toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Gabin, J.M.; Tambs, K.; Saltvedt, I.; Sund, E.; Holmen, J. url  doi
  Title Association between blood pressure and Alzheimer disease measured up to 27 years prior to diagnosis: the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Alzheimer's Research & Therapy Abbreviated Journal Alzheimers Res Ther  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 37  
  Keywords Age Distribution; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alzheimer Disease/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Asymptomatic Diseases/*epidemiology; Blood Pressure Determination/statistics & numerical data; Comorbidity; Dementia/diagnosis/epidemiology; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Hypertension/*diagnostic imaging/*epidemiology; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Prevalence; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sex Distribution; Alzheimer disease; Blood pressure; Epidemiology; Prospective case cohort; Risk factors; Vascular dementia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: A lot of attention has been paid to the relationship of blood pressure and dementia because epidemiological research has reported conflicting evidence. Observational data has shown that midlife hypertension is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia later in life, whereas there is evidence that low blood pressure is predictive in later life. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between dementia and blood pressure measured up to 27 years (mean 17.6 years) prior to ascertainment. METHODS: In Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, incident dementia data were collected during 1995-2011, and the diagnoses were validated by a panel of experts in the field. By using the subjects' personal identification numbers, the dementia data were linked to data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a large, population-based health study performed in 1984-1986 (HUNT 1) and 1995-1997 (HUNT 2). A total of 24,638 participants of the HUNT Study were included in the present study, 579 of whom were diagnosed with Alzheimer disease, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, or vascular dementia. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between dementia and blood pressure data from HUNT 1 and HUNT 2. RESULTS: Over the age of 60 years, consistent inverse associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and all-cause dementia, mixed Alzheimer/vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease, but not with vascular dementia, when adjusting for age, sex, education, and other relevant covariates. This was observed for systolic blood pressure in both HUNT 1 and HUNT 2, regardless of antihypertensive medication use. There was an adverse association between systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and Alzheimer disease in individuals treated with antihypertensive medication under the age of 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our data are in line with those in previous studies demonstrating an inverse association between dementia and systolic blood pressure in individuals over the age of 60 years. We cannot exclude a survival effect, however. Among middle-aged subjects (<60 years), elevated systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were associated with eventual Alzheimer disease in individuals who reported using antihypertensive medication.  
  Address HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Forskningsveien 2, 7600, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1758-9193 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28569205; PMCID:PMC5452294 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1900  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Selmeryd, J.; Henriksen, E.; Dalen, H.; Hedberg, P. url  doi
  Title Derivation and Evaluation of Age-Specific Multivariate Reference Regions to Aid in Identification of Abnormal Filling Patterns: The HUNT and VaMIS Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication JACC. Cardiovascular Imaging Abbreviated Journal JACC Cardiovasc Imaging  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Doppler; diastolic dysfunction; echocardiography; heart failure; reference values  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to derive age-specific multivariate reference regions (MVRs) able to classify subjects into those having normal or abnormal filling patterns and to evaluate the prognostic impact of this classification. BACKGROUND: The integration of several parameters is necessary to diagnose disorders of left ventricular (LV) filling because no single measurement accurately describes the complexity of diastolic function. However, no generally accepted validated multiparametric algorithm currently exists. METHODS: A cohort of 1,240 apparently healthy subjects from HUNT (the Nord-Trondelag Health Study) with measured early (E) and late (A) mitral inflow velocity and early mitral annular diastolic tissue velocity (e') were used to derive univariate 95% reference bands and age-specific MVRs. Subsequently, the prognostic impact of this MVR-based classification was evaluated by Cox regression in a community-based cohort (n = 726) and in a cohort of subjects with recent acute myocardial infarction (n = 551). Both evaluation cohorts were derived from VaMIS (the Vastmanland Myocardial Infarction Study). RESULTS: Univariate reference bands and MVRs are presented graphically and as regression equations. After adjustment for sex, age, hypertension, body mass index, diabetes, prior ischemic heart disease, LV mass, LV ejection fraction, and left atrial size, the hazard ratio associated with abnormal filling patterns in the community-based cohort was 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 7.0; p < 0.001) and that in the acute myocardial infarction cohort was 1.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 2.8; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: This study derived age-specific MVRs for identification of abnormal LV filling patterns and showed, in a community-based cohort and in a cohort of patients with recent acute myocardial infarction, that these MVRs conveyed important prognostic information. An MVR-based classification of LV filling patterns could lead to more consistent diagnostic algorithms for identification of different filling disorders.  
  Address Department of Clinical Physiology, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1876-7591 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28734926 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1977  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grov, E.K.; Fossa, S.D.; Dahl, A.A. url  doi
  Title A controlled study of the influence of comorbidity on activities of daily living in elderly cancer survivors (the HUNT-3 survey) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Geriatric Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Geriatr Oncol  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 328-335  
  Keywords Adl; Activities of daily living; Cancer survivors; Comorbidity; Elderly; Home dwelling  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine the influence of somatic comorbidity on Activity of Daily Living (ADL) problems in cancer survivors >/=70years (ECSs) based on data from The Health Study of Nord-Trondelag County (HUNT-3) 2006-08. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Among participants of the HUNT-3 survey, 599 ECSs had a diagnosis of one invasive cancer according to both The Cancer Registry of Norway and self-report. Three controls without cancer aged >/=70years for each ECS were drawn from the HUNT-3 sample. We compared personal-ADL (P-ADL) and instrumental-ADL (I-ADL) problems for ECSs and differences between ADL problems for ECSs with and without comorbidity and controls with and without comorbidity. RESULTS: The prevalence of P-ADL problems was 3.5% among ECSs and 2.9% among controls (p=0.97) and for I-ADL 28.5% versus 21.4% (p=0.01), respectively. In bivariate analyses where ECSs versus controls was the dependent variable, presence of I-ADL problems, higher age, being female, paired relationship, poor self-rated health, hospitalization last year, and low level of neuroticism were associated being ECSs. In multivariate analyses, these variables, except I-ADL-problems and paired relationship, remained significantly associated being ECSs. No significant differences were shown for P-ADL problems when comparing ECSs and controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with and without comorbidity. ECSs with comorbidity reported significantly more I-ADL-problems than controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with comorbidity had significantly more I-ADL-problems than ECSs without comorbidity. CONCLUSION: Our results reflect common factors found in ADL studies in the elderly population. Health personnel have to be particularly observant on I-ADL problems among female ECSs, and those reporting poor self-rated health or comorbidity.  
  Address National Advisory Unit on Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1879-4068 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28629695 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1917  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bjornland, T.; Langaas, M.; Grill, V.; Mostad, I.L. url  doi
  Title Assessing gene-environment interaction effects of FTO, MC4R and lifestyle factors on obesity using an extreme phenotype sampling design: Results from the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175071  
  Keywords Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; *Gene-Environment Interaction; Humans; *Life Style; Obesity/*genetics; *Phenotype; Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4/*genetics; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess the influence of age, gender and lifestyle factors on the effect of the obesity-promoting alleles of FTO and MCR4. METHODS: The HUNT study comprises health information on the population of Nord-Trondelag county, Norway. Extreme phenotype participants (gender-wise lower and upper quartiles of waist-hip-ratio and BMI >/= 35 kg/m2) in the third survey, HUNT3 (2006-08), were genotyped for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs9939609 (FTO) and rs17782313 (MC4R); 25686 participants were successfully genotyped. Extreme sampling was chosen to increase power to detect genetic and gene-environment effects on waist-hip-ratio and BMI. Statistical inference was based on linear regression models and a missing-covariate likelihood approach for the extreme phenotype sampling design. Environmental factors were physical activity, diet (artificially sweetened beverages) and smoking. Longitudinal analysis was performed using material from HUNT2 (1995-97). RESULTS: Cross-sectional and longitudinal genetic effects indicated stronger genetic associations with obesity in young than in old, as well as differences between women and men. We observed larger genetic effects among physically inactive compared to active individuals. This interaction was age-dependent and seen mainly in 20-40 year olds. We observed a greater FTO effect among men with a regular intake of artificially sweetened beverages, compared to non-drinkers. Interaction analysis of smoking was mainly inconclusive. CONCLUSIONS: In a large all-adult and area-based population survey the effects of obesity-promoting minor-alleles of FTO and MCR4, and interactions with life style factors are age- and gender-related. These findings appear relevant when designing individualized treatment for and prophylaxis against obesity.  
  Address Department of Clinical Nutrition and Speech-Language Therapy, Clinic of Clinical Services, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28384342; PMCID:PMC5383228 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1884  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Borte, S.; Winsvold, B.S.; Stensland, S.O.; Smastuen, M.C.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title The effect of foetal growth restriction on the development of migraine and tension-type headache in adulthood. The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175908  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Weight; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology/*etiology; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Logistic Models; Male; Migraine Disorders/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Tension-Type Headache/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about how factors early in life affect the development of migraine and tension-type headache. We aimed to examine whether growth restriction in utero is associated with development of migraine and frequent tension-type headache in adults. METHODS: The population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3) contained a validated headache questionnaire, which differentiated between migraine and tension-type headache. These data were linked to information on weight and gestational age at birth from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. In total 4557 females and 2789 males, aged 19-41 years, were included in this registry-based study. Participants were categorized as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, 10th-90th percentile), small for gestational age (SGA, 3rd-10th percentile) or very small for gestational age (VSGA, < 3rd percentile). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for migraine and tension-type headache, with exposure being growth restriction at birth. RESULTS: The effect of growth restriction on migraine was modified by sex, with a significant association in males (p<0.001), but not in females (p = 0.20). In particular, males born VSGA were at increased risk of developing migraine (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.63-4.58, p<0.001), with an intermediate risk among those born SGA (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.35, p = 0.08) compared to those born AGA. There was no significant association between growth restriction and frequent TTH (p = 0.051). CONCLUSION: Growth restriction was associated with increased risk of migraine in adulthood among males, but not among females. This suggests that migraine might, in part, be influenced by early life events, and that males seem to be particularly vulnerable.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28410431; PMCID:PMC5391957 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1885  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Johnsen, M.B.; Hellevik, A.I.; Smastuen, M.C.; Langhammer, A.; Furnes, O.; Flugsrud, G.B.; Nordsletten, L.; Zwart, J.A.; Storheim, K. url  doi
  Title The mediating effect of body mass index on the relationship between smoking and hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis. A population-based cohort study (the HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 12 Pages e0190288  
  Keywords  
  Abstract To investigate the total effect of smoking on total hip or knee replacement (THR/TKR) due to primary osteoarthritis (OA) and to quantify the indirect effect of smoking through body mass index (BMI). Participants from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study) were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register to detect the first THR or TKR due to primary OA. A mediation analysis was used to decompose the total effect of smoking into a direct and indirect effect. BMI was considered a mediator in the analysis. All effects were estimated as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The indirect effect of smoking mediated through BMI was expressed as a percentage (proportion*100). In total 55 188 participants were followed up during 17.2 years (median). We identified 1322 THRs and 754 TKRs. For men, the total effect of current vs. never smoking revealed a decreased risk of THR (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.46-0.76) and TKR (HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.32-0.66). For women, current smoking increased the risk of THR (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.60). For men, 6% and 7% of the risk reduction for THR and TKR, respectively, was mediated by BMI. We found a negative association between smoking and THR or TKR for men. On the contrary, smoking was associated with increased risk of THR for women. Most of the effect of smoking on joint replacement risk remained unexplained by BMI.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29284048; PMCID:PMC5746263 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1933  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Torske, M.O.; Krokstad, S.; Stamatakis, E.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Dog ownership and all-cause mortality in a population cohort in Norway: The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179832  
  Keywords Adult; Animals; *Cause of Death; Cohort Studies; Dogs; Exercise; Female; Health Status; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Mortality; Norway/epidemiology; *Ownership; *Population Surveillance; Walking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has been increased interest in human-animal interactions and their possible effects on human health. Some of this research has focused on human physical activity levels, mediated through increased dog walking. Much of the reported research has been cross sectional, and very few epidemiological studies have examined the association between dog ownership and mortality in populations. METHODS: We used data from the Norwegian county population-based Nord-Trondelag HUNT Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to analyse the relationship between dog ownership and all-cause mortality. The median follow-up time was 18.5 years and the maximum follow-up time was 19.7 years. RESULTS: In this population, dog owners were no more physically active than non-dog owners, both groups reporting a total of just over 3 hours/week of light and vigorous activity. Dog owners (n = 25,031, with 1,587 deaths during follow-up; 504,017 person-years of time at risk) had virtually the same hazard of dying as non-dog owners (Hazard ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence for an association between the presence of a dog in the household and all-cause mortality or physical activity levels in this Norwegian population. Further epidemiological research is needed to clarify this relationship, as methodological limitations and an active Norwegian population sample means that generalizable evidence is not yet clear on dog ownership and mortality.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28662069; PMCID:PMC5491039 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2014  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Daneshvar, F.; Weinreich, M.; Daneshvar, D.; Sperling, M.; Salmane, C.; Yacoub, H.; Gabriels, J.; McGinn, T.; Smith, M.C. url  doi
  Title Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Internal Medicine Residents: Are Future Physicians Becoming Deconditioned? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Graduate Medical Education Abbreviated Journal J Grad Med Educ  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 97-101  
  Keywords *Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Cross-Sectional Studies; Education, Medical, Graduate; Exercise/*psychology; Female; Habits; Humans; Internal Medicine/*education; *Internship and Residency; Male; New York; Surveys and Questionnaires; Time Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND : Previous studies have shown a falloff in physicians' physical activity from medical school to residency. Poor fitness may result in stress, increase resident burnout, and contribute to mortality from cardiovascular disease and other causes. Physicians with poor exercise habits are also less likely to counsel patients about exercise. Prior studies have reported resident physical activity but not cardiorespiratory fitness age. OBJECTIVE : The study was conducted in 2 residency programs (3 hospitals) to assess internal medicine residents' exercise habits as well as their cardiorespiratory fitness age. METHODS : Data regarding physical fitness levels and exercise habits were collected in an anonymous cross-sectional survey. Cardiopulmonary fitness age was determined using fitness calculator based on the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). RESULTS : Of 199 eligible physicians, 125 (63%) responded to the survey. Of respondents, 11 (9%) reported never having exercised prior to residency and 45 (36%) reported not exercising during residency (P < .001). In addition, 42 (34%) reported exercising every day prior to residency, while only 5 (4%) reported exercising daily during residency (P < .001), with 99 (79%) participants indicating residency obligations as their main barrier to exercise. We found residents' calculated mean fitness age to be 5.6 years higher than their mean chronological age (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS : Internal medicine residents reported significant decreases in physical activity and fitness. Residents attributed time constraints due to training as a key barrier to physical activity.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1949-8357 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28261402; PMCID:PMC5330203 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1904  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Justice, A.E.; Winkler, T.W.; Feitosa, M.F.; Graff, M.; Fisher, V.A.; Young, K.; Barata, L.; Deng, X.; Czajkowski, J.; Hadley, D.; Ngwa, J.S.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Chu, A.Y.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Lim, E.; Perez, J.; Eicher, J.D.; Kutalik, Z.; Xue, L.; Mahajan, A.; Renstrom, F.; Wu, J.; Qi, Q.; Ahmad, S.; Alfred, T.; Amin, N.; Bielak, L.F.; Bonnefond, A.; Bragg, J.; Cadby, G.; Chittani, M.; Coggeshall, S.; Corre, T.; Direk, N.; Eriksson, J.; Fischer, K.; Gorski, M.; Neergaard Harder, M.; Horikoshi, M.; Huang, T.; Huffman, J.E.; Jackson, A.U.; Justesen, J.M.; Kanoni, S.; Kinnunen, L.; Kleber, M.E.; Komulainen, P.; Kumari, M.; Lim, U.; Luan, J.'an; Lyytikainen, L.-P.; Mangino, M.; Manichaikul, A.; Marten, J.; Middelberg, R.P.S.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Navarro, P.; Perusse, L.; Pervjakova, N.; Sarti, C.; Smith, A.V.; Smith, J.A.; Stancakova, A.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Stringham, H.M.; Sung, Y.J.; Tanaka, T.; Teumer, A.; Trompet, S.; van der Laan, S.W.; van der Most, P.J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vedantam, S.L.; Verweij, N.; Vink, J.M.; Vitart, V.; Wu, Y.; Yengo, L.; Zhang, W.; Hua Zhao, J.; Zimmermann, M.E.; Zubair, N.; Abecasis, G.R.; Adair, L.S.; Afaq, S.; Afzal, U.; Bakker, S.J.L.; Bartz, T.M.; Beilby, J.; Bergman, R.N.; Bergmann, S.; Biffar, R.; Blangero, J.; Boerwinkle, E.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Bottinger, E.; Braga, D.; Buckley, B.M.; Buyske, S.; Campbell, H.; Chambers, J.C.; Collins, F.S.; Curran, J.E.; de Borst, G.J.; de Craen, A.J.M.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Dedoussis, G.; Delgado, G.E.; den Ruijter, H.M.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Eriksson, A.L.; Esko, T.; Faul, J.D.; Ford, I.; Forrester, T.; Gertow, K.; Gigante, B.; Glorioso, N.; Gong, J.; Grallert, H.; Grammer, T.B.; Grarup, N.; Haitjema, S.; Hallmans, G.; Hamsten, A.; Hansen, T.; Harris, T.B.; Hartman, C.A.; Hassinen, M.; Hastie, N.D.; Heath, A.C.; Hernandez, D.; Hindorff, L.; Hocking, L.J.; Hollensted, M.; Holmen, O.L.; Homuth, G.; Jan Hottenga, J.; Huang, J.; Hung, J.; Hutri-Kahonen, N.; Ingelsson, E.; James, A.L.; Jansson, J.-O.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Jhun, M.A.; Jorgensen, M.E.; Juonala, M.; Kahonen, M.; Karlsson, M.; Koistinen, H.A.; Kolcic, I.; Kolovou, G.; Kooperberg, C.; Kramer, B.K.; Kuusisto, J.; Kvaloy, K.; Lakka, T.A.; Langenberg, C.; Launer, L.J.; Leander, K.; Lee, N.R.; Lind, L.; Lindgren, C.M.; Linneberg, A.; Lobbens, S.; Loh, M.; Lorentzon, M.; Luben, R.; Lubke, G.; Ludolph-Donislawski, A.; Lupoli, S.; Madden, P.A.F.; Mannikko, R.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Martin, N.G.; McKenzie, C.A.; McKnight, B.; Mellstrom, D.; Menni, C.; Montgomery, G.W.; Musk, A.B.; Narisu, N.; Nauck, M.; Nolte, I.M.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Olden, M.; Ong, K.K.; Padmanabhan, S.; Peyser, P.A.; Pisinger, C.; Porteous, D.J.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rankinen, T.; Rao, D.C.; Rasmussen-Torvik, L.J.; Rawal, R.; Rice, T.; Ridker, P.M.; Rose, L.M.; Bien, S.A.; Rudan, I.; Sanna, S.; Sarzynski, M.A.; Sattar, N.; Savonen, K.; Schlessinger, D.; Scholtens, S.; Schurmann, C.; Scott, R.A.; Sennblad, B.; Siemelink, M.A.; Silbernagel, G.; Slagboom, P.E.; Snieder, H.; Staessen, J.A.; Stott, D.J.; Swertz, M.A.; Swift, A.J.; Taylor, K.D.; Tayo, B.O.; Thorand, B.; Thuillier, D.; Tuomilehto, J.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Vandenput, L.; Vohl, M.-C.; Volzke, H.; Vonk, J.M.; Waeber, G.; Waldenberger, M.; Westendorp, R.G.J.; Wild, S.; Willemsen, G.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zhao, W.; Zillikens, M.C.; Baldassarre, D.; Balkau, B.; Bandinelli, S.; Boger, C.A.; Boomsma, D.I.; Bouchard, C.; Bruinenberg, M.; Chasman, D.I.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Chines, P.S.; Cooper, R.S.; Cucca, F.; Cusi, D.; Faire, U. de; Ferrucci, L.; Franks, P.W.; Froguel, P.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Grabe, H.-J.; Gudnason, V.; Haiman, C.A.; Hayward, C.; Hveem, K.; Johnson, A.D.; Wouter Jukema, J.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Kivimaki, M.; Kooner, J.S.; Kuh, D.; Laakso, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Marchand, L.L.; Marz, W.; McCarthy, M.I.; Metspalu, A.; Morris, A.P.; Ohlsson, C.; Palmer, L.J.; Pasterkamp, G.; Pedersen, O.; Peters, A.; Peters, U.; Polasek, O.; Psaty, B.M.; Qi, L.; Rauramaa, R.; Smith, B.H.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Strauch, K.; Tiemeier, H.; Tremoli, E.; van der Harst, P.; Vestergaard, H.; Vollenweider, P.; Wareham, N.J.; Weir, D.R.; Whitfield, J.B.; Wilson, J.F.; Tyrrell, J.; Frayling, T.M.; Barroso, I.; Boehnke, M.; Deloukas, P.; Fox, C.S.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Hunter, D.J.; Spector, T.D.; Strachan, D.P.; van Duijn, C.M.; Heid, I.M.; Mohlke, K.L.; Marchini, J.; Loos, R.J.F.; Kilpelainen, T.O.; Liu, C.-T.; Borecki, I.B.; North, K.E.; Cupples, L.A. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide meta-analysis of 241,258 adults accounting for smoking behaviour identifies novel loci for obesity traits Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Communications Abbreviated Journal Nat Commun  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages 14977  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) account for environmental exposures, like smoking, potentially impacting the overall trait variance when investigating the genetic contribution to obesity-related traits. Here, we use GWAS data from 51,080 current smokers and 190,178 nonsmokers (87% European descent) to identify loci influencing BMI and central adiposity, measured as waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio both adjusted for BMI. We identify 23 novel genetic loci, and 9 loci with convincing evidence of gene-smoking interaction (GxSMK) on obesity-related traits. We show consistent direction of effect for all identified loci and significance for 18 novel and for 5 interaction loci in an independent study sample. These loci highlight novel biological functions, including response to oxidative stress, addictive behaviour, and regulatory functions emphasizing the importance of accounting for environment in genetic analyses. Our results suggest that tobacco smoking may alter the genetic susceptibility to overall adiposity and body fat distribution.  
  Address NHLBI Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, Massachusetts, 01702 USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2041-1723 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28443625; PMCID:PMC5414044 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1937  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Scelo, G.; Purdue, M.P.; Brown, K.M.; Johansson, M.; Wang, Z.; Eckel-Passow, J.E.; Ye, Y.; Hofmann, J.N.; Choi, J.; Foll, M.; Gaborieau, V.; Machiela, M.J.; Colli, L.M.; Li, P.; Sampson, J.N.; Abedi-Ardekani, B.; Besse, C.; Blanche, H.; Boland, A.; Burdette, L.; Chabrier, A.; Durand, G.; Le Calvez-Kelm, F.; Prokhortchouk, E.; Robinot, N.; Skryabin, K.G.; Wozniak, M.B.; Yeager, M.; Basta-Jovanovic, G.; Dzamic, Z.; Foretova, L.; Holcatova, I.; Janout, V.; Mates, D.; Mukeriya, A.; Rascu, S.; Zaridze, D.; Bencko, V.; Cybulski, C.; Fabianova, E.; Jinga, V.; Lissowska, J.; Lubinski, J.; Navratilova, M.; Rudnai, P.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Benhamou, S.; Cancel-Tassin, G.; Cussenot, O.; Baglietto, L.; Boeing, H.; Khaw, K.-T.; Weiderpass, E.; Ljungberg, B.; Sitaram, R.T.; Bruinsma, F.; Jordan, S.J.; Severi, G.; Winship, I.; Hveem, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Fletcher, T.; Koppova, K.; Larsson, S.C.; Wolk, A.; Banks, R.E.; Selby, P.J.; Easton, D.F.; Pharoah, P.; Andreotti, G.; Freeman, L.E.B.; Koutros, S.; Albanes, D.; Mannisto, S.; Weinstein, S.; Clark, P.E.; Edwards, T.L.; Lipworth, L.; Gapstur, S.M.; Stevens, V.L.; Carol, H.; Freedman, M.L.; Pomerantz, M.M.; Cho, E.; Kraft, P.; Preston, M.A.; Wilson, K.M.; Michael Gaziano, J.; Sesso, H.D.; Black, A.; Freedman, N.D.; Huang, W.-Y.; Anema, J.G.; Kahnoski, R.J.; Lane, B.R.; Noyes, S.L.; Petillo, D.; Teh, B.T.; Peters, U.; White, E.; Anderson, G.L.; Johnson, L.; Luo, J.; Buring, J.; Lee, I.-M.; Chow, W.-H.; Moore, L.E.; Wood, C.; Eisen, T.; Henrion, M.; Larkin, J.; Barman, P.; Leibovich, B.C.; Choueiri, T.K.; Mark Lathrop, G.; Rothman, N.; Deleuze, J.-F.; McKay, J.D.; Parker, A.S.; Wu, X.; Houlston, R.S.; Brennan, P.; Chanock, S.J. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide association study identifies multiple risk loci for renal cell carcinoma Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Communications Abbreviated Journal Nat Commun  
  Volume 8 Issue Pages 15724  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified six risk loci for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We conducted a meta-analysis of two new scans of 5,198 cases and 7,331 controls together with four existing scans, totalling 10,784 cases and 20,406 controls of European ancestry. Twenty-four loci were tested in an additional 3,182 cases and 6,301 controls. We confirm the six known RCC risk loci and identify seven new loci at 1p32.3 (rs4381241, P=3.1 x 10(-10)), 3p22.1 (rs67311347, P=2.5 x 10(-8)), 3q26.2 (rs10936602, P=8.8 x 10(-9)), 8p21.3 (rs2241261, P=5.8 x 10(-9)), 10q24.33-q25.1 (rs11813268, P=3.9 x 10(-8)), 11q22.3 (rs74911261, P=2.1 x 10(-10)) and 14q24.2 (rs4903064, P=2.2 x 10(-24)). Expression quantitative trait analyses suggest plausible candidate genes at these regions that may contribute to RCC susceptibility.  
  Address Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2041-1723 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28598434; PMCID:PMC5472706 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1976  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Almkvist, O.; Bosnes, O.; Bosnes, I.; Stordal, E. url  doi
  Title Selective impact of disease on short-term and long-term components of self-reported memory: a population-based HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages e013586  
  Keywords Hunt; disease; health; long-term memory; short-term memory; subjective memory  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Subjective memory is commonly considered to be a unidimensional measure. However, theories of performance-based memory suggest that subjective memory could be divided into more than one dimension. OBJECTIVE: To divide subjective memory into theoretically related components of memory and explore the relationship to disease. METHODS: In this study, various aspects of self-reported memory were studied with respect to demographics and diseases in the third wave of the HUNT epidemiological study in middle Norway. The study included all individuals 55 years of age or older, who responded to a nine-item questionnaire on subjective memory and questionnaires on health (n=18 633). RESULTS: A principle component analysis of the memory items resulted in two memory components; the criterion used was an eigenvalue above 1, which accounted for 54% of the total variance. The components were interpreted as long-term memory (LTM; the first component; 43% of the total variance) and short-term memory (STM; the second component; 11% of the total variance). Memory impairment was significantly related to all diseases (except Bechterew's disease), most strongly to brain infarction, heart failure, diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and whiplash. For most diseases, the STM component was more affected than the LTM component; however, in cancer, the opposite pattern was seen. CONCLUSIONS: Subjective memory impairment as measured in HUNT contained two components, which were differentially associated with diseases.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28490551; PMCID:PMC5566596 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1874  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Heuch, I.; Heuch, I.; Hagen, K.; Mai, X.-M.; Langhammer, A.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title Is there an association between vitamin D status and risk of chronic low back pain? A nested case-control analysis in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 11 Pages e018521  
  Keywords back pain; epidemiology; vitamin D and low back  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To explore potential associations between vitamin D status and risk of chronic low back pain (LBP) in a Norwegian cohort, and to investigate whether relationships depend on the season of blood sample collection. DESIGN: A nested case-control study in a prospective data set. SETTING: The Norwegian community-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT). Data were collected in the HUNT2 (1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008) surveys. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Chronic LBP, defined as LBP persisting at least 3 months continuously during the past year. PARTICIPANTS: Among individuals aged 19-55 years without LBP in HUNT2, a data set was generated including 1685 cases with LBP in HUNT3 and 3137 controls without LBP. METHODS: Blood samples from the participants collected in HUNT2 were analysed for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level. Associations with LBP in HUNT3 were evaluated by unconditional logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, sex, work status, physical activity at work and in leisure time, education, smoking, and body mass index. RESULTS: No association between vitamin D status and risk of chronic LBP was found in the total data set (OR per 10 nmol/L 25(OH)D=1.01, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.06) or in individuals with blood samples collected in summer/autumn (OR per 10 nmol/L 25(OH)D=0.99, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.06). For blood samples drawn in winter/spring, associations differed significantly between women and men (p=0.004). Among women a positive association was seen (OR per 10 nmol/L 25(OH)D=1.11, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.20), but among men no significant association was observed (OR per 10 nmol/L 25(OH)D=0.90, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.01). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, no association between vitamin D status and risk of LBP was demonstrated. The association suggested in women for the winter/spring season cannot be regarded as established.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29175890; PMCID:PMC5719329 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1928  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hjerkind, K.V.; Stenehjem, J.S.; Nilsen, T.I.L. url  doi
  Title Adiposity, physical activity and risk of diabetes mellitus: prospective data from the population-based HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages e013142  
  Keywords *Adiposity; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Body Mass Index; Comorbidity; Diabetes Mellitus/*epidemiology; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Young Adult; *Epidemiology; *Public Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Physical activity may counteract the adverse effects of adiposity on cardiovascular mortality; however, the evidence of a similar effect on diabetes is sparse. This study examines whether physical activity may compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk. METHODS: The study population consisted of 38 231 individuals aged 20 years or more who participated in two consecutive waves of the prospective longitudinal Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway: in 1984-1986 and in 1995-1997. A Poisson regression model with SEs derived from robust variance was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios of diabetes between categories of body mass index and physical activity. RESULTS: Risk of diabetes increased both with increasing body mass (Ptrend <0.001) and with decreasing physical activity level (Ptrend <0.001 in men and 0.01 in women). Combined analyses showed that men who were both obese and had low activity levels had a risk ratio of 17 (95% CI 9.52 to 30) compared to men who were normal weight and highly active, whereas obese men who reported high activity had a risk ratio of 13 (95% CI 6.92 to 26). Corresponding analysis in obese women produced risk ratios of 15 (95% CI 9.18 to 25) and 13 (95% CI 7.42 to 21) among women reporting low and high activity levels, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that overweight and obesity are associated with a substantially increased risk of diabetes, particularly among those who also reported being physically inactive. High levels of physical activity were associated with a lower risk of diabetes within all categories of body mass index, but there was no clear evidence that being physically active could entirely compensate for the adverse effect of adiposity on diabetes risk.  
  Address Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28093432; PMCID:PMC5253523 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1929  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nordstoga, A.L.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Vasseljen, O.; Unsgaard-Tondel, M.; Mork, P.J. url  doi
  Title The influence of multisite pain and psychological comorbidity on prognosis of chronic low back pain: longitudinal data from the Norwegian HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages e015312  
  Keywords back pain; epidemiology; musculoskeletal disorders; spine  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the prospective influence of multisite pain, depression, anxiety, self-rated health and pain-related disability on recovery from chronic low back pain (LBP). SETTING: The data is derived from the second (1995-1997) and third (2006-2008) wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: The study population comprises 4484 women and 3039 men in the Norwegian HUNT Study who reported chronic LBP at baseline in 1995-1997. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was recovery from chronic LBP at the 11-year follow-up. Persons not reporting pain and/or stiffness for at least three consecutive months during the last year were defined as recovered. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate adjusted risk ratios (RRs) with 95% CIs. RESULTS: At follow-up, 1822 (40.6%) women and 1578 (51.9%) men reported recovery from chronic LBP. The probability of recovery was inversely associated with number of pain sites (P-trend<0.001). Compared with reporting 2-3 pain sites, persons with only LBP had a slightly higher probability of recovery (RR 1.10, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.22 in women and RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.21 in men), whereas people reporting 6-9 pain sites had substantially lower probability of recovery (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.63 in women and RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.79 in men). Poor/not so good self-rated general health, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and pain-related disability in work and leisure were all associated with reduced probability of recovery, but there was no statistical interaction between multisite pain and these comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing number of pain sites was inversely associated with recovery from chronic LBP. In addition, factors such as poor self-rated health, psychological symptoms and pain-related disability may further reduce the probability of recovery from chronic LBP.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28592580; PMCID:PMC5734202 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1967  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Langhammer, A.; Skorpen, F.; Chen, Y.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level, chronic diseases and all-cause mortality in a population-based prospective cohort: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 6 Pages e017256  
  Keywords 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D); all-cause mortality; chronic diseases; prospective cohort study; vitamin D  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of vitamin D status with all-cause mortality in a Norwegian population and the potential influences of existing chronic diseases on the association. DESIGN: A population-based prospective cohort study. SETTING: Nord-Trondelag County, Norway. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample (n=6613) of adults aged 20 years or older in a cohort. METHODS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were measured in blood samples collected at baseline (n=6377). Mortality was ascertained from the Norwegian National Registry. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the HRs with 95% CIs for all-cause mortality in association with serum 25(OH)D levels after adjustment for a wide spectrum of confounding factors as well as chronic diseases at baseline. RESULTS: The median follow-up time was 18.5 years, during which 1539 subjects died. The HRs for all-cause mortality associated with the first quartile level of 25(OH)D (<34.5 nmol/L) as compared with the fourth quartile (>/=58.1 nmol/L) before and after adjustment for chronic diseases at baseline were 1.30 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.51) and 1.27 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.48), respectively. In the subjects without chronic diseases at baseline and with further exclusion of the first 3 years of follow-up, the corresponding adjusted HR was 1.34 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.66). CONCLUSIONS: Low serum 25(OH)D level was associated with increased all-cause mortality in a general Norwegian population. The association was not notably influenced by existing chronic diseases.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28674149; PMCID:PMC5734252 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1990  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Skaaby, T.; Taylor, A.E.; Jacobsen, R.K.; Paternoster, L.; Thuesen, B.H.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Larsen, S.C.; Zhou, A.; Wong, A.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Flexeder, C.; Mannisto, S.; Hardy, R.; Kuh, D.; Barry, S.J.; Tang Mollehave, L.; Cerqueira, C.; Friedrich, N.; Bonten, T.N.; Noordam, R.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Taube, C.; Jessen, L.E.; McConnachie, A.; Sattar, N.; Upton, M.N.; McSharry, C.; Bonnelykke, K.; Bisgaard, H.; Schulz, H.; Strauch, K.; Meitinger, T.; Peters, A.; Grallert, H.; Nohr, E.A.; Kivimaki, M.; Kumari, M.; Volker, U.; Nauck, M.; Volzke, H.; Power, C.; Hypponen, E.; Hansen, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Salomaa, V.; Grarup, N.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.R.; Skorpen, F.; Kaprio, J.; R Munafo, M.; Linneberg, A. url  doi
  Title Investigating the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in the CARTA consortium Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2224  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Observational studies on smoking and risk of hay fever and asthma have shown inconsistent results. However, observational studies may be biased by confounding and reverse causation. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants as markers of exposures to examine causal effects. We examined the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma by using the smoking-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968/rs1051730. We included 231,020 participants from 22 population-based studies. Observational analyses showed that current vs never smokers had lower risk of hay fever (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.61, 0.76; P < 0.001) and allergic sensitization (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.86; P < 0.001), but similar asthma risk (OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.09; P = 0.967). Mendelian randomization analyses in current smokers showed a slightly lower risk of hay fever (OR = 0.958, 95% CI: 0.920, 0.998; P = 0.041), a lower risk of allergic sensitization (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.02; P = 0.117), but higher risk of asthma (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.11; P = 0.020) per smoking-increasing allele. Our results suggest that smoking may be causally related to a higher risk of asthma and a slightly lower risk of hay fever. However, the adverse events associated with smoking limit its clinical significance.  
  Address Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28533558; PMCID:PMC5440386 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1980  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Taylor, A.E.; Carslake, D.; de Mola, C.L.; Rydell, M.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Horta, B.L.; Pearson, R.; Rai, D.; Galanti, M.R.; Barros, F.C.; Romundstad, P.R.; Davey Smith, G.; Munafo, M.R. url  doi
  Title Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy and Offspring Depression: a cross cohort and negative control study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 12579  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Previous reports suggest that offspring of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have greater risk of developing depression. However, it is unclear whether this is due to intrauterine effects. Using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) from the UK (N = 2,869), the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) from Norway (N = 15,493), the Pelotas 1982 Birth Cohort Study from Brazil (N = 2,626), and the Swedish Sibling Health Cohort (N = 258 sibling pairs), we compared associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy and mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy with offspring depression and performed a discordant sibling analysis. In meta-analysis, maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with higher odds of offspring depression (OR 1.20, 95% CI:1.08,1.34), but mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy was not (OR 1.05, 95% CI:0.94,1.17). However, there was only weak statistical evidence that the odds ratios for maternal and mother's partner's smoking differed from each other (p = 0.08). There was no clear evidence for an association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring depression in the sibling analysis. Findings do not provide strong support for a causal role of maternal smoking during pregnancy in offspring depression, rather observed associations may reflect residual confounding relating to characteristics of parents who smoke.  
  Address UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28974730; PMCID:PMC5626710 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2010  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Extracellular matrix markers and risk of myocardial infarction: The HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Preventive Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Prev Cardiol  
  Volume 24 Issue 11 Pages 1161-1167  
  Keywords Extracellular matrix; Ykl-40; case-control; myocardial infarction  
  Abstract Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling may influence atherosclerotic progression and plaque stability. We hypothesized that evaluation of extracellular matrix markers, with potentially different roles during atherogenesis, could provide information on underlying mechanisms and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. A total of 58,761 men and women, free of known cardiovascular disease, were followed for a first MI. During 11.3 years of follow-up, 1587 incident MIs were registered, and these cases were compared with 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. Circulating levels of the ECM proteins CD147 (ECM metalloproteinase inducer; EMMPRIN), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP: thrombospondin-5) and YKL-40 (chitinase-3-like-1) were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Results We found an inverse association between COMP (quartile (Q) 4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.98)) and YKL-40 (Q4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.77 (0.62-0.95)) with incidence of MI after full multivariable adjustment. Serum CD147 was not associated with MI risk in adjusted analysis. Conclusion High levels of COMP and YKL-40 were associated with lower risk of incident MI, suggesting a potential beneficial role in promoting plaque stability in individuals without incident cardiovascular disease.  
  Address 12 Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2047-4873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28429960 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1999  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gemes, K.; Malmo, V.; Laugsand, L.E.; Loennechen, J.P.; Ellekjaer, H.; Laszlo, K.D.; Ahnve, S.; Vatten, L.J.; Mukamal, K.J.; Janszky, I. url  doi
  Title Does Moderate Drinking Increase the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation? The Norwegian HUNT (Nord-Trondelag Health) Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of the American Heart Association Abbreviated Journal J Am Heart Assoc  
  Volume 6 Issue 10 Pages  
  Keywords Hunt; alcohol; atrial fibrillation; cohort study; epidemiology; moderate alcohol  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Compelling evidence suggests that excessive alcohol consumption increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), but the effect of light-moderate alcohol consumption is less certain. We investigated the association between alcohol consumption within recommended limits and AF risk in a light-drinking population. METHODS AND RESULTS: Among 47 002 participants with information on alcohol consumption in a population-based cohort study in Norway, conducted from October 2006 to June 2008, 1697 validated AF diagnoses were registered during the 8 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazard models with fractional polynomials to analyze the association between alcohol intake and AF. Population attributable risk for drinking within the recommended limit (ie, at most 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men without risky drinking) compared with nondrinking was also calculated. The average alcohol intake was 3.8+/-4.8 g/d. The adjusted hazard ratio for AF was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.80) when we compared participants consuming >7 drinks per week with abstainers. When we modeled the quantity of alcohol intake as a continuous variable, the risk increased in a curvilinear manner. It was higher with heavier alcohol intake, but there was virtually no association at <1 drink per day for women and <2 drinks per day for men in the absence of risky drinking. The population attributable risk among nonrisky drinkers was 0.07% (95% confidence interval, -0.01% to 0.13%). CONCLUSIONS: Although alcohol consumption was associated with a curvilinearly increasing risk of AF in general, the attributable risk of alcohol consumption within recommended limits among participants without binge or problem drinking was negligible in this population.  
  Address Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav's Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2047-9980 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29054845; PMCID:PMC5721892 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1901  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Folling, I.S.; Kulseng, B.; Midthjell, K.; Rangul, V.; Helvik, A.-S. url  doi
  Title Individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes invited to a lifestyle program: characteristics of participants versus non-participants (the HUNT Study) and 24-month follow-up of participants (the VEND-RISK Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care  
  Volume 5 Issue 1 Pages e000368  
  Keywords Findrisc; lifestyle programme; non-participants; primary health care; type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus is possible through lifestyle programs, but the effect depends on the program's content, resources, and setting. Lifestyle programs are often confronted with high rates of non-participation and attrition. This study invited individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes to a lifestyle program in the Norwegian primary healthcare setting. The aims were to investigate possible differences in characteristics between participants and non-participants and to study the effect of the lifestyle program at 24-month follow-up for participants. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Individuals identified at high risk for type 2 diabetes during the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3) from two municipalities (n=332) were invited to a lifestyle program (the VEND-RISK Study). A cross-sectional design was used to explore if the participants' characteristics differed from non-participants. A non-randomized, single-arm, pre-post examination was used to examine the effect of the lifestyle program on participants' characteristics at 24-month follow-up. RESULTS: Of all individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes invited to the lifestyle program, 86% (287/332) declined to participate. Non-participating women had fewer years of education (p<0.001), compared with participating women. For men, no differences were seen between non-participants and participants. Among all participants (n=45) at 24-month follow-up, none had developed type 2 diabetes, and HbA1c (p<0.001) had decreased significantly. There was a small reduction in mean body mass index from baseline to 24 months that was not statistically significant. For women, waist circumference (-4.0 cm, p<0.001) decreased significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Future research regarding individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes in the primary healthcare lifestyle program should focus on how to promote recruitment of women with low education. Participants attending this study's lifestyle program improved their cardiometabolic markers. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT01135901; Results.  
  Address St. Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2052-4897 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28878932; PMCID:PMC5574427 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1899  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Talseth, A.; Edna, T.-H.; Hveem, K.; Lydersen, S.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title Quality of life and psychological and gastrointestinal symptoms after cholecystectomy: a population-based cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Gastroenterol  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages e000128  
  Keywords Cholecystectomy; Gastrointestinal Function; Quality Of Life  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The study aims to examine gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life and the risk of psychological symptoms after cholecystectomy. DESIGN: This is a prospective population-based cohort study based on the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Norway. HUNT is a repeated health survey of the county population and includes a wide range of health-related items. In the present study, all 3 HUNT surveys were included, performed between 1984 and 2008. Selected items were scores on quality of life, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and selected gastrointestinal symptoms. Participants who underwent cholecystectomy for gallstone disease between 1 January 1990 and until 1 year before attending HUNT3 were compared with the remaining non-operated cohort. Associations between cholecystectomy and the postoperative scores and symptoms were assessed by multivariable regression models. RESULTS: Participants in HUNT1, HUNT2 and HUNT3 were 77 212 (89.4% of those invited), 65 237 (69.5%) and 50 807 (54.1%), respectively. In the study period, 931 participants were operated with cholecystectomy. Cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of diarrhoea and stomach pain postoperatively. In addition, cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of nausea postoperatively in men. We found no associations between cholecystectomy and quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation following surgery. CONCLUSIONS: In this large population-based cohort study, cholecystectomy was associated with postoperative diarrhoea and stomach pain. Cholecystectomy for gallstone colic was associated with nausea in men. There were no associations between quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2054-4774 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28761686; PMCID:PMC5508800 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2008  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Halvorsen, S.; Ghanima, W.; Fride Tvete, I.; Hoxmark, C.; Falck, P.; Solli, O.; Jonasson, C. url  doi
  Title A nationwide registry study to compare bleeding rates in patients with atrial fibrillation being prescribed oral anticoagulants Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Heart Journal. Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 28-36  
  Keywords Apixaban; Atrial fibrillation; Bleeding; Dabigatran; Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; Oral anticoagulants; Rivaroxaban; Warfarin  
  Abstract AIMS: We aimed to evaluate bleeding risk in clinical practice in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) being prescribed dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban compared with warfarin. METHODS: Using nationwide registries (Norwegian Patient Registry and Norwegian Prescription Database), we identified AF patients with a first prescription of oral anticoagulants between January 2013 and June 2015. Patients were followed until discontinuation or switching of oral anticoagulants, death, or end of follow-up. The primary endpoint was major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding. RESULTS: In total 32 675 AF patients were identified (58% men, median age 74 years): 11 427 patients used warfarin, 7925 dabigatran, 6817 rivaroxaban, and 6506 apixaban. After a median follow-up of 173 days (25th, 75th percentile 84, 340), 2081 (6.37%) patients experienced a first major or CRNM bleeding. Using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for baseline characteristics, use of apixaban [hazard ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.80, P < 0.001] and dabigatran (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.84, P < 0.001) were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin whereas use of rivaroxaban was not (HR: 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.17, P = 0.400). Use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were associated with higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas use of apixaban and dabigatran were associated with lower risk of intracranial bleeding, compared with warfarin. CONCLUSION: In this nationwide cohort study in AF patients, apixaban and dabigatran were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban and dabigatran compared with warfarin.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 2055-6845 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27680880; PMCID:PMC5216196 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1920  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gulati, A.M.; Hoff, M.; Salvesen, O.; Dhainaut, A.; Semb, A.G.; Kavanaugh, A.; Haugeberg, G. url  doi
  Title Bone mineral density in patients with psoriatic arthritis: data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication RMD Open Abbreviated Journal RMD Open  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages e000413  
  Keywords Psoriatic arthritis; bone mineral density; osteoporosis