-hip-ratio and BMI. Statistical inference was based on linear regression models and a missing-covariate likelihood approach for the extreme phenotype sampling design. Environmental factors were physical activity, diet (artificially sweetened beverages) and smoking. Longitudinal analysis was performed using material from HUNT2 (1995-97). RESULTS: Cross-sectional and longitudinal genetic effects indicated stronger genetic associations with obesity in young than in old, as well as differences between women and men. We observed larger genetic effects among physically inactive compared to active individuals. This interaction was age-dependent and seen mainly in 20-40 year olds. We observed a greater FTO effect among men with a regular intake of artificially sweetened beverages, compared to non-drinkers. Interaction analysis of smoking was mainly inconclusive. CONCLUSIONS: In a large all-adult and area-based population survey the effects of obesity-promoting minor-alleles of FTO and MCR4, and interactions with life style factors are age- and gender-related. These findings appear relevant when designing individualized treatment for and prophylaxis against obesity.  
  Address (up) Department of Clinical Nutrition and Speech-Language Therapy, Clinic of Clinical Services, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28384342; PMCID:PMC5383228 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1884  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mauseth, S.A.; Skurtveit, S.; Langhammer, A.; Spigset, O. url  doi
  Title Incidence of and factors associated with anticholinergic drug use among Norwegian women with urinary incontinence Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Urogynecology Journal Abbreviated Journal Int Urogynecol J  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Anticholinergic drugs; Drug treatment; Epidemiology; Health survey; Prescription patterns; Urinary incontinence  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aims of this study were to investigate patterns of prescribing anticholinergic drugs among women with urinary incontinence (UI) and to identify factors associated with prescription of these drugs. METHODS: We analysed questionnaire data on UI from 21,735 women older than 20 years who participated in a cross-sectional population-based study in Nord-Trondelag county, Norway (the HUNT study). These data were linked at the individual level to a national prescription database, and analysed using a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among the women with UI, 4.5% had been prescribed an anticholinergic drug during the previous 12 months. Prescription was most frequent in women with urge UI (10.5%) and mixed UI (7.0%). Of women with UI without treatment with an anticholinergic drug, 1.8% obtained such a prescription during the subsequent 12 months, corresponding to 3.1% of women with urge UI and 3.0% of women with mixed UI. Characteristics significantly associated with starting treatment were age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe or very severe symptoms, consumption of four or more cups of coffee per day, and having visited a doctor for UI. No association was found with marital status, parity, smoking, alcohol, body mass index or anxiety/depression. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study, 4.5% of women with UI were prescribed an anticholinergic drug, and the 12-month incidence of starting treatment was 1.8%. Age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe symptoms, high coffee consumption and having visited a doctor for UI were factors associated with first-time drug prescription.  
  Address (up) Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olav University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0937-3462 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29103164 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1954  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Selmeryd, J.; Henriksen, E.; Dalen, H.; Hedberg, P. url  doi
  Title Derivation and Evaluation of Age-Specific Multivariate Reference Regions to Aid in Identification of Abnormal Filling Patterns: The HUNT and VaMIS Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication JACC. Cardiovascular Imaging Abbreviated Journal JACC Cardiovasc Imaging  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Doppler; diastolic dysfunction; echocardiography; heart failure; reference values  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to derive age-specific multivariate reference regions (MVRs) able to classify subjects into those having normal or abnormal filling patterns and to evaluate the prognostic impact of this classification. BACKGROUND: The integration of several parameters is necessary to diagnose disorders of left ventricular (LV) filling because no single measurement accurately describes the complexity of diastolic function. However, no generally accepted validated multiparametric algorithm currently exists. METHODS: A cohort of 1,240 apparently healthy subjects from HUNT (the Nord-Trondelag Health Study) with measured early (E) and late (A) mitral inflow velocity and early mitral annular diastolic tissue velocity (e') were used to derive univariate 95% reference bands and age-specific MVRs. Subsequently, the prognostic impact of this MVR-based classification was evaluated by Cox regression in a community-based cohort (n = 726) and in a cohort of subjects with recent acute myocardial infarction (n = 551). Both evaluation cohorts were derived from VaMIS (the Vastmanland Myocardial Infarction Study). RESULTS: Univariate reference bands and MVRs are presented graphically and as regression equations. After adjustment for sex, age, hypertension, body mass index, diabetes, prior ischemic heart disease, LV mass, LV ejection fraction, and left atrial size, the hazard ratio associated with abnormal filling patterns in the community-based cohort was 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 7.0; p < 0.001) and that in the acute myocardial infarction cohort was 1.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 2.8; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: This study derived age-specific MVRs for identification of abnormal LV filling patterns and showed, in a community-based cohort and in a cohort of patients with recent acute myocardial infarction, that these MVRs conveyed important prognostic information. An MVR-based classification of LV filling patterns could lead to more consistent diagnostic algorithms for identification of different filling disorders.  
  Address (up) Department of Clinical Physiology, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1876-7591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28734926 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1977  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vindenes, H.K.; Svanes, C.; Lygre, S.H.L.; Hollund, B.-E.; Langhammer, A.; Bertelsen, R.J. url  doi
  Title Prevalence of, and work-related risk factors for, hand eczema in a Norwegian general population (The HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Contact Dermatitis Abbreviated Journal Contact Dermatitis  
  Volume 77