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Author Hoff, M.; Meyer, H.E.; Skurtveit, S.; Langhammer, A.; Sogaard, A.J.; Syversen, U.; Dhainaut, A.; Skovlund, E.; Abrahamsen, B.; Schei, B. url  doi
  Title Validation of FRAX and the impact of self-reported falls among elderly in a general population: the HUNT study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA Abbreviated Journal Osteoporos Int  
  Volume 28 Issue 10 Pages 2935-2944  
  Keywords Fracture risk assessment; General population studies; Hunt; Osteoporosis  
  Abstract Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) without bone mineral density (BMD) for hip fracture prediction was validated in a Norwegian population 50-90 years. Fracture risk increased with higher FRAX score, and the observed number of hip fractures agreed well with the predicted number, except for the youngest and oldest men. Self-reported fall was an independent risk factor for fracture in women. INTRODUCTION: The primary aim was to validate FRAX without BMD for hip fracture prediction in a Norwegian population of men and women 50-90 years. Secondary, to study whether information of falls could improve prediction of fractures in the subgroup aged 70-90 years. METHODS: Data were obtained from the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3), the fracture registry in Nord-Trondelag, and the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD), including 15,432 women and 13,585 men. FRAX hip without BMD was calculated, and hip fractures were registered for a median follow-up of 5.2 years. The number of estimated and observed fractures was assessed, ROC curves with area under the curve (AUC), and Cox regression analyses. For the group aged 70-90 years, self-reported falls the last year before HUNT3 were included in the Cox regression model. RESULTS: The risk of fracture increased with higher FRAX score. When FRAX groups were categorized in a 10-year percentage risk for hip fracture as follows, <4, 4-7.9, 8-11.9, and >/=12%, the hazard ratio (HR) for hip fracture between the lowest and the highest group was 17.80 (95% CI: 12.86-24.65) among women and 23.40 (13.93-39.30) in men. Observed number of hip fractures agreed quite well with the predicted number, except for the youngest and oldest men. AUC was 0.81 (0.78-0.83) for women and 0.79 (0.76-0.83) for men. Self-reported fall was an independent risk factor for fracture in women (HR 1.64, 1.20-2.24), and among men, this was not significant (1.09, 0.65-1.83). CONCLUSIONS: FRAX without BMD predicted hip fracture reasonably well. In the age group 70-90 years, falls seemed to imply an additional risk among women.  
  Address Department of Gynecology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0937-941X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28668994 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1930  
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Author Simic, A.; Hansen, A.F.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Midthjell, K.; Syversen, T.; Flaten, T.P. url  doi
  Title Trace element status in patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway: The HUNT3 Survey Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) Abbreviated Journal J Trace Elem Med Biol  
  Volume 41 Issue Pages 91-98  
  Keywords Aged; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*blood/diagnosis/epidemiology; Female; *Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Trace Elements/*blood; Case-control study; Hunt3; Trace elements; Type 2 diabetes; Whole blood  
  Abstract Several epidemiological studies have indicated that a number of trace elements may play a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D). We investigated the association between prevalent T2D and the concentrations of 25 trace elements in whole blood, and the relationships between T2D duration and blood levels of the trace elements that we found to be related to T2D prevalence. In this population based case-control study, 267 patients with self-reported T2D and 609 controls (frequency matched), were selected from the third Nord-Trondelag Health Survey. Trace element blood levels were determined by high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Multivariable conditional logistic regression and multivariable linear regression were used to estimate associations. The prevalence of T2D was positively associated with boron, calcium and silver, and inversely associated with indium, lead and magnesium (Ptrend<0.05). We found no statistical evidence for associations between blood levels of arsenic, bromine, cadmium, cesium, chromium, copper, gallium, gold, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, rubidium, selenium, strontium, tantalum, thallium, tin and zinc and T2D prevalence. After corrections for multiple testing, associations remained significant for calcium and lead (Qtrend<0.05), and borderline significant for magnesium, silver and boron. With increasing disease duration, higher calcium levels were observed (P<0.05). This study suggests an association between prevalent T2D and blood levels of boron, calcium, indium, lead, magnesium and silver.  
  Address Department of Chemistry, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0946-672X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28347468 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1979  
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Author Neumann, L.; Dapp, U.; Jacobsen, W.; van Lenthe, F.; von Renteln-Kruse, W. url  doi
  Title The MINDMAP project: mental well-being in urban environments : Design and first results of a survey on healthcare planning policies, strategies and programmes that address mental health promotion and mental disorder prevention for older people in Europe Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie Abbreviated Journal Z Gerontol Geriatr  
  Volume 50 Issue 7 Pages 588-602  
  Keywords Functional competence; Geriatrics; Longitudinal cohort ageing studies; Mental health; Urban environment  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The MINDMAP consortium (2016-2019) aims to identify opportunities provided by the urban environment for the promotion of mental well-being and functioning of older people in Europe by bringing together European cities with urban longitudinal ageing studies: GLOBE, HAPIEE, HUNT, LASA, LUCAS, RECORD, Rotterdam Study, Turin Study. A survey on mental healthcare planning policies and programmes dedicated to older persons covering the range from health promotion to need of nursing care was performed for profound data interpretation in Amsterdam, Eindhoven, Hamburg, Helsinki, Kaunas, Krakow, London, Nord-Trondelag, Paris, Prague, Rotterdam and Turin. OBJECTIVES: To collect detailed information on healthcare planning policies and programmes across these European cities to evaluate variations and to delineate recommendations for sciences, policies and planners using experience from evidence-based practice feedback from the MINDMAP cities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The MINDMAP partners identified experts in the 12 cities with the best background knowledge of the mental health sector. After pretesting, semi-structured telephone interviews (1-2 h) were performed always by the same person. A structured evaluation matrix based on the geriatric functioning continuum and the World Health Organization (WHO) Public Health Framework for Healthy Ageing was applied. RESULTS: A complete survey (12 out of 12) was performed reporting on 41 policies and 280 programmes on the city level. It appeared from extensive analyses that the focus on older citizens, specific target groups, and multidimensional programmes could be intensified. CONCLUSION: There is a broad variety to cope with the challenges of ageing in health, and to address both physical and mental capacities in older individuals and their dynamic interactions in urban environments.  
  Address Geriatrics Centre, Scientific Department at the University of Hamburg, Albertinen-Haus, Sellhopsweg 18-22, 22459, Hamburg, Germany. w.renteln-kruse@albertinen.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title Das MINDMAP Projekt: mentale Gesundheit in stadtischen Lebensraumen : Design und erste Ergebnisse einer Umfrage zu gesundheitspolitischen Planungen, Strategien und Programmen zur Forderung der mentalen Gesundheit und Pravention mentaler Storungen alterer Menschen in Europa  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0948-6704 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28819693; PMCID:PMC5649390 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1966  
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Author Bosnes, I.; Almkvist, O.; Bosnes, O.; Stordal, E.; Romild, U.; Nordahl, H.M. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and correlates of successful aging in a population-based sample of older adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Psychogeriatrics Abbreviated Journal Int Psychogeriatr  
  Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 431-440  
  Keywords Hunt; components; correlates; prevalence; successful aging  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The factors influencing successful aging (SA) are of great interest in an aging society. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of SA, the relative importance across age of the three components used to define it (absence of disease and disability, high cognitive and physical function, and active engagement with life), and its correlates. METHODS: Data were extracted from the population-based cross-sectional Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3 2006-2008). Individuals aged 70-89 years with complete datasets for the three components were included (N = 5773 of 8,040, 71.8%). Of the respondents, 54.6% were women. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to analyze possible correlates of SA. RESULTS: Overall, 35.6% of the sample met one of the three criteria, 34.1% met combinations, and 14.5% met all of the three criteria. The most demanding criterion was high function, closely followed by absence of disease, while approximately two-thirds were actively engaged in life. The relative change with age was largest for the high cognitive and physical function component and smallest for active engagement with life. The significant correlates of SA were younger age, female gender, higher education, weekly exercise, more satisfaction with life, non-smoking, and alcohol consumption, whereas marital status was not related to SA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of SA in this study (14.5%) is comparable to previous studies. It may be possible to increase the prevalence by intervention directed toward more exercise, non-smoking, and better satisfaction with life.  
  Address Department of Psychology,Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU),Trondheim,Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1041-6102 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27852332 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1886  
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Author Yu, D.; Takata, Y.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Blot, W.; Sawada, N.; White, E.; Freedman, N.; Robien, K.; Giovannucci, E.; Zhang, X.; Park, Y.; Gao, Y.-T.; Chlebowski, R.T.; Langhammer, A.; Yang, G.; Severi, G.; Manjer, J.; Khaw, K.-T.; Weiderpass, E.; Liao, L.M.; Caporaso, N.; Krokstad, S.; Hveem, K.; Sinha, R.; Ziegler, R.; Tsugane, S.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Johansson, M.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O. url  doi
  Title Prediagnostic Calcium Intake and Lung Cancer Survival: A Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev  
  Volume 26 Issue 7 Pages 1060-1070  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. Little is known about whether prediagnostic nutritional factors may affect survival. We examined the associations of prediagnostic calcium intake from foods and/or supplements with lung cancer survival.Methods: The present analysis included 23,882 incident, primary lung cancer patients from 12 prospective cohort studies. Dietary calcium intake was assessed using food-frequency questionnaires at baseline in each cohort and standardized to caloric intake of 2,000 kcal/d for women and 2,500 kcal/d for men. Stratified, multivariable-adjusted Cox regression was applied to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: The 5-year survival rates were 56%, 21%, and 5.7% for localized, regional, and distant stage lung cancer, respectively. Low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake (<500-600 mg/d, less than half of the recommendation) was associated with a small increase in risk of death compared with recommended calcium intakes (800-1,200 mg/d); HR (95% CI) was 1.07 (1.01-1.13) after adjusting for age, stage, histology, grade, smoking status, pack-years, and other potential prognostic factors. The association between low calcium intake and higher lung cancer mortality was evident primarily among localized/regional stage patients, with HR (95% CI) of 1.15 (1.04-1.27). No association was found for supplemental calcium with survival in the multivariable-adjusted model.Conclusions: This large pooled analysis is the first, to our knowledge, to indicate that low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake may be associated with poorer survival among early-stage lung cancer patients.Impact: This multinational prospective study linked low calcium intake to lung cancer prognosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1060-70. (c)2017 AACR.  
  Address Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. xiao-ou.shu@vanderbilt.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1055-9965 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28264875; PMCID:PMC5500413 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2025  
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Author Ferreira, M.A.; Vonk, J.M.; Baurecht, H.; Marenholz, I.; Tian, C.; Hoffman, J.D.; Helmer, Q.; Tillander, A.; Ullemar, V.; van Dongen, J.; Lu, Y.; Ruschendorf, F.; Esparza-Gordillo, J.; Medway, C.W.; Mountjoy, E.; Burrows, K.; Hummel, O.; Grosche, S.; Brumpton, B.M.; Witte, J.S.; Hottenga, J.-J.; Willemsen, G.; Zheng, J.; Rodriguez, E.; Hotze, M.; Franke, A.; Revez, J.A.; Beesley, J.; Matheson, M.C.; Dharmage, S.C.; Bain, L.M.; Fritsche, L.G.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Balliu, B.; Nielsen, J.B.; Zhou, W.; Hveem, K.; Langhammer, A.; Holmen, O.L.; Loset, M.; Abecasis, G.R.; Willer, C.J.; Arnold, A.; Homuth, G.; Schmidt, C.O.; Thompson, P.J.; Martin, N.G.; Duffy, D.L.; Novak, N.; Schulz, H.; Karrasch, S.; Gieger, C.; Strauch, K.; Melles, R.B.; Hinds, D.A.; Hubner, N.; Weidinger, S.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Jansen, R.; Jorgenson, E.; Lee, Y.-A.; Boomsma, D.I.; Almqvist, C.; Karlsson, R.; Koppelman, G.H.; Paternoster, L. url  doi
  Title Shared genetic origin of asthma, hay fever and eczema elucidates allergic disease biology Type Meta-Analysis
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 49 Issue 12 Pages 1752-1757  
  Keywords Asthma/*genetics; Eczema/*genetics; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics; Genome-Wide Association Study/methods; Humans; Hypersensitivity/*genetics; Phenotype; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal/*genetics; Risk Factors  
  Abstract Asthma, hay fever (or allergic rhinitis) and eczema (or atopic dermatitis) often coexist in the same individuals, partly because of a shared genetic origin. To identify shared risk variants, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS; n = 360,838) of a broad allergic disease phenotype that considers the presence of any one of these three diseases. We identified 136 independent risk variants (P < 3 x 10(-8)), including 73 not previously reported, which implicate 132 nearby genes in allergic disease pathophysiology. Disease-specific effects were detected for only six variants, confirming that most represent shared risk factors. Tissue-specific heritability and biological process enrichment analyses suggest that shared risk variants influence lymphocyte-mediated immunity. Six target genes provide an opportunity for drug repositioning, while for 36 genes CpG methylation was found to influence transcription independently of genetic effects. Asthma, hay fever and eczema partly coexist because they share many genetic risk variants that dysregulate the expression of immune-related genes.  
  Address MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
  Corporate Author LifeLines Cohort Study Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29083406 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1903  
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Author Liu, D.J.; Peloso, G.M.; Yu, H.; Butterworth, A.S.; Wang, X.; Mahajan, A.; Saleheen, D.; Emdin, C.; Alam, D.; Alves, A.C.; Amouyel, P.; Di Angelantonio, E.; Arveiler, D.; Assimes, T.L.; Auer, P.L.; Baber, U.; Ballantyne, C.M.; Bang, L.E.; Benn, M.; Bis, J.C.; Boehnke, M.; Boerwinkle, E.; Bork-Jensen, J.; Bottinger, E.P.; Brandslund, I.; Brown, M.; Busonero, F.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chambers, J.C.; Chasman, D.I.; Chen, Y.E.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Chowdhury, R.; Christensen, C.; Chu, A.Y.; Connell, J.M.; Cucca, F.; Cupples, L.A.; Damrauer, S.M.; Davies, G.; Deary, I.J.; Dedoussis, G.; Denny, J.C.; Dominiczak, A.; Dube, M.-P.; Ebeling, T.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Esko, T.; Farmaki, A.-E.; Feitosa, M.F.; Ferrario, M.; Ferrieres, J.; Ford, I.; Fornage, M.; Franks, P.W.; Frayling, T.M.; Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Fritsche, L.G.; Frossard, P.; Fuster, V.; Ganesh, S.K.; Gao, W.; Garcia, M.E.; Gieger, C.; Giulianini, F.; Goodarzi, M.O.; Grallert, H.; Grarup, N.; Groop, L.; Grove, M.L.; Gudnason, V.; Hansen, T.; Harris, T.B.; Hayward, C.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Holmen, O.L.; Huffman, J.; Huo, Y.; Hveem, K.; Jabeen, S.; Jackson, A.U.; Jakobsdottir, J.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Jensen, G.B.; Jorgensen, M.E.; Jukema, J.W.; Justesen, J.M.; Kamstrup, P.R.; Kanoni, S.; Karpe, F.; Kee, F.; Khera, A.V.; Klarin, D.; Koistinen, H.A.; Kooner, J.S.; Kooperberg, C.; Kuulasmaa, K.; Kuusisto, J.; Laakso, M.; Lakka, T.; Langenberg, C.; Langsted, A.; Launer, L.J.; Lauritzen, T.; Liewald, D.C.M.; Lin, L.A.; Linneberg, A.; Loos, R.J.F.; Lu, Y.; Lu, X.; Magi, R.; Malarstig, A.; Manichaikul, A.; Manning, A.K.; Mantyselka, P.; Marouli, E.; Masca, N.G.D.; Maschio, A.; Meigs, J.B.; Melander, O.; Metspalu, A.; Morris, A.P.; Morrison, A.C.; Mulas, A.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Munroe, P.B.; Neville, M.J.; Nielsen, J.B.; Nielsen, S.F.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Ordovas, J.M.; Mehran, R.; O'Donnell, C.J.; Orho-Melander, M.; Molony, C.M.; Muntendam, P.; Padmanabhan, S.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Pasko, D.; Patel, A.P.; Pedersen, O.; Perola, M.; Peters, A.; Pisinger, C.; Pistis, G.; Polasek, O.; Poulter, N.; Psaty, B.M.; Rader, D.J.; Rasheed, A.; Rauramaa, R.; Reilly, D.F.; Reiner, A.P.; Renstrom, F.; Rich, S.S.; Ridker, P.M.; Rioux, J.D.; Robertson, N.R.; Roden, D.M.; Rotter, J.I.; Rudan, I.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Sanna, S.; Sattar, N.; Schmidt, E.M.; Scott, R.A.; Sever, P.; Sevilla, R.S.; Shaffer, C.M.; Sim, X.; Sivapalaratnam, S.; Small, K.S.; Smith, A.V.; Smith, B.H.; Somayajula, S.; Southam, L.; Spector, T.D.; Speliotes, E.K.; Starr, J.M.; Stirrups, K.E.; Stitziel, N.; Strauch, K.; Stringham, H.M.; Surendran, P.; Tada, H.; Tall, A.R.; Tang, H.; Tardif, J.-C.; Taylor, K.D.; Trompet, S.; Tsao, P.S.; Tuomilehto, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; van Zuydam, N.R.; Varbo, A.; Varga, T.V.; Virtamo, J.; Waldenberger, M.; Wang, N.; Wareham, N.J.; Warren, H.R.; Weeke, P.E.; Weinstock, J.; Wessel, J.; Wilson, J.G.; Wilson, P.W.F.; Xu, M.; Yaghootkar, H.; Young, R.; Zeggini, E.; Zhang, H.; Zheng, N.S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, W.; Zhou, Y.; Zoledziewska, M.; Howson, J.M.M.; Danesh, J.; McCarthy, M.I.; Cowan, C.A.; Abecasis, G.; Deloukas, P.; Musunuru, K.; Willer, C.J.; Kathiresan, S. url  doi
  Title Exome-wide association study of plasma lipids in >300,000 individuals Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 49 Issue 12 Pages 1758-1766  
  Keywords Coronary Artery Disease/blood/genetics; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood/genetics; Exome/*genetics; Genetic Association Studies/*methods; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics; *Genetic Variation; Genotype; Humans; Lipids/*blood; Macular Degeneration/blood/genetics; Phenotype; Risk Factors  
  Abstract We screened variants on an exome-focused genotyping array in >300,000 participants (replication in >280,000 participants) and identified 444 independent variants in 250 loci significantly associated with total cholesterol (TC), high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and/or triglycerides (TG). At two loci (JAK2 and A1CF), experimental analysis in mice showed lipid changes consistent with the human data. We also found that: (i) beta-thalassemia trait carriers displayed lower TC and were protected from coronary artery disease (CAD); (ii) excluding the CETP locus, there was not a predictable relationship between plasma HDL-C and risk for age-related macular degeneration; (iii) only some mechanisms of lowering LDL-C appeared to increase risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D); and (iv) TG-lowering alleles involved in hepatic production of TG-rich lipoproteins (TM6SF2 and PNPLA3) tracked with higher liver fat, higher risk for T2D, and lower risk for CAD, whereas TG-lowering alleles involved in peripheral lipolysis (LPL and ANGPTL4) had no effect on liver fat but decreased risks for both T2D and CAD.  
  Address Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA  
  Corporate Author VA Million Veteran Program Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29083408; PMCID:PMC5709146 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1943  
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Author Lu, X.; Peloso, G.M.; Liu, D.J.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, W.; Li, J.; Tang, C.S.-M.; Dorajoo, R.; Li, H.; Long, J.; Guo, X.; Xu, M.; Spracklen, C.N.; Chen, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Khor, C.C.; Liu, J.; Sun, L.; Wang, L.; Gao, Y.-T.; Hu, Y.; Yu, K.; Wang, Y.; Cheung, C.Y.Y.; Wang, F.; Huang, J.; Fan, Q.; Cai, Q.; Chen, S.; Shi, J.; Yang, X.; Zhao, W.; Sheu, W.H.-H.; Cherny, S.S.; He, M.; Feranil, A.B.; Adair, L.S.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Du, S.; Varma, R.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Shu, X.-O.; Lam, K.S.L.; Wong, T.Y.; Ganesh, S.K.; Mo, Z.; Hveem, K.; Fritsche, L.G.; Nielsen, J.B.; Tse, H.-F.; Huo, Y.; Cheng, C.-Y.; Chen, Y.E.; Zheng, W.; Tai, E.S.; Gao, W.; Lin, X.; Huang, W.; Abecasis, G.; Kathiresan, S.; Mohlke, K.L.; Wu, T.; Sham, P.C.; Gu, D.; Willer, C.J. url  doi
  Title Exome chip meta-analysis identifies novel loci and East Asian-specific coding variants that contribute to lipid levels and coronary artery disease Type Meta-Analysis
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Genetics Abbreviated Journal Nat Genet  
  Volume 49 Issue 12 Pages 1722-1730  
  Keywords Asian Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; Coronary Artery Disease/ethnology/*genetics; Europe; European Continental Ancestry Group/genetics; Exome/*genetics; Far East; Gene Frequency; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/ethnology/*genetics; *Genetic Variation; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Lipid Metabolism/*genetics; Lipids/analysis  
  Abstract Most genome-wide association studies have been of European individuals, even though most genetic variation in humans is seen only in non-European samples. To search for novel loci associated with blood lipid levels and clarify the mechanism of action at previously identified lipid loci, we used an exome array to examine protein-coding genetic variants in 47,532 East Asian individuals. We identified 255 variants at 41 loci that reached chip-wide significance, including 3 novel loci and 14 East Asian-specific coding variant associations. After a meta-analysis including >300,000 European samples, we identified an additional nine novel loci. Sixteen genes were identified by protein-altering variants in both East Asians and Europeans, and thus are likely to be functional genes. Our data demonstrate that most of the low-frequency or rare coding variants associated with lipids are population specific, and that examining genomic data across diverse ancestries may facilitate the identification of functional genes at associated loci.  
  Address Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA  
  Corporate Author GLGC Consortium Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1061-4036 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29083407 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1957  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hellevik, A.I.; Nordsletten, L.; Johnsen, M.B.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title Age of menarche is associated with knee joint replacement due to primary osteoarthritis (The HUNT Study and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume 25 Issue 10 Pages 1654-1662  
  Keywords Hip joint replacement; Hormonal therapies; Knee joint replacement; Osteoarthritis; Reproductive history  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether parity, age at menarche, menopausal status, age at menopause, use of oral contraceptives (OC) or use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) were associated with total knee replacement (TKR) or total hip replacement (THR) due to primary osteoarthritis. METHOD: In a prospective cohort study of 30,289 women from the second and third surveys of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, data were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR) in order to identify TKR or THR due to primary osteoarthritis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs). RESULTS: We observed 430 TKRs and 675 THRs during a mean follow-up time of 8.3 years. Increasing age at menarche was inversely associated with the risk of TKR (P-trend < 0.001). Past users and users of systemic HRT were at higher risk of TKR compared to never users (HR 1.42 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.90) and HR 1.40 (95% CI 1.03-1.90), respectively). No association was found between parity, age at menarche, menopausal status, age at menopause, oral contraceptive use or HRT use and THR. CONCLUSION: We found that increasing age at menarche reduced the risk of TKR. Past users and users of systemic HRT were at higher risk of TKR compared to never users. Parity did not increase the risk of THR or TKR.  
  Address The HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN (up) 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28705605 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1925  
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Author Hellevik, A.I.; Nordsletten, L.; Johnsen, M.B.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Langhammer, A. url  doi
  Title Corrigendum to “Age of menarche is associated with knee joint replacement due to primary osteoarthritis (The HUNT Study and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register)” [Osteoarthr Cartil 25 (2017) 1654-1662] Type Published Erratum
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 2148-2149  
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  Abstract  
  Address The HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: arnulf.langhammer@ntnu.no  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN (up) 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29066295 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1926  
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Author Johnsen, M.B.; Vie, G.A.; Winsvold, B.S.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Pedersen, L.M.; Hellevik, A.I.; Langhammer, A.; Furnes, O.; Flugsrud, G.B.; Skorpen, F.; Romundstad, P.R.; Storheim, K.; Nordsletten, L.; Zwart, J.A. url  doi
  Title The causal role of smoking on the risk of hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis: a Mendelian randomisation analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume 25 Issue 6 Pages 817-823  
  Keywords Epidemiology; Genetic variants; Osteoarthritis; Smoking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Smoking has been associated with a reduced risk of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and subsequent joint replacement. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the observed association is likely to be causal. METHOD: 55,745 participants of a population-based cohort were genotyped for the rs1051730 C > T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), a proxy for smoking quantity among smokers. A Mendelian randomization analysis was performed using rs1051730 as an instrument to evaluate the causal role of smoking on the risk of hip or knee replacement (combined as total joint replacement (TJR)). Association between rs1051730 T alleles and TJR was estimated by hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All analyses were adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: Smoking quantity (no. of cigarettes) was inversely associated with TJR (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.97-0.98). In the Mendelian randomization analysis, rs1051730 T alleles were associated with reduced risk of TJR among current smokers (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, per T allele), however we found no evidence of association among former (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88-1.07) and never smokers (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.89-1.06). Neither adjusting for body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular disease (CVD) nor accounting for the competing risk of mortality substantially changed the results. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that smoking may be causally associated with the reduced risk of TJR. Our findings add support to the inverse association found in previous observational studies. More research is needed to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms of this causal association.  
  Address Communication and Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Disorders, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: j.a.zwart@medisin.uio.no  
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  ISSN (up) 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28049019 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1934  
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Author Vie, G.A.; Pape, K.; Krokstad, S.; Johnsen, R.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Temporal changes in health within 5 years before and after disability pension-the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Eur J Public Health  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 653-659  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Health status has been reported to change before, during and after disability pension receipt. These associations might be subject to temporal changes according to changes in policy, incidence of disability pensions and other contextual factors. We compared the perceived health around time of disability retirement among persons receiving disability pension in the 1990 s and 2000 s in Norway. Methods: We linked data from two consecutive cross-sectional population based Norwegian health surveys, HUNT2 (1995-97) and HUNT3 (2006-08), to national registries, identifying those who received disability pension within 5 years before or after participation in the survey (HUNT2: n = 5362, HUNT3: n = 4649). We used logistic regression to assess associations of time from receiving a disability pension with self-rated health, insomnia, depression and anxiety symptoms and subsequently estimated adjusted prevalence over time. Results: Prevalence of poor self-rated health peaked around time of receiving disability pension in both decades. For those aged 50+, prevalence the year before disability pension was slightly lower in 2006-08 (74%, 95% CI 70-79%) than in 1995-97 (83%, 95% CI 79-87%), whereas peak prevalence was similar between surveys for those younger than 50. Depression symptoms peaked more pronouncedly in 1995-97 than in 2006-08, whereas prevalence of anxiety symptoms was similar at time of receiving disability pension between surveys. Conclusions: We found no strong evidence of differences in health selection to disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s. However, we found indication of less depression symptoms around time of disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s.  
  Address Forensic Department and Research Centre Broset, St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  ISSN (up) 1101-1262 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28637220 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2002  
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Author Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) Abbreviated Journal Respirology  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 278-283  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*physiopathology; Cohort Studies; Disease Progression; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Physical Exertion; Sedentary Lifestyle; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vital Capacity; *forced expiratory volume in 1 s; *forced vital capacity; *leisure time; *peak expiratory flow; *prospective  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: People with asthma may seek advice about physical activity. However, the benefits of leisure time physical activity on lung function are unclear. We investigated the association between leisure time physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study in Norway, we used multiple linear regressions to estimate the annual mean decline in lung function (and 95% CI) in 1329 people with asthma over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. The durations of light and hard physical activity per week in the last year were collected by questionnaire. Inactive participants did not report any light or hard activity, while active participants reported light or hard activity. RESULTS: The mean decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was 37 mL/year among inactive participants and 32 mL/year in active participants (difference: -5 mL/year (95% CI: -13 to 3)). The mean decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 33 mL/year among inactive participants and 31 mL/year in active participants (difference: -2 mL/year (95% CI: -11 to 7)). The mean decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio was 0.36%/year among inactive participants and 0.22%/year in active participants (difference: -0.14%/year (95% CI: -0.27 to -0.01)). The mean decline in peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 14 mL/year among the inactive participants and 10 mL/year in active participants (difference: -4 mL/year (95% CI: -9 to 1)). CONCLUSION: We observed slightly less decline in lung function in physically active than inactive participants with asthma, particularly for FEV1 , FEV1 /FVC ratio and PEF.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1323-7799 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:27696634 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1892  
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Author Brunes, A.; Flanders, W.D.; Augestad, L.B. url  doi
  Title Self-reported visual impairment, physical activity and all-cause mortality: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 45 Issue 1 Pages 33-41  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; *Self Report; Vision Disorders/*epidemiology; *All-cause mortality; *HUNT study; *physical activity; *prospective cohort study; *self-reported; *visual impairment  
  Abstract AIMS: To examine the associations of self-reported visual impairment and physical activity (PA) with all-cause mortality. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 65,236 Norwegians aged 20 years who had participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Of these participants, 11,074 (17.0%) had self-reported visual impairment (SRVI). The participants' data were linked to Norway's Cause of Death Registry and followed throughout 2012. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were assessed using Cox regression analyses with age as the time-scale. The Cox models were fitted for restricted age groups (<60, 60-84, 85 years). RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 14.5 years, 13,549 deaths were identified. Compared with adults with self-reported no visual impairment, the multivariable hazard ratios among adults with SRVI were 2.47 (95% CI 1.94-3.13) in those aged <60 years, 1.22 (95% CI 1.13-1.33) in those aged 60-84 years and 1.05 (95% CI 0.96-1.15) in those aged 85 years. The strength of the associations remained similar or stronger after additionally controlling for PA. When examining the joint associations, the all-cause mortality risk of SRVI was higher for those who reported no PA than for those who reported weekly hours of PA. We found a large, positive departure from additivity in adults aged <60 years, whereas the departure from additivity was small for the other age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Adults with SRVI reporting no PA were associated with an increased all-cause mortality risk. The associations attenuated with age.  
  Address 4 Department of Visual Impairment, Statped Mid-Norway, Norway  
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  ISSN (up) 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:27913690 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1893  
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Author Jorgensen, P.; Langhammer, A.; Krokstad, S.; Forsmo, S. url  doi
  Title Mortality in persons with undetected and diagnosed hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and hypothyroidism, compared with persons without corresponding disease – a prospective cohort study; The HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Family Practice Abbreviated Journal BMC Fam Pract  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 98  
  Keywords Chronic disease; Diabetes; Hypertension; Primary care; Public health; Thyroid disorders  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Suggested strategies in reducing the impact of non-communicable diseases (NCD) are early diagnosing and screening. We have limited proof of benefit of population screening for NCD. Increased mortality in persons with diagnosed NCD has been shown for decades. However, mortality in undetected NCD has barely been studied. This paper explores whether all-cause mortality differed between persons with diagnosed hypothyroidism, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and hypertension, compared with persons with undetected-, and with persons without the corresponding disease. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of the general population in Nord-Trondelag, Norway. Persons >/=20 years at baseline 1995-97 were followed until death or June 15, 2016. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute age and multiple adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between disease status and all-cause mortality. The number of participants in the hypothyroidism study was 31,960, in the T2DM study 37,957, and in the hypertension study 63,371. RESULTS: Mortality was increased in persons with diagnosed type 2 diabetes and hypertension, compared to persons without corresponding disease; HR 1.69 (95% CI 1.55-1.84) and HR 1.23 (95% CI 1.09-1.39), respectively. Among persons with undetected T2DM, the HR was 1.21 (95% CI 1.08-1.37), whilst among undetected hypothyroidism and hypertension, mortality was not increased compared with persons without the diseases. Further, the association with mortality was stronger in persons with long duration of T2DM (HR 1.96 (95% CI 1.57-2.44)) and hypertension (HR 1.32 (95% CI 1.17-1.49)), compared with persons with short duration (HR 1.29 (1.09-1.53) and HR 1.16 (1.03-1-30) respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Mortality was increased in persons with diagnosed T2DM and hypertension, and in undetected T2DM, compared with persons without the diseases. The strength of the association with mortality in undetected T2DM was however lower compared with persons with diagnosed T2DM, and mortality was not increased in persons with undetected hypothyroidism and hypertension, compared with persons without the diseases. Thus, future research needs to test more thoroughly if early diagnosing of these diseases, such as general population screening, is beneficial for health.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Postbox 8905, 7491, Trondheim, Norway  
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  ISSN (up) 1471-2296 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:29212453; PMCID:PMC5719734 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1935  
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Author Li, J.; Wu, B.; Selbaek, G.; Krokstad, S.; Helvik, A.-S. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with consumption of alcohol in older adults – a comparison between two cultures, China and Norway: the CLHLS and the HUNT-study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Geriatrics Abbreviated Journal BMC Geriatr  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 172  
  Keywords Abstainers; Alcohol consumption; China; Elderly; Norway; Older adults  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about the consumption of alcohol among Chinese and Norwegian older adults aged 65 years and over. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and factors related to alcohol consumption among older adults in China and Norway. METHODS: The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) data in 2008-2009 conducted in China and The Nord-Trondelag Health Study data in 2006-2008 (HUNT3) conducted in Norway were used. Mulitvariable logistic regression was used to test the factors related to alcohol consumption. RESULTS: The prevalence of participants who drink alcohol in the Chinese and Norwegian sample were 19.88% and 46.2%, respectively. The weighted prevalence of participants with consumption of alcohol in the Chinese sample of women and men were 7.20% and 34.14%, respectively. In the Norwegian sample, the prevalence of consumption of alcohol were 43.31% and 65.35% for women and men, respectively. Factors such as younger age, higher level of education, living in urban areas, living with spouse or partner, and better health status were related to higher likelihood of alcohol consumption among Norwegian older women and men; while reported better health status and poorer life satisfaction were related to higher likelihood of alcohol consumption among Chinese. In addition, rural males and older females with higher level of education were more likely to consume alcohol. CONCLUSION: The alcohol consumption patterns were quite different between China and Norway. Besides economic development levels and cultures in the two different countries, demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, overall health status, and life satisfaction were associated with alcohol consumption as well.  
  Address St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1471-2318 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28760157; PMCID:PMC5537928 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1947  
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Author Bauman, A.E.; Grunseit, A.C.; Rangul, V.; Heitmann, B.L. url  doi
  Title Physical activity, obesity and mortality: does pattern of physical activity have stronger epidemiological associations? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 788  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Hip circumference; Waist circumference  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Most studies of physical activity (PA) epidemiology use behaviour measured at a single time-point. We examined whether 'PA patterns' (consistently low, consistently high or inconsistent PA levels over time) showed different epidemiological relationships for anthropometric and mortality outcomes, compared to single time-point measure of PA. METHODS: Data were the Danish MONICA (MONItoring Trends and Determinants in CArdiovascular Disease) study over three waves 1982-3 (time 1), 1987-8 (time 2) and 1993-4 (time 3). Associations between leisure time single time-point PA levels at time 1 and time 3, and sport and active travel at times 1 and 2 with BMI, waist, hip circumference and mortality (death from coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD)) were compared to 'PA patterns' spanning multiple time points. PA pattern classified participants' PA as either 1) inactive or low PA at both time points; 2) moderate level PA at time 1 and high activity at time 3; or 3) a 'mixed PA pattern' indicating a varying levels of activity over time. Similarly, sport and active travel were also classified as indicating stable low, stable high and mixed patterns. RESULTS: The moderately and highly active groups for PA at times 1 and 3 had up to 1.7 cm lower increase in waist circumference compared with the inactive/low active group. Across 'PA patterns', 'active maintainers' had a 2.0 cm lower waist circumference than 'inactive/low maintainers'. Waist circumference was inversely related to sport but not active travel. CHD risk did not vary by activity levels at time 1, but was reduced significantly by 43% for high PA at time 3 (vs 'inactive' group) and among 'active maintainers' (vs 'inactive/low maintainers') by 62%. 'Sport pattern' showed stronger reductions in mortality for cardiovascular disease and CHD deaths among sport maintainers, than the single time point measures. CONCLUSIONS: PA patterns demonstrated a stronger association with a number of anthropometric and mortality outcomes than the single time-point measures. Operationalising PA as a sustained behavioural pattern may address some of the known under-estimation of risk for poor health in PA self-report measurements and better reflect exposure for epidemiological analysis of risk of health outcomes.  
  Address Copenhagen Center for Preventive Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, Copenhagen Capital Region, Denmark  
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  ISSN (up) 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28982371; PMCID:PMC5629749 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1880  
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Author Krokstad, S.; Ding, D.; Grunseit, A.C.; Sund, E.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Multiple lifestyle behaviours and mortality, findings from a large population-based Norwegian cohort study – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 58  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology; Cohort Studies; Diet/adverse effects; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; *Risk-Taking; Sleep; Smoking/adverse effects; Social Behavior; Young Adult; *All-cause mortality; *Cardiovascular disease; *Cohort study; *Lifestyle behaviour; *Metabolic disease; *Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Lifestyle risk behaviours are responsible for a large proportion of disease burden and premature mortality worldwide. Risk behaviours tend to cluster in populations. We developed a new lifestyle risk index by including emerging risk factors (sleep, sitting time, and social participation) and examine unique risk combinations and their associations with all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality. METHODS: Data are from a large population-based cohort study in a Norway, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), with an average follow-up time of 14.1 years. Baseline data from 1995-97 were linked to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry. The analytic sample comprised 36 911 adults aged 20-69 years. Cox regression models were first fitted for seven risk factors (poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption, current smoking, physical inactivity, excessive sitting, too much/too little sleep, and poor social participation) separately and then adjusted for socio-demographic covariates. Based on these results, a lifestyle risk index was developed. Finally, we explored common combinations of the risk factors in relation to all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality outcomes. RESULTS: All single risk factors, except for diet, were significantly associated with both mortality outcomes, and were therefore selected to form a lifestyle risk index. Risk of mortality increased as the index score increased. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality increased from 1.37 (1.15-1.62) to 6.15 (3.56-10.63) as the number of index risk factors increased from one to six respectively. Among the most common risk factor combinations the association with mortality was particularly strong when smoking and/or social participation were included. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to previous research on multiple risk behaviours by incorporating emerging risk factors. Findings regarding social participation and prolonged sitting suggest new components of healthy lifestyles and potential new directions for population health interventions.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
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  ISSN (up) 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28068991; PMCID:PMC5223537 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1946  
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Author Hellevik, A.I.; Johnsen, M.B.; Langhammer, A.; Fenstad, A.M.; Furnes, O.; Storheim, K.; Zwart, J.A.; Flugsrud, G.; Nordsletten, L. url  doi
  Title Incidence of total hip or knee replacement due to osteoarthritis in relation to thyroid function: a prospective cohort study (The Nord-Trondelag Health Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders Abbreviated Journal BMC Musculoskelet Disord  
  Volume 18 Issue 1 Pages 201  
  Keywords Hip joint replacement; Knee joint replacement; Osteoarthritis; Thyroid function; Thyroid stimulating hormone  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To study whether thyroid function was associated with risk of hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, data from the second and third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study were linked to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register in order to identify total hip or knee replacement as a result of primary osteoarthritis. RESULTS: Among 37 891 participants without previously known thyroid disease we recorded 978 total hip replacements (THRs) and 538 total knee replacements (TKRs) during a median follow-up time of 15.7 years. The analyses were adjusted for sex, age, BMI (body mass index), smoking, physical activity and diabetes. We did not find any association between TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) and THR or TKR due to osteoarthritis. Neither were changes in TSH over time, or overt hypo- or hyperthyroidism, associated with incidence of THR or TKR. CONCLUSION: No association was found between thyroid function and hip or knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway  
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  ISSN (up) 1471-2474 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28521834; PMCID:PMC5437592 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1924  
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Author Grunseit, A.C.; Chau, J.Y.; Rangul, V.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Patterns of sitting and mortality in the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 8  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Posture; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Self Report; Young Adult; *Cardiovascular disease; *Epidemiology; *Mortality; *Sedentary behaviour  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Current evidence concerning sedentary behaviour and mortality risk has used single time point assessments of sitting. Little is known about how changes in sitting levels over time affect subsequent mortality risk. AIM: To examine the associations between patterns of sitting time assessed at two time points 11 years apart and risk of all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality. METHODS: Participants were 25,651 adults aged > =20 years old from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study with self-reported total sitting time in 1995-1997 (HUNT2) and 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Four categories characterised patterns of sitting: (1) low at HUNT2/ low at HUNT3, 'consistently low sitting'; (2) low at HUNT2/high at HUNT3, 'increased sitting'; (3) high at HUNT2/low at HUNT3, 'reduced sitting'; and (4) high at HUNT2 /high at HUNT3, 'consistently high sitting'. Associations of sitting pattern with all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality were analysed using Cox regression adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 6.2 years (158880 person-years); 1212 participants died. Compared to 'consistently low sitting', adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.51 (95% CI: 1.28-2.78), 1.03 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20), and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.06-1.51) for 'increased sitting', 'reduced sitting' and 'consistently high sitting' respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Examining patterns of sitting over time augments single time-point analyses of risk exposures associated with high sitting time. Whilst sitting habits can be stable over a long period, life events (e.g., changing jobs, retiring or illness) may influence sitting trajectories and therefore sitting-attributable risk. Reducing sitting may yield mortality risks comparable to a stable low-sitting pattern.  
  Address Department of Public health and General practice, HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway  
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  ISSN (up) 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28122625; PMCID:PMC5267382 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1918  
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Author Ness-Jensen, E.; Lagergren, J. url  doi
  Title Tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Best Practice & Research. Clinical Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Best Pract Res Clin Gastroenterol  
  Volume 31 Issue 5 Pages 501-508  
  Keywords Causality; Disease management; Ethanol; Gastroesophageal reflux; Smoking; Tobacco  
  Abstract Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) develops when reflux of gastric content causes troublesome symptoms or complications. The main symptoms are heartburn and acid regurgitation and complications include oesophagitis, strictures, Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition to hereditary influence, GORD is associated with lifestyle factors, mainly obesity. Tobacco smoking is regarded as an aetiological factor of GORD, while alcohol consumption is considered a triggering factor of reflux episodes and not a causal factor. Yet, both tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption can reduce the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, facilitating reflux. In addition, tobacco smoking reduces the production of saliva rich in bicarbonate, which is important for buffering and clearance of acid in the oesophagus. Alcohol also has a direct noxious effect on the oesophageal mucosa, which predisposes to acidic injury. Tobacco smoking cessation reduces the risk of GORD symptoms and avoidance of alcohol is encouraged in individuals where alcohol consumption triggers reflux.  
  Address Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden; School of Cancer Sciences, King's College London, SE1 9RT, United Kingdom. Electronic address: jesper.lagergren@ki.se  
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  ISSN (up) 1521-6918 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:29195669 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1965  
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Author Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Steinshamn, S.; Mai, X.-M.; Brumpton, B.M. url  doi
  Title The Prevalence and Symptom Profile of Asthma-COPD Overlap: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Copd Abbreviated Journal Copd  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Acos; epidemiology; obstructive lung disease; spirometry  
  Abstract The concept of asthma and COPD as separate conditions has been questioned, and the term asthma-COPD overlap syndrome has been introduced. We assessed the prevalence, symptoms, and lifestyle factors of asthma-COPD overlap (ACO) in a large Norwegian population-based study. From 2006 to 2008, a total of 50,777 residents of Nord-Trondelag participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway. They completed questionnaires regarding respiratory symptoms, disease status, and medication use. We estimated the prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of ACO. Additionally, spirometry was used to estimate the prevalence of ACO in a subgroup. The prevalence of self-reported ACO was 1.9%, and in age groups <40, 40-60 and >/=60 years it was 0.7%, 1.4%, and 3.2%, respectively. Among those reporting COPD, the proportion of ACO was 0.56. In the spirometry subgroup when ACO was defined as doctor diagnosed asthma ever and FEV1/FVC < 0.70, the prevalence of ACO was 2.0%. All respiratory symptoms, separately or in combination, as well as medication use were reported most frequently in those with ACO compared to the other groups. Strikingly, we observed a two-fold higher proportion of allergic rhinitis in ACO compared to COPD only. In this Norwegian population, the prevalence of self-reported ACO was 1.9%, and the corresponding proportion of ACO among those with COPD was 0.56. Participants with ACO generally had the highest proportions of respiratory symptoms compared to asthma or COPD.  
  Address d K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1541-2563 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29257905 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1927  
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