toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Felde, G.; Ebbesen, M.H.; Hunskaar, S. url  doi
  Title Anxiety and depression associated with urinary incontinence. A 10-year follow-up study from the Norwegian HUNT study (EPINCONT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Neurourology and Urodynamics Abbreviated Journal Neurourol Urodyn  
  Volume 36 Issue 2 Pages 322-328  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*epidemiology/etiology/psychology; Depression/*epidemiology/etiology/psychology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Middle Aged; Norway; Prevalence; Risk Factors; Urinary Incontinence/*complications/psychology; Young Adult; Epincont; Hads; Hunt; anxiety; depression; epidemiology; urinary incontinence  
  Abstract AIMS: Firstly, to investigate the association between depression, anxiety and urinary incontinence (UI) in a 10-year longitudinal study of women. Secondly, to investigate the association between possible differences in the stress- and urgency components of UI and different severities of depression and anxiety by age groups. METHODS: In a longitudinal, population-based survey study, the EPINCONT part of the HUNT study in Norway, we analyzed questionnaire data on UI, depression and anxiety from 16,263 women from 20 years of age. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to predict the odds of developing anxiety and depression among the women with and without UI at baseline and the odds of developing UI among the women with and without anxiety or depression at baseline. RESULTS: For women with any UI at baseline we found an association with the incidence of depression and anxiety symptoms, OR 1.45 (1.23-1.72) and 1.26 (1.8-1.47) for mild depression and anxiety respectively. For women with depression or anxiety symptoms at baseline we found an association with the incidence of any UI with OR 2.09 (1.55-2.83) and 1.65 (1.34-2.03) for moderate/severe symptom-score for depression and anxiety, respectively, for the whole sample. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, both depression and anxiety are shown to be risk factors for developing UI with a dose-dependent trend. UI is associated with increased incidence of depression and anxiety. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:322-328, 2017. (c) 2015 The Authors. Neurourology and Urodynamics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.  
  Address National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care, Uni Research Health, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-2467 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:26584597 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1902  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hansen, A.G.; Stovner, L.J.; Hagen, K.; Helvik, A.-S.; Thorstensen, W.M.; Nordgard, S.; Bugten, V.; Eggesbo, H.B. url  doi
  Title Paranasal sinus opacification in headache sufferers: A population-based imaging study (the HUNT study-MRI) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cephalalgia : an International Journal of Headache Abbreviated Journal Cephalalgia  
  Volume 37 Issue 6 Pages 509-516  
  Keywords Paranasal sinuses; headache; magnetic resonance imaging; migraine; opacification; sinus headache; tension headache  
  Abstract Background The association between headache and paranasal sinus disease is still unclear. Because of symptom overlap, the two conditions are not easily studied on the basis of symptoms alone. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether paranasal sinus opacification on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was associated with migraine, tension-type headache (TTH) or unclassified headache. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 844 randomly selected participants (442 women, age range 50-65 years, mean age 57.7 years). Based on 14 headache questions, participants were allocated to four mutually exclusive groups: migraine, TTH, unclassified headache or headache free. On MRI, opacifications as mucosal thickening, polyps/retention cysts and fluid in the five paired sinuses were measured and recorded if >/=1 mm. For each participant, opacification thickness was summed for each sinus and, in addition, a total sum of all sinuses was calculated. Opacification in each sinus was compared between headache-free participants and the headache groups using non-parametric tests, and the total sum was compared by logistical regression. Results No significant association was found between paranasal sinus opacification and headache in general, nor when headache was differentiated into migraine, TTH and unclassified headache. This was also true in separate analyses of mucosal thickening and fluid and of opacification from each paranasal sinus. Conclusion Migraine, TTH and unclassified headache were found not to be associated with an increased degree of paranasal sinus opacification at MRI.  
  Address 5 Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0333-1024 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27215544 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1921  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rasouli, B.; Andersson, T.; Carlsson, P.-O.; Grill, V.; Groop, L.; Martinell, M.; Midthjell, K.; Storm, P.; Tuomi, T.; Carlsson, S. url  doi
  Title Use of Swedish smokeless tobacco (snus) and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association Abbreviated Journal Diabet Med  
  Volume 34 Issue 4 Pages 514-521  
  Keywords  
  Abstract AIMS: It has been suggested that moist snuff (snus), a smokeless tobacco product that is high in nicotine and widespread in Scandinavia, increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes. Previous studies are however few, contradictory and, with regard to autoimmune diabetes, lacking. Our aim was to study the association between snus use and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA). METHOD: Analyses were based on incident cases (Type 2 diabetes, n = 724; LADA, n = 200) and population-based controls (n = 699) from a Swedish case-control study. Additional analyses were performed on cross-sectional data from the Norwegian HUNT study (n = 21 473) with 829 prevalent cases of Type 2 diabetes. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated adjusted for age, BMI family history of diabetes and smoking. Only men were included. RESULTS: No association between snus use and Type 2 diabetes or LADA was seen in the Swedish data. For Type 2 diabetes, the OR for > 10 box-years was 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47 to 2.11] and for LADA 1.01 (95% CI, 0.45 to 2.29). Similarly, in HUNT, the OR for Type 2 diabetes in ever-users was estimated at 0.91 (95% CI, 0.75 to 1.10) and in heavy users at 0.92 (95% CI, 0.46 to 1.83). CONCLUSION: The risk of Type 2 diabetes and LADA is unrelated to the use of snus, despite its high nicotine content. This opens the possibility of the increased risk of Type 2 diabetes seen in smokers may not be attributed to nicotine, but to other substances in tobacco smoke.  
  Address Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3071 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27353226 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1972  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Evensen, M.; Lyngstad, T.H.; Melkevik, O.; Reneflot, A.; Mykletun, A. url  doi
  Title Adolescent mental health and earnings inequalities in adulthood: evidence from the Young-HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health Abbreviated Journal J Epidemiol Community Health  
  Volume 71 Issue 2 Pages 201-206  
  Keywords Employment; Inequalities; Longitudinal Studies; Mental Health; Social and life-course epidemiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that adolescent mental health problems are associated with lower employment probabilities and risk of unemployment. The evidence on how earnings are affected is much weaker, and few have addressed whether any association reflects unobserved characteristics and whether the consequences of mental health problems vary across the earnings distribution. METHODS: A population-based Norwegian health survey linked to administrative registry data (N=7885) was used to estimate how adolescents' mental health problems (separate indicators of internalising, conduct, and attention problems and total sum scores) affect earnings (>/=30 years) in young adulthood. We used linear regression with fixed-effects models comparing either students within schools or siblings within families. Unconditional quantile regressions were used to explore differentials across the earnings distribution. RESULTS: Mental health problems in adolescence reduce average earnings in adulthood, and associations are robust to control for observed family background and school fixed effects. For some, but not all mental health problems, associations are also robust in sibling fixed-effects models, where all stable family factors are controlled. Further, we found much larger earnings loss below the 25th centile. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent mental health problems reduce adult earnings, especially among individuals in the lower tail of the earnings distribution. Preventing mental health problems in adolescence may increase future earnings.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-005X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27531845 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1905  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Perreault, K.; Bauman, A.; Johnson, N.; Britton, A.; Rangul, V.; Stamatakis, E. url  doi
  Title Does physical activity moderate the association between alcohol drinking and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular diseases mortality? A pooled analysis of eight British population cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication British Journal of Sports Medicine Abbreviated Journal Br J Sports Med  
  Volume 51 Issue 8 Pages 651-657  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Alcohol Drinking/*adverse effects; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; England; *Exercise; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Mortality; Neoplasms/*mortality; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Cancer; Epidemiology; Physical activity; Public health  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To examine whether physical activity (PA) moderates the association between alcohol intake and all-cause mortality, cancer mortality and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mortality. DESIGN: Prospective study using 8 British population-based surveys, each linked to cause-specific mortality: Health Survey for England (1994, 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004 and 2006) and Scottish Health Survey (1998 and 2003). PARTICIPANTS: 36 370 men and women aged 40 years and over were included with a corresponding 5735 deaths and a mean of 353 049 person-years of follow-up. EXPOSURES: 6 sex-specific categories of alcohol intake (UK units/week) were defined: (1) never drunk; (2) ex-drinkers; (3) occasional drinkers; (4) within guidelines (<14 (women); <21 (men)); (5) hazardous (14-35 (women); 21-49 (men)) and (6) harmful (>35 (women) >49 (men)). PA was categorised as inactive (</=7 MET-hour/week), active at the lower (>7.5 MET-hour/week) and upper (>15 MET-hour/week) of recommended levels. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Cox proportional-hazard models were used to examine associations between alcohol consumption and all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality risk after adjusting for several confounders. Stratified analyses were performed to evaluate mortality risks within each PA stratum. RESULTS: We found a direct association between alcohol consumption and cancer mortality risk starting from drinking within guidelines (HR (95% CI) hazardous drinking: 1.40 (1.11 to 1.78)). Stratified analyses showed that the association between alcohol intake and mortality risk was attenuated (all-cause) or nearly nullified (cancer) among individuals who met the PA recommendations (HR (95% CI)). CONCLUSIONS: Meeting the current PA public health recommendations offsets some of the cancer and all-cause mortality risk associated with alcohol drinking.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-3674 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27581162 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1970  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Halvorsen, S.; Ghanima, W.; Fride Tvete, I.; Hoxmark, C.; Falck, P.; Solli, O.; Jonasson, C. url  doi
  Title A nationwide registry study to compare bleeding rates in patients with atrial fibrillation being prescribed oral anticoagulants Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Heart Journal. Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 28-36  
  Keywords Apixaban; Atrial fibrillation; Bleeding; Dabigatran; Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; Oral anticoagulants; Rivaroxaban; Warfarin  
  Abstract AIMS: We aimed to evaluate bleeding risk in clinical practice in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) being prescribed dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban compared with warfarin. METHODS: Using nationwide registries (Norwegian Patient Registry and Norwegian Prescription Database), we identified AF patients with a first prescription of oral anticoagulants between January 2013 and June 2015. Patients were followed until discontinuation or switching of oral anticoagulants, death, or end of follow-up. The primary endpoint was major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding. RESULTS: In total 32 675 AF patients were identified (58% men, median age 74 years): 11 427 patients used warfarin, 7925 dabigatran, 6817 rivaroxaban, and 6506 apixaban. After a median follow-up of 173 days (25th, 75th percentile 84, 340), 2081 (6.37%) patients experienced a first major or CRNM bleeding. Using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for baseline characteristics, use of apixaban [hazard ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.80, P < 0.001] and dabigatran (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.84, P < 0.001) were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin whereas use of rivaroxaban was not (HR: 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.17, P = 0.400). Use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were associated with higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas use of apixaban and dabigatran were associated with lower risk of intracranial bleeding, compared with warfarin. CONCLUSION: In this nationwide cohort study in AF patients, apixaban and dabigatran were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban and dabigatran compared with warfarin.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2055-6845 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27680880; PMCID:PMC5216196 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1920  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lie, A.; Engdahl, B.; Hoffman, H.J.; Li, C.-M.; Tambs, K. url  doi
  Title Occupational noise exposure, hearing loss, and notched audiograms in the HUNT Nord-Trondelag hearing loss study, 1996-1998 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Laryngoscope Abbreviated Journal Laryngoscope  
  Volume 127 Issue 6 Pages 1442-1450  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Audiometry/*statistics & numerical data; Female; Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced/*epidemiology/etiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Noise, Occupational/*adverse effects; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology; Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects; Prevalence; Sex Distribution; Young Adult; Noise; noise-induced hearing loss; notched audiograms; occupation  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To study the prevalence and usefulness of audiometric notches in the diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). STUDY DESIGN: Audiograms and data on noise exposure from 23,297 men and 26,477 women, aged 20 to 101 years, from the Nord-Trondelag Hearing Loss Study, 1996-1998. METHODS: The prevalence of four types of audiometric notches (Coles, Hoffman, Wilson) and 4 kHz notch were computed in relation to occupational noise exposure, age, sex, and report of recurrent ear infections. RESULTS: The prevalence of notches in the 3 to 6 kHz range (Wilson, Hoffman, and Coles) ranged from 50% to 60% in subjects without occupational noise exposure, and 60% to 70% in the most occupationally noise-exposed men. The differences were statistically significant only for bilateral notches. For 4 kHz notches, the prevalence varied from 25% in occupationally nonexposed to 35% in the most occupationally exposed men, and the differences were statistically significant for both bilateral and unilateral notches. For women, the prevalence of notches was lower than in men, especially for 4 kHz notches, and the differences between occupationally noise exposed and nonexposed were smaller. Recreational exposure to high music was not associated with notched audiograms. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of bilateral notches and unilateral 4 kHz notches is of some value in diagnosing NIHL, especially in men. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1442-1450, 2017.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0023-852X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27696439; PMCID:PMC5484347 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1948  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) Abbreviated Journal Respirology  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 278-283  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*physiopathology; Cohort Studies; Disease Progression; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Physical Exertion; Sedentary Lifestyle; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vital Capacity; *forced expiratory volume in 1 s; *forced vital capacity; *leisure time; *peak expiratory flow; *prospective  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: People with asthma may seek advice about physical activity. However, the benefits of leisure time physical activity on lung function are unclear. We investigated the association between leisure time physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study in Norway, we used multiple linear regressions to estimate the annual mean decline in lung function (and 95% CI) in 1329 people with asthma over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. The durations of light and hard physical activity per week in the last year were collected by questionnaire. Inactive participants did not report any light or hard activity, while active participants reported light or hard activity. RESULTS: The mean decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was 37 mL/year among inactive participants and 32 mL/year in active participants (difference: -5 mL/year (95% CI: -13 to 3)). The mean decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 33 mL/year among inactive participants and 31 mL/year in active participants (difference: -2 mL/year (95% CI: -11 to 7)). The mean decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio was 0.36%/year among inactive participants and 0.22%/year in active participants (difference: -0.14%/year (95% CI: -0.27 to -0.01)). The mean decline in peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 14 mL/year among the inactive participants and 10 mL/year in active participants (difference: -4 mL/year (95% CI: -9 to 1)). CONCLUSION: We observed slightly less decline in lung function in physically active than inactive participants with asthma, particularly for FEV1 , FEV1 /FVC ratio and PEF.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1323-7799 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27696634 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1892  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Modalsli, E.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Langhammer, A.; Hoff, M.; Forsmo, S.; Naldi, L.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Psoriasis, fracture risk and bone mineral density: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The British Journal of Dermatology Abbreviated Journal Br J Dermatol  
  Volume 176 Issue 5 Pages 1162-1169  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: An association between psoriasis and osteoporosis has been reported. OBJECTIVES: To investigate, in a large prospective population-based Norwegian study, whether psoriasis is associated with increased risk of forearm or hip fracture; to investigate the cross-sectional association between psoriasis and bone mineral density (BMD) T-score in a subpopulation. METHODS: Hospital-derived fracture data from Nord-Trondelag County (1995-2013) were linked to psoriasis information, BMD measurements and lifestyle factors from the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2006-08 (HUNT3); socioeconomic data from the National Education Database; and use of medication from the Norwegian Prescription Database. RESULTS: Among 48 194 participants in HUNT3, we found no increased risk of forearm or hip fracture in 2804 patients with self-reported psoriasis [overall age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-1.31]. No clear association was found between psoriasis and mean BMD T-score; overall age- and sex-adjusted differences in total hip, femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD T-scores were 0.02 (95% CI -0.11 to 0.14), 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.17) and 0.07 (95% CI -0.09 to 0.24), respectively. No clear association was found between psoriasis and prevalent osteoporosis in either total hip, femoral neck or lumbar spine; overall age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio was 0.77 (95% CI 0.54-1.10). Associations did not change substantially after adjustment for education, smoking, systemic steroid use and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS: We found no association between psoriasis and risk of fracture. The study did not indicate reduced BMD T-score or higher prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0963 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27718508 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1955  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thomsen, L.C.V.; McCarthy, N.S.; Melton, P.E.; Cadby, G.; Austgulen, R.; Nygard, O.K.; Johnson, M.P.; Brennecke, S.; Moses, E.K.; Bjorge, L.; Iversen, A.-C. url  doi
  Title The antihypertensive MTHFR gene polymorphism rs17367504-G is a possible novel protective locus for preeclampsia Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Hypertension Abbreviated Journal J Hypertens  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 132-139  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Alleles; Australia; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gene Frequency; Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Genotype; Humans; Hypertension/genetics; Inflammation/genetics; Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2)/*genetics; Norway; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Pre-Eclampsia/*genetics; Pregnancy; Protective Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Preeclampsia is a complex heterogeneous disease commonly defined by new-onset hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy. Women experiencing preeclampsia have increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) later in life. Preeclampsia and CVD share risk factors and pathophysiologic mechanisms, including dysregulated inflammation and raised blood pressure. Despite commonalities, little is known about the contribution of shared genes (pleiotropy) to these diseases. This study aimed to investigate whether genetic risk factors for hypertension or inflammation are pleiotropic by also being associated with preeclampsia. METHODS: We genotyped 122 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in women with preeclampsia (n = 1006) and nonpreeclamptic controls (n = 816) from the Norwegian HUNT Study. SNPs were chosen on the basis of previously reported associations with either nongestational hypertension or inflammation in genome-wide association studies. The SNPs were tested for association with preeclampsia in a multiple logistic regression model. RESULTS: The minor (G) allele of the intronic SNP rs17367504 in the gene methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) was associated with a protective effect on preeclampsia (odds ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.80) in the Norwegian cohort. This association did not replicate in an Australian preeclampsia case-control cohort (P = 0.68, odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.32, minor allele frequency = 0.15). CONCLUSION: MTHFR is important for regulating transmethylation processes and is involved in regulation of folate metabolism. The G allele of rs17367504 has previously been shown to protect against nongestational hypertension. Our study suggests a novel association between this allele and reduced risk for preeclampsia. This is the first study associating the minor (G) allele of a SNP within the MTHFR gene with a protective effect on preeclampsia, and in doing so identifying a possible pleiotropic protective effect on preeclampsia and hypertension.  
  Address aDepartment of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Haukeland University Hospital bDepartment of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway cCentre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia dDepartment of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Centre of Molecular Inflammation Research, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim eDepartment of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway fSouth Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, School of Medicine, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, Texas, USA gDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville hPregnancy Research Centre, Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria iFaculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0263-6352 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27755385; PMCID:PMC5131692 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1996  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sen, A.; Opdahl, S.; Strand, L.B.; Vatten, L.J.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I. url  doi
  Title Insomnia and the Risk of Breast Cancer: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Psychosomatic Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychosom Med  
  Volume 79 Issue 4 Pages 461-468  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The association of insomnia with subsequent breast cancer risk is largely unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether different symptoms of insomnia and their combination are associated with incident breast cancer in a large population-based study. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, 33,332 women were followed to monitor the occurrence of their first invasive breast cancer identified by the Cancer Registry of Norway. Insomnia symptoms including () nonrestorative sleep and () difficulty initiating and () maintaining sleep were self-reported using a study specific measure reflecting the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multiadjusted Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: A total of 862 incident breast cancer cases occurred during a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. No consistent association was observed between the individual insomnia symptoms and breast cancer risk. However, compared to women reporting no insomnia complaints, those who reported having all three aspects of insomnia simultaneously were at increased risk (hazard ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval = 1.11-5.09). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that having only some aspects of insomnia may not predispose someone to breast cancer. In contrast, experiencing all insomnia symptoms simultaneously might confer considerable excess risk.  
  Address From the Department of Public Health and General Practice (Sen, Opdahl, Strand, Vatten, Laugsand, Janszky), Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Internal Medicine (Laugsand), St. Olav's hospital, Trondheim, Norway; and Department of Public Health Sciences (Janszky), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-3174 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27763987 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1978  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lie, T.M.; Bomme, M.; Hveem, K.; Hansen, J.M.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title Snus and risk of gastroesophageal reflux. A population-based case-control study: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 193-198  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/*epidemiology; Heartburn/etiology; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Tobacco Use/*epidemiology; Tobacco, Smokeless/*adverse effects; Young Adult; Health surveys; oral tobacco; smokeless tobacco; snuff  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Tobacco smoking is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux, but whether other tobacco products increase the risk is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if snus increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was based on the third Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT3), a population-based study of all adult residents in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, performed in 2006-2009. The association between self-reported severe heartburn/regurgitation and snus use was assessed by logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared to never snus users, daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS (OR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.93), while previous snus users and those using <2 boxes of snus/month had an increased risk (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.46 and OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, respectively). There was no association between age when starting using snus and GERS. Snus users who started using snus to quit or cut down on cigarette smoking, who started using both snus and cigarettes or cigarettes alone had an increased risk of GERS. Snus users <30 years of age had an increased risk of GERS (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.16), while those aged between 50-60 and 60-70 years had a reduced risk (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93 and OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28-0.94, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS. However, previous snus users and subgroups of snus users had an increased risk of GERS indicating reverse causality, such that snus use could increase the risk of GERS.  
  Address d Department of Medicine , Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust , Levanger , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5521 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27797289 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1942  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zijlema, W.; Cai, Y.; Doiron, D.; Mbatchou, S.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; de Hoogh, K.; Morley, D.; Hodgson, S.; Elliott, P.; Key, T.; Kongsgard, H.; Hveem, K.; Gaye, A.; Burton, P.; Hansell, A.; Stolk, R.; Rosmalen, J. url  doi
  Title Corrigendum to “Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses of harmonized data from 88,336 participants” [Environ. Res. 151 (2016) 804-813] Type Published Erratum
  Year 2017 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 152 Issue Pages 520  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27823774 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2027  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bosnes, I.; Almkvist, O.; Bosnes, O.; Stordal, E.; Romild, U.; Nordahl, H.M. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and correlates of successful aging in a population-based sample of older adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Psychogeriatrics Abbreviated Journal Int Psychogeriatr  
  Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 431-440  
  Keywords Hunt; components; correlates; prevalence; successful aging  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The factors influencing successful aging (SA) are of great interest in an aging society. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of SA, the relative importance across age of the three components used to define it (absence of disease and disability, high cognitive and physical function, and active engagement with life), and its correlates. METHODS: Data were extracted from the population-based cross-sectional Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3 2006-2008). Individuals aged 70-89 years with complete datasets for the three components were included (N = 5773 of 8,040, 71.8%). Of the respondents, 54.6% were women. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to analyze possible correlates of SA. RESULTS: Overall, 35.6% of the sample met one of the three criteria, 34.1% met combinations, and 14.5% met all of the three criteria. The most demanding criterion was high function, closely followed by absence of disease, while approximately two-thirds were actively engaged in life. The relative change with age was largest for the high cognitive and physical function component and smallest for active engagement with life. The significant correlates of SA were younger age, female gender, higher education, weekly exercise, more satisfaction with life, non-smoking, and alcohol consumption, whereas marital status was not related to SA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of SA in this study (14.5%) is comparable to previous studies. It may be possible to increase the prevalence by intervention directed toward more exercise, non-smoking, and better satisfaction with life.  
  Address Department of Psychology,Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU),Trondheim,Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1041-6102 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27852332 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1886  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author url  doi
  Title Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015: a pooled analysis of 1479 population-based measurement studies with 19.1 million participants Type Comment
  Year 2017 Publication Lancet (London, England) Abbreviated Journal Lancet  
  Volume 389 Issue 10064 Pages 37-55  
  Keywords Bayes Theorem; *Blood Pressure; *Global Health; Humans; Prevalence; Risk Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. METHODS: For this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure. FINDINGS: We pooled 1479 studies that had measured the blood pressures of 19.1 million adults. Global age-standardised mean systolic blood pressure in 2015 was 127.0 mm Hg (95% credible interval 125.7-128.3) in men and 122.3 mm Hg (121.0-123.6) in women; age-standardised mean diastolic blood pressure was 78.7 mm Hg (77.9-79.5) for men and 76.7 mm Hg (75.9-77.6) for women. Global age-standardised prevalence of raised blood pressure was 24.1% (21.4-27.1) in men and 20.1% (17.8-22.5) in women in 2015. Mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure decreased substantially from 1975 to 2015 in high-income western and Asia Pacific countries, moving these countries from having some of the highest worldwide blood pressure in 1975 to the lowest in 2015. Mean blood pressure also decreased in women in central and eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and, more recently, central Asia, Middle East, and north Africa, but the estimated trends in these super-regions had larger uncertainty than in high-income super-regions. By contrast, mean blood pressure might have increased in east and southeast Asia, south Asia, Oceania, and sub-Saharan Africa. In 2015, central and eastern Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, and south Asia had the highest blood pressure levels. Prevalence of raised blood pressure decreased in high-income and some middle-income countries; it remained unchanged elsewhere. The number of adults with raised blood pressure increased from 594 million in 1975 to 1.13 billion in 2015, with the increase largely in low-income and middle-income countries. The global increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure is a net effect of increase due to population growth and ageing, and decrease due to declining age-specific prevalence. INTERPRETATION: During the past four decades, the highest worldwide blood pressure levels have shifted from high-income countries to low-income countries in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa due to opposite trends, while blood pressure has been persistently high in central and eastern Europe. FUNDING: Wellcome Trust.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC) Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0140-6736 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27863813; PMCID:PMC5220163 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1897  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nauman, J.; Nes, B.M.; Lavie, C.J.; Jackson, A.S.; Sui, X.; Coombes, J.S.; Blair, S.N.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Prediction of Cardiovascular Mortality by Estimated Cardiorespiratory Fitness Independent of Traditional Risk Factors: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Mayo Clinic Proceedings Abbreviated Journal Mayo Clin Proc  
  Volume 92 Issue 2 Pages 218-227  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; *Cardiorespiratory Fitness; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; Cause of Death; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Myocardial Ischemia/mortality; Norway/epidemiology; Predictive Value of Tests; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Registries; Risk Factors; Stroke/mortality  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the predictive value of estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) and evaluate the additional contribution of traditional risk factors in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality prediction. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: The study included healthy men (n=18,721) and women (n=19,759) aged 30 to 74 years. A nonexercise algorithm estimated cardiorespiratory fitness. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the primary (CVD mortality) and secondary (all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and stroke mortality) end points. The added predictive value of traditional CVD risk factors was evaluated using the Harrell C statistic and net reclassification improvement. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 16.3 years (range, 0.04-17.4 years), there were 3863 deaths, including 1133 deaths from CVD (734 men and 399 women). Low eCRF was a strong predictor of CVD and all-cause mortality after adjusting for established risk factors. The C statistics for eCRF and CVD mortality were 0.848 (95% CI, 0.836-0.861) and 0.878 (95% CI, 0.862-0.894) for men and women, respectively, increasing to 0.851 (95% CI, 0.839-0.863) and 0.881 (95% CI, 0.865-0.897), respectively, when adding clinical variables. By adding clinical variables to eCRF, the net reclassification improvement of CVD mortality was 0.014 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.051) and 0.052 (95% CI, -0.023 to 0.127) in men and women, respectively. CONCLUSION: Low eCRF is independently associated with CVD and all-cause mortality. The inclusion of traditional clinical CVD risk factors added little to risk discrimination and did not improve the classification of risk beyond this simple eCRF measurement, which may be proposed as a practical and cost-effective first-line approach in primary prevention settings.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center for Exercise in Medicine, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0025-6196 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27866655 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1963  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brunes, A.; Flanders, W.D.; Augestad, L.B. url  doi
  Title Self-reported visual impairment, physical activity and all-cause mortality: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 45 Issue 1 Pages 33-41  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; *Self Report; Vision Disorders/*epidemiology; *All-cause mortality; *HUNT study; *physical activity; *prospective cohort study; *self-reported; *visual impairment  
  Abstract AIMS: To examine the associations of self-reported visual impairment and physical activity (PA) with all-cause mortality. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 65,236 Norwegians aged 20 years who had participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Of these participants, 11,074 (17.0%) had self-reported visual impairment (SRVI). The participants' data were linked to Norway's Cause of Death Registry and followed throughout 2012. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were assessed using Cox regression analyses with age as the time-scale. The Cox models were fitted for restricted age groups (<60, 60-84, 85 years). RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 14.5 years, 13,549 deaths were identified. Compared with adults with self-reported no visual impairment, the multivariable hazard ratios among adults with SRVI were 2.47 (95% CI 1.94-3.13) in those aged <60 years, 1.22 (95% CI 1.13-1.33) in those aged 60-84 years and 1.05 (95% CI 0.96-1.15) in those aged 85 years. The strength of the associations remained similar or stronger after additionally controlling for PA. When examining the joint associations, the all-cause mortality risk of SRVI was higher for those who reported no PA than for those who reported weekly hours of PA. We found a large, positive departure from additivity in adults aged <60 years, whereas the departure from additivity was small for the other age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Adults with SRVI reporting no PA were associated with an increased all-cause mortality risk. The associations attenuated with age.  
  Address 4 Department of Visual Impairment, Statped Mid-Norway, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27913690 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1893  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Nes, B.M.; Gutvik, C.R.; Lavie, C.J.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI) for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Promotion of Physical Activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The American Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Med  
  Volume 130 Issue 3 Pages 328-336  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Algorithms; Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality/*prevention & control; *Exercise; Female; Health Promotion/*methods; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment/*methods; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Young Adult; Activity tracking; Cardiovascular disease mortality; Physical activity; Prevention  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To derive and validate a single metric of activity tracking that associates with lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. METHODS: We derived an algorithm, Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI), using the HUNT Fitness Study (n = 4631), and validated it in the general HUNT population (n = 39,298) aged 20-74 years. The PAI was divided into three sex-specific groups (</=50, 51-99, and >/=100), and the inactive group (0 PAI) was used as the referent. Hazard ratios for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: After >1 million person-years of observations during a mean follow-up time of 26.2 (SD 5.9) years, there were 10,062 deaths, including 3867 deaths (2207 men and 1660 women) from cardiovascular disease. Men and women with a PAI level >/=100 had 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-27%) and 23% (95% CI, 4%-38%) reduced risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, respectively, compared with the inactive groups. Obtaining >/=100 PAI was associated with significantly lower risk for cardiovascular disease mortality in all prespecified age groups, and in participants with known cardiovascular disease risk factors (all P-trends <.01). Participants who did not obtain >/=100 PAI had increased risk of dying regardless of meeting the physical activity recommendations. CONCLUSION: PAI may have a huge potential to motivate people to become and stay physically active, as it is an easily understandable and scientifically proven metric that could inform potential users of how much physical activity is needed to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular disease death.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9343 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27984009 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1964  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Andre, B.; Canhao, H.; Espnes, G.A.; Ferreira Rodrigues, A.M.; Gregorio, M.J.; Nguyen, C.; Sousa, R.; Gronning, K. url  doi
  Title Is there an association between food patterns and life satisfaction among Norway's inhabitants ages 65 years and older? Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Appetite Abbreviated Journal Appetite  
  Volume 110 Issue Pages 108-115  
  Keywords Anxiety; Depression; Elderly adults; Food patterns; Life satisfaction  
  Abstract The lack of information regarding older adults' health and lifestyles makes it difficult to design suitable interventions for people at risk of developing unhealth lifestyles. Therefore, there is a need to increase knowledge about older adults' food patterns and quality of life. Our aim was to determine associations among food patterns, anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction in Norwegian inhabitants ages 65+. The Nord-Trondelag Health Study (The HUNT Study) is a large, population-based cohort study that includes data for 125 000 Norwegian participants. The cohort used for this study is wave three of the study, consisting of 11 619 participants age 65 and over. Cluster analysis was used to categorize the participants based on similarities in food consumption; two clusters were identified based on similarities regarding food consumption among participants. Significant differences between the clusters were found, as participants in the healthy food-patterns cluster had higher life satisfaction and lower anxiety and depression than those in the unhealthy food-patterns cluster. The associations among food patterns, anxiety, depression, and life satisfaction among older adults show the need for increased focus on interactions among food patterns, food consumption, and life satisfaction among the elderly in order to explore how society can influence these patterns.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway; NTNU Center for Health Promotion Research, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-6663 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:27988367 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1878  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Quanjer, P.H.; Ruppel, G.L.; Langhammer, A.; Krishna, A.; Mertens, F.; Johannessen, A.; Menezes, A.M.B.; Wehrmeister, F.C.; Perez-Padilla, R.; Swanney, M.P.; Tan, W.C.; Bourbeau, J. url  doi
  Title Bronchodilator Response in FVC Is Larger and More Relevant Than in FEV1 in Severe Airflow Obstruction Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Chest Abbreviated Journal Chest  
  Volume 151 Issue 5 Pages 1088-1098  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Airway Obstruction/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Asthma/*diagnosis/physiopathology; *Bronchodilator Agents; Canada; Child; Child, Preschool; Female; Forced Expiratory Volume/*physiology; Healthy Volunteers; Humans; Latin America; Male; Middle Aged; Netherlands; New Zealand; Norway; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/*diagnosis/physiopathology; Severity of Illness Index; Treatment Outcome; United States; Vital Capacity/*physiology; Young Adult; airways obstruction; asthma; bronchodilator responsiveness; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; respiratory physiology  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Recommendations on interpreting tests of bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR) are conflicting. We investigated the dependence of BDR criteria on sex, age, height, ethnicity, and severity of respiratory impairment. METHODS: BDR test data were available from clinical patients in the Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United States (n = 15,278; female subjects, 51.7%) and from surveys in Canada, Norway, and five Latin-American countries (n = 16,250; female subjects, 54.7%). BDR calculated according to FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC was expressed as absolute change, a percentage of the baseline level (% baseline), a percentage of the predicted value (% predicted), and z score. RESULTS: Change (Delta) in FEV1 and FVC, in milliliters, was unrelated to the baseline value but was biased toward age, height, sex, and level of airways obstruction; DeltaFEV1 was significantly lower in African Americans. In 1,106 subjects with low FEV1 (200-1,621 mL) the FEV1 increased by 12% to 44.7% relative to baseline but < 200 mL. Expressing BDR as a percentage of the predicted value or as a z score attenuated the bias and made the 200-mL criterion redundant, but reduced positive responses by half. DeltaFEV1 % baseline increased with the level of airflow obstruction but decreased with severe obstruction when expressed as z scores or % predicted; DeltaFVC, however expressed, increased with the level of airflow obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Expressing FEV1 responsiveness as % baseline spuriously suggests that responsiveness increases with the severity of respiratory impairment. Expressing change in FEV1 or FVC as % predicted or as z scores eliminates this artifact and renders the required 200-mL minimum increase redundant. In severe airways obstruction DeltaFVC should be critically evaluated as an index of clinically important relief of hyperinflation, with implications for bronchodilator drug trials.  
  Address Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-3692 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:28040521 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1971  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Johnsen, M.B.; Vie, G.A.; Winsvold, B.S.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Pedersen, L.M.; Hellevik, A.I.; Langhammer, A.; Furnes, O.; Flugsrud, G.B.; Skorpen, F.; Romundstad, P.R.; Storheim, K.; Nordsletten, L.; Zwart, J.A. url  doi
  Title The causal role of smoking on the risk of hip or knee replacement due to primary osteoarthritis: a Mendelian randomisation analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Abbreviated Journal Osteoarthritis Cartilage  
  Volume 25 Issue 6 Pages 817-823  
  Keywords Epidemiology; Genetic variants; Osteoarthritis; Smoking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Smoking has been associated with a reduced risk of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and subsequent joint replacement. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the observed association is likely to be causal. METHOD: 55,745 participants of a population-based cohort were genotyped for the rs1051730 C > T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), a proxy for smoking quantity among smokers. A Mendelian randomization analysis was performed using rs1051730 as an instrument to evaluate the causal role of smoking on the risk of hip or knee replacement (combined as total joint replacement (TJR)). Association between rs1051730 T alleles and TJR was estimated by hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All analyses were adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: Smoking quantity (no. of cigarettes) was inversely associated with TJR (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.97-0.98). In the Mendelian randomization analysis, rs1051730 T alleles were associated with reduced risk of TJR among current smokers (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, per T allele), however we found no evidence of association among former (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.88-1.07) and never smokers (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.89-1.06). Neither adjusting for body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular disease (CVD) nor accounting for the competing risk of mortality substantially changed the results. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that smoking may be causally associated with the reduced risk of TJR. Our findings add support to the inverse association found in previous observational studies. More research is needed to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms of this causal association.  
  Address Communication and Research Unit for Musculoskeletal Disorders, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: j.a.zwart@medisin.uio.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1063-4584 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:28049019 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1934  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Asvold, B.O.; Midthjell, K.; Krokstad, S.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Prolonged sitting may increase diabetes risk in physically inactive individuals: an 11 year follow-up of the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 60 Issue 5 Pages 830-835  
  Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology/metabolism; Exercise/physiology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Epidemiology; Sedentary lifestyle; Type 2 diabetes mellitus  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We examined the association between sitting time and diabetes incidence, overall and by strata of leisure-time physical activity and BMI. METHODS: We followed 28,051 adult participants of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a population-based study, for diabetes incidence from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 and estimated HRs of any diabetes by categories of self-reported total daily sitting time at baseline. RESULTS: Of 28,051 participants, 1253 (4.5%) developed diabetes during 11 years of follow-up. Overall, sitting >/=8 h/day was associated with a 17% (95% CI 2, 34) higher risk of developing diabetes compared with sitting </=4 h/day, adjusted for age, sex and education. However, the association was attenuated to a non-significant 9% (95% CI -5, 26) increase in risk after adjustment for leisure-time physical activity and BMI. The association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by leisure-time physical activity (p Interaction = 0.01). Among participants with low leisure-time physical activity (</=2 h light activity per week and no vigorous activity), sitting 5-7 h/day and >/=8 h/day were associated with a 26% (95% CI 2, 57) and 30% (95% CI 5, 61) higher risk of diabetes, respectively, compared with sitting </=4 h/day. There was no corresponding association among participants with high leisure-time physical activity (>/=3 h light activity or >0 h vigorous activity per week). There was no statistical evidence that the association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by obesity (p Interaction = 0.65). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that total sitting time has little association with diabetes risk in the population as a whole, but prolonged sitting may contribute to an increased diabetes risk among physically inactive people.  
  Address School of Public Health, Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:28054097 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1879  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Krokstad, S.; Ding, D.; Grunseit, A.C.; Sund, E.R.; Holmen, T.L.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Multiple lifestyle behaviours and mortality, findings from a large population-based Norwegian cohort study – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMC Public Health Abbreviated Journal BMC Public Health  
  Volume 17 Issue 1 Pages 58  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology; Cohort Studies; Diet/adverse effects; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; *Life Style; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; *Risk-Taking; Sleep; Smoking/adverse effects; Social Behavior; Young Adult; *All-cause mortality; *Cardiovascular disease; *Cohort study; *Lifestyle behaviour; *Metabolic disease; *Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Lifestyle risk behaviours are responsible for a large proportion of disease burden and premature mortality worldwide. Risk behaviours tend to cluster in populations. We developed a new lifestyle risk index by including emerging risk factors (sleep, sitting time, and social participation) and examine unique risk combinations and their associations with all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality. METHODS: Data are from a large population-based cohort study in a Norway, the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT), with an average follow-up time of 14.1 years. Baseline data from 1995-97 were linked to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry. The analytic sample comprised 36 911 adults aged 20-69 years. Cox regression models were first fitted for seven risk factors (poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption, current smoking, physical inactivity, excessive sitting, too much/too little sleep, and poor social participation) separately and then adjusted for socio-demographic covariates. Based on these results, a lifestyle risk index was developed. Finally, we explored common combinations of the risk factors in relation to all-cause and cardio-metabolic mortality outcomes. RESULTS: All single risk factors, except for diet, were significantly associated with both mortality outcomes, and were therefore selected to form a lifestyle risk index. Risk of mortality increased as the index score increased. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality increased from 1.37 (1.15-1.62) to 6.15 (3.56-10.63) as the number of index risk factors increased from one to six respectively. Among the most common risk factor combinations the association with mortality was particularly strong when smoking and/or social participation were included. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to previous research on multiple risk behaviours by incorporating emerging risk factors. Findings regarding social participation and prolonged sitting suggest new components of healthy lifestyles and potential new directions for population health interventions.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2458 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes (up) PMID:28068991; PMCID:PMC5223537 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1946  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Naicker, K.; Johnson, J.A.; Skogen, J.C.; Manuel, D.; Overland, S.; Sivertsen, B.; Colman, I. url  doi
  Title Type 2 Diabetes and Comorbid Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety: Longitudinal Associations With Mortality Risk Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Diabetes Care Abbreviated Journal Diabetes Care  
  Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 352-358  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*complications; Comorbidity; Depression/*complications; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Depression is strongly linked to increased mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Despite high rates of co-occurring anxiety and depression, the risk of death associated with comorbid anxiety in individuals with type 2 diabetes is poorly understood. This study documented the excess mortality risk associated with symptoms of depression and/or anxiety comorbid with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using data for 64,177 Norwegian adults from the second wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2), with linkage to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry, we assessed all-cause mortality from survey participation in 1995 through to 2013. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine mortality risk over 18 years associated with type 2 diabetes status and the presence of comorbid affective symptoms at baseline. RESULTS: Three clear patterns emerged from our findings. First, mortality risk in individuals with diabetes increased in the presence of depression or anxiety, or both. Second, mortality ri