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Author Li, J.; Wu, B.; Selbaek, G.; Krokstad, S.; Helvik, A.-S. url  doi
  Title Factors associated with consumption of alcohol in older adults – a comparison between two cultures, China and Norway: the CLHLS and the HUNT-study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Geriatrics Abbreviated Journal BMC Geriatr  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 172  
  Keywords (up) Abstainers; Alcohol consumption; China; Elderly; Norway; Older adults  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about the consumption of alcohol among Chinese and Norwegian older adults aged 65 years and over. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and factors related to alcohol consumption among older adults in China and Norway. METHODS: The Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) data in 2008-2009 conducted in China and The Nord-Trondelag Health Study data in 2006-2008 (HUNT3) conducted in Norway were used. Mulitvariable logistic regression was used to test the factors related to alcohol consumption. RESULTS: The prevalence of participants who drink alcohol in the Chinese and Norwegian sample were 19.88% and 46.2%, respectively. The weighted prevalence of participants with consumption of alcohol in the Chinese sample of women and men were 7.20% and 34.14%, respectively. In the Norwegian sample, the prevalence of consumption of alcohol were 43.31% and 65.35% for women and men, respectively. Factors such as younger age, higher level of education, living in urban areas, living with spouse or partner, and better health status were related to higher likelihood of alcohol consumption among Norwegian older women and men; while reported better health status and poorer life satisfaction were related to higher likelihood of alcohol consumption among Chinese. In addition, rural males and older females with higher level of education were more likely to consume alcohol. CONCLUSION: The alcohol consumption patterns were quite different between China and Norway. Besides economic development levels and cultures in the two different countries, demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, overall health status, and life satisfaction were associated with alcohol consumption as well.  
  Address St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2318 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28760157; PMCID:PMC5537928 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1947  
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Author Henriksen, A.H.; Langhammer, A.; Steinshamn, S.; Mai, X.-M.; Brumpton, B.M. url  doi
  Title The Prevalence and Symptom Profile of Asthma-COPD Overlap: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Copd Abbreviated Journal Copd  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords (up) Acos; epidemiology; obstructive lung disease; spirometry  
  Abstract The concept of asthma and COPD as separate conditions has been questioned, and the term asthma-COPD overlap syndrome has been introduced. We assessed the prevalence, symptoms, and lifestyle factors of asthma-COPD overlap (ACO) in a large Norwegian population-based study. From 2006 to 2008, a total of 50,777 residents of Nord-Trondelag participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study, Norway. They completed questionnaires regarding respiratory symptoms, disease status, and medication use. We estimated the prevalence and 95% confidence intervals of ACO. Additionally, spirometry was used to estimate the prevalence of ACO in a subgroup. The prevalence of self-reported ACO was 1.9%, and in age groups <40, 40-60 and >/=60 years it was 0.7%, 1.4%, and 3.2%, respectively. Among those reporting COPD, the proportion of ACO was 0.56. In the spirometry subgroup when ACO was defined as doctor diagnosed asthma ever and FEV1/FVC < 0.70, the prevalence of ACO was 2.0%. All respiratory symptoms, separately or in combination, as well as medication use were reported most frequently in those with ACO compared to the other groups. Strikingly, we observed a two-fold higher proportion of allergic rhinitis in ACO compared to COPD only. In this Norwegian population, the prevalence of self-reported ACO was 1.9%, and the corresponding proportion of ACO among those with COPD was 0.56. Participants with ACO generally had the highest proportions of respiratory symptoms compared to asthma or COPD.  
  Address d K.G. Jebsen Center for Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1541-2563 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29257905 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1927  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Marouli, E.; Graff, M.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Lo, K.S.; Wood, A.R.; Kjaer, T.R.; Fine, R.S.; Lu, Y.; Schurmann, C.; Highland, H.M.; Rueger, S.; Thorleifsson, G.; Justice, A.E.; Lamparter, D.; Stirrups, K.E.; Turcot, V.; Young, K.L.; Winkler, T.W.; Esko, T.; Karaderi, T.; Locke, A.E.; Masca, N.G.D.; Ng, M.C.Y.; Mudgal, P.; Rivas, M.A.; Vedantam, S.; Mahajan, A.; Guo, X.; Abecasis, G.; Aben, K.K.; Adair, L.S.; Alam, D.S.; Albrecht, E.; Allin, K.H.; Allison, M.; Amouyel, P.; Appel, E.V.; Arveiler, D.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Auer, P.L.; Balkau, B.; Banas, B.; Bang, L.E.; Benn, M.; Bergmann, S.; Bielak, L.F.; Bluher, M.; Boeing, H.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boger, C.A.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Bork-Jensen, J.; Bots, M.L.; Bottinger, E.P.; Bowden, D.W.; Brandslund, I.; Breen, G.; Brilliant, M.H.; Broer, L.; Burt, A.A.; Butterworth, A.S.; Carey, D.J.; Caulfield, M.J.; Chambers, J.C.; Chasman, D.I.; Chen, Y.-D.I.; Chowdhury, R.; Christensen, C.; Chu, A.Y.; Cocca, M.; Collins, F.S.; Cook, J.P.; Corley, J.; Galbany, J.C.; Cox, A.J.; Cuellar-Partida, G.; Danesh, J.; Davies, G.; de Bakker, P.I.W.; de Borst, G.J.; de Denus, S.; de Groot, M.C.H.; de Mutsert, R.; Deary, I.J.; Dedoussis, G.; Demerath, E.W.; den Hollander, A.I.; Dennis, J.G.; Di Angelantonio, E.; Drenos, F.; Du, M.; Dunning, A.M.; Easton, D.F.; Ebeling, T.; Edwards, T.L.; Ellinor, P.T.; Elliott, P.; Evangelou, E.; Farmaki, A.-E.; Faul, J.D.; Feitosa, M.F.; Feng, S.; Ferrannini, E.; Ferrario, M.M.; Ferrieres, J.; Florez, J.C.; Ford, I.; Fornage, M.; Franks, P.W.; Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Galesloot, T.E.; Gan, W.; Gandin, I.; Gasparini, P.; Giedraitis, V.; Giri, A.; Girotto, G.; Gordon, S.D.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Gorski, M.; Grarup, N.; Grove, M.L.; Gudnason, V.; Gustafsson, S.; Hansen, T.; Harris, K.M.; Harris, T.B.; Hattersley, A.T.; Hayward, C.; He, L.; Heid, I.M.; Heikkila, K.; Helgeland, O.; Hernesniemi, J.; Hewitt, A.W.; Hocking, L.J.; Hollensted, M.; Holmen, O.L.; Hovingh, G.K.; Howson, J.M.M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Huang, P.L.; Hveem, K.; Ikram, M.A.; Ingelsson, E.; Jackson, A.U.; Jansson, J.-H.; Jarvik, G.P.; Jensen, G.B.; Jhun, M.A.; Jia, Y.; Jiang, X.; Johansson, S.; Jorgensen, M.E.; Jorgensen, T.; Jousilahti, P.; Jukema, J.W.; Kahali, B.; Kahn, R.S.; Kahonen, M.; Kamstrup, P.R.; Kanoni, S.; Kaprio, J.; Karaleftheri, M.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Karpe, F.; Kee, F.; Keeman, R.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Kitajima, H.; Kluivers, K.B.; Kocher, T.; Komulainen, P.; Kontto, J.; Kooner, J.S.; Kooperberg, C.; Kovacs, P.; Kriebel, J.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Kury, S.; Kuusisto, J.; La Bianca, M.; Laakso, M.; Lakka, T.A.; Lange, E.M.; Lange, L.A.; Langefeld, C.D.; Langenberg, C.; Larson, E.B.; Lee, I.-T.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lewis, C.E.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Gao, R.; Lin, H.; Lin, L.-A.; Lin, X.; Lind, L.; Lindstrom, J.; Linneberg, A.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Lophatananon, A.; Luan, J.'an; Lubitz, S.A.; Lyytikainen, L.-P.; Mackey, D.A.; Madden, P.A.F.; Manning, A.K.; Mannisto, S.; Marenne, G.; Marten, J.; Martin, N.G.; Mazul, A.L.; Meidtner, K.; Metspalu, A.; Mitchell, P.; Mohlke, K.L.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Morgan, A.; Morris, A.D.; Morris, A.P.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Munroe, P.B.; Nalls, M.A.; Nauck, M.; Nelson, C.P.; Neville, M.; Nielsen, S.F.; Nikus, K.; Njolstad, P.R.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Ntalla, I.; O'Connel, J.R.; Oksa, H.; Loohuis, L.M.O.; Ophoff, R.A.; Owen, K.R.; Packard, C.J.; Padmanabhan, S.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Pasterkamp, G.; Patel, A.P.; Pattie, A.; Pedersen, O.; Peissig, P.L.; Peloso, G.M.; Pennell, C.E.; Perola, M.; Perry, J.A.; Perry, J.R.B.; Person, T.N.; Pirie, A.; Polasek, O.; Posthuma, D.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rasheed, A.; Rauramaa, R.; Reilly, D.F.; Reiner, A.P.; Renstrom, F.; Ridker, P.M.; Rioux, J.D.; Robertson, N.; Robino, A.; Rolandsson, O.; Rudan, I.; Ruth, K.S.; Saleheen, D.; Salomaa, V.; Samani, N.J.; Sandow, K.; Sapkota, Y.; Sattar, N.; Schmidt, M.K.; Schreiner, P.J.; Schulze, M.B.; Scott, R.A.; Segura-Lepe, M.P.; Shah, S.; Sim, X.; Sivapalaratnam, S.; Small, K.S.; Smith, A.V.; Smith, J.A.; Southam, L.; Spector, T.D.; Speliotes, E.K.; Starr, J.M.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Stringham, H.M.; Stumvoll, M.; Surendran, P.; 't Hart, L.M.; Tansey, K.E.; Tardif, J.-C.; Taylor, K.D.; Teumer, A.; Thompson, D.J.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Thuesen, B.H.; Tonjes, A.; Tromp, G.; Trompet, S.; Tsafantakis, E.; Tuomilehto, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Tyrer, J.P.; Uher, R.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Ulivi, S.; van der Laan, S.W.; Van Der Leij, A.R.; van Duijn, C.M.; van Schoor, N.M.; van Setten, J.; Varbo, A.; Varga, T.V.; Varma, R.; Edwards, D.R.V.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Vestergaard, H.; Vitart, V.; Vogt, T.F.; Vozzi, D.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, C.A.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.; Wareham, N.J.; Warren, H.R.; Wessel, J.; Willems, S.M.; Wilson, J.G.; Witte, D.R.; Woods, M.O.; Wu, Y.; Yaghootkar, H.; Yao, J.; Yao, P.; Yerges-Armstrong, L.M.; Young, R.; Zeggini, E.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, J.H.; Zhao, W.; Zhao, W.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, W.; Rotter, J.I.; Boehnke, M.; Kathiresan, S.; McCarthy, M.I.; Willer, C.J.; Stefansson, K.; Borecki, I.B.; Liu, D.J.; North, K.E.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Pers, T.H.; Lindgren, C.M.; Oxvig, C.; Kutalik, Z.; Rivadeneira, F.; Loos, R.J.F.; Frayling, T.M.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Deloukas, P.; Lettre, G. url  doi
  Title Rare and low-frequency coding variants alter human adult height Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 542 Issue 7640 Pages 186-190  
  Keywords (up) ADAMTS Proteins/genetics; Adult; Alleles; Body Height/*genetics; Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics; Female; Gene Frequency/*genetics; Genetic Variation/*genetics; Genome, Human/genetics; Glycoproteins/genetics/metabolism; Glycosaminoglycans/biosynthesis; Hedgehog Proteins/genetics; Humans; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Interferon Regulatory Factors/genetics; Interleukin-11 Receptor alpha Subunit/genetics; Male; Multifactorial Inheritance/genetics; NADPH Oxidase 4; NADPH Oxidases/genetics; Phenotype; Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A/metabolism; Procollagen N-Endopeptidase/genetics; Proteoglycans/biosynthesis; Proteolysis; Receptors, Androgen/genetics; Somatomedins/metabolism  
  Abstract Height is a highly heritable, classic polygenic trait with approximately 700 common associated variants identified through genome-wide association studies so far. Here, we report 83 height-associated coding variants with lower minor-allele frequencies (in the range of 0.1-4.8%) and effects of up to 2 centimetres per allele (such as those in IHH, STC2, AR and CRISPLD2), greater than ten times the average effect of common variants. In functional follow-up studies, rare height-increasing alleles of STC2 (giving an increase of 1-2 centimetres per allele) compromised proteolytic inhibition of PAPP-A and increased cleavage of IGFBP-4 in vitro, resulting in higher bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors. These 83 height-associated variants overlap genes that are mutated in monogenic growth disorders and highlight new biological candidates (such as ADAMTS3, IL11RA and NOX4) and pathways (such as proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan synthesis) involved in growth. Our results demonstrate that sufficiently large sample sizes can uncover rare and low-frequency variants of moderate-to-large effect associated with polygenic human phenotypes, and that these variants implicate relevant genes and pathways.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, H3T 1J4, Canada  
  Corporate Author MAGIC Investigators Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28146470; PMCID:PMC5302847 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1953  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Graff, M.; Scott, R.A.; Justice, A.E.; Young, K.L.; Feitosa, M.F.; Barata, L.; Winkler, T.W.; Chu, A.Y.; Mahajan, A.; Hadley, D.; Xue, L.; Workalemahu, T.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; den Hoed, M.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Qi, Q.; Ngwa, J.S.; Renstrom, F.; Quaye, L.; Eicher, J.D.; Hayes, J.E.; Cornelis, M.; Kutalik, Z.; Lim, E.; Luan, J.'an; Huffman, J.E.; Zhang, W.; Zhao, W.; Griffin, P.J.; Haller, T.; Ahmad, S.; Marques-Vidal, P.M.; Bien, S.; Yengo, L.; Teumer, A.; Smith, A.V.; Kumari, M.; Harder, M.N.; Justesen, J.M.; Kleber, M.E.; Hollensted, M.; Lohman, K.; Rivera, N.V.; Whitfield, J.B.; Zhao, J.H.; Stringham, H.M.; Lyytikainen, L.-P.; Huppertz, C.; Willemsen, G.; Peyrot, W.J.; Wu, Y.; Kristiansson, K.; Demirkan, A.; Fornage, M.; Hassinen, M.; Bielak, L.F.; Cadby, G.; Tanaka, T.; Magi, R.; van der Most, P.J.; Jackson, A.U.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Vitart, V.; Marten, J.; Navarro, P.; Bellis, C.; Pasko, D.; Johansson, A.; Snitker, S.; Cheng, Y.-C.; Eriksson, J.; Lim, U.; Aadahl, M.; Adair, L.S.; Amin, N.; Balkau, B.; Auvinen, J.; Beilby, J.; Bergman, R.N.; Bergmann, S.; Bertoni, A.G.; Blangero, J.; Bonnefond, A.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Borja, J.B.; Brage, S.; Busonero, F.; Buyske, S.; Campbell, H.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Corre, T.; Smith, G.D.; Delgado, G.E.; Dueker, N.; Dorr, M.; Ebeling, T.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Esko, T.; Faul, J.D.; Fu, M.; Faerch, K.; Gieger, C.; Glaser, S.; Gong, J.; Gordon-Larsen, P.; Grallert, H.; Grammer, T.B.; Grarup, N.; van Grootheest, G.; Harald, K.; Hastie, N.D.; Havulinna, A.S.; Hernandez, D.; Hindorff, L.; Hocking, L.J.; Holmens, O.L.; Holzapfel, C.; Hottenga, J.J.; Huang, J.; Huang, T.; Hui, J.; Huth, C.; Hutri-Kahonen, N.; James, A.L.; Jansson, J.-O.; Jhun, M.A.; Juonala, M.; Kinnunen, L.; Koistinen, H.A.; Kolcic, I.; Komulainen, P.; Kuusisto, J.; Kvaloy, K.; Kahonen, M.; Lakka, T.A.; Launer, L.J.; Lehne, B.; Lindgren, C.M.; Lorentzon, M.; Luben, R.; Marre, M.; Milaneschi, Y.; Monda, K.L.; Montgomery, G.W.; De Moor, M.H.M.; Mulas, A.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Musk, A.W.; Mannikko, R.; Mannisto, S.; Narisu, N.; Nauck, M.; Nettleton, J.A.; Nolte, I.M.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Olden, M.; Ong, K.K.; Padmanabhan, S.; Paternoster, L.; Perez, J.; Perola, M.; Peters, A.; Peters, U.; Peyser, P.A.; Prokopenko, I.; Puolijoki, H.; Raitakari, O.T.; Rankinen, T.; Rasmussen-Torvik, L.J.; Rawal, R.; Ridker, P.M.; Rose, L.M.; Rudan, I.; Sarti, C.; Sarzynski, M.A.; Savonen, K.; Scott, W.R.; Sanna, S.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Sidney, S.; Silbernagel, G.; Smith, B.H.; Smith, J.A.; Snieder, H.; Stancakova, A.; Sternfeld, B.; Swift, A.J.; Tammelin, T.; Tan, S.-T.; Thorand, B.; Thuillier, D.; Vandenput, L.; Vestergaard, H.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Vohl, M.-C.; Volker, U.; Waeber, G.; Walker, M.; Wild, S.; Wong, A.; Wright, A.F.; Zillikens, M.C.; Zubair, N.; Haiman, C.A.; Lemarchand, L.; Gyllensten, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Hofman, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Perusse, L.; Wilson, J.F.; Hayward, C.; Polasek, O.; Cucca, F.; Hveem, K.; Hartman, C.A.; Tonjes, A.; Bandinelli, S.; Palmer, L.J.; Kardia, S.L.R.; Rauramaa, R.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Tuomilehto, J.; Salomaa, V.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.; Lehtimaki, T.; Mangino, M.; Laakso, M.; Bouchard, C.; Martin, N.G.; Kuh, D.; Liu, Y.; Linneberg, A.; Marz, W.; Strauch, K.; Kivimaki, M.; Harris, T.B.; Gudnason, V.; Volzke, H.; Qi, L.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; Chambers, J.C.; Kooner, J.S.; Froguel, P.; Kooperberg, C.; Vollenweider, P.; Hallmans, G.; Hansen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Metspalu, A.; Wareham, N.J.; Langenberg, C.; Weir, D.R.; Porteous, D.J.; Boerwinkle, E.; Chasman, D.I.; Abecasis, G.R.; Barroso, I.; McCarthy, M.I.; Frayling, T.M.; O'Connell, J.R.; van Duijn, C.M.; Boehnke, M.; Heid, I.M.; Mohlke, K.L.; Strachan, D.P.; Fox, C.S.; Liu, C.-T.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Klein, R.J.; Johnson, A.D.; Borecki, I.B.; Franks, P.W.; North, K.E.; Cupples, L.A.; Loos, R.J.F.; Kilpelainen, T.O. url  doi
  Title Genome-wide physical activity interactions in adiposity – A meta-analysis of 200,452 adults Type Meta-Analysis
  Year 2017 Publication PLoS Genetics Abbreviated Journal PLoS Genet  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages e1006528  
  Keywords (up) Adiposity/*genetics/physiology; Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; Epigenomics; *Exercise; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Male; Obesity/*genetics/physiopathology; Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Physical activity (PA) may modify the genetic effects that give rise to increased risk of obesity. To identify adiposity loci whose effects are modified by PA, we performed genome-wide interaction meta-analyses of BMI and BMI-adjusted waist circumference and waist-hip ratio from up to 200,452 adults of European (n = 180,423) or other ancestry (n = 20,029). We standardized PA by categorizing it into a dichotomous variable where, on average, 23% of participants were categorized as inactive and 77% as physically active. While we replicate the interaction with PA for the strongest known obesity-risk locus in the FTO gene, of which the effect is attenuated by ~30% in physically active individuals compared to inactive individuals, we do not identify additional loci that are sensitive to PA. In additional genome-wide meta-analyses adjusting for PA and interaction with PA, we identify 11 novel adiposity loci, suggesting that accounting for PA or other environmental factors that contribute to variation in adiposity may facilitate gene discovery.  
  Address The Department of Preventive Medicine, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, United States of America  
  Corporate Author PAGE Consortium Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1553-7390 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28448500; PMCID:PMC5407576 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1909  
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Author Grov, E.K.; Fossa, S.D.; Dahl, A.A. url  doi
  Title A controlled study of the influence of comorbidity on activities of daily living in elderly cancer survivors (the HUNT-3 survey) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Geriatric Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Geriatr Oncol  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 328-335  
  Keywords (up) Adl; Activities of daily living; Cancer survivors; Comorbidity; Elderly; Home dwelling  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine the influence of somatic comorbidity on Activity of Daily Living (ADL) problems in cancer survivors >/=70years (ECSs) based on data from The Health Study of Nord-Trondelag County (HUNT-3) 2006-08. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Among participants of the HUNT-3 survey, 599 ECSs had a diagnosis of one invasive cancer according to both The Cancer Registry of Norway and self-report. Three controls without cancer aged >/=70years for each ECS were drawn from the HUNT-3 sample. We compared personal-ADL (P-ADL) and instrumental-ADL (I-ADL) problems for ECSs and differences between ADL problems for ECSs with and without comorbidity and controls with and without comorbidity. RESULTS: The prevalence of P-ADL problems was 3.5% among ECSs and 2.9% among controls (p=0.97) and for I-ADL 28.5% versus 21.4% (p=0.01), respectively. In bivariate analyses where ECSs versus controls was the dependent variable, presence of I-ADL problems, higher age, being female, paired relationship, poor self-rated health, hospitalization last year, and low level of neuroticism were associated being ECSs. In multivariate analyses, these variables, except I-ADL-problems and paired relationship, remained significantly associated being ECSs. No significant differences were shown for P-ADL problems when comparing ECSs and controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with and without comorbidity. ECSs with comorbidity reported significantly more I-ADL-problems than controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with comorbidity had significantly more I-ADL-problems than ECSs without comorbidity. CONCLUSION: Our results reflect common factors found in ADL studies in the elderly population. Health personnel have to be particularly observant on I-ADL problems among female ECSs, and those reporting poor self-rated health or comorbidity.  
  Address National Advisory Unit on Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1879-4068 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28629695 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1917  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Junker, A.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Bjerkeset, O. url  doi
  Title Adolescent health and subsequent risk of self-harm hospitalisation: a 15-year follow-up of the Young-HUNT cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health Abbreviated Journal Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 25  
  Keywords (up) Adolescence; Hospitalisation; Self-harm  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Self-harm is associated with increased suicide risk, and constitutes a major challenge in adolescent mental healthcare. In the current study, we examined the association between different aspects of adolescent health and risk of later self-harm requiring hospital admission. METHODS: We linked baseline information from 13 to 19 year old participants (n = 8965) in the Norwegian Young-HUNT 1 study to patient records of self-harm hospitalisation during 15 years of follow-up. We used Cox regression to estimate risk factor hazard ratios (HR). RESULTS: Eighty-nine persons (71% female) were admitted to hospital because of self-harm. Intoxication/self-poisoning was the most frequent method (81%). Both mental (anxiety/depression, loneliness, being bullied) and somatic (epilepsy, migraine) health issues were associated with up to fourfold increased risk of self-harm-related hospital admission. CONCLUSIONS: Several health issues during adolescence markedly increased the risk of later self-harm hospitalisation. Current findings should be incorporated in the strive to reduce self-harming and attempted suicides among young people.  
  Address Faculty of Health Sciences, Nord University, Levanger, Norway.grid.465487.c  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1753-2000 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28469702; PMCID:PMC5410696 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1936  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quanjer, P.H.; Ruppel, G.L.; Langhammer, A.; Krishna, A.; Mertens, F.; Johannessen, A.; Menezes, A.M.B.; Wehrmeister, F.C.; Perez-Padilla, R.; Swanney, M.P.; Tan, W.C.; Bourbeau, J. url  doi
  Title Bronchodilator Response in FVC Is Larger and More Relevant Than in FEV1 in Severe Airflow Obstruction Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Chest Abbreviated Journal Chest  
  Volume 151 Issue 5 Pages 1088-1098  
  Keywords (up) Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Airway Obstruction/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Asthma/*diagnosis/physiopathology; *Bronchodilator Agents; Canada; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/*physiology; Healthy Volunteers; Humans; Latin America; Male; Middle Aged; Netherlands; New Zealand; Norway; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Treatment Outcome; United States; Vital Capacity/*physiology; Young Adult; airways obstruction; asthma; bronchodilator responsiveness; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; respiratory physiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Recommendations on interpreting tests of bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR) are conflicting. We investigated the dependence of BDR criteria on sex, age, height, ethnicity, and severity of respiratory impairment. METHODS: BDR test data were available from clinical patients in the Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United States (n = 15,278; female subjects, 51.7%) and from surveys in Canada, Norway, and five Latin-American countries (n = 16,250; female subjects, 54.7%). BDR calculated according to FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC was expressed as absolute change, a percentage of the baseline level (% baseline), a percentage of the predicted value (% predicted), and z score. RESULTS: Change (Delta) in FEV1 and FVC, in milliliters, was unrelated to the baseline value but was biased toward age, height, sex, and level of airways obstruction; DeltaFEV1 was significantly lower in African Americans. In 1,106 subjects with low FEV1 (200-1,621 mL) the FEV1 increased by 12% to 44.7% relative to baseline but < 200 mL. Expressing BDR as a percentage of the predicted value or as a z score attenuated the bias and made the 200-mL criterion redundant, but reduced positive responses by half. DeltaFEV1 % baseline increased with the level of airflow obstruction but decreased with severe obstruction when expressed as z scores or % predicted; DeltaFVC, however expressed, increased with the level of airflow obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Expressing FEV1 responsiveness as % baseline spuriously suggests that responsiveness increases with the severity of respiratory impairment. Expressing change in FEV1 or FVC as % predicted or as z scores eliminates this artifact and renders the required 200-mL minimum increase redundant. In severe airways obstruction DeltaFVC should be critically evaluated as an index of clinically important relief of hyperinflation, with implications for bronchodilator drug trials.  
  Address Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-3692 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28040521 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1971  
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Author Thomsen, L.C.V.; McCarthy, N.S.; Melton, P.E.; Cadby, G.; Austgulen, R.; Nygard, O.K.; Johnson, M.P.; Brennecke, S.; Moses, E.K.; Bjorge, L.; Iversen, A.-C. url  doi
  Title The antihypertensive MTHFR gene polymorphism rs17367504-G is a possible novel protective locus for preeclampsia Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal J Hypertens  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 132-139  
  Keywords (up) Adolescent; Adult; Alleles; Australia; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gene Frequency; Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Hypertension/genetics; Inflammation/genetics; Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)/*genetics; Norway; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Pre-Eclampsia/*genetics; Pregnancy; Protective Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Preeclampsia is a complex heterogeneous disease commonly defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy. Women experiencing preeclampsia have increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) later in life. Preeclampsia and CVD share risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms, including dysregulated inflammation and raised blood pressure. Despite commonalities, little is known about the contribution of shared genes (pleiotropy) to these diseases. This study aimed to investigate whether genetic risk factors for hypertension or inflammation are pleiotropic by also being associated with preeclampsia. METHODS: We genotyped 122 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in women with preeclampsia (n = 1006) and nonpreeclamptic controls (n = 816) from the Norwegian HUNT Study. SNPs were chosen on the basis of previously reported associations with either nongestational hypertension or inflammation in genome-wide association studies. The SNPs were tested for association with preeclampsia in a multiple logistic regression model. RESULTS: The minor (G) allele of the intronic SNP rs17367504 in the gene methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was associated with a protective effect on preeclampsia (odds ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.80) in the Norwegian cohort. This association did not replicate in an Australian preeclampsia case-control cohort (P = 0.68, odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.32, minor allele frequency = 0.15). CONCLUSION: MTHFR is important for regulating transmethylation processes and is involved in regulation of folate metabolism. The G allele of rs17367504 has previously been shown to protect against nongestational hypertension. Our study suggests a novel association between this allele and reduced risk for preeclampsia. This is the first study associating the minor (G) allele of a SNP within the MTHFR gene with a protective effect on preeclampsia, and in doing so identifying a possible pleiotropic protective effect on preeclampsia and hypertension.  
  Address aDepartment of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Haukeland University Hospital bDepartment of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway cCentre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia dDepartment of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim eDepartment of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway fSouth Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, Texas, USA gDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville hPregnancy Research Centre, Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria iFaculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0263-6352 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27755385; PMCID:PMC5131692 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1996  
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Author Sardahaee, F.S.; Holmen, T.L.; Micali, N.; Kvaloy, K. url  doi
  Title Effects of single genetic variants and polygenic obesity risk scores on disordered eating in adolescents – The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Appetite Abbreviated Journal Appetite  
  Volume 118 Issue Pages 8-16  
  Keywords (up) Adolescents; Comt; Disordered eating; Eat-12; Hunt; Obesity polygenic risk score  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Improving the understanding of the role of genetic risk on disordered eating (DE). METHODS: A case-control study including 1757 (F: 979, M: 778) adolescents (aged 13-19 years) from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), an ethnically homogenous Norwegian population based study. Cases and controls were defined using a shortened version of the Eating Attitude Test. Logistic regression was employed to test for associations between DE phenotypes and 24 obesity and eating disorder susceptibility SNPs, and the joint effect of a subset of these in a genetic risk score (GRS). RESULTS: COMT was shown to be associated with poor appetite/undereating (OR: 0.6, CI 95%: 0.43-0.83, p = 0.002). Independent of obesity associations, the weighted GRS was associated to overeating in 13-15 year old females (OR: 2.07, CI 95%: 1.14-3.76, p = 0.017). Additionally, a significant association was observed between the GRS and loss of control over eating in the total sample (OR: 1.62, CI 95%: 1.01-2.61, p = 0.046). CONCLUSIONS: The COMT variant (rs4680) was associated with poor appetite/undereating. Our study further confirms prior findings that obesity risk also confers risk for loss of control over eating; and overeating amongst girls.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Research and Development, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Health Trust, Levanger, Norway. Electronic address: kirsti.kvaloy@ntnu.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-6663 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28694222 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1975  
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Author Nes, B.M.; Gutvik, C.R.; Lavie, C.J.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI) for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Promotion of Physical Activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The American Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Med  
  Volume 130 Issue 3 Pages 328-336  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Algorithms; Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality/*prevention & control; *Exercise; Female; Health Promotion/*methods; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment/*methods; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Young Adult; Activity tracking; Cardiovascular disease mortality; Physical activity; Prevention  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To derive and validate a single metric of activity tracking that associates with lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. METHODS: We derived an algorithm, Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI), using the HUNT Fitness Study (n = 4631), and validated it in the general HUNT population (n = 39,298) aged 20-74 years. The PAI was divided into three sex-specific groups (</=50, 51-99, and >/=100), and the inactive group (0 PAI) was used as the referent. Hazard ratios for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: After >1 million person-years of observations during a mean follow-up time of 26.2 (SD 5.9) years, there were 10,062 deaths, including 3867 deaths (2207 men and 1660 women) from cardiovascular disease. Men and women with a PAI level >/=100 had 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-27%) and 23% (95% CI, 4%-38%) reduced risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, respectively, compared with the inactive groups. Obtaining >/=100 PAI was associated with significantly lower risk for cardiovascular disease mortality in all prespecified age groups, and in participants with known cardiovascular disease risk factors (all P-trends <.01). Participants who did not obtain >/=100 PAI had increased risk of dying regardless of meeting the physical activity recommendations. CONCLUSION: PAI may have a huge potential to motivate people to become and stay physically active, as it is an easily understandable and scientifically proven metric that could inform potential users of how much physical activity is needed to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular disease death.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9343 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27984009 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1964  
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Author Nauman, J.; Nes, B.M.; Lavie, C.J.; Jackson, A.S.; Sui, X.; Coombes, J.S.; Blair, S.N.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Prediction of Cardiovascular Mortality by Estimated Cardiorespiratory Fitness Independent of Traditional Risk Factors: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc  
  Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 218-227  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Aged; *Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Ischemia/mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Registries; Risk Factors; Stroke/mortality  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) and evaluate the additional contribution of traditional risk factors in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality prediction. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: The study included healthy men (n=18,721) and women (n=19,759) aged 30 to 74 years. A nonexercise algorithm estimated cardiorespiratory fitness. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the primary (CVD mortality) and secondary (all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and stroke mortality) end points. The added predictive value of traditional CVD risk factors was evaluated using the Harrell C statistic and net reclassification improvement. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 16.3 years (range, 0.04-17.4 years), there were 3863 deaths, including 1133 deaths from CVD (734 men and 399 women). Low eCRF was a strong predictor of CVD and all-cause mortality after adjusting for established risk factors. The C statistics for eCRF and CVD mortality were 0.848 (95% CI, 0.836-0.861) and 0.878 (95% CI, 0.862-0.894) for men and women, respectively, increasing to 0.851 (95% CI, 0.839-0.863) and 0.881 (95% CI, 0.865-0.897), respectively, when adding clinical variables. By adding clinical variables to eCRF, the net reclassification improvement of CVD mortality was 0.014 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.051) and 0.052 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.127) in men and women, respectively. CONCLUSION: Low eCRF is independently associated with CVD and all-cause mortality. The inclusion of traditional clinical CVD risk factors added little to risk discrimination and did not improve the classification of risk beyond this simple eCRF measurement, which may be proposed as a practical and cost-effective first-line approach in primary prevention settings.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-6196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27866655 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1963  
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Author Perreault, K.; Bauman, A.; Johnson, N.; Britton, A.; Rangul, V.; Stamatakis, E. url  doi
  Title Does physical activity moderate the association between alcohol drinking and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular diseases mortality? A pooled analysis of eight British population cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication British Journal of Sports Medicine Abbreviated Journal Br J Sports Med  
  Volume 51 Issue 8 Pages 651-657  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*adverse effects; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; England; *Exercise; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Mortality; Neoplasms/*mortality; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Cancer; Epidemiology; Physical activity; Public health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine whether physical activity (PA) moderates the association between alcohol intake and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mortality. DESIGN: Prospective study using 8 British population-based surveys, each linked to cause-specific mortality: Health Survey for England (1994, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004 and 2006) and Scottish Health Survey (1998 and 2003). PARTICIPANTS: 36 370 men and women aged 40 years and over were included with a corresponding 5735 deaths and a mean of 353 049 person-years of follow-up. EXPOSURES: 6 sex-specific categories of alcohol intake (UK units/week) were defined: (1) never drunk; (2) ex-drinkers; (3) occasional drinkers; (4) within guidelines (<14 (women); <21 (men)); (5) hazardous (14-35 (women); 21-49 (men)) and (6) harmful (>35 (women) >49 (men)). PA was categorised as inactive (</=7 MET-hour/week), active at the lower (>7.5 MET-hour/week) and upper (>15 MET-hour/week) of recommended levels. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Cox proportional-hazard models were used to examine associations between alcohol consumption and all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality risk after adjusting for several confounders. Stratified analyses were performed to evaluate mortality risks within each PA stratum. RESULTS: We found a direct association between alcohol consumption and cancer mortality risk starting from drinking within guidelines (HR (95% CI) hazardous drinking: 1.40 (1.11 to 1.78)). Stratified analyses showed that the association between alcohol intake and mortality risk was attenuated (all-cause) or nearly nullified (cancer) among individuals who met the PA recommendations (HR (95% CI)). CONCLUSIONS: Meeting the current PA public health recommendations offsets some of the cancer and all-cause mortality risk associated with alcohol drinking.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-3674 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27581162 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1970  
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Author Naicker, K.; Johnson, J.A.; Skogen, J.C.; Manuel, D.; Overland, S.; Sivertsen, B.; Colman, I. url  doi
  Title Type 2 Diabetes and Comorbid Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety: Longitudinal Associations With Mortality Risk Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Diabetes Care Abbreviated Journal Diabetes Care  
  Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 352-358  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*complications; Comorbidity; Depression/*complications; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Depression is strongly linked to increased mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Despite high rates of co-occurring anxiety and depression, the risk of death associated with comorbid anxiety in individuals with type 2 diabetes is poorly understood. This study documented the excess mortality risk associated with symptoms of depression and/or anxiety comorbid with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using data for 64,177 Norwegian adults from the second wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2), with linkage to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry, we assessed all-cause mortality from survey participation in 1995 through to 2013. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine mortality risk over 18 years associated with type 2 diabetes status and the presence of comorbid affective symptoms at baseline. RESULTS: Three clear patterns emerged from our findings. First, mortality risk in individuals with diabetes increased in the presence of depression or anxiety, or both. Second, mortality risk was lowest for symptoms of anxiety, higher for comorbid depression-anxiety, and highest for depression. Lastly, excess mortality risk associated with depression and anxiety was observed in men with diabetes but not in women. The highest risk of death was observed in men with diabetes and symptoms of depression only (hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI 1.96, 6.14). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that symptoms of anxiety affect mortality risk in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of symptoms of depression, in addition to attenuating the relationship between depressive symptoms and mortality in these individuals.  
  Address School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada icolman@uottawa.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0149-5992 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28077458 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1961  
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Author Felde, G.; Ebbesen, M.H.; Hunskaar, S. url  doi
  Title Anxiety and depression associated with urinary incontinence. A 10-year follow-up study from the Norwegian HUNT study (EPINCONT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neurourology and Urodynamics Abbreviated Journal Neurourol Urodyn  
  Volume 36 Issue 2 Pages 322-328  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*epidemiology/etiology/psychology; Depression/*epidemiology/etiology/psychology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Middle Aged; Norway; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Urinary Incontinence/*complications/psychology; Young Adult; Epincont; Hads; Hunt; anxiety; depression; epidemiology; urinary incontinence  
  Abstract AIMS: Firstly, to investigate the association between depression, anxiety and urinary incontinence (UI) in a 10-year longitudinal study of women. Secondly, to investigate the association between possible differences in the stress- and urgency components of UI and different severities of depression and anxiety by age groups. METHODS: In a longitudinal, population-based survey study, the EPINCONT part of the HUNT study in Norway, we analyzed questionnaire data on UI, depression and anxiety from 16,263 women from 20 years of age. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to predict the odds of developing anxiety and depression among the women with and without UI at baseline and the odds of developing UI among the women with and without anxiety or depression at baseline. RESULTS: For women with any UI at baseline we found an association with the incidence of depression and anxiety symptoms, OR 1.45 (1.23-1.72) and 1.26 (1.8-1.47) for mild depression and anxiety respectively. For women with depression or anxiety symptoms at baseline we found an association with the incidence of any UI with OR 2.09 (1.55-2.83) and 1.65 (1.34-2.03) for moderate/severe symptom-score for depression and anxiety, respectively, for the whole sample. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, both depression and anxiety are shown to be risk factors for developing UI with a dose-dependent trend. UI is associated with increased incidence of depression and anxiety. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:322-328, 2017. (c) 2015 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.  
  Address National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-2467 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26584597 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1902  
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Author Lie, A.; Engdahl, B.; Hoffman, H.J.; Li, C.-M.; Tambs, K. url  doi
  Title Occupational noise exposure, hearing loss, and notched audiograms in the HUNT Nord-Trondelag hearing loss study, 1996-1998 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Laryngoscope Abbreviated Journal Laryngoscope  
  Volume 127 Issue 6 Pages 1442-1450  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Audiometry/*statistics & numerical data; Female; Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced/*epidemiology/etiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Noise, Occupational/*adverse effects; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology; Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects; Prevalence; Sex Distribution; Young Adult; Noise; noise-induced hearing loss; notched audiograms; occupation  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To study the prevalence and usefulness of audiometric notches in the diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). STUDY DESIGN: Audiograms and data on noise exposure from 23,297 men and 26,477 women, aged 20 to 101 years, from the Nord-Trondelag Hearing Loss Study, 1996-1998. METHODS: The prevalence of four types of audiometric notches (Coles, Hoffman, Wilson) and 4 kHz notch were computed in relation to occupational noise exposure, age, sex, and report of recurrent ear infections. RESULTS: The prevalence of notches in the 3 to 6 kHz range (Wilson, Hoffman, and Coles) ranged from 50% to 60% in subjects without occupational noise exposure, and 60% to 70% in the most occupationally noise-exposed men. The differences were statistically significant only for bilateral notches. For 4 kHz notches, the prevalence varied from 25% in occupationally nonexposed to 35% in the most occupationally exposed men, and the differences were statistically significant for both bilateral and unilateral notches. For women, the prevalence of notches was lower than in men, especially for 4 kHz notches, and the differences between occupationally noise exposed and nonexposed were smaller. Recreational exposure to high music was not associated with notched audiograms. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of bilateral notches and unilateral 4 kHz notches is of some value in diagnosing NIHL, especially in men. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1442-1450, 2017.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0023-852X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696439; PMCID:PMC5484347 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1948  
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Author Lie, T.M.; Bomme, M.; Hveem, K.; Hansen, J.M.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title Snus and risk of gastroesophageal reflux. A population-based case-control study: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 193-198  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/*epidemiology; Heartburn/etiology; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Tobacco Use/*epidemiology; Tobacco, Smokeless/*adverse effects; Young Adult; Health surveys; oral tobacco; smokeless tobacco; snuff  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Tobacco smoking is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux, but whether other tobacco products increase the risk is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if snus increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was based on the third Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT3), a population-based study of all adult residents in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, performed in 2006-2009. The association between self-reported severe heartburn/regurgitation and snus use was assessed by logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared to never snus users, daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS (OR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.93), while previous snus users and those using <2 boxes of snus/month had an increased risk (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.46 and OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, respectively). There was no association between age when starting using snus and GERS. Snus users who started using snus to quit or cut down on cigarette smoking, who started using both snus and cigarettes or cigarettes alone had an increased risk of GERS. Snus users <30 years of age had an increased risk of GERS (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.16), while those aged between 50-60 and 60-70 years had a reduced risk (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93 and OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28-0.94, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS. However, previous snus users and subgroups of snus users had an increased risk of GERS indicating reverse causality, such that snus use could increase the risk of GERS.  
  Address d Department of Medicine , Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust , Levanger , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5521 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27797289 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1942  
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Author Krokstad, S.; Ding, D.; Grunseit, A.C.; Sund, E.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Multiple lifestyle behaviours and mortality, findings from a large population-based Norwegian cohort study – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 58  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Aged; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology; Cohort Studies; Diet/adverse effects; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; *Risk-Taking; Sleep; Smoking/adverse effects; Social Behavior; Young Adult; *All-cause mortality; *Cardiovascular disease; *Cohort study; *Lifestyle behaviour; *Metabolic disease; *Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Lifestyle risk behaviours are responsible for a large proportion of disease burden and premature mortality worldwide. Risk behaviours tend to cluster in populations. We developed a new lifestyle risk index by including emerging risk factors (sleep, sitting time, and social participation) and examine unique risk combinations and their associations with all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality. METHODS: Data are from a large population-based cohort study in a Norway, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), with an average follow-up time of 14.1 years. Baseline data from 1995-97 were linked to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry. The analytic sample comprised 36 911 adults aged 20-69 years. Cox regression models were first fitted for seven risk factors (poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption, current smoking, physical inactivity, excessive sitting, too much/too little sleep, and poor social participation) separately and then adjusted for socio-demographic covariates. Based on these results, a lifestyle risk index was developed. Finally, we explored common combinations of the risk factors in relation to all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality outcomes. RESULTS: All single risk factors, except for diet, were significantly associated with both mortality outcomes, and were therefore selected to form a lifestyle risk index. Risk of mortality increased as the index score increased. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality increased from 1.37 (1.15-1.62) to 6.15 (3.56-10.63) as the number of index risk factors increased from one to six respectively. Among the most common risk factor combinations the association with mortality was particularly strong when smoking and/or social participation were included. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to previous research on multiple risk behaviours by incorporating emerging risk factors. Findings regarding social participation and prolonged sitting suggest new components of healthy lifestyles and potential new directions for population health interventions.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28068991; PMCID:PMC5223537 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1946  
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Author Grunseit, A.C.; Chau, J.Y.; Rangul, V.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Patterns of sitting and mortality in the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 8  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Posture; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Self Report; Young Adult; *Cardiovascular disease; *Epidemiology; *Mortality; *Sedentary behaviour  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Current evidence concerning sedentary behaviour and mortality risk has used single time point assessments of sitting. Little is known about how changes in sitting levels over time affect subsequent mortality risk. AIM: To examine the associations between patterns of sitting time assessed at two time points 11 years apart and risk of all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality. METHODS: Participants were 25,651 adults aged > =20 years old from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study with self-reported total sitting time in 1995-1997 (HUNT2) and 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Four categories characterised patterns of sitting: (1) low at HUNT2/ low at HUNT3, 'consistently low sitting'; (2) low at HUNT2/high at HUNT3, 'increased sitting'; (3) high at HUNT2/low at HUNT3, 'reduced sitting'; and (4) high at HUNT2 /high at HUNT3, 'consistently high sitting'. Associations of sitting pattern with all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality were analysed using Cox regression adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 6.2 years (158880 person-years); 1212 participants died. Compared to 'consistently low sitting', adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.51 (95% CI: 1.28-2.78), 1.03 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20), and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.06-1.51) for 'increased sitting', 'reduced sitting' and 'consistently high sitting' respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Examining patterns of sitting over time augments single time-point analyses of risk exposures associated with high sitting time. Whilst sitting habits can be stable over a long period, life events (e.g., changing jobs, retiring or illness) may influence sitting trajectories and therefore sitting-attributable risk. Reducing sitting may yield mortality risks comparable to a stable low-sitting pattern.  
  Address Department of Public health and General practice, HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28122625; PMCID:PMC5267382 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1918  
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Author Torske, M.O.; Krokstad, S.; Stamatakis, E.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Dog ownership and all-cause mortality in a population cohort in Norway: The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179832  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Animals; *Cause of Death; Cohort Studies; Dogs; Exercise; Female; Health Status; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Mortality; Norway/epidemiology; *Ownership; *Population Surveillance; Walking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has been increased interest in human-animal interactions and their possible effects on human health. Some of this research has focused on human physical activity levels, mediated through increased dog walking. Much of the reported research has been cross sectional, and very few epidemiological studies have examined the association between dog ownership and mortality in populations. METHODS: We used data from the Norwegian county population-based Nord-Trondelag HUNT Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to analyse the relationship between dog ownership and all-cause mortality. The median follow-up time was 18.5 years and the maximum follow-up time was 19.7 years. RESULTS: In this population, dog owners were no more physically active than non-dog owners, both groups reporting a total of just over 3 hours/week of light and vigorous activity. Dog owners (n = 25,031, with 1,587 deaths during follow-up; 504,017 person-years of time at risk) had virtually the same hazard of dying as non-dog owners (Hazard ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence for an association between the presence of a dog in the household and all-cause mortality or physical activity levels in this Norwegian population. Further epidemiological research is needed to clarify this relationship, as methodological limitations and an active Norwegian population sample means that generalizable evidence is not yet clear on dog ownership and mortality.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28662069; PMCID:PMC5491039 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2014  
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Author Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) Abbreviated Journal Respirology  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 278-283  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Asthma/*physiopathology; Cohort Studies; Disease Progression; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Physical Exertion; Sedentary Lifestyle; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vital Capacity; *forced expiratory volume in 1 s; *forced vital capacity; *leisure time; *peak expiratory flow; *prospective  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: People with asthma may seek advice about physical activity. However, the benefits of leisure time physical activity on lung function are unclear. We investigated the association between leisure time physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study in Norway, we used multiple linear regressions to estimate the annual mean decline in lung function (and 95% CI) in 1329 people with asthma over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. The durations of light and hard physical activity per week in the last year were collected by questionnaire. Inactive participants did not report any light or hard activity, while active participants reported light or hard activity. RESULTS: The mean decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was 37 mL/year among inactive participants and 32 mL/year in active participants (difference: -5 mL/year (95% CI: -13 to 3)). The mean decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 33 mL/year among inactive participants and 31 mL/year in active participants (difference: -2 mL/year (95% CI: -11 to 7)). The mean decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio was 0.36%/year among inactive participants and 0.22%/year in active participants (difference: -0.14%/year (95% CI: -0.27 to -0.01)). The mean decline in peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 14 mL/year among the inactive participants and 10 mL/year in active participants (difference: -4 mL/year (95% CI: -9 to 1)). CONCLUSION: We observed slightly less decline in lung function in physically active than inactive participants with asthma, particularly for FEV1 , FEV1 /FVC ratio and PEF.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1323-7799 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696634 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1892  
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Author Borte, S.; Winsvold, B.S.; Stensland, S.O.; Smastuen, M.C.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title The effect of foetal growth restriction on the development of migraine and tension-type headache in adulthood. The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175908  
  Keywords (up) Adult; Birth Weight; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology/*etiology; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Logistic Models; Male; Migraine Disorders/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Tension-Type Headache/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about how factors early in life affect the development of migraine and tension-type headache. We aimed to examine whether growth restriction in utero is associated with development of migraine and frequent tension-type headache in adults. METHODS: The population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3) contained a validated headache questionnaire, which differentiated between migraine and tension-type headache. These data were linked to information on weight and gestational age at birth from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. In total 4557 females and 2789 males, aged 19-41 years, were included in this registry-based study. Participants were categorized as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, 10th-90th percentile), small for gestational age (SGA, 3rd-10th percentile) or very small for gestational age (VSGA, < 3rd percentile). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for migraine and tension-type headache, with exposure being growth restriction at birth. RESULTS: The effect of growth restriction on migraine was modified by sex, with a significant association in males (p<0.001), but not in females (p = 0.20). In particular, males born VSGA were at increased risk of developing migraine (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.63-4.58, p<0.001), with an intermediate risk among those born SGA (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.35, p = 0.08) compared to those born AGA. There was no significant association between growth restriction and frequent TTH (p = 0.051). CONCLUSION: Growth restriction was associated with increased risk of migraine in adulthood among males, but not among females. This suggests that migraine might, in part, be influenced by early life events, and that males seem to be particularly vulnerable.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28410431; PMCID:PMC5391957 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1885  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Alsnes, I.V.; Vatten, L.J.; Fraser, A.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Rich-Edwards, J.; Romundstad, P.R.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Hypertension in Pregnancy and Offspring Cardiovascular Risk in Young Adulthood: Prospective and Sibling Studies in the HUNT Study (Nord-Trondelag Health Study) in Norway Type Multicenter Study
  Year 2017