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Author Videm, V.; Thomas, R.; Brown, M.A.; Hoff, M. url  doi
  Title Self-reported Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis or Ankylosing Spondylitis Has Low Accuracy: Data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The Journal of Rheumatology Abbreviated Journal J Rheumatol  
  Volume 44 Issue 8 Pages 1134-1141  
  Keywords Ankylosing Spondylitis; Epidemiology; Rheumatoid Arthritis  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Self-reported diagnoses of inflammatory arthritis are not accurate. The primary study aim was to ascertain self-reported diagnoses of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the Norwegian population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) using hospital case files. The secondary aim was to provide updated estimates of the prevalence and incidence of RA and AS. METHODS: All inhabitants >/= 20 years old from the county of Nord-Trondelag were invited. Data from 70,805 unique participants from HUNT2 (1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008) were included. For participants who self-reported RA or AS, case files from all 3 hospitals in the catchment area were evaluated using standardized diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: Of 2703 self-reported cases of RA, 19.1% were verified in hospital files. Of 1064 self-reported cases of AS, 15.8% were verified. Of 259 cases self-reporting both RA and AS, 8.1% had RA and 5.4% had AS. Overall, a self-report of 1 or both diagnoses could not be verified in 82.1%, including 22.8% with insufficient information or no case file. The prevalence of RA was 768 (95% CI 705-835) per 100,000. The incidence of RA from HUNT2 to HUNT3 was 0.48 (0.41-0.56) per 1000 per year. The prevalence of AS was 264 (228-305) per 100,000. The incidence of AS from HUNT2 to HUNT3 was 0.19 (0.15-0.24) per 1000 per year. CONCLUSION: Self-reported diagnoses of RA and AS are often false-positive. The prevalence and incidence of RA were comparable to reports from similar populations. The incidence of AS was higher than previously reported in a mixed population from Norway.  
  Address V. Videm, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, NTNU, and Senior Consultant, Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital; R. Thomas, MBBS, FRACP, MD, Professor, Translational Research Institute, University of Queensland; M.A. Brown, MBBS, MD, Director of Genomics, Queensland University of Technology, Institute of Health and Biomedical Research, Princess Alexandra Hospital; M. Hoff, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Public Health and General Practice and Department of Neuroscience, NTNU, and Senior Consultant, Department of Rheumatology, St. Olavs Hospital  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0315-162X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28412703 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2001  
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Author Vie, G.A.; Pape, K.; Krokstad, S.; Johnsen, R.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Temporal changes in health within 5 years before and after disability pension-the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Eur J Public Health  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 653-659  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Health status has been reported to change before, during and after disability pension receipt. These associations might be subject to temporal changes according to changes in policy, incidence of disability pensions and other contextual factors. We compared the perceived health around time of disability retirement among persons receiving disability pension in the 1990 s and 2000 s in Norway. Methods: We linked data from two consecutive cross-sectional population based Norwegian health surveys, HUNT2 (1995-97) and HUNT3 (2006-08), to national registries, identifying those who received disability pension within 5 years before or after participation in the survey (HUNT2: n = 5362, HUNT3: n = 4649). We used logistic regression to assess associations of time from receiving a disability pension with self-rated health, insomnia, depression and anxiety symptoms and subsequently estimated adjusted prevalence over time. Results: Prevalence of poor self-rated health peaked around time of receiving disability pension in both decades. For those aged 50+, prevalence the year before disability pension was slightly lower in 2006-08 (74%, 95% CI 70-79%) than in 1995-97 (83%, 95% CI 79-87%), whereas peak prevalence was similar between surveys for those younger than 50. Depression symptoms peaked more pronouncedly in 1995-97 than in 2006-08, whereas prevalence of anxiety symptoms was similar at time of receiving disability pension between surveys. Conclusions: We found no strong evidence of differences in health selection to disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s. However, we found indication of less depression symptoms around time of disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s.  
  Address Forensic Department and Research Centre Broset, St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1101-1262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28637220 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2002  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Langhammer, A.; Wu, C.; Skorpen, F.; Chen, Y.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level with incidence of lung cancer and histologic types in Norwegian adults: a case-cohort analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Case-cohort study; Histologic types; Lung cancer; Pulmonary adenocarcinoma; Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]; Vitamin D  
  Abstract Previous prospective studies have shown inconsistent associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and lung cancer incidence. The aim of the present study was to explore the associations of serum 25(OH)D levels with incidence of lung cancer overall and different histologic types. We performed a population-based prospective case-cohort study including 696 incident lung cancer cases and 5804 individuals in a subcohort who participated in the second survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway. Cox proportional hazards regression models counting for the case-cohort design were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) for lung cancer overall or histologic types in relation to serum 25(OH)D levels. Compared with the fourth season-specific quartile of 25(OH)D (median 68.0 nmol/L), lower 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the incidence of overall, small or squamous cell lung cancer. However, the risk of adenocarcinoma was lower in the second and third quartiles (median 39.9 and 51.5 nmol/L) compared with the fourth quartile, with HRs of 0.63 (95% CI 0.41-0.98) and 0.58 (0.38-0.88), respectively. The associations of lower levels of 25(OH)D with a reduced risk of adenocarcinoma were only observed in the overweight/obese subjects [HRs for second and third quartiles: 0.40 (0.22-0.72) and 0.50 (0.27-0.92)] but not in the normal weight subjects [HRs: 0.95 (0.52-1.75) and 0.60 (0.32-1.10)]. Serum 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the risk of lung cancer in general. The observation that lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with a lower risk of adenocarcinoma should be interpreted with caution.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29080012 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2007  
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Author Talseth, A.; Edna, T.-H.; Hveem, K.; Lydersen, S.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title Quality of life and psychological and gastrointestinal symptoms after cholecystectomy: a population-based cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open Gastroenterol  
  Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages e000128  
  Keywords Cholecystectomy; Gastrointestinal Function; Quality Of Life  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The study aims to examine gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life and the risk of psychological symptoms after cholecystectomy. DESIGN: This is a prospective population-based cohort study based on the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) Norway. HUNT is a repeated health survey of the county population and includes a wide range of health-related items. In the present study, all 3 HUNT surveys were included, performed between 1984 and 2008. Selected items were scores on quality of life, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and selected gastrointestinal symptoms. Participants who underwent cholecystectomy for gallstone disease between 1 January 1990 and until 1 year before attending HUNT3 were compared with the remaining non-operated cohort. Associations between cholecystectomy and the postoperative scores and symptoms were assessed by multivariable regression models. RESULTS: Participants in HUNT1, HUNT2 and HUNT3 were 77 212 (89.4% of those invited), 65 237 (69.5%) and 50 807 (54.1%), respectively. In the study period, 931 participants were operated with cholecystectomy. Cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of diarrhoea and stomach pain postoperatively. In addition, cholecystectomy was associated with an increased risk of nausea postoperatively in men. We found no associations between cholecystectomy and quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation following surgery. CONCLUSIONS: In this large population-based cohort study, cholecystectomy was associated with postoperative diarrhoea and stomach pain. Cholecystectomy for gallstone colic was associated with nausea in men. There were no associations between quality of life, symptoms of anxiety and depression, constipation, heartburn, or acid regurgitation.  
  Address Department of Medicine, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-4774 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28761686; PMCID:PMC5508800 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2008  
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Author Taylor, A.E.; Carslake, D.; de Mola, C.L.; Rydell, M.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Horta, B.L.; Pearson, R.; Rai, D.; Galanti, M.R.; Barros, F.C.; Romundstad, P.R.; Davey Smith, G.; Munafo, M.R. url  doi
  Title Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy and Offspring Depression: a cross cohort and negative control study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 12579  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Previous reports suggest that offspring of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have greater risk of developing depression. However, it is unclear whether this is due to intrauterine effects. Using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) from the UK (N = 2,869), the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) from Norway (N = 15,493), the Pelotas 1982 Birth Cohort Study from Brazil (N = 2,626), and the Swedish Sibling Health Cohort (N = 258 sibling pairs), we compared associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy and mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy with offspring depression and performed a discordant sibling analysis. In meta-analysis, maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with higher odds of offspring depression (OR 1.20, 95% CI:1.08,1.34), but mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy was not (OR 1.05, 95% CI:0.94,1.17). However, there was only weak statistical evidence that the odds ratios for maternal and mother's partner's smoking differed from each other (p = 0.08). There was no clear evidence for an association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring depression in the sibling analysis. Findings do not provide strong support for a causal role of maternal smoking during pregnancy in offspring depression, rather observed associations may reflect residual confounding relating to characteristics of parents who smoke.  
  Address UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28974730; PMCID:PMC5626710 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2010  
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Author Theofylaktopoulou, D.; Midttun, O.; Ueland, P.M.; Meyer, K.; Fanidi, A.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Prentice, R.; Pettinger, M.; Thomson, C.A.; Giles, G.G.; Hodge, A.; Cai, Q.; Blot, W.J.; Wu, J.; Johansson, M.; Hultdin, J.; Grankvist, K.; Stevens, V.L.; McCullough, M.M.; Weinstein, S.J.; Albanes, D.; Ziegler, R.; Freedman, N.D.; Langhammer, A.; Hveem, K.; Naess, M.; Sesso, H.D.; Gaziano, J.M.; Buring, J.E.; Lee, I.-M.; Severi, G.; Zhang, X.; Stampfer, M.J.; Han, J.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Le Marchand, L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Wang, R.; Butler, L.M.; Koh, W.-P.; Gao, Y.-T.; Rothman, N.; Ericson, U.; Sonestedt, E.; Visvanathan, K.; Jones, M.R.; Relton, C.; Brennan, P.; Johansson, M.; Ulvik, A. url  doi
  Title Impaired functional vitamin B6 status is associated with increased risk of lung cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid; Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium; functional vitamin B6 marker; pyridoxal 5'-phosphate  
  Abstract Circulating vitamin B6 levels have been found to be inversely associated with lung cancer. Most studies have focused on the B6 form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a direct biomarker influenced by inflammation and other factors. Using a functional B6 marker allows further investigation of the potential role of vitamin B6 status in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. We prospectively evaluated the association of the functional marker of vitamin B6 status, the 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid (HK:XA) ratio, with risk of lung cancer in a nested case-control study consisting of 5,364 matched case-control pairs from the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between HK:XA and lung cancer, and random effect models to combine results from different cohorts and regions. High levels of HK:XA, indicating impaired functional B6 status, were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, the odds ratio comparing the fourth and the first quartiles (OR4thvs.1st ) was 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.41). Stratified analyses indicated that this association was primarily driven by cases diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. Notably, the risk associated with HK:XA was approximately 50% higher in groups with a high relative frequency of squamous cell carcinoma, i.e., men, former and current smokers. This risk of squamous cell carcinoma was present in both men and women regardless of smoking status.  
  Address Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29238985 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2011  
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Author Thorstensen, K.; Kvitland, M.A.; Irgens, W.O.; Asberg, A.; Borch-Iohnsen, B.; Moen, T.; Hveem, K. url  doi
  Title Iron loading in HFE p.C282Y homozygotes found by population screening: relationships to HLA-type and T-lymphocyte subsets Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation Abbreviated Journal Scand J Clin Lab Invest  
  Volume 77 Issue 7 Pages 477-485  
  Keywords Hla-A*03; Haplotypes; Mhc; homozygote; iron overload  
  Abstract Iron loading in p.C282Y homozygous HFE hemochromatosis subjects is highly variable, and it is unclear what factors cause this variability. Finding such factors could aid in predicting which patients are at highest risk and require closest follow-up. The degree of iron loading has previously been associated with certain HLA-types and with abnormally low CD8 + cell counts in peripheral blood. In 183 Norwegian, p.C282Y homozygotes (104 men, 79 women) originally found through population screening we determined HLA type and measured total T-lymphocytes, CD4 + and CD8 + cells, and compared this with data on iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous men, but not in homozygous women, we found that the presence of two HLA-A*03 alleles increased the iron load on average by approximately 2-fold compared to p.C282Y homozygous men carrying zero or one A*03 allele. On the other hand, the presence of two HLA-A*01 alleles, in male subjects, apparently reduced the iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous individuals, the iron loading was increased if the CD8 + cell number was below the 25 percentile or if the CD4 + cell number was above the 75 percentile. This effect appeared to be additive to the effect of the number of HLA-A*03 alleles. Our data indicate that homozygosity for the HLA-A*03 allele significantly increases the risk of excessive iron loading in Norwegian p.C282Y homozygous male patients. In addition, low CD8 + cell number or high CD4 + cell number further increases the risk of excessive iron loading.  
  Address d HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28678636 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2013  
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Author Torske, M.O.; Krokstad, S.; Stamatakis, E.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Dog ownership and all-cause mortality in a population cohort in Norway: The HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 6 Pages e0179832  
  Keywords Adult; Animals; *Cause of Death; Cohort Studies; Dogs; Exercise; Female; Health Status; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Mortality; Norway/epidemiology; *Ownership; *Population Surveillance; Walking  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: There has been increased interest in human-animal interactions and their possible effects on human health. Some of this research has focused on human physical activity levels, mediated through increased dog walking. Much of the reported research has been cross sectional, and very few epidemiological studies have examined the association between dog ownership and mortality in populations. METHODS: We used data from the Norwegian county population-based Nord-Trondelag HUNT Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to analyse the relationship between dog ownership and all-cause mortality. The median follow-up time was 18.5 years and the maximum follow-up time was 19.7 years. RESULTS: In this population, dog owners were no more physically active than non-dog owners, both groups reporting a total of just over 3 hours/week of light and vigorous activity. Dog owners (n = 25,031, with 1,587 deaths during follow-up; 504,017 person-years of time at risk) had virtually the same hazard of dying as non-dog owners (Hazard ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.09). CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence for an association between the presence of a dog in the household and all-cause mortality or physical activity levels in this Norwegian population. Further epidemiological research is needed to clarify this relationship, as methodological limitations and an active Norwegian population sample means that generalizable evidence is not yet clear on dog ownership and mortality.  
  Address Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28662069; PMCID:PMC5491039 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2014  
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Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers are not independently associated with MI risk in healthy individuals – results from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 243 Issue Pages 502-504  
  Keywords Leukocyte markers; Myocardial infarction  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that circulating markers reflecting monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. METHODS: Serum monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers soluble (s) CD163, sCD14, Gal3BP, sCD25 and sCD166 were analyzed by enzyme-immunoassay in a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. Among 58,761 apparently healthy men and women followed a median 11.3years, 1587 incident MI cases were registered, and compared to 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. RESULTS: Higher serum sCD163 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.27, P-trend 0.002), sCD14 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.38, P-trend<0.001), and especially sCD25 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.45, P-trend<0.001), were associated with increased MI risk in the age-and sex adjusted models. However, after additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors these associations were strongly attenuated (Q4 vs Q1 ORs between 1.02 and 1.12, P-trends between 0.30 and 0.58). CONCLUSIONS: sCD163, sCD14 and sCD25 may reflect leukocyte activation and inflammatory mechanisms related to atherogenesis, but do not predict MI risk above and beyond conventional cardiovascular risk factors.  
  Address Department of Public Health, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28615143 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2016  
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Author Yu, D.; Takata, Y.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Blot, W.; Sawada, N.; White, E.; Freedman, N.; Robien, K.; Giovannucci, E.; Zhang, X.; Park, Y.; Gao, Y.-T.; Chlebowski, R.T.; Langhammer, A.; Yang, G.; Severi, G.; Manjer, J.; Khaw, K.-T.; Weiderpass, E.; Liao, L.M.; Caporaso, N.; Krokstad, S.; Hveem, K.; Sinha, R.; Ziegler, R.; Tsugane, S.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Johansson, M.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O. url  doi
  Title Prediagnostic Calcium Intake and Lung Cancer Survival: A Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev  
  Volume 26 Issue 7 Pages 1060-1070  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. Little is known about whether prediagnostic nutritional factors may affect survival. We examined the associations of prediagnostic calcium intake from foods and/or supplements with lung cancer survival.Methods: The present analysis included 23,882 incident, primary lung cancer patients from 12 prospective cohort studies. Dietary calcium intake was assessed using food-frequency questionnaires at baseline in each cohort and standardized to caloric intake of 2,000 kcal/d for women and 2,500 kcal/d for men. Stratified, multivariable-adjusted Cox regression was applied to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI).Results: The 5-year survival rates were 56%, 21%, and 5.7% for localized, regional, and distant stage lung cancer, respectively. Low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake (<500-600 mg/d, less than half of the recommendation) was associated with a small increase in risk of death compared with recommended calcium intakes (800-1,200 mg/d); HR (95% CI) was 1.07 (1.01-1.13) after adjusting for age, stage, histology, grade, smoking status, pack-years, and other potential prognostic factors. The association between low calcium intake and higher lung cancer mortality was evident primarily among localized/regional stage patients, with HR (95% CI) of 1.15 (1.04-1.27). No association was found for supplemental calcium with survival in the multivariable-adjusted model.Conclusions: This large pooled analysis is the first, to our knowledge, to indicate that low prediagnostic dietary calcium intake may be associated with poorer survival among early-stage lung cancer patients.Impact: This multinational prospective study linked low calcium intake to lung cancer prognosis. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(7); 1060-70. (c)2017 AACR.  
  Address Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. xiao-ou.shu@vanderbilt.edu  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28264875; PMCID:PMC5500413 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2025  
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Author Zhou, W.; Fritsche, L.G.; Das, S.; Zhang, H.; Nielsen, J.B.; Holmen, O.L.; Chen, J.; Lin, M.; Elvestad, M.B.; Hveem, K.; Abecasis, G.R.; Kang, H.M.; Willer, C.J. url  doi
  Title Improving power of association tests using multiple sets of imputed genotypes from distributed reference panels Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Genetic Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Genet Epidemiol  
  Volume 41 Issue 8 Pages 744-755  
  Keywords Gwas; genotype imputation; multiple reference panels; population-specific; study power  
  Abstract The accuracy of genotype imputation depends upon two factors: the sample size of the reference panel and the genetic similarity between the reference panel and the target samples. When multiple reference panels are not consented to combine together, it is unclear how to combine the imputation results to optimize the power of genetic association studies. We compared the accuracy of 9,265 Norwegian genomes imputed from three reference panels-1000 Genomes phase 3 (1000G), Haplotype Reference Consortium (HRC), and a reference panel containing 2,201 Norwegian participants from the population-based Nord Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) from low-pass genome sequencing. We observed that the population-matched reference panel allowed for imputation of more population-specific variants with lower frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.05% and 0.5%). The overall imputation accuracy from the population-specific panel was substantially higher than 1000G and was comparable with HRC, despite HRC being 15-fold larger. These results recapitulate the value of population-specific reference panels for genotype imputation. We also evaluated different strategies to utilize multiple sets of imputed genotypes to increase the power of association studies. We observed that testing association for all variants imputed from any panel results in higher power to detect association than the alternative strategy of including only one version of each genetic variant, selected for having the highest imputation quality metric. This was particularly true for lower frequency variants (MAF < 1%), even after adjusting for the additional multiple testing burden.  
  Address Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America  
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  ISSN 0741-0395 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28861891 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2026  
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Author Zijlema, W.; Cai, Y.; Doiron, D.; Mbatchou, S.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; de Hoogh, K.; Morley, D.; Hodgson, S.; Elliott, P.; Key, T.; Kongsgard, H.; Hveem, K.; Gaye, A.; Burton, P.; Hansell, A.; Stolk, R.; Rosmalen, J. url  doi
  Title Corrigendum to “Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses of harmonized data from 88,336 participants” [Environ. Res. 151 (2016) 804-813] Type Published Erratum
  Year 2017 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 152 Issue Pages 520  
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  Abstract  
  Address University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands  
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  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:27823774 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2027  
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Author Zisko, N.; Skjerve, K.N.; Tari, A.R.; Sandbakk, S.B.; Wisloff, U.; Nes, B.M.; Nauman, J. url  doi
  Title Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI), Sedentary Behavior and Cardiovascular Risk Factor Clustering – the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis  
  Volume 60 Issue 1 Pages 89-95  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Cardiovascular disease risk factors; Exercise; Exercise intensity; Physical activity; Sedentary behavior  
  Abstract Prolonged sedentary behavior (SB) positively associates with clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The recently developed metric for physical activity (PA) tracking called Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI) takes into account age, sex, resting and maximum heart rate, and a score of >/=100 weekly PAI has been shown to reduce the risk of premature CVD death in healthy as well as individuals with known CVD risk factors, regardless of whether or not the current PA recommendations were met. The aim of the present study was to examine if PAI modifies the associations between SB and CVD risk factor (CV-RF) clustering in a large apparently healthy general population cohort (n=29,950, aged >/=20 years). Logistic regression revealed that in those with >/=100 weekly PAI, the likelihood of CV-RF clustering prevalence associated with prolonged SB was attenuated across age groups. Monitoring weekly PAI-level could be useful to ensure that people perform enough PA to combat SB's deleterious association with CV-RF.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Cardiology, St. Olavs Hospital, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-0620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28274818 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2028  
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Author Vindenes, H.K.; Svanes, C.; Lygre, S.H.L.; Hollund, B.-E.; Langhammer, A.; Bertelsen, R.J. url  doi
  Title Prevalence of, and work-related risk factors for, hand eczema in a Norwegian general population (The HUNT Study) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Contact Dermatitis Abbreviated Journal Contact Dermatitis  
  Volume 77 Issue 4 Pages 214-223  
  Keywords Hunt; atopic dermatitis; epidemiology; hand eczema; occupational  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Chemical exposures at work and at home may cause hand eczema. However, this has been scarcely described for Norway. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of, and occupational risk factors for, hand eczema in Norway. METHODS: Among 50 805 respondents (aged >/=20 years) to the third Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3), 5757 persons reported ever having hand eczema, and 4206 answered a hand eczema questionnaire. RESULTS: The lifetime prevalences of hand eczema were 8.4% in men and 13.8% in women (p < 0.001), with onset at age </=10 years in 24% (men) and 20% (women), and onset at age >/=30 years in 37% (men) and 25% (women) (p < 0.001). Work-related hand eczema affected 4.8% of the population, and was most frequently associated with health/social work (29%) and occupational cleaning (20%) in women, and with farming (26%) and industrial occupations (27%) in men. Cleaning detergents (75%) and other chemicals (36%) were the most common exacerbating factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of hand eczema was 11.3%, and that of work-related hand eczema was 4.8%. Hand eczema was more common in women than in men, but with a later onset in men. Cleaning detergents were the most common aggravating factors. A large proportion of the Nord-Trondelag population is employed in farming, providing the possibility to identify farming as an important risk factor for hand eczema.  
  Address Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, 5021, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0105-1873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28449354 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2031  
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Author Almkvist, O.; Bosnes, O.; Bosnes, I.; Stordal, E. url  doi
  Title Selective impact of disease on short-term and long-term components of self-reported memory: a population-based HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication BMJ Open Abbreviated Journal BMJ Open  
  Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages e013586  
  Keywords Hunt; disease; health; long-term memory; short-term memory; subjective memory  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Subjective memory is commonly considered to be a unidimensional measure. However, theories of performance-based memory suggest that subjective memory could be divided into more than one dimension. OBJECTIVE: To divide subjective memory into theoretically related components of memory and explore the relationship to disease. METHODS: In this study, various aspects of self-reported memory were studied with respect to demographics and diseases in the third wave of the HUNT epidemiological study in middle Norway. The study included all individuals 55 years of age or older, who responded to a nine-item questionnaire on subjective memory and questionnaires on health (n=18 633). RESULTS: A principle component analysis of the memory items resulted in two memory components; the criterion used was an eigenvalue above 1, which accounted for 54% of the total variance. The components were interpreted as long-term memory (LTM; the first component; 43% of the total variance) and short-term memory (STM; the second component; 11% of the total variance). Memory impairment was significantly related to all diseases (except Bechterew's disease), most strongly to brain infarction, heart failure, diabetes, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and whiplash. For most diseases, the STM component was more affected than the LTM component; however, in cancer, the opposite pattern was seen. CONCLUSIONS: Subjective memory impairment as measured in HUNT contained two components, which were differentially associated with diseases.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2044-6055 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28490551; PMCID:PMC5566596 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1874  
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Author Grov, E.K.; Fossa, S.D.; Dahl, A.A. url  doi
  Title A controlled study of the influence of comorbidity on activities of daily living in elderly cancer survivors (the HUNT-3 survey) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of Geriatric Oncology Abbreviated Journal J Geriatr Oncol  
  Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 328-335  
  Keywords Adl; Activities of daily living; Cancer survivors; Comorbidity; Elderly; Home dwelling  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: To examine the influence of somatic comorbidity on Activity of Daily Living (ADL) problems in cancer survivors >/=70years (ECSs) based on data from The Health Study of Nord-Trondelag County (HUNT-3) 2006-08. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Among participants of the HUNT-3 survey, 599 ECSs had a diagnosis of one invasive cancer according to both The Cancer Registry of Norway and self-report. Three controls without cancer aged >/=70years for each ECS were drawn from the HUNT-3 sample. We compared personal-ADL (P-ADL) and instrumental-ADL (I-ADL) problems for ECSs and differences between ADL problems for ECSs with and without comorbidity and controls with and without comorbidity. RESULTS: The prevalence of P-ADL problems was 3.5% among ECSs and 2.9% among controls (p=0.97) and for I-ADL 28.5% versus 21.4% (p=0.01), respectively. In bivariate analyses where ECSs versus controls was the dependent variable, presence of I-ADL problems, higher age, being female, paired relationship, poor self-rated health, hospitalization last year, and low level of neuroticism were associated being ECSs. In multivariate analyses, these variables, except I-ADL-problems and paired relationship, remained significantly associated being ECSs. No significant differences were shown for P-ADL problems when comparing ECSs and controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with and without comorbidity. ECSs with comorbidity reported significantly more I-ADL-problems than controls with comorbidity, and ECSs with comorbidity had significantly more I-ADL-problems than ECSs without comorbidity. CONCLUSION: Our results reflect common factors found in ADL studies in the elderly population. Health personnel have to be particularly observant on I-ADL problems among female ECSs, and those reporting poor self-rated health or comorbidity.  
  Address National Advisory Unit on Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway; Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1879-4068 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28629695 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1917  
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Author Grunseit, A.C.; Chau, J.Y.; Rangul, V.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Patterns of sitting and mortality in the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 8  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Posture; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Self Report; Young Adult; *Cardiovascular disease; *Epidemiology; *Mortality; *Sedentary behaviour  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Current evidence concerning sedentary behaviour and mortality risk has used single time point assessments of sitting. Little is known about how changes in sitting levels over time affect subsequent mortality risk. AIM: To examine the associations between patterns of sitting time assessed at two time points 11 years apart and risk of all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality. METHODS: Participants were 25,651 adults aged > =20 years old from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study with self-reported total sitting time in 1995-1997 (HUNT2) and 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Four categories characterised patterns of sitting: (1) low at HUNT2/ low at HUNT3, 'consistently low sitting'; (2) low at HUNT2/high at HUNT3, 'increased sitting'; (3) high at HUNT2/low at HUNT3, 'reduced sitting'; and (4) high at HUNT2 /high at HUNT3, 'consistently high sitting'. Associations of sitting pattern with all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality were analysed using Cox regression adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 6.2 years (158880 person-years); 1212 participants died. Compared to 'consistently low sitting', adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.51 (95% CI: 1.28-2.78), 1.03 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20), and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.06-1.51) for 'increased sitting', 'reduced sitting' and 'consistently high sitting' respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Examining patterns of sitting over time augments single time-point analyses of risk exposures associated with high sitting time. Whilst sitting habits can be stable over a long period, life events (e.g., changing jobs, retiring or illness) may influence sitting trajectories and therefore sitting-attributable risk. Reducing sitting may yield mortality risks comparable to a stable low-sitting pattern.  
  Address Department of Public health and General practice, HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28122625; PMCID:PMC5267382 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1918  
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Author Gulati, A.M.; Hoff, M.; Salvesen, O.; Dhainaut, A.; Semb, A.G.; Kavanaugh, A.; Haugeberg, G. url  doi
  Title Bone mineral density in patients with psoriatic arthritis: data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication RMD Open Abbreviated Journal RMD Open  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages e000413  
  Keywords Psoriatic arthritis; bone mineral density; osteoporosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The risk of osteoporosis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in patients with PsA and controls. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with PsA and controls were recruited from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) 3. RESULTS: Patients with PsA (n=69) and controls (n=11 703) were comparable in terms of age (56.8 vs 55.3 years, p=0.32), gender distribution (females 65.2% vs 64.3%, p=0.87) and postmenopausal status (75.6% vs 62.8%, p=0.08). Body mass index (BMI) was higher in patients with PsA compared with controls (28.5 vs 27.2 kg/m(2), p=0.01). After adjusting for potential confounding factors (including BMI), BMD was higher in patients with PsA compared with controls at lumbar spine 1-4 (1.213 vs 1.147 g/cm(2), p=0.003) and femoral neck (0.960 vs 0.926 g/cm(2), p=0.02), but not at total hip (1.013 vs 0.982 g/cm(2), p=0.11). Controls had significantly higher odds of having osteopenia or osteoporosis based on measurements of BMD in both the femoral neck (p=0.001), total hip (p=0.033) and lumbar spine (p=0.033). CONCLUSION: Our population-based data showed comparable BMD in patients with PsA and controls. This supports that the PsA population is not at increased risk of osteoporosis.  
  Address Department of Rheumatology, Martina Hansens Hospital, Brum, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2056-5933 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28955483; PMCID:PMC5604602 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1919  
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Author Halvorsen, S.; Ghanima, W.; Fride Tvete, I.; Hoxmark, C.; Falck, P.; Solli, O.; Jonasson, C. url  doi
  Title A nationwide registry study to compare bleeding rates in patients with atrial fibrillation being prescribed oral anticoagulants Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Heart Journal. Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 28-36  
  Keywords Apixaban; Atrial fibrillation; Bleeding; Dabigatran; Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; Oral anticoagulants; Rivaroxaban; Warfarin  
  Abstract AIMS: We aimed to evaluate bleeding risk in clinical practice in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) being prescribed dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban compared with warfarin. METHODS: Using nationwide registries (Norwegian Patient Registry and Norwegian Prescription Database), we identified AF patients with a first prescription of oral anticoagulants between January 2013 and June 2015. Patients were followed until discontinuation or switching of oral anticoagulants, death, or end of follow-up. The primary endpoint was major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding. RESULTS: In total 32 675 AF patients were identified (58% men, median age 74 years): 11 427 patients used warfarin, 7925 dabigatran, 6817 rivaroxaban, and 6506 apixaban. After a median follow-up of 173 days (25th, 75th percentile 84, 340), 2081 (6.37%) patients experienced a first major or CRNM bleeding. Using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for baseline characteristics, use of apixaban [hazard ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.80, P < 0.001] and dabigatran (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.84, P < 0.001) were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin whereas use of rivaroxaban was not (HR: 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.17, P = 0.400). Use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were associated with higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas use of apixaban and dabigatran were associated with lower risk of intracranial bleeding, compared with warfarin. CONCLUSION: In this nationwide cohort study in AF patients, apixaban and dabigatran were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban and dabigatran compared with warfarin.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2055-6845 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27680880; PMCID:PMC5216196 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1920  
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Author Hansen, A.G.; Stovner, L.J.; Hagen, K.; Helvik, A.-S.; Thorstensen, W.M.; Nordgard, S.; Bugten, V.; Eggesbo, H.B. url  doi
  Title Paranasal sinus opacification in headache sufferers: A population-based imaging study (the HUNT study-MRI) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Cephalalgia : an International Journal of Headache Abbreviated Journal Cephalalgia  
  Volume 37 Issue 6 Pages 509-516  
  Keywords Paranasal sinuses; headache; magnetic resonance imaging; migraine; opacification; sinus headache; tension headache  
  Abstract Background The association between headache and paranasal sinus disease is still unclear. Because of symptom overlap, the two conditions are not easily studied on the basis of symptoms alone. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether paranasal sinus opacification on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was associated with migraine, tension-type headache (TTH) or unclassified headache. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 844 randomly selected participants (442 women, age range 50-65 years, mean age 57.7 years). Based on 14 headache questions, participants were allocated to four mutually exclusive groups: migraine, TTH, unclassified headache or headache free. On MRI, opacifications as mucosal thickening, polyps/retention cysts and fluid in the five paired sinuses were measured and recorded if >/=1 mm. For each participant, opacification thickness was summed for each sinus and, in addition, a total sum of all sinuses was calculated. Opacification in each sinus was compared between headache-free participants and the headache groups using non-parametric tests, and the total sum was compared by logistical regression. Results No significant association was found between paranasal sinus opacification and headache in general, nor when headache was differentiated into migraine, TTH and unclassified headache. This was also true in separate analyses of mucosal thickening and fluid and of opacification from each paranasal sinus. Conclusion Migraine, TTH and unclassified headache were found not to be associated with an increased degree of paranasal sinus opacification at MRI.  
  Address 5 Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0333-1024 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27215544 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1921  
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Author Machiela, M.J.; Hofmann, J.N.; Carreras-Torres, R.; Brown, K.M.; Johansson, M.; Wang, Z.; Foll, M.; Li, P.; Rothman, N.; Savage, S.A.; Gaborieau, V.; McKay, J.D.; Ye, Y.; Henrion, M.; Bruinsma, F.; Jordan, S.; Severi, G.; Hveem, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Fletcher, T.; Koppova, K.; Larsson, S.C.; Wolk, A.; Banks, R.E.; Selby, P.J.; Easton, D.F.; Pharoah, P.; Andreotti, G.; Freeman, L.E.B.; Koutros, S.; Albanes, D.; Mannisto, S.; Weinstein, S.; Clark, P.E.; Edwards, T.E.; Lipworth, L.; Gapstur, S.M.; Stevens, V.L.; Carol, H.; Freedman, M.L.; Pomerantz, M.M.; Cho, E.; Kraft, P.; Preston, M.A.; Wilson, K.M.; Gaziano, J.M.; Sesso, H.S.; Black, A.; Freedman, N.D.; Huang, W.-Y.; Anema, J.G.; Kahnoski, R.J.; Lane, B.R.; Noyes, S.L.; Petillo, D.; Colli, L.M.; Sampson, J.N.; Besse, C.; Blanche, H.; Boland, A.; Burdette, L.; Prokhortchouk, E.; Skryabin, K.G.; Yeager, M.; Mijuskovic, M.; Ognjanovic, M.; Foretova, L.; Holcatova, I.; Janout, V.; Mates, D.; Mukeriya, A.; Rascu, S.; Zaridze, D.; Bencko, V.; Cybulski, C.; Fabianova, E.; Jinga, V.; Lissowska, J.; Lubinski, J.; Navratilova, M.; Rudnai, P.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Benhamou, S.; Cancel-Tassin, G.; Cussenot, O.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Canzian, F.; Duell, E.J.; Ljungberg, B.; Sitaram, R.T.; Peters, U.; White, E.; Anderson, G.L.; Johnson, L.; Luo, J.; Buring, J.; Lee, I.-M.; Chow, W.-H.; Moore, L.E.; Wood, C.; Eisen, T.; Larkin, J.; Choueiri, T.K.; Lathrop, G.M.; Teh, B.T.; Deleuze, J.-F.; Wu, X.; Houlston, R.S.; Brennan, P.; Chanock, S.J.; Scelo, G.; Purdue, M.P. url  doi
  Title Genetic Variants Related to Longer Telomere Length are Associated with Increased Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication European Urology Abbreviated Journal Eur Urol  
  Volume 72 Issue 5 Pages 747-754  
  Keywords Genetic variants; Mendelian randomization; Renal cell carcinoma; Risk; Telomere length  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Relative telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been evaluated as a potential biomarker for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk in several studies, with conflicting findings. OBJECTIVE: We performed an analysis of genetic variants associated with leukocyte telomere length to assess the relationship between telomere length and RCC risk using Mendelian randomization, an approach unaffected by biases from temporal variability and reverse causation that might have affected earlier investigations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Genotypes from nine telomere length-associated variants for 10 784 cases and 20 406 cancer-free controls from six genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of RCC were aggregated into a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) predictive of leukocyte telomere length. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Odds ratios (ORs) relating the GRS and RCC risk were computed in individual GWAS datasets and combined by meta-analysis. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Longer genetically inferred telomere length was associated with an increased risk of RCC (OR=2.07 per predicted kilobase increase, 95% confidence interval [CI]:=1.70-2.53, p<0.0001). As a sensitivity analysis, we excluded two telomere length variants in linkage disequilibrium (R(2)>0.5) with GWAS-identified RCC risk variants (rs10936599 and rs9420907) from the telomere length GRS; despite this exclusion, a statistically significant association between the GRS and RCC risk persisted (OR=1.73, 95% CI=1.36-2.21, p<0.0001). Exploratory analyses for individual histologic subtypes suggested comparable associations with the telomere length GRS for clear cell (N=5573, OR=1.93, 95% CI=1.50-2.49, p<0.0001), papillary (N=573, OR=1.96, 95% CI=1.01-3.81, p=0.046), and chromophobe RCC (N=203, OR=2.37, 95% CI=0.78-7.17, p=0.13). CONCLUSIONS: Our investigation adds to the growing body of evidence indicating some aspect of longer telomere length is important for RCC risk. PATIENT SUMMARY: Telomeres are segments of DNA at chromosome ends that maintain chromosomal stability. Our study investigated the relationship between genetic variants associated with telomere length and renal cell carcinoma risk. We found evidence suggesting individuals with inherited predisposition to longer telomere length are at increased risk of developing renal cell carcinoma.  
  Address Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MS, USA. Electronic address: purduem@mail.nih.gov  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0302-2838 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28797570; PMCID:PMC5641242 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1959  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Chen, Y.; Langhammer, A.; Skorpen, F.; Wu, C.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Passive smoking in relation to lung cancer incidence and histologic types in Norwegian adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 50 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Dept of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29025890 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1989  
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Author Webb, T.R.; Erdmann, J.; Stirrups, K.E.; Stitziel, N.O.; Masca, N.G.D.; Jansen, H.; Kanoni, S.; Nelson, C.P.; Ferrario, P.G.; Konig, I.R.; Eicher, J.D.; Johnson, A.D.; Hamby, S.E.; Betsholtz, C.; Ruusalepp, A.; Franzen, O.; Schadt, E.E.; Bjorkegren, J.L.M.; Weeke, P.E.; Auer, P.L.; Schick, U.M.; Lu, Y.; Zhang, H.; Dube, M.-P.; Goel, A.; Farrall, M.; Peloso, G.M.; Won, H.-H.; Do, R.; van Iperen, E.; Kruppa, J.; Mahajan, A.; Scott, R.A.; Willenborg, C.; Braund, P.S.; van Capelleveen, J.C.; Doney, A.S.F.; Donnelly, L.A.; Asselta, R.; Merlini, P.A.; Duga, S.; Marziliano, N.; Denny, J.C.; Shaffer, C.; El-Mokhtari, N.E.; Franke, A.; Heilmann, S.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Holmen, O.L.; Hveem, K.; Jansson, J.-H.; Jockel, K.-H.; Kessler, T.; Kriebel, J.; Laugwitz, K.L.; Marouli, E.; Martinelli, N.; McCarthy, M.I.; Van Zuydam, N.R.; Meisinger, C.; Esko, T.; Mihailov, E.; Escher, S.A.; Alver, M.; Moebus, S.; Morris, A.D.; Virtamo, J.; Nikpay, M.; Olivieri, O.; Provost, S.; AlQarawi, A.; Robertson, N.R.; Akinsansya, K.O.; Reilly, D.F.; Vogt, T.F.; Yin, W.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Kooperberg, C.; Jackson, R.D.; Stahl, E.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Strauch, K.; Varga, T.V.; Waldenberger, M.; Zeng, L.; Chowdhury, R.; Salomaa, V.; Ford, I.; Jukema, J.W.; Amouyel, P.; Kontto, J.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Ferrieres, J.; Saleheen, D.; Sattar, N.; Surendran, P.; Wagner, A.; Young, R.; Howson, J.M.M.; Butterworth, A.S.; Danesh, J.; Ardissino, D.; Bottinger, E.P.; Erbel, R.; Franks, P.W.; Girelli, D.; Hall, A.S.; Hovingh, G.K.; Kastrati, A.; Lieb, W.; Meitinger, T.; Kraus, W.E.; Shah, S.H.; McPherson, R.; Orho-Melander, M.; Melander, O.; Metspalu, A.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Peters, A.; Rader, D.J.; Reilly, M.P.; Loos, R.J.F.; Reiner, A.P.; Roden, D.M.; Tardif, J.-C.; Thompson, J.R.; Wareham, N.J.; Watkins, H.; Willer, C.J.; Samani, N.J.; Schunkert, H.; Deloukas, P.; Kathiresan, S. url  doi
  Title Systematic Evaluation of Pleiotropy Identifies 6 Further Loci Associated With Coronary Artery Disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Journal of the American College of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal J Am Coll Cardiol  
  Volume 69 Issue 7 Pages 823-836  
  Keywords Case-Control Studies; Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology/*genetics; Female; Gene Frequency; *Genetic Loci; *Genetic Pleiotropy; Genome-Wide Association Study; Humans; Male; Odds Ratio; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; cholesteryl ester transfer protein; expression quantitative trait loci; genetics; genome-wide association; single nucleotide polymorphism  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies have so far identified 56 loci associated with risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Many CAD loci show pleiotropy; that is, they are also associated with other diseases or traits. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to systematically test if genetic variants identified for non-CAD diseases/traits also associate with CAD and to undertake a comprehensive analysis of the extent of pleiotropy of all CAD loci. METHODS: In discovery analyses involving 42,335 CAD cases and 78,240 control subjects we tested the association of 29,383 common (minor allele frequency >5%) single nucleotide polymorphisms available on the exome array, which included a substantial proportion of known or suspected single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with common diseases or traits as of 2011. Suggestive association signals were replicated in an additional 30,533 cases and 42,530 control subjects. To evaluate pleiotropy, we tested CAD loci for association with cardiovascular risk factors (lipid traits, blood pressure phenotypes, body mass index, diabetes, and smoking behavior), as well as with other diseases/traits through interrogation of currently available genome-wide association study catalogs. RESULTS: We identified 6 new loci associated with CAD at genome-wide significance: on 2q37 (KCNJ13-GIGYF2), 6p21 (C2), 11p15 (MRVI1-CTR9), 12q13 (LRP1), 12q24 (SCARB1), and 16q13 (CETP). Risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.15 to 0.86, and odds ratio per copy of the risk allele ranged from 1.04 to 1.09. Of 62 new and known CAD loci, 24 (38.7%) showed statistical association with a traditional cardiovascular risk factor, with some showing multiple associations, and 29 (47%) showed associations at p < 1 x 10(-4) with a range of other diseases/traits. CONCLUSIONS: We identified 6 loci associated with CAD at genome-wide significance. Several CAD loci show substantial pleiotropy, which may help us understand the mechanisms by which these loci affect CAD risk.  
  Address Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Cardiovascular Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Program in Medical and Population Genetics, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts  
  Corporate Author Myocardial Infarction Genetics and CARDIoGRAM Exome Consortia Investigators Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication (up) Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0735-1097 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28209224; PMCID:PMC5314135 Approved no  
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