|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Nes, B.M.; Gutvik, C.R.; Lavie, C.J.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U.
Title Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI) for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Promotion of Physical Activity Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The American Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Med
Volume 130 Issue 3 Pages 328-336
Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Algorithms; Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality/*prevention & control; *Exercise; Female; Health Promotion/*methods; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment/*methods; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Young Adult; Activity tracking; Cardiovascular disease mortality; Physical activity; Prevention
Abstract PURPOSE: To derive and validate a single metric of activity tracking that associates with lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. METHODS: We derived an algorithm, Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI), using the HUNT Fitness Study (n = 4631), and validated it in the general HUNT population (n = 39,298) aged 20-74 years. The PAI was divided into three sex-specific groups (</=50, 51-99, and >/=100), and the inactive group (0 PAI) was used as the referent. Hazard ratios for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: After >1 million person-years of observations during a mean follow-up time of 26.2 (SD 5.9) years, there were 10,062 deaths, including 3867 deaths (2207 men and 1660 women) from cardiovascular disease. Men and women with a PAI level >/=100 had 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-27%) and 23% (95% CI, 4%-38%) reduced risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, respectively, compared with the inactive groups. Obtaining >/=100 PAI was associated with significantly lower risk for cardiovascular disease mortality in all prespecified age groups, and in participants with known cardiovascular disease risk factors (all P-trends <.01). Participants who did not obtain >/=100 PAI had increased risk of dying regardless of meeting the physical activity recommendations. CONCLUSION: PAI may have a huge potential to motivate people to become and stay physically active, as it is an easily understandable and scientifically proven metric that could inform potential users of how much physical activity is needed to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular disease death.
Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0002-9343 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27984009 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1964
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Modalsli, E.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Langhammer, A.; Hoff, M.; Forsmo, S.; Naldi, L.; Saunes, M.
Title Psoriasis, fracture risk and bone mineral density: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The British Journal of Dermatology Abbreviated Journal Br J Dermatol
Volume 176 Issue 5 Pages 1162-1169
Keywords
Abstract BACKGROUND: An association between psoriasis and osteoporosis has been reported. OBJECTIVES: To investigate, in a large prospective population-based Norwegian study, whether psoriasis is associated with increased risk of forearm or hip fracture; to investigate the cross-sectional association between psoriasis and bone mineral density (BMD) T-score in a subpopulation. METHODS: Hospital-derived fracture data from Nord-Trondelag County (1995-2013) were linked to psoriasis information, BMD measurements and lifestyle factors from the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2006-08 (HUNT3); socioeconomic data from the National Education Database; and use of medication from the Norwegian Prescription Database. RESULTS: Among 48 194 participants in HUNT3, we found no increased risk of forearm or hip fracture in 2804 patients with self-reported psoriasis [overall age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-1.31]. No clear association was found between psoriasis and mean BMD T-score; overall age- and sex-adjusted differences in total hip, femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD T-scores were 0.02 (95% CI -0.11 to 0.14), 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.17) and 0.07 (95% CI -0.09 to 0.24), respectively. No clear association was found between psoriasis and prevalent osteoporosis in either total hip, femoral neck or lumbar spine; overall age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio was 0.77 (95% CI 0.54-1.10). Associations did not change substantially after adjustment for education, smoking, systemic steroid use and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS: We found no association between psoriasis and risk of fracture. The study did not indicate reduced BMD T-score or higher prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with psoriasis.
Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0007-0963 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27718508 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1955
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Asvold, B.O.; Midthjell, K.; Krokstad, S.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A.
Title Prolonged sitting may increase diabetes risk in physically inactive individuals: an 11 year follow-up of the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia
Volume 60 Issue 5 Pages 830-835
Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology/metabolism; Exercise/physiology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Epidemiology; Sedentary lifestyle; Type 2 diabetes mellitus
Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We examined the association between sitting time and diabetes incidence, overall and by strata of leisure-time physical activity and BMI. METHODS: We followed 28,051 adult participants of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a population-based study, for diabetes incidence from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 and estimated HRs of any diabetes by categories of self-reported total daily sitting time at baseline. RESULTS: Of 28,051 participants, 1253 (4.5%) developed diabetes during 11 years of follow-up. Overall, sitting >/=8 h/day was associated with a 17% (95% CI 2, 34) higher risk of developing diabetes compared with sitting </=4 h/day, adjusted for age, sex and education. However, the association was attenuated to a non-significant 9% (95% CI -5, 26) increase in risk after adjustment for leisure-time physical activity and BMI. The association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by leisure-time physical activity (p Interaction = 0.01). Among participants with low leisure-time physical activity (</=2 h light activity per week and no vigorous activity), sitting 5-7 h/day and >/=8 h/day were associated with a 26% (95% CI 2, 57) and 30% (95% CI 5, 61) higher risk of diabetes, respectively, compared with sitting </=4 h/day. There was no corresponding association among participants with high leisure-time physical activity (>/=3 h light activity or >0 h vigorous activity per week). There was no statistical evidence that the association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by obesity (p Interaction = 0.65). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that total sitting time has little association with diabetes risk in the population as a whole, but prolonged sitting may contribute to an increased diabetes risk among physically inactive people.
Address School of Public Health, Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0012-186X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28054097 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1879
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quanjer, P.H.; Ruppel, G.L.; Langhammer, A.; Krishna, A.; Mertens, F.; Johannessen, A.; Menezes, A.M.B.; Wehrmeister, F.C.; Perez-Padilla, R.; Swanney, M.P.; Tan, W.C.; Bourbeau, J.
Title Bronchodilator Response in FVC Is Larger and More Relevant Than in FEV1 in Severe Airflow Obstruction Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Chest Abbreviated Journal Chest
Volume 151 Issue 5 Pages 1088-1098
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Airway Obstruction/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Asthma/*diagnosis/physiopathology; *Bronchodilator Agents; Canada; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/*physiology; Healthy Volunteers; Humans; Latin America; Male; Middle Aged; Netherlands; New Zealand; Norway; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Treatment Outcome; United States; Vital Capacity/*physiology; Young Adult; airways obstruction; asthma; bronchodilator responsiveness; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; respiratory physiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Recommendations on interpreting tests of bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR) are conflicting. We investigated the dependence of BDR criteria on sex, age, height, ethnicity, and severity of respiratory impairment. METHODS: BDR test data were available from clinical patients in the Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United States (n = 15,278; female subjects, 51.7%) and from surveys in Canada, Norway, and five Latin-American countries (n = 16,250; female subjects, 54.7%). BDR calculated according to FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC was expressed as absolute change, a percentage of the baseline level (% baseline), a percentage of the predicted value (% predicted), and z score. RESULTS: Change (Delta) in FEV1 and FVC, in milliliters, was unrelated to the baseline value but was biased toward age, height, sex, and level of airways obstruction; DeltaFEV1 was significantly lower in African Americans. In 1,106 subjects with low FEV1 (200-1,621 mL) the FEV1 increased by 12% to 44.7% relative to baseline but < 200 mL. Expressing BDR as a percentage of the predicted value or as a z score attenuated the bias and made the 200-mL criterion redundant, but reduced positive responses by half. DeltaFEV1 % baseline increased with the level of airflow obstruction but decreased with severe obstruction when expressed as z scores or % predicted; DeltaFVC, however expressed, increased with the level of airflow obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Expressing FEV1 responsiveness as % baseline spuriously suggests that responsiveness increases with the severity of respiratory impairment. Expressing change in FEV1 or FVC as % predicted or as z scores eliminates this artifact and renders the required 200-mL minimum increase redundant. In severe airways obstruction DeltaFVC should be critically evaluated as an index of clinically important relief of hyperinflation, with implications for bronchodilator drug trials.
Address Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0012-3692 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28040521 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1971
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zijlema, W.; Cai, Y.; Doiron, D.; Mbatchou, S.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; de Hoogh, K.; Morley, D.; Hodgson, S.; Elliott, P.; Key, T.; Kongsgard, H.; Hveem, K.; Gaye, A.; Burton, P.; Hansell, A.; Stolk, R.; Rosmalen, J.
Title Corrigendum to “Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses of harmonized data from 88,336 participants” [Environ. Res. 151 (2016) 804-813] Type Published Erratum
Year 2017 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res
Volume 152 Issue Pages 520
Keywords
Abstract
Address University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0013-9351 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27823774 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2027
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Theofylaktopoulou, D.; Midttun, O.; Ueland, P.M.; Meyer, K.; Fanidi, A.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Prentice, R.; Pettinger, M.; Thomson, C.A.; Giles, G.G.; Hodge, A.; Cai, Q.; Blot, W.J.; Wu, J.; Johansson, M.; Hultdin, J.; Grankvist, K.; Stevens, V.L.; McCullough, M.M.; Weinstein, S.J.; Albanes, D.; Ziegler, R.; Freedman, N.D.; Langhammer, A.; Hveem, K.; Naess, M.; Sesso, H.D.; Gaziano, J.M.; Buring, J.E.; Lee, I.-M.; Severi, G.; Zhang, X.; Stampfer, M.J.; Han, J.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Le Marchand, L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Wang, R.; Butler, L.M.; Koh, W.-P.; Gao, Y.-T.; Rothman, N.; Ericson, U.; Sonestedt, E.; Visvanathan, K.; Jones, M.R.; Relton, C.; Brennan, P.; Johansson, M.; Ulvik, A.
Title Impaired functional vitamin B6 status is associated with increased risk of lung cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid; Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium; functional vitamin B6 marker; pyridoxal 5'-phosphate
Abstract Circulating vitamin B6 levels have been found to be inversely associated with lung cancer. Most studies have focused on the B6 form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a direct biomarker influenced by inflammation and other factors. Using a functional B6 marker allows further investigation of the potential role of vitamin B6 status in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. We prospectively evaluated the association of the functional marker of vitamin B6 status, the 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid (HK:XA) ratio, with risk of lung cancer in a nested case-control study consisting of 5,364 matched case-control pairs from the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between HK:XA and lung cancer, and random effect models to combine results from different cohorts and regions. High levels of HK:XA, indicating impaired functional B6 status, were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, the odds ratio comparing the fourth and the first quartiles (OR4thvs.1st ) was 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.41). Stratified analyses indicated that this association was primarily driven by cases diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. Notably, the risk associated with HK:XA was approximately 50% higher in groups with a high relative frequency of squamous cell carcinoma, i.e., men, former and current smokers. This risk of squamous cell carcinoma was present in both men and women regardless of smoking status.
Address Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0020-7136 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29238985 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2011
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Snekvik, I.; Smith, C.H.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Langan, S.M.; Modalsli, E.H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M.
Title Obesity, Waist Circumference, Weight Change, and Risk of Incident Psoriasis: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Investigative Dermatology Abbreviated Journal J Invest Dermatol
Volume 137 Issue 12 Pages 2484-2490
Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Obesity/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Psoriasis/complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; *Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract Although psoriasis has been associated with obesity, there are few prospective studies with objective measures. We prospectively examined the effect of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, and 10-year weight change on the risk of developing psoriasis among 33,734 people in the population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (i.e., HUNT), Norway. During follow-up, 369 incident psoriasis cases occurred. Relative risk (RR) of psoriasis was estimated by Cox regression. One standard deviation higher body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-hip ratio gave RRs of 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.34), 1.26 (95% CI = 1.15-1.39), and 1.18 (95% CI = 1.07-1.31), respectively. Compared with normal weight participants, obese people had an RR of 1.87 (95% CI = 1.38-2.52), whereas comparing the fourth with the first quartile of waist circumference gave an RR of 1.95 (95% CI = 1.46-2.61). One standard deviation higher weight change gave an RR of 1.20 (95% CI = 1.07-1.35), and people who increased their body weight by 10 kg or more had an RR of 1.72 (95% CI = 1.15-2.58) compared with being weight stable. In conclusion, obesity and high abdominal fat mass doubles the risk of psoriasis, and long-term weight gain substantially increases psoriasis risk. Preventing weight gain and promoting maintenance of a normal body weight could reduce incidence of psoriasis.
Address Department of Dermatology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway; Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0022-202X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28780086 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1988
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lie, A.; Engdahl, B.; Hoffman, H.J.; Li, C.-M.; Tambs, K.
Title Occupational noise exposure, hearing loss, and notched audiograms in the HUNT Nord-Trondelag hearing loss study, 1996-1998 Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication The Laryngoscope Abbreviated Journal Laryngoscope
Volume 127 Issue 6 Pages 1442-1450
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Audiometry/*statistics & numerical data; Female; Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced/*epidemiology/etiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Noise, Occupational/*adverse effects; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology; Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects; Prevalence; Sex Distribution; Young Adult; Noise; noise-induced hearing loss; notched audiograms; occupation
Abstract OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To study the prevalence and usefulness of audiometric notches in the diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). STUDY DESIGN: Audiograms and data on noise exposure from 23,297 men and 26,477 women, aged 20 to 101 years, from the Nord-Trondelag Hearing Loss Study, 1996-1998. METHODS: The prevalence of four types of audiometric notches (Coles, Hoffman, Wilson) and 4 kHz notch were computed in relation to occupational noise exposure, age, sex, and report of recurrent ear infections. RESULTS: The prevalence of notches in the 3 to 6 kHz range (Wilson, Hoffman, and Coles) ranged from 50% to 60% in subjects without occupational noise exposure, and 60% to 70% in the most occupationally noise-exposed men. The differences were statistically significant only for bilateral notches. For 4 kHz notches, the prevalence varied from 25% in occupationally nonexposed to 35% in the most occupationally exposed men, and the differences were statistically significant for both bilateral and unilateral notches. For women, the prevalence of notches was lower than in men, especially for 4 kHz notches, and the differences between occupationally noise exposed and nonexposed were smaller. Recreational exposure to high music was not associated with notched audiograms. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of bilateral notches and unilateral 4 kHz notches is of some value in diagnosing NIHL, especially in men. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1442-1450, 2017.
Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0023-852X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27696439; PMCID:PMC5484347 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1948
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Karlsen, T.; Nauman, J.; Dalen, H.; Langhammer, A.; Wisloff, U.
Title The Combined Association of Skeletal Muscle Strength and Physical Activity on Mortality in Older Women: The HUNT2 Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc
Volume 92 Issue 5 Pages 710-718
Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Hand Strength; Humans; Leg/physiology; *Muscle Strength; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the isolated and combined associations of leg and arm strength with adherence to current physical activity guidelines with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in healthy elderly women. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study of 2529 elderly women (72.6+/-4.8 years) from the Norwegian Healthy survey of Northern Trondelag (second wave) (HUNT2) between August 15, 1995, and June 18, 1997, with a median of 15.6 years (interquartile range, 10.4-16.3 years) of follow-up. Chair-rise test and handgrip strength performances were assessed, and divided into tertiles. The hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause and cause-specific mortality by tertiles of handgrip strength and chair-rise test performance, and combined associations with physical activity were estimated by using Cox proportional hazard regression models. RESULTS: We observed independent associations of physical activity and the chair-rise test performance with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and between handgrip strength and all-cause mortality. Despite following physical activity guidelines, women with low muscle strength had increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR chair test, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.07-1.76; HR handgrip strength, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05-1.85) and cardiovascular disease mortality (HR chair test, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.01-2.42). Slow chair-test performance was associated with all-cause (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.16-1.51) and cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.14-1.76) mortality. The association between handgrip strength and all-cause mortality was dose dependent (P value for trend <.01). CONCLUSION: Handgrip strength and chair-rise test performance predicted the risk of all-cause and CVD mortality independent of physical activity. Clinically feasible tests of skeletal muscle strength could increase the precision of prognosis, even in elderly women following current physical activity guidelines.
Address Faculty of Medicine, K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0025-6196 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28473035 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1938
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nauman, J.; Nes, B.M.; Lavie, C.J.; Jackson, A.S.; Sui, X.; Coombes, J.S.; Blair, S.N.; Wisloff, U.
Title Prediction of Cardiovascular Mortality by Estimated Cardiorespiratory Fitness Independent of Traditional Risk Factors: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc
Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 218-227
Keywords Adult; Aged; *Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Ischemia/mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Registries; Risk Factors; Stroke/mortality
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) and evaluate the additional contribution of traditional risk factors in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality prediction. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: The study included healthy men (n=18,721) and women (n=19,759) aged 30 to 74 years. A nonexercise algorithm estimated cardiorespiratory fitness. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the primary (CVD mortality) and secondary (all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and stroke mortality) end points. The added predictive value of traditional CVD risk factors was evaluated using the Harrell C statistic and net reclassification improvement. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 16.3 years (range, 0.04-17.4 years), there were 3863 deaths, including 1133 deaths from CVD (734 men and 399 women). Low eCRF was a strong predictor of CVD and all-cause mortality after adjusting for established risk factors. The C statistics for eCRF and CVD mortality were 0.848 (95% CI, 0.836-0.861) and 0.878 (95% CI, 0.862-0.894) for men and women, respectively, increasing to 0.851 (95% CI, 0.839-0.863) and 0.881 (95% CI, 0.865-0.897), respectively, when adding clinical variables. By adding clinical variables to eCRF, the net reclassification improvement of CVD mortality was 0.014 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.051) and 0.052 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.127) in men and women, respectively. CONCLUSION: Low eCRF is independently associated with CVD and all-cause mortality. The inclusion of traditional clinical CVD risk factors added little to risk discrimination and did not improve the classification of risk beyond this simple eCRF measurement, which may be proposed as a practical and cost-effective first-line approach in primary prevention settings.
Address K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0025-6196 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27866655 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1963
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Marouli, E.; Graff, M.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Lo, K.S.; Wood, A.R.; Kjaer, T.R.; Fine, R.S.; Lu, Y.; Schurmann, C.; Highland, H.M.; Rueger, S.; Thorleifsson, G.; Justice, A.E.; Lamparter, D.; Stirrups, K.E.; Turcot, V.; Young, K.L.; Winkler, T.W.; Esko, T.; Karaderi, T.; Locke, A.E.; Masca, N.G.D.; Ng, M.C.Y.; Mudgal, P.; Rivas, M.A.; Vedantam, S.; Mahajan, A.; Guo, X.; Abecasis, G.; Aben, K.K.; Adair, L.S.; Alam, D.S.; Albrecht, E.; Allin, K.H.; Allison, M.; Amouyel, P.; Appel, E.V.; Arveiler, D.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Auer, P.L.; Balkau, B.; Banas, B.; Bang, L.E.; Benn, M.; Bergmann, S.; Bielak, L.F.; Bluher, M.; Boeing, H.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boger, C.A.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Bork-Jensen, J.; Bots, M.L.; Bottinger, E.P.; Bowden, D.W.; Brandslund, I.; Breen, G.; Brilliant, M.H.; Broer, L.; Burt, A.A.; Butterworth, A.S.; Carey, D.J.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chambers, J.C.; Chasman, D.I.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Chowdhury, R.; Christensen, C.; Chu, A.Y.; Cocca, M.; Collins, F.S.; Cook, J.P.; Corley, J.; Galbany, J.C.; Cox, A.J.; Cuellar-Partida, G.; Danesh, J.; Davies, G.; de Bakker, P.I.W.; de Borst, G.J.; de Denus, S.; de Groot, M.C.H.; de Mutsert, R.; Deary, I.J.; Dedoussis, G.; Demerath, E.W.; den Hollander, A.I.; Dennis, J.G.; Di Angelantonio, E.; Drenos, F.; Du, M.; Dunning, A.M.; Easton, D.F.; Ebeling, T.; Edwards, T.L.; Ellinor, P.T.; Elliott, P.; Evangelou, E.; Farmaki, A.-E.; Faul, J.D.; Feitosa, M.F.; Feng, S.; Ferrannini, E.; Ferrario, M.M.; Ferrieres, J.; Florez, J.C.; Ford, I.; Fornage, M.; Franks, P.W.; Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Galesloot, T.E.; Gan, W.; Gandin, I.; Gasparini, P.; Giedraitis, V.; Giri, A.; Girotto, G.; Gordon, S.D.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Gorski, M.; Grarup, N.; Grove, M.L.; Gudnason, V.; Gustafsson, S.; Hansen, T.; Harris, K.M.; Harris, T.B.; Hattersley, A.T.; Hayward, C.; He, L.; Heid, I.M.; Heikkila, K.; Helgeland, O.; Hernesniemi, J.; Hewitt, A.W.; Hocking, L.J.; Hollensted, M.; Holmen, O.L.; Hovingh, G.K.; Howson, J.M.M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Huang, P.L.; Hveem, K.; Ikram, M.A.; Ingelsson, E.; Jackson, A.U.; Jansson, J.-H.; Jarvik, G.P.; Jensen, G.B.; Jhun, M.A.; Jia, Y.; Jiang, X.; Johansson, S.; Jorgensen, M.E.; Jorgensen, T.; Jousilahti, P.; Jukema, J.W.; Kahali, B.; Kahn, R.S.; Kahonen, M.; Kamstrup, P.R.; Kanoni, S.; Kaprio, J.; Karaleftheri, M.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Karpe, F.; Kee, F.; Keeman, R.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Kitajima, H.; Kluivers, K.B.; Kocher, T.; Komulainen, P.; Kontto, J.; Kooner, J.S.; Kooperberg, C.; Kovacs, P.; Kriebel, J.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Kury, S.; Kuusisto, J.; La Bianca, M.; Laakso, M.; Lakka, T.A.; Lange, E.M.; Lange, L.A.; Langefeld, C.D.; Langenberg, C.; Larson, E.B.; Lee, I.-T.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lewis, C.E.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Gao, R.; Lin, H.; Lin, L.-A.; Lin, X.; Lind, L.; Lindstrom, J.; Linneberg, A.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Lophatananon, A.; Luan, J.'an; Lubitz, S.A.; Lyytikainen, L.-P.; Mackey, D.A.; Madden, P.A.F.; Manning, A.K.; Mannisto, S.; Marenne, G.; Marten, J.; Martin, N.G.; Mazul, A.L.; Meidtner, K.; Metspalu, A.; Mitchell, P.; Mohlke, K.L.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Morgan, A.; Morris, A.D.; Morris, A.P.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Munroe, P.B.; Nalls, M.A.; Nauck, M.; Nelson, C.P.; Neville, M.; Nielsen, S.F.; Nikus, K.; Njolstad, P.R.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Ntalla, I.; O'Connel, J.R.; Oksa, H.; Loohuis, L.M.O.; Ophoff, R.A.; Owen, K.R.; Packard, C.J.; Padmanabhan, S.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Pasterkamp, G.; Patel, A.P.; Pattie, A.; Pedersen, O.; Peissig, P.L.; Peloso, G.M.; Pennell, C.E.; Perola, M.; Perry, J.A.; Perry, J.R.B.; Person, T.N.; Pirie, A.; Polasek, O.; Posthuma, D.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rasheed, A.; Rauramaa, R.; Reilly, D.F.; Reiner, A.P.; Renstrom, F.; Ridker, P.M.; Rioux, J.D.; Robertson, N.; Robino, A.; Rolandsson, O.; Rudan, I.; Ruth, K.S.; Saleheen, D.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Sandow, K.; Sapkota, Y.; Sattar, N.; Schmidt, M.K.; Schreiner, P.J.; Schulze, M.B.; Scott, R.A.; Segura-Lepe, M.P.; Shah, S.; Sim, X.; Sivapalaratnam, S.; Small, K.S.; Smith, A.V.; Smith, J.A.; Southam, L.; Spector, T.D.; Speliotes, E.K.; Starr, J.M.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Stringham, H.M.; Stumvoll, M.; Surendran, P.; 't Hart, L.M.; Tansey, K.E.; Tardif, J.-C.; Taylor, K.D.; Teumer, A.; Thompson, D.J.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Thuesen, B.H.; Tonjes, A.; Tromp, G.; Trompet, S.; Tsafantakis, E.; Tuomilehto, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Tyrer, J.P.; Uher, R.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Ulivi, S.; van der Laan, S.W.; Van Der Leij, A.R.; van Duijn, C.M.; van Schoor, N.M.; van Setten, J.; Varbo, A.; Varga, T.V.; Varma, R.; Edwards, D.R.V.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Vestergaard, H.; Vitart, V.; Vogt, T.F.; Vozzi, D.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, C.A.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.; Wareham, N.J.; Warren, H.R.; Wessel, J.; Willems, S.M.; Wilson, J.G.; Witte, D.R.; Woods, M.O.; Wu, Y.; Yaghootkar, H.; Yao, J.; Yao, P.; Yerges-Armstrong, L.M.; Young, R.; Zeggini, E.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, J.H.; Zhao, W.; Zhao, W.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, W.; Rotter, J.I.; Boehnke, M.; Kathiresan, S.; McCarthy, M.I.; Willer, C.J.; Stefansson, K.; Borecki, I.B.; Liu, D.J.; North, K.E.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Pers, T.H.; Lindgren, C.M.; Oxvig, C.; Kutalik, Z.; Rivadeneira, F.; Loos, R.J.F.; Frayling, T.M.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Deloukas, P.; Lettre, G.
Title Rare and low-frequency coding variants alter human adult height Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 542 Issue 7640 Pages 186-190
Keywords ADAMTS Proteins/genetics; Adult; Alleles; Body Height/*genetics; Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics; Female; Gene Frequency/*genetics; Genetic Variation/*genetics; Genome, Human/genetics; Glycoproteins/genetics/metabolism; Glycosaminoglycans/biosynthesis; Hedgehog Proteins/genetics; Humans; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Interferon Regulatory Factors/genetics; Interleukin-11 Receptor alpha Subunit/genetics; Male; Multifactorial Inheritance/genetics; NADPH Oxidase 4; NADPH Oxidases/genetics; Phenotype; Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A/metabolism; Procollagen N-Endopeptidase/genetics; Proteoglycans/biosynthesis; Proteolysis; Receptors, Androgen/genetics; Somatomedins/metabolism
Abstract Height is a highly heritable, classic polygenic trait with approximately 700 common associated variants identified through genome-wide association studies so far. Here, we report 83 height-associated coding variants with lower minor-allele frequencies (in the range of 0.1-4.8%) and effects of up to 2 centimetres per allele (such as those in IHH, STC2, AR and CRISPLD2), greater than ten times the average effect of common variants. In functional follow-up studies, rare height-increasing alleles of STC2 (giving an increase of 1-2 centimetres per allele) compromised proteolytic inhibition of PAPP-A and increased cleavage of IGFBP-4 in vitro, resulting in higher bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors. These 83 height-associated variants overlap genes that are mutated in monogenic growth disorders and highlight new biological candidates (such as ADAMTS3, IL11RA and NOX4) and pathways (such as proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan synthesis) involved in growth. Our results demonstrate that sufficiently large sample sizes can uncover rare and low-frequency variants of moderate-to-large effect associated with polygenic human phenotypes, and that these variants implicate relevant genes and pathways.
Address Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, H3T 1J4, Canada
Corporate Author MAGIC Investigators Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28146470; PMCID:PMC5302847 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1953
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Osthus, I.B.O.; Lydersen, S.; Dalen, H.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U.
Title Association of Telomere Length With Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Cohort From the Population Based HUNT 2 Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis
Volume 59 Issue 6 Pages 649-655
Keywords Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Genetic Markers; Humans; Incidence; Linear Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis/epidemiology/*genetics; Norway/epidemiology; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Telomere/*genetics; *Telomere Homeostasis; Time Factors; Cardiovascular diseases; Myocardial infarction; Prevention; Risk factors; Telomeres
Abstract As possible markers of biological age, telomere length (TL) has been associated with age-related diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI) with conflicting findings. We sought to assess the relationship between TL and risk of future MI in 915 healthy participants (51.7% women) 65 years or older from a population-based prospective cohort (the HUNT 2 study, Norway). Mean TL was measured by quantitative PCR expressed as relative T (telomere repeat copy number) to S (single copy gene number) ratio, and log-transformed. During a mean follow up of 13.0 (SD, 3.2) years and 11,923 person-years, 82 participants were diagnosed with MI. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Relative TL was associated with age in women (P=0.01), but not in men (P=0.43). Using relative TL as a continuous variable, we observed a higher risk of MI in participants with longer telomeres with HRs of 2.46 (95% CI; 1.13 to 4.54) in men, and 2.93 (95% CI; 1.41 to 6.10) in women. Each 1-SD change in relative TL was associated with an HR of 1.54 (95% CI; 1.15 to 2.06) and 1.67 (95% CI; 1.18 to 2.37) in men and women, respectively. Compared with the bottom tertile of relative TL, HR of incident MI in top tertile was 2.71 (95% CI; 1.25 to 5.89) in men, and 3.65 (95% CI; 1.35 to 9.90) in women. Longer telomeres in healthy participants 65 years or older are associated with a high risk of incident MI. Future large scale prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore the potential association between TL and MI.
Address K. G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0033-0620 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28442329 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1968
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zisko, N.; Skjerve, K.N.; Tari, A.R.; Sandbakk, S.B.; Wisloff, U.; Nes, B.M.; Nauman, J.
Title Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI), Sedentary Behavior and Cardiovascular Risk Factor Clustering – the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis
Volume 60 Issue 1 Pages 89-95
Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Cardiovascular disease risk factors; Exercise; Exercise intensity; Physical activity; Sedentary behavior
Abstract Prolonged sedentary behavior (SB) positively associates with clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The recently developed metric for physical activity (PA) tracking called Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI) takes into account age, sex, resting and maximum heart rate, and a score of >/=100 weekly PAI has been shown to reduce the risk of premature CVD death in healthy as well as individuals with known CVD risk factors, regardless of whether or not the current PA recommendations were met. The aim of the present study was to examine if PAI modifies the associations between SB and CVD risk factor (CV-RF) clustering in a large apparently healthy general population cohort (n=29,950, aged >/=20 years). Logistic regression revealed that in those with >/=100 weekly PAI, the likelihood of CV-RF clustering prevalence associated with prolonged SB was attenuated across age groups. Monitoring weekly PAI-level could be useful to ensure that people perform enough PA to combat SB's deleterious association with CV-RF.
Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Cardiology, St. Olavs Hospital, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0033-0620 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28274818 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2028
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sen, A.; Opdahl, S.; Strand, L.B.; Vatten, L.J.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.
Title Insomnia and the Risk of Breast Cancer: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Psychosomatic Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychosom Med
Volume 79 Issue 4 Pages 461-468
Keywords
Abstract OBJECTIVE: The association of insomnia with subsequent breast cancer risk is largely unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether different symptoms of insomnia and their combination are associated with incident breast cancer in a large population-based study. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, 33,332 women were followed to monitor the occurrence of their first invasive breast cancer identified by the Cancer Registry of Norway. Insomnia symptoms including () nonrestorative sleep and () difficulty initiating and () maintaining sleep were self-reported using a study specific measure reflecting the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multiadjusted Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: A total of 862 incident breast cancer cases occurred during a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. No consistent association was observed between the individual insomnia symptoms and breast cancer risk. However, compared to women reporting no insomnia complaints, those who reported having all three aspects of insomnia simultaneously were at increased risk (hazard ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval = 1.11-5.09). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that having only some aspects of insomnia may not predispose someone to breast cancer. In contrast, experiencing all insomnia symptoms simultaneously might confer considerable excess risk.
Address From the Department of Public Health and General Practice (Sen, Opdahl, Strand, Vatten, Laugsand, Janszky), Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Internal Medicine (Laugsand), St. Olav's hospital, Trondheim, Norway; and Department of Public Health Sciences (Janszky), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0033-3174 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27763987 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1978
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thorstensen, K.; Kvitland, M.A.; Irgens, W.O.; Asberg, A.; Borch-Iohnsen, B.; Moen, T.; Hveem, K.
Title Iron loading in HFE p.C282Y homozygotes found by population screening: relationships to HLA-type and T-lymphocyte subsets Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation Abbreviated Journal Scand J Clin Lab Invest
Volume 77 Issue 7 Pages 477-485
Keywords Hla-A*03; Haplotypes; Mhc; homozygote; iron overload
Abstract Iron loading in p.C282Y homozygous HFE hemochromatosis subjects is highly variable, and it is unclear what factors cause this variability. Finding such factors could aid in predicting which patients are at highest risk and require closest follow-up. The degree of iron loading has previously been associated with certain HLA-types and with abnormally low CD8 + cell counts in peripheral blood. In 183 Norwegian, p.C282Y homozygotes (104 men, 79 women) originally found through population screening we determined HLA type and measured total T-lymphocytes, CD4 + and CD8 + cells, and compared this with data on iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous men, but not in homozygous women, we found that the presence of two HLA-A*03 alleles increased the iron load on average by approximately 2-fold compared to p.C282Y homozygous men carrying zero or one A*03 allele. On the other hand, the presence of two HLA-A*01 alleles, in male subjects, apparently reduced the iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous individuals, the iron loading was increased if the CD8 + cell number was below the 25 percentile or if the CD4 + cell number was above the 75 percentile. This effect appeared to be additive to the effect of the number of HLA-A*03 alleles. Our data indicate that homozygosity for the HLA-A*03 allele significantly increases the risk of excessive iron loading in Norwegian p.C282Y homozygous male patients. In addition, low CD8 + cell number or high CD4 + cell number further increases the risk of excessive iron loading.
Address d HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0036-5513 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28678636 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2013
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lie, T.M.; Bomme, M.; Hveem, K.; Hansen, J.M.; Ness-Jensen, E.
Title Snus and risk of gastroesophageal reflux. A population-based case-control study: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Gastroenterol
Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 193-198
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/*epidemiology; Heartburn/etiology; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Tobacco Use/*epidemiology; Tobacco, Smokeless/*adverse effects; Young Adult; Health surveys; oral tobacco; smokeless tobacco; snuff
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Tobacco smoking is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux, but whether other tobacco products increase the risk is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if snus increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was based on the third Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT3), a population-based study of all adult residents in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, performed in 2006-2009. The association between self-reported severe heartburn/regurgitation and snus use was assessed by logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared to never snus users, daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS (OR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.93), while previous snus users and those using <2 boxes of snus/month had an increased risk (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.46 and OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, respectively). There was no association between age when starting using snus and GERS. Snus users who started using snus to quit or cut down on cigarette smoking, who started using both snus and cigarettes or cigarettes alone had an increased risk of GERS. Snus users <30 years of age had an increased risk of GERS (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.16), while those aged between 50-60 and 60-70 years had a reduced risk (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93 and OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28-0.94, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS. However, previous snus users and subgroups of snus users had an increased risk of GERS indicating reverse causality, such that snus use could increase the risk of GERS.
Address d Department of Medicine , Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust , Levanger , Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0036-5521 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27797289 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1942
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vindenes, H.K.; Svanes, C.; Lygre, S.H.L.; Hollund, B.-E.; Langhammer, A.; Bertelsen, R.J.
Title Prevalence of, and work-related risk factors for, hand eczema in a Norwegian general population (The HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Contact Dermatitis Abbreviated Journal Contact Dermatitis
Volume 77 Issue 4 Pages 214-223
Keywords Hunt; atopic dermatitis; epidemiology; hand eczema; occupational
Abstract BACKGROUND: Chemical exposures at work and at home may cause hand eczema. However, this has been scarcely described for Norway. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of, and occupational risk factors for, hand eczema in Norway. METHODS: Among 50 805 respondents (aged >/=20 years) to the third Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3), 5757 persons reported ever having hand eczema, and 4206 answered a hand eczema questionnaire. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalences of hand eczema were 8.4% in men and 13.8% in women (p < 0.001), with onset at age </=10 years in 24% (men) and 20% (women), and onset at age >/=30 years in 37% (men) and 25% (women) (p < 0.001). Work-related hand eczema affected 4.8% of the population, and was most frequently associated with health/social work (29%) and occupational cleaning (20%) in women, and with farming (26%) and industrial occupations (27%) in men. Cleaning detergents (75%) and other chemicals (36%) were the most common exacerbating factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of hand eczema was 11.3%, and that of work-related hand eczema was 4.8%. Hand eczema was more common in women than in men, but with a later onset in men. Cleaning detergents were the most common aggravating factors. A large proportion of the Nord-Trondelag population is employed in farming, providing the possibility to identify farming as an important risk factor for hand eczema.
Address Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, 5021, Bergen, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0105-1873 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28449354 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2031
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author
Title Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015: a pooled analysis of 1479 population-based measurement studies with 19.1 million participants Type Comment
Year 2017 Publication Lancet (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Lancet
Volume 389 Issue 10064 Pages 37-55
Keywords Bayes Theorem; *Blood Pressure; *Global Health; Humans; Prevalence; Risk Factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. METHODS: For this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure. FINDINGS: We pooled 1479 studies that had measured the blood pressures of 19.1 million adults. Global age-standardised mean systolic blood pressure in 2015 was 127.0 mm Hg (95% credible interval 125.7-128.3) in men and 122.3 mm Hg (121.0-123.6) in women; age-standardised mean diastolic blood pressure was 78.7 mm Hg (77.9-79.5) for men and 76.7 mm Hg (75.9-77.6) for women. Global age-standardised prevalence of raised blood pressure was 24.1% (21.4-27.1) in men and 20.1% (17.8-22.5) in women in 2015. Mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure decreased substantially from 1975 to 2015 in high-income western and Asia Pacific countries, moving these countries from having some of the highest worldwide blood pressure in 1975 to the lowest in 2015. Mean blood pressure also decreased in women in central and eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and, more recently, central Asia, Middle East, and north Africa, but the estimated trends in these super-regions had larger uncertainty than in high-income super-regions. By contrast, mean blood pressure might have increased in east and southeast Asia, south Asia, Oceania, and sub-Saharan Africa. In 2015, central and eastern Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and south Asia had the highest blood pressure levels. Prevalence of raised blood pressure decreased in high-income and some middle-income countries; it remained unchanged elsewhere. The number of adults with raised blood pressure increased from 594 million in 1975 to 1.13 billion in 2015, with the increase largely in low-income and middle-income countries. The global increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure is a net effect of increase due to population growth and ageing, and decrease due to declining age-specific prevalence. INTERPRETATION: During the past four decades, the highest worldwide blood pressure levels have shifted from high-income countries to low-income countries in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa due to opposite trends, while blood pressure has been persistently high in central and eastern Europe. FUNDING: Wellcome Trust.
Address
Corporate Author NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC) Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0140-6736 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27863813; PMCID:PMC5220163 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1897
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Evensen, M.; Lyngstad, T.H.; Melkevik, O.; Reneflot, A.; Mykletun, A.
Title Adolescent mental health and earnings inequalities in adulthood: evidence from the Young-HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health
Volume 71 Issue 2 Pages 201-206
Keywords Employment; Inequalities; Longitudinal Studies; Mental Health; Social and life-course epidemiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that adolescent mental health problems are associated with lower employment probabilities and risk of unemployment. The evidence on how earnings are affected is much weaker, and few have addressed whether any association reflects unobserved characteristics and whether the consequences of mental health problems vary across the earnings distribution. METHODS: A population-based Norwegian health survey linked to administrative registry data (N=7885) was used to estimate how adolescents' mental health problems (separate indicators of internalising, conduct, and attention problems and total sum scores) affect earnings (>/=30 years) in young adulthood. We used linear regression with fixed-effects models comparing either students within schools or siblings within families. Unconditional quantile regressions were used to explore differentials across the earnings distribution. RESULTS: Mental health problems in adolescence reduce average earnings in adulthood, and associations are robust to control for observed family background and school fixed effects. For some, but not all mental health problems, associations are also robust in sibling fixed-effects models, where all stable family factors are controlled. Further, we found much larger earnings loss below the 25th centile. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent mental health problems reduce adult earnings, especially among individuals in the lower tail of the earnings distribution. Preventing mental health problems in adolescence may increase future earnings.
Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0143-005X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27531845 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1905
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Naicker, K.; Johnson, J.A.; Skogen, J.C.; Manuel, D.; Overland, S.; Sivertsen, B.; Colman, I.
Title Type 2 Diabetes and Comorbid Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety: Longitudinal Associations With Mortality Risk Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Diabetes Care Abbreviated Journal Diabetes Care
Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 352-358
Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*complications; Comorbidity; Depression/*complications; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Young Adult
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Depression is strongly linked to increased mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Despite high rates of co-occurring anxiety and depression, the risk of death associated with comorbid anxiety in individuals with type 2 diabetes is poorly understood. This study documented the excess mortality risk associated with symptoms of depression and/or anxiety comorbid with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using data for 64,177 Norwegian adults from the second wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2), with linkage to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry, we assessed all-cause mortality from survey participation in 1995 through to 2013. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine mortality risk over 18 years associated with type 2 diabetes status and the presence of comorbid affective symptoms at baseline. RESULTS: Three clear patterns emerged from our findings. First, mortality risk in individuals with diabetes increased in the presence of depression or anxiety, or both. Second, mortality risk was lowest for symptoms of anxiety, higher for comorbid depression-anxiety, and highest for depression. Lastly, excess mortality risk associated with depression and anxiety was observed in men with diabetes but not in women. The highest risk of death was observed in men with diabetes and symptoms of depression only (hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI 1.96, 6.14). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that symptoms of anxiety affect mortality risk in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of symptoms of depression, in addition to attenuating the relationship between depressive symptoms and mortality in these individuals.
Address School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada icolman@uottawa.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0149-5992 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28077458 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1961
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Vie, G.A.; Janszky, I.; Vatten, L.J.
Title Reply to Letter to the editor “Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT Study” Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol
Volume 242 Issue Pages 8
Keywords
Abstract
Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway; Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0167-5273 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28619354 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1882
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Vie, G.A.; Krokstad, S.; Janszky, I.; Romundstad, P.R.; Vatten, L.J.
Title Cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol
Volume 232 Issue Pages 127-133
Keywords Cardiovascular mortality; Confounding; Couples; Population study; Risk factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: To compare associations of conventional risk factors with cardiovascular death within couples and in the population as a whole. METHODS: We analysed baseline data (1995-97) from the HUNT2 Study in Norway linked to the national Causes of Death Registry. We compared risk within couples using stratified Cox regression. RESULTS: During 914776 person-years, 3964 cardiovascular deaths occurred, and 1658 of the deaths occurred among 1494 couples. There were consistently stronger associations of serum lipids and blood pressure with cardiovascular mortality within couples compared to the population as a whole. For instance, for systolic blood pressure (per 20mmHg), the hazard ratio (HR) within couples was 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.40) compared to 1.16 (1.12, 1.20) in the total population, and for diastolic pressure (per 10mmHg), the corresponding HRs were 1.16 (1.07, 1.26) and 1.11 (1.08, 1.13). Anthropometric factors (BMI, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio) as well as diabetes, smoking, physical activity, and education, showed nearly identical positive associations within couples and in the total population. CONCLUSIONS: Prospective population studies may tend to slightly underestimate associations of these factors with cardiovascular mortality.
Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway; Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0167-5273 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28082089 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1883
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Safiri, S.; Ayubi, E.
Title Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT study Type Comment
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol
Volume 242 Issue Pages 7
Keywords *Cardiovascular Diseases; Humans; Norway; Risk Factors
Abstract
Address Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: aubi65@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0167-5273 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28619353 Approved no
Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1974
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O.
Title Monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers are not independently associated with MI risk in healthy individuals – results from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol
Volume 243 Issue Pages 502-504
Keywords Leukocyte markers; Myocardial infarction
Abstract BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that circulating markers reflecting monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. METHODS: Serum monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers soluble (s) CD163, sCD14, Gal3BP, sCD25 and sCD166 were analyzed by enzyme-immunoassay in a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. Among 58,761 apparently healthy men and women followed a median 11.3years, 1587 incident MI cases were registered, and compared to 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. RESULTS: Higher serum sCD163 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.27, P-trend 0.002), sCD14 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.38, P-trend<0.001), and especially sCD25 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.45, P-trend<0.001), were associated with increased MI risk in the age-and sex adjusted models. However, after additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors these associations were strongly attenuated (Q4 vs Q1 ORs between 1.02 and 1.12, P-trends between 0.30 and 0.58). CONCLUSIONS: sCD163, sCD14 and sCD25 may reflect leukocyte activation and inflammatory mechanisms related to atherogenesis, but do not predict MI risk above and beyond conventional cardiovascular risk factors.
Address Department of Public Health, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
Corporate Author