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Author Neumann, L.; Dapp, U.; Jacobsen, W.; van Lenthe, F.; von Renteln-Kruse, W. url  doi
  Title The MINDMAP project: mental well-being in urban environments : Design and first results of a survey on healthcare planning policies, strategies and programmes that address mental health promotion and mental disorder prevention for older people in Europe Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie Abbreviated Journal Z Gerontol Geriatr  
  Volume 50 Issue 7 Pages 588-602  
  Keywords Functional competence; Geriatrics; Longitudinal cohort ageing studies; Mental health; Urban environment  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The MINDMAP consortium (2016-2019) aims to identify opportunities provided by the urban environment for the promotion of mental well-being and functioning of older people in Europe by bringing together European cities with urban longitudinal ageing studies: GLOBE, HAPIEE, HUNT, LASA, LUCAS, RECORD, Rotterdam Study, Turin Study. A survey on mental healthcare planning policies and programmes dedicated to older persons covering the range from health promotion to need of nursing care was performed for profound data interpretation in Amsterdam, Eindhoven, Hamburg, Helsinki, Kaunas, Krakow, London, Nord-Trondelag, Paris, Prague, Rotterdam and Turin. OBJECTIVES: To collect detailed information on healthcare planning policies and programmes across these European cities to evaluate variations and to delineate recommendations for sciences, policies and planners using experience from evidence-based practice feedback from the MINDMAP cities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The MINDMAP partners identified experts in the 12 cities with the best background knowledge of the mental health sector. After pretesting, semi-structured telephone interviews (1-2 h) were performed always by the same person. A structured evaluation matrix based on the geriatric functioning continuum and the World Health Organization (WHO) Public Health Framework for Healthy Ageing was applied. RESULTS: A complete survey (12 out of 12) was performed reporting on 41 policies and 280 programmes on the city level. It appeared from extensive analyses that the focus on older citizens, specific target groups, and multidimensional programmes could be intensified. CONCLUSION: There is a broad variety to cope with the challenges of ageing in health, and to address both physical and mental capacities in older individuals and their dynamic interactions in urban environments.  
  Address Geriatrics Centre, Scientific Department at the University of Hamburg, Albertinen-Haus, Sellhopsweg 18-22, 22459, Hamburg, Germany. w.renteln-kruse@albertinen.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title Das MINDMAP Projekt: mentale Gesundheit in stadtischen Lebensraumen : Design und erste Ergebnisse einer Umfrage zu gesundheitspolitischen Planungen, Strategien und Programmen zur Forderung der mentalen Gesundheit und Pravention mentaler Storungen alterer Menschen in Europa  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0948-6704 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28819693; PMCID:PMC5649390 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1966  
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Author Lie, A.; Engdahl, B.; Hoffman, H.J.; Li, C.-M.; Tambs, K. url  doi
  Title Occupational noise exposure, hearing loss, and notched audiograms in the HUNT Nord-Trondelag hearing loss study, 1996-1998 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The Laryngoscope Abbreviated Journal Laryngoscope  
  Volume 127 Issue 6 Pages 1442-1450  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Audiometry/*statistics & numerical data; Female; Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced/*epidemiology/etiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Noise, Occupational/*adverse effects; Norway/epidemiology; Occupational Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology; Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects; Prevalence; Sex Distribution; Young Adult; Noise; noise-induced hearing loss; notched audiograms; occupation  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To study the prevalence and usefulness of audiometric notches in the diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). STUDY DESIGN: Audiograms and data on noise exposure from 23,297 men and 26,477 women, aged 20 to 101 years, from the Nord-Trondelag Hearing Loss Study, 1996-1998. METHODS: The prevalence of four types of audiometric notches (Coles, Hoffman, Wilson) and 4 kHz notch were computed in relation to occupational noise exposure, age, sex, and report of recurrent ear infections. RESULTS: The prevalence of notches in the 3 to 6 kHz range (Wilson, Hoffman, and Coles) ranged from 50% to 60% in subjects without occupational noise exposure, and 60% to 70% in the most occupationally noise-exposed men. The differences were statistically significant only for bilateral notches. For 4 kHz notches, the prevalence varied from 25% in occupationally nonexposed to 35% in the most occupationally exposed men, and the differences were statistically significant for both bilateral and unilateral notches. For women, the prevalence of notches was lower than in men, especially for 4 kHz notches, and the differences between occupationally noise exposed and nonexposed were smaller. Recreational exposure to high music was not associated with notched audiograms. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of bilateral notches and unilateral 4 kHz notches is of some value in diagnosing NIHL, especially in men. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1442-1450, 2017.  
  Address Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0023-852X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696439; PMCID:PMC5484347 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1948  
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Author Jaremko, J.L.; Azmat, O.; Lambert, R.G.; Bird, P.; Haugen, I.K.; Jans, L.; Weber, U.; Winn, N.; Zubler, V.; Maksymowych, W.P. url  doi
  Title Validation of a Knowledge Transfer Tool for the Knee Inflammation MRI Scoring System for Bone Marrow Lesions According to the OMERACT Filter: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The Journal of Rheumatology Abbreviated Journal J Rheumatol  
  Volume 44 Issue 11 Pages 1718-1722  
  Keywords Bone Marrow Lesion; Knee Joint; Mri; Omeract; Osteoarthritis; Scoring Methods  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To assess feasibility and reliability of scoring bone marrow lesions (BML) on knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in osteoarthritis using the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Knee Inflammation MRI Scoring System (KIMRISS), with a Web-based interface and online training with real-time iterative calibration. METHODS: Six readers new to the KIMRISS (3 radiologists, 3 rheumatologists) scored sagittal T2-weighted fat-saturated MRI in 20 subjects randomly selected from the Osteoarthritis Initiative data, at baseline and 1-year followup. In the KIMRISS, the reader moves a transparent overlay grid within a Web-based interface to fit bones, then clicks or touches each region containing BML per slice, to score 1 if BML is present. Regional and total scores are automatically calculated. Outcomes include the interreader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and the smallest detectable change (SDC). RESULTS: Scoring took 3-12 min per scan and all readers rated the process as moderately to very user friendly. Despite a low BML burden (average score 2.8% of maximum possible) and small changes, interobserver reliability was moderate to high for BML status and change in the femur and tibia (ICC 0.78-0.88). Four readers also scored the patella reliably, whereas 2 readers were outliers, likely because of image artifacts. SDC of 1.5-5.6 represented 0.7% of the maximum possible score. CONCLUSION: We confirmed feasibility of knee BML scoring by new readers using interactive training and a Web-based touch-sensitive overlay system, finding high reliability and sensitivity to change. Further work will include adjustments to training materials regarding patellar scoring, and study in therapeutic trial datasets with higher burden of BML and larger changes.  
  Address J.L. Jaremko, MD, PhD, FRCPC, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta; O. Azmat, MB, FRCP, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta; R.G. Lambert, MB, FRCPC, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta; P. Bird, MD, Division of Medicine, University of New South Wales; I.K. Haugen, MD, PhD, Department of Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital; L. Jans, MD, PhD, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University Hospital; U. Weber, MD, King Christian 10th Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, and Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark; N. Winn, MBBS, FRCR, Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital; V. Zubler, MD, Department of Radiology, Balgrist University Hospital; W.P. Maksymowych, MB ChB, FRCP(C), FACP, Division of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0315-162X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28365581 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1932  
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Author Videm, V.; Thomas, R.; Brown, M.A.; Hoff, M. url  doi
  Title Self-reported Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis or Ankylosing Spondylitis Has Low Accuracy: Data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The Journal of Rheumatology Abbreviated Journal J Rheumatol  
  Volume 44 Issue 8 Pages 1134-1141  
  Keywords Ankylosing Spondylitis; Epidemiology; Rheumatoid Arthritis  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Self-reported diagnoses of inflammatory arthritis are not accurate. The primary study aim was to ascertain self-reported diagnoses of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the Norwegian population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) using hospital case files. The secondary aim was to provide updated estimates of the prevalence and incidence of RA and AS. METHODS: All inhabitants >/= 20 years old from the county of Nord-Trondelag were invited. Data from 70,805 unique participants from HUNT2 (1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008) were included. For participants who self-reported RA or AS, case files from all 3 hospitals in the catchment area were evaluated using standardized diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: Of 2703 self-reported cases of RA, 19.1% were verified in hospital files. Of 1064 self-reported cases of AS, 15.8% were verified. Of 259 cases self-reporting both RA and AS, 8.1% had RA and 5.4% had AS. Overall, a self-report of 1 or both diagnoses could not be verified in 82.1%, including 22.8% with insufficient information or no case file. The prevalence of RA was 768 (95% CI 705-835) per 100,000. The incidence of RA from HUNT2 to HUNT3 was 0.48 (0.41-0.56) per 1000 per year. The prevalence of AS was 264 (228-305) per 100,000. The incidence of AS from HUNT2 to HUNT3 was 0.19 (0.15-0.24) per 1000 per year. CONCLUSION: Self-reported diagnoses of RA and AS are often false-positive. The prevalence and incidence of RA were comparable to reports from similar populations. The incidence of AS was higher than previously reported in a mixed population from Norway.  
  Address V. Videm, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, NTNU, and Senior Consultant, Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, St. Olavs Hospital; R. Thomas, MBBS, FRACP, MD, Professor, Translational Research Institute, University of Queensland; M.A. Brown, MBBS, MD, Director of Genomics, Queensland University of Technology, Institute of Health and Biomedical Research, Princess Alexandra Hospital; M. Hoff, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Public Health and General Practice and Department of Neuroscience, NTNU, and Senior Consultant, Department of Rheumatology, St. Olavs Hospital  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0315-162X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28412703 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2001  
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Author Snekvik, I.; Smith, C.H.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Langan, S.M.; Modalsli, E.H.; Romundstad, P.R.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Obesity, Waist Circumference, Weight Change, and Risk of Incident Psoriasis: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The Journal of Investigative Dermatology Abbreviated Journal J Invest Dermatol  
  Volume 137 Issue 12 Pages 2484-2490  
  Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Body Weight; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Obesity/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Psoriasis/complications/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; *Waist Circumference; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract Although psoriasis has been associated with obesity, there are few prospective studies with objective measures. We prospectively examined the effect of body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, and 10-year weight change on the risk of developing psoriasis among 33,734 people in the population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (i.e., HUNT), Norway. During follow-up, 369 incident psoriasis cases occurred. Relative risk (RR) of psoriasis was estimated by Cox regression. One standard deviation higher body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-hip ratio gave RRs of 1.22 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.34), 1.26 (95% CI = 1.15-1.39), and 1.18 (95% CI = 1.07-1.31), respectively. Compared with normal weight participants, obese people had an RR of 1.87 (95% CI = 1.38-2.52), whereas comparing the fourth with the first quartile of waist circumference gave an RR of 1.95 (95% CI = 1.46-2.61). One standard deviation higher weight change gave an RR of 1.20 (95% CI = 1.07-1.35), and people who increased their body weight by 10 kg or more had an RR of 1.72 (95% CI = 1.15-2.58) compared with being weight stable. In conclusion, obesity and high abdominal fat mass doubles the risk of psoriasis, and long-term weight gain substantially increases psoriasis risk. Preventing weight gain and promoting maintenance of a normal body weight could reduce incidence of psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Dermatology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway; Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-202X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28780086 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1988  
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Author Grunseit, A.C.; Chau, J.Y.; Rangul, V.; Holmen, T.L.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Patterns of sitting and mortality in the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Abbreviated Journal Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act  
  Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 8  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Cardiovascular Diseases/*mortality; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; *Posture; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Self Report; Young Adult; *Cardiovascular disease; *Epidemiology; *Mortality; *Sedentary behaviour  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Current evidence concerning sedentary behaviour and mortality risk has used single time point assessments of sitting. Little is known about how changes in sitting levels over time affect subsequent mortality risk. AIM: To examine the associations between patterns of sitting time assessed at two time points 11 years apart and risk of all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality. METHODS: Participants were 25,651 adults aged > =20 years old from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study with self-reported total sitting time in 1995-1997 (HUNT2) and 2006-2008 (HUNT3). Four categories characterised patterns of sitting: (1) low at HUNT2/ low at HUNT3, 'consistently low sitting'; (2) low at HUNT2/high at HUNT3, 'increased sitting'; (3) high at HUNT2/low at HUNT3, 'reduced sitting'; and (4) high at HUNT2 /high at HUNT3, 'consistently high sitting'. Associations of sitting pattern with all-cause and cardio-metabolic disease mortality were analysed using Cox regression adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 6.2 years (158880 person-years); 1212 participants died. Compared to 'consistently low sitting', adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality were 1.51 (95% CI: 1.28-2.78), 1.03 (95% CI: 0.88-1.20), and 1.26 (95% CI: 1.06-1.51) for 'increased sitting', 'reduced sitting' and 'consistently high sitting' respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Examining patterns of sitting over time augments single time-point analyses of risk exposures associated with high sitting time. Whilst sitting habits can be stable over a long period, life events (e.g., changing jobs, retiring or illness) may influence sitting trajectories and therefore sitting-attributable risk. Reducing sitting may yield mortality risks comparable to a stable low-sitting pattern.  
  Address Department of Public health and General practice, HUNT Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1479-5868 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28122625; PMCID:PMC5267382 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1918  
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Author Brumpton, B.; Mai, X.-M.; Langhammer, A.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I.; Strand, L.B. url  doi
  Title Prospective study of insomnia and incident asthma in adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 49 Issue 2 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Insomnia is highly prevalent among asthmatics; however, few studies have investigated insomnia symptoms and asthma development. We aimed to investigate the association between insomnia and the risk of incident asthma in a population-based cohort.Among 17 927 participants free from asthma at baseline we calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the risk of incident asthma among those with insomnia compared to those without. Participants reported sleep initiation problems, sleep maintenance problems and nonrestorative sleep. Chronic insomnia was defined as those reporting one or more insomnia symptom at baseline and 10 years earlier. Incident asthma was defined by questions on asthma at baseline and follow-up (average 11 years).The prevalence of sleep initiation problems, sleep maintenance problems and nonrestorative sleep were 1%, 1% and 5%, respectively. The multi-adjusted odds ratios were 1.18 (95% CI 0.97-1.44), 1.30 (95% CI 1.03-1.64) and 1.70 (95% CI 1.37-2.11) for people with one, two and three insomnia symptoms, respectively, compared with people without symptoms (p<0.01 for trend). The risk of developing asthma in those with chronic insomnia was three times higher (adjusted OR 3.16, 95% CI 1.37-6.40) than those without.Insomnia symptoms were associated with increased risk of incident asthma in this study.  
  Address Dept of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28153868 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1887  
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Author Burgel, P.-R.; Paillasseur, J.-L.; Janssens, W.; Piquet, J.; Ter Riet, G.; Garcia-Aymerich, J.; Cosio, B.; Bakke, P.; Puhan, M.A.; Langhammer, A.; Alfageme, I.; Almagro, P.; Ancochea, J.; Celli, B.R.; Casanova, C.; de-Torres, J.P.; Decramer, M.; Echazarreta, A.; Esteban, C.; Gomez Punter, R.M.; Han, M.L.K.; Johannessen, A.; Kaiser, B.; Lamprecht, B.; Lange, P.; Leivseth, L.; Marin, J.M.; Martin, F.; Martinez-Camblor, P.; Miravitlles, M.; Oga, T.; Sofia Ramirez, A.; Sin, D.D.; Sobradillo, P.; Soler-Cataluna, J.J.; Turner, A.M.; Verdu Rivera, F.J.; Soriano, J.B.; Roche, N. url  doi
  Title A simple algorithm for the identification of clinical COPD phenotypes Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 50 Issue 5 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract This study aimed to identify simple rules for allocating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to clinical phenotypes identified by cluster analyses.Data from 2409 COPD patients of French/Belgian COPD cohorts were analysed using cluster analysis resulting in the identification of subgroups, for which clinical relevance was determined by comparing 3-year all-cause mortality. Classification and regression trees (CARTs) were used to develop an algorithm for allocating patients to these subgroups. This algorithm was tested in 3651 patients from the COPD Cohorts Collaborative International Assessment (3CIA) initiative.Cluster analysis identified five subgroups of COPD patients with different clinical characteristics (especially regarding severity of respiratory disease and the presence of cardiovascular comorbidities and diabetes). The CART-based algorithm indicated that the variables relevant for patient grouping differed markedly between patients with isolated respiratory disease (FEV1, dyspnoea grade) and those with multi-morbidity (dyspnoea grade, age, FEV1 and body mass index). Application of this algorithm to the 3CIA cohorts confirmed that it identified subgroups of patients with different clinical characteristics, mortality rates (median, from 4% to 27%) and age at death (median, from 68 to 76 years).A simple algorithm, integrating respiratory characteristics and comorbidities, allowed the identification of clinically relevant COPD phenotypes.  
  Address Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Cochin Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France  
  Corporate Author Initiatives BPCO, EABPCO, Leuven and 3CIA study groups Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29097431 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1894  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Chen, Y.; Langhammer, A.; Skorpen, F.; Wu, C.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Passive smoking in relation to lung cancer incidence and histologic types in Norwegian adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The European Respiratory Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Respir J  
  Volume 50 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Dept of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0903-1936 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29025890 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1989  
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Author Modalsli, E.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.R.; Langhammer, A.; Hoff, M.; Forsmo, S.; Naldi, L.; Saunes, M. url  doi
  Title Psoriasis, fracture risk and bone mineral density: the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The British Journal of Dermatology Abbreviated Journal Br J Dermatol  
  Volume 176 Issue 5 Pages 1162-1169  
  Keywords  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: An association between psoriasis and osteoporosis has been reported. OBJECTIVES: To investigate, in a large prospective population-based Norwegian study, whether psoriasis is associated with increased risk of forearm or hip fracture; to investigate the cross-sectional association between psoriasis and bone mineral density (BMD) T-score in a subpopulation. METHODS: Hospital-derived fracture data from Nord-Trondelag County (1995-2013) were linked to psoriasis information, BMD measurements and lifestyle factors from the third survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 2006-08 (HUNT3); socioeconomic data from the National Education Database; and use of medication from the Norwegian Prescription Database. RESULTS: Among 48 194 participants in HUNT3, we found no increased risk of forearm or hip fracture in 2804 patients with self-reported psoriasis [overall age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82-1.31]. No clear association was found between psoriasis and mean BMD T-score; overall age- and sex-adjusted differences in total hip, femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD T-scores were 0.02 (95% CI -0.11 to 0.14), 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.17) and 0.07 (95% CI -0.09 to 0.24), respectively. No clear association was found between psoriasis and prevalent osteoporosis in either total hip, femoral neck or lumbar spine; overall age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio was 0.77 (95% CI 0.54-1.10). Associations did not change substantially after adjustment for education, smoking, systemic steroid use and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS: We found no association between psoriasis and risk of fracture. The study did not indicate reduced BMD T-score or higher prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with psoriasis.  
  Address Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0963 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27718508 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1955  
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Author Nes, B.M.; Gutvik, C.R.; Lavie, C.J.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI) for Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Promotion of Physical Activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) The American Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal Am J Med  
  Volume 130 Issue 3 Pages 328-336  
  Keywords Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Algorithms; Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality/*prevention & control; *Exercise; Female; Health Promotion/*methods; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment/*methods; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Young Adult; Activity tracking; Cardiovascular disease mortality; Physical activity; Prevention  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To derive and validate a single metric of activity tracking that associates with lower risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. METHODS: We derived an algorithm, Personalized Activity Intelligence (PAI), using the HUNT Fitness Study (n = 4631), and validated it in the general HUNT population (n = 39,298) aged 20-74 years. The PAI was divided into three sex-specific groups (</=50, 51-99, and >/=100), and the inactive group (0 PAI) was used as the referent. Hazard ratios for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: After >1 million person-years of observations during a mean follow-up time of 26.2 (SD 5.9) years, there were 10,062 deaths, including 3867 deaths (2207 men and 1660 women) from cardiovascular disease. Men and women with a PAI level >/=100 had 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 7%-27%) and 23% (95% CI, 4%-38%) reduced risk of cardiovascular disease mortality, respectively, compared with the inactive groups. Obtaining >/=100 PAI was associated with significantly lower risk for cardiovascular disease mortality in all prespecified age groups, and in participants with known cardiovascular disease risk factors (all P-trends <.01). Participants who did not obtain >/=100 PAI had increased risk of dying regardless of meeting the physical activity recommendations. CONCLUSION: PAI may have a huge potential to motivate people to become and stay physically active, as it is an easily understandable and scientifically proven metric that could inform potential users of how much physical activity is needed to reduce the risk of premature cardiovascular disease death.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9343 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27984009 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1964  
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Author Skaaby, T.; Taylor, A.E.; Jacobsen, R.K.; Paternoster, L.; Thuesen, B.H.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Larsen, S.C.; Zhou, A.; Wong, A.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Flexeder, C.; Mannisto, S.; Hardy, R.; Kuh, D.; Barry, S.J.; Tang Mollehave, L.; Cerqueira, C.; Friedrich, N.; Bonten, T.N.; Noordam, R.; Mook-Kanamori, D.O.; Taube, C.; Jessen, L.E.; McConnachie, A.; Sattar, N.; Upton, M.N.; McSharry, C.; Bonnelykke, K.; Bisgaard, H.; Schulz, H.; Strauch, K.; Meitinger, T.; Peters, A.; Grallert, H.; Nohr, E.A.; Kivimaki, M.; Kumari, M.; Volker, U.; Nauck, M.; Volzke, H.; Power, C.; Hypponen, E.; Hansen, T.; Jorgensen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Salomaa, V.; Grarup, N.; Langhammer, A.; Romundstad, P.R.; Skorpen, F.; Kaprio, J.; R Munafo, M.; Linneberg, A. url  doi
  Title Investigating the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in the CARTA consortium Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 2224  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Observational studies on smoking and risk of hay fever and asthma have shown inconsistent results. However, observational studies may be biased by confounding and reverse causation. Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants as markers of exposures to examine causal effects. We examined the causal effect of smoking on hay fever and asthma by using the smoking-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs16969968/rs1051730. We included 231,020 participants from 22 population-based studies. Observational analyses showed that current vs never smokers had lower risk of hay fever (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.61, 0.76; P < 0.001) and allergic sensitization (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.64, 0.86; P < 0.001), but similar asthma risk (OR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.09; P = 0.967). Mendelian randomization analyses in current smokers showed a slightly lower risk of hay fever (OR = 0.958, 95% CI: 0.920, 0.998; P = 0.041), a lower risk of allergic sensitization (OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.02; P = 0.117), but higher risk of asthma (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.11; P = 0.020) per smoking-increasing allele. Our results suggest that smoking may be causally related to a higher risk of asthma and a slightly lower risk of hay fever. However, the adverse events associated with smoking limit its clinical significance.  
  Address Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28533558; PMCID:PMC5440386 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1980  
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Author Taylor, A.E.; Carslake, D.; de Mola, C.L.; Rydell, M.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Horta, B.L.; Pearson, R.; Rai, D.; Galanti, M.R.; Barros, F.C.; Romundstad, P.R.; Davey Smith, G.; Munafo, M.R. url  doi
  Title Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy and Offspring Depression: a cross cohort and negative control study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages 12579  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Previous reports suggest that offspring of mothers who smoke during pregnancy have greater risk of developing depression. However, it is unclear whether this is due to intrauterine effects. Using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) from the UK (N = 2,869), the Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT) from Norway (N = 15,493), the Pelotas 1982 Birth Cohort Study from Brazil (N = 2,626), and the Swedish Sibling Health Cohort (N = 258 sibling pairs), we compared associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy and mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy with offspring depression and performed a discordant sibling analysis. In meta-analysis, maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with higher odds of offspring depression (OR 1.20, 95% CI:1.08,1.34), but mother's partner's smoking during pregnancy was not (OR 1.05, 95% CI:0.94,1.17). However, there was only weak statistical evidence that the odds ratios for maternal and mother's partner's smoking differed from each other (p = 0.08). There was no clear evidence for an association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring depression in the sibling analysis. Findings do not provide strong support for a causal role of maternal smoking during pregnancy in offspring depression, rather observed associations may reflect residual confounding relating to characteristics of parents who smoke.  
  Address UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, School of Experimental Psychology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28974730; PMCID:PMC5626710 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2010  
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Author Brunes, A.; Flanders, W.D.; Augestad, L.B. url  doi
  Title Self-reported visual impairment, physical activity and all-cause mortality: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Scandinavian Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Public Health  
  Volume 45 Issue 1 Pages 33-41  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; *Cause of Death; *Exercise; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Assessment; *Self Report; Vision Disorders/*epidemiology; *All-cause mortality; *HUNT study; *physical activity; *prospective cohort study; *self-reported; *visual impairment  
  Abstract AIMS: To examine the associations of self-reported visual impairment and physical activity (PA) with all-cause mortality. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included 65,236 Norwegians aged 20 years who had participated in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995-1997). Of these participants, 11,074 (17.0%) had self-reported visual impairment (SRVI). The participants' data were linked to Norway's Cause of Death Registry and followed throughout 2012. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were assessed using Cox regression analyses with age as the time-scale. The Cox models were fitted for restricted age groups (<60, 60-84, 85 years). RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 14.5 years, 13,549 deaths were identified. Compared with adults with self-reported no visual impairment, the multivariable hazard ratios among adults with SRVI were 2.47 (95% CI 1.94-3.13) in those aged <60 years, 1.22 (95% CI 1.13-1.33) in those aged 60-84 years and 1.05 (95% CI 0.96-1.15) in those aged 85 years. The strength of the associations remained similar or stronger after additionally controlling for PA. When examining the joint associations, the all-cause mortality risk of SRVI was higher for those who reported no PA than for those who reported weekly hours of PA. We found a large, positive departure from additivity in adults aged <60 years, whereas the departure from additivity was small for the other age groups. CONCLUSIONS: Adults with SRVI reporting no PA were associated with an increased all-cause mortality risk. The associations attenuated with age.  
  Address 4 Department of Visual Impairment, Statped Mid-Norway, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1403-4948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27913690 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1893  
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Author Lie, T.M.; Bomme, M.; Hveem, K.; Hansen, J.M.; Ness-Jensen, E. url  doi
  Title Snus and risk of gastroesophageal reflux. A population-based case-control study: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology Abbreviated Journal Scand J Gastroenterol  
  Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 193-198  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gastroesophageal Reflux/*epidemiology; Heartburn/etiology; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Multivariate Analysis; Norway/epidemiology; Risk Factors; Tobacco Use/*epidemiology; Tobacco, Smokeless/*adverse effects; Young Adult; Health surveys; oral tobacco; smokeless tobacco; snuff  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Tobacco smoking is a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux, but whether other tobacco products increase the risk is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate if snus increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was based on the third Nord-Trondelag health study (HUNT3), a population-based study of all adult residents in Nord-Trondelag County, Norway, performed in 2006-2009. The association between self-reported severe heartburn/regurgitation and snus use was assessed by logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared to never snus users, daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS (OR 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.93), while previous snus users and those using <2 boxes of snus/month had an increased risk (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.00-1.46 and OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.02-1.96, respectively). There was no association between age when starting using snus and GERS. Snus users who started using snus to quit or cut down on cigarette smoking, who started using both snus and cigarettes or cigarettes alone had an increased risk of GERS. Snus users <30 years of age had an increased risk of GERS (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.16), while those aged between 50-60 and 60-70 years had a reduced risk (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93 and OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.28-0.94, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Daily snus users had a reduced risk of GERS. However, previous snus users and subgroups of snus users had an increased risk of GERS indicating reverse causality, such that snus use could increase the risk of GERS.  
  Address d Department of Medicine , Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trondelag Hospital Trust , Levanger , Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5521 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27797289 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1942  
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Author Thorstensen, K.; Kvitland, M.A.; Irgens, W.O.; Asberg, A.; Borch-Iohnsen, B.; Moen, T.; Hveem, K. url  doi
  Title Iron loading in HFE p.C282Y homozygotes found by population screening: relationships to HLA-type and T-lymphocyte subsets Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation Abbreviated Journal Scand J Clin Lab Invest  
  Volume 77 Issue 7 Pages 477-485  
  Keywords Hla-A*03; Haplotypes; Mhc; homozygote; iron overload  
  Abstract Iron loading in p.C282Y homozygous HFE hemochromatosis subjects is highly variable, and it is unclear what factors cause this variability. Finding such factors could aid in predicting which patients are at highest risk and require closest follow-up. The degree of iron loading has previously been associated with certain HLA-types and with abnormally low CD8 + cell counts in peripheral blood. In 183 Norwegian, p.C282Y homozygotes (104 men, 79 women) originally found through population screening we determined HLA type and measured total T-lymphocytes, CD4 + and CD8 + cells, and compared this with data on iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous men, but not in homozygous women, we found that the presence of two HLA-A*03 alleles increased the iron load on average by approximately 2-fold compared to p.C282Y homozygous men carrying zero or one A*03 allele. On the other hand, the presence of two HLA-A*01 alleles, in male subjects, apparently reduced the iron loading. In p.C282Y homozygous individuals, the iron loading was increased if the CD8 + cell number was below the 25 percentile or if the CD4 + cell number was above the 75 percentile. This effect appeared to be additive to the effect of the number of HLA-A*03 alleles. Our data indicate that homozygosity for the HLA-A*03 allele significantly increases the risk of excessive iron loading in Norwegian p.C282Y homozygous male patients. In addition, low CD8 + cell number or high CD4 + cell number further increases the risk of excessive iron loading.  
  Address d HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine , Norwegian University of Science and Technology , Trondheim , Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-5513 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28678636 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2013  
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Author Gulati, A.M.; Hoff, M.; Salvesen, O.; Dhainaut, A.; Semb, A.G.; Kavanaugh, A.; Haugeberg, G. url  doi
  Title Bone mineral density in patients with psoriatic arthritis: data from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) RMD Open Abbreviated Journal RMD Open  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages e000413  
  Keywords Psoriatic arthritis; bone mineral density; osteoporosis  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The risk of osteoporosis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in patients with PsA and controls. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with PsA and controls were recruited from the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) 3. RESULTS: Patients with PsA (n=69) and controls (n=11 703) were comparable in terms of age (56.8 vs 55.3 years, p=0.32), gender distribution (females 65.2% vs 64.3%, p=0.87) and postmenopausal status (75.6% vs 62.8%, p=0.08). Body mass index (BMI) was higher in patients with PsA compared with controls (28.5 vs 27.2 kg/m(2), p=0.01). After adjusting for potential confounding factors (including BMI), BMD was higher in patients with PsA compared with controls at lumbar spine 1-4 (1.213 vs 1.147 g/cm(2), p=0.003) and femoral neck (0.960 vs 0.926 g/cm(2), p=0.02), but not at total hip (1.013 vs 0.982 g/cm(2), p=0.11). Controls had significantly higher odds of having osteopenia or osteoporosis based on measurements of BMD in both the femoral neck (p=0.001), total hip (p=0.033) and lumbar spine (p=0.033). CONCLUSION: Our population-based data showed comparable BMD in patients with PsA and controls. This supports that the PsA population is not at increased risk of osteoporosis.  
  Address Department of Rheumatology, Martina Hansens Hospital, Brum, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2056-5933 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28955483; PMCID:PMC5604602 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1919  
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Author Brumpton, B.M.; Langhammer, A.; Henriksen, A.H.; Camargo, C.A.J.; Chen, Y.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) Abbreviated Journal Respirology  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 278-283  
  Keywords Adult; Asthma/*physiopathology; Cohort Studies; Disease Progression; Exercise/*physiology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Forced Expiratory Volume; Humans; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; Norway; Physical Exertion; Sedentary Lifestyle; Surveys and Questionnaires; Vital Capacity; *forced expiratory volume in 1 s; *forced vital capacity; *leisure time; *peak expiratory flow; *prospective  
  Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: People with asthma may seek advice about physical activity. However, the benefits of leisure time physical activity on lung function are unclear. We investigated the association between leisure time physical activity and lung function decline in adults with asthma. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study in Norway, we used multiple linear regressions to estimate the annual mean decline in lung function (and 95% CI) in 1329 people with asthma over a mean follow-up of 11.6 years. The durations of light and hard physical activity per week in the last year were collected by questionnaire. Inactive participants did not report any light or hard activity, while active participants reported light or hard activity. RESULTS: The mean decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ) was 37 mL/year among inactive participants and 32 mL/year in active participants (difference: -5 mL/year (95% CI: -13 to 3)). The mean decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) was 33 mL/year among inactive participants and 31 mL/year in active participants (difference: -2 mL/year (95% CI: -11 to 7)). The mean decline in FEV1 /FVC ratio was 0.36%/year among inactive participants and 0.22%/year in active participants (difference: -0.14%/year (95% CI: -0.27 to -0.01)). The mean decline in peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 14 mL/year among the inactive participants and 10 mL/year in active participants (difference: -4 mL/year (95% CI: -9 to 1)). CONCLUSION: We observed slightly less decline in lung function in physically active than inactive participants with asthma, particularly for FEV1 , FEV1 /FVC ratio and PEF.  
  Address Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1323-7799 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27696634 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1892  
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Author Sen, A.; Opdahl, S.; Strand, L.B.; Vatten, L.J.; Laugsand, L.E.; Janszky, I. url  doi
  Title Insomnia and the Risk of Breast Cancer: The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Psychosomatic Medicine Abbreviated Journal Psychosom Med  
  Volume 79 Issue 4 Pages 461-468  
  Keywords  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The association of insomnia with subsequent breast cancer risk is largely unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether different symptoms of insomnia and their combination are associated with incident breast cancer in a large population-based study. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, 33,332 women were followed to monitor the occurrence of their first invasive breast cancer identified by the Cancer Registry of Norway. Insomnia symptoms including () nonrestorative sleep and () difficulty initiating and () maintaining sleep were self-reported using a study specific measure reflecting the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using multiadjusted Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: A total of 862 incident breast cancer cases occurred during a mean follow-up of 14.7 years. No consistent association was observed between the individual insomnia symptoms and breast cancer risk. However, compared to women reporting no insomnia complaints, those who reported having all three aspects of insomnia simultaneously were at increased risk (hazard ratio, 2.38; 95% confidence interval = 1.11-5.09). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that having only some aspects of insomnia may not predispose someone to breast cancer. In contrast, experiencing all insomnia symptoms simultaneously might confer considerable excess risk.  
  Address From the Department of Public Health and General Practice (Sen, Opdahl, Strand, Vatten, Laugsand, Janszky), Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Internal Medicine (Laugsand), St. Olav's hospital, Trondheim, Norway; and Department of Public Health Sciences (Janszky), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-3174 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27763987 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1978  
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Author Naicker, K.; Overland, S.; Johnson, J.A.; Manuel, D.; Skogen, J.C.; Sivertsen, B.; Colman, I. url  doi
  Title Symptoms of anxiety and depression in type 2 diabetes: Associations with clinical diabetes measures and self-management outcomes in the Norwegian HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology  
  Volume 84 Issue Pages 116-123  
  Keywords Anxiety; Depression; Diabetes self-management; Metabolic control; Type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: To determine if symptoms of depression and anxiety are differentially associated with clinical diabetes measures and self-management behaviours in individuals with Type 2 diabetes, and whether these associations vary by patient sex. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis using data from 2035 adults with Type 2 diabetes in the Nord-Trondelag Health Study. Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore associations between symptoms of depression and anxiety and waist girth, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, c-reactive protein, glycemic control, diet adherence, exercise, glucose monitoring, foot checks for ulcers, and the subjective patient experience. Analyses were stratified by sex. RESULTS: Depression was associated with a lower likelihood of avoiding saturated fats (OR=0.20 [95% CI: 0.06, 0.68]) and increased odds of physical inactivity (OR=1.69 [95% CI: 1.37, 2.72]). Anxiety was associated with increased odds of eating vegetables (OR=1.66 [95% CI: 1.02, 2.73]), and an over two-fold increase of feeling that having diabetes is difficult. In women, anxiety was associated with elevated c-reactive protein levels (OR=1.57 [95% CI: 1.05, 2.34]). In men, depressive symptoms were associated with elevated HbA1c (OR=5.00 [95% CI: 1.15, 8.23). CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms of depression and anxiety were differentially associated with some key diabetes-related measures. Our results suggest sex-specific differences with respect to two important clinical outcomes (i.e., anxiety and CRP in women and depression and glycemic control in men). These findings should alert practitioners to the importance of detection and management of psychological symptoms in individuals with Type 2 diabetes.  
  Address School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario Canada. Electronic address: icolman@uottawa.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4530 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28704763 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1962  
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Author Osthus, I.B.O.; Lydersen, S.; Dalen, H.; Nauman, J.; Wisloff, U. url  doi
  Title Association of Telomere Length With Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Cohort From the Population Based HUNT 2 Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis  
  Volume 59 Issue 6 Pages 649-655  
  Keywords Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Female; Genetic Markers; Humans; Incidence; Linear Models; Male; Multivariate Analysis; Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis/epidemiology/*genetics; Norway/epidemiology; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Predictive Value of Tests; Prognosis; Proportional Hazards Models; Prospective Studies; Risk Factors; Sex Factors; Telomere/*genetics; *Telomere Homeostasis; Time Factors; Cardiovascular diseases; Myocardial infarction; Prevention; Risk factors; Telomeres  
  Abstract As possible markers of biological age, telomere length (TL) has been associated with age-related diseases such as myocardial infarction (MI) with conflicting findings. We sought to assess the relationship between TL and risk of future MI in 915 healthy participants (51.7% women) 65 years or older from a population-based prospective cohort (the HUNT 2 study, Norway). Mean TL was measured by quantitative PCR expressed as relative T (telomere repeat copy number) to S (single copy gene number) ratio, and log-transformed. During a mean follow up of 13.0 (SD, 3.2) years and 11,923 person-years, 82 participants were diagnosed with MI. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Relative TL was associated with age in women (P=0.01), but not in men (P=0.43). Using relative TL as a continuous variable, we observed a higher risk of MI in participants with longer telomeres with HRs of 2.46 (95% CI; 1.13 to 4.54) in men, and 2.93 (95% CI; 1.41 to 6.10) in women. Each 1-SD change in relative TL was associated with an HR of 1.54 (95% CI; 1.15 to 2.06) and 1.67 (95% CI; 1.18 to 2.37) in men and women, respectively. Compared with the bottom tertile of relative TL, HR of incident MI in top tertile was 2.71 (95% CI; 1.25 to 5.89) in men, and 3.65 (95% CI; 1.35 to 9.90) in women. Longer telomeres in healthy participants 65 years or older are associated with a high risk of incident MI. Future large scale prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and explore the potential association between TL and MI.  
  Address K. G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-0620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28442329 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1968  
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Author Zisko, N.; Skjerve, K.N.; Tari, A.R.; Sandbakk, S.B.; Wisloff, U.; Nes, B.M.; Nauman, J. url  doi
  Title Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI), Sedentary Behavior and Cardiovascular Risk Factor Clustering – the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Abbreviated Journal Prog Cardiovasc Dis  
  Volume 60 Issue 1 Pages 89-95  
  Keywords Cardiovascular disease; Cardiovascular disease risk factors; Exercise; Exercise intensity; Physical activity; Sedentary behavior  
  Abstract Prolonged sedentary behavior (SB) positively associates with clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The recently developed metric for physical activity (PA) tracking called Personal Activity Intelligence (PAI) takes into account age, sex, resting and maximum heart rate, and a score of >/=100 weekly PAI has been shown to reduce the risk of premature CVD death in healthy as well as individuals with known CVD risk factors, regardless of whether or not the current PA recommendations were met. The aim of the present study was to examine if PAI modifies the associations between SB and CVD risk factor (CV-RF) clustering in a large apparently healthy general population cohort (n=29,950, aged >/=20 years). Logistic regression revealed that in those with >/=100 weekly PAI, the likelihood of CV-RF clustering prevalence associated with prolonged SB was attenuated across age groups. Monitoring weekly PAI-level could be useful to ensure that people perform enough PA to combat SB's deleterious association with CV-RF.  
  Address K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at the Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Cardiology, St. Olavs Hospital, Norway  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0033-0620 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28274818 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2028  
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Author Bjornland, T.; Langaas, M.; Grill, V.; Mostad, I.L. url  doi
  Title Assessing gene-environment interaction effects of FTO, MC4R and lifestyle factors on obesity using an extreme phenotype sampling design: Results from the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175071  
  Keywords Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO/*genetics; Body Mass Index; *Gene-Environment Interaction; Humans; *Life Style; Obesity/*genetics; *Phenotype; Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4/*genetics; Waist-Hip Ratio  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess the influence of age, gender and lifestyle factors on the effect of the obesity-promoting alleles of FTO and MCR4. METHODS: The HUNT study comprises health information on the population of Nord-Trondelag county, Norway. Extreme phenotype participants (gender-wise lower and upper quartiles of waist-hip-ratio and BMI >/= 35 kg/m2) in the third survey, HUNT3 (2006-08), were genotyped for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs9939609 (FTO) and rs17782313 (MC4R); 25686 participants were successfully genotyped. Extreme sampling was chosen to increase power to detect genetic and gene-environment effects on waist-hip-ratio and BMI. Statistical inference was based on linear regression models and a missing-covariate likelihood approach for the extreme phenotype sampling design. Environmental factors were physical activity, diet (artificially sweetened beverages) and smoking. Longitudinal analysis was performed using material from HUNT2 (1995-97). RESULTS: Cross-sectional and longitudinal genetic effects indicated stronger genetic associations with obesity in young than in old, as well as differences between women and men. We observed larger genetic effects among physically inactive compared to active individuals. This interaction was age-dependent and seen mainly in 20-40 year olds. We observed a greater FTO effect among men with a regular intake of artificially sweetened beverages, compared to non-drinkers. Interaction analysis of smoking was mainly inconclusive. CONCLUSIONS: In a large all-adult and area-based population survey the effects of obesity-promoting minor-alleles of FTO and MCR4, and interactions with life style factors are age- and gender-related. These findings appear relevant when designing individualized treatment for and prophylaxis against obesity.  
  Address Department of Clinical Nutrition and Speech-Language Therapy, Clinic of Clinical Services, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28384342; PMCID:PMC5383228 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1884  
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Author Borte, S.; Winsvold, B.S.; Stensland, S.O.; Smastuen, M.C.; Zwart, J.-A. url  doi
  Title The effect of foetal growth restriction on the development of migraine and tension-type headache in adulthood. The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (down) PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages e0175908  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Weight; Female; Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology/*etiology; Gestational Age; Health Surveys; Humans; Infant, Newborn; Logistic Models; Male; Migraine Disorders/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Norway/epidemiology; Odds Ratio; Pregnancy; Registries; Risk Factors; Tension-Type Headache/complications/*diagnosis/epidemiology; Young Adult  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge about how factors early in life affect the development of migraine and tension-type headache. We aimed to examine whether growth restriction in utero is associated with development of migraine and frequent tension-type headache in adults. METHODS: The population-based Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT 3) contained a validated headache questionnaire, which differentiated between migraine and tension-type headache. These data were linked to information on weight and gestational age at birth from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry. In total 4557 females and 2789 males, aged 19-41 years, were included in this registry-based study. Participants were categorized as appropriate for gestational age (AGA, 10th-90th percentile), small for gestational age (SGA, 3rd-10th percentile) or very small for gestational age (VSGA, < 3rd percentile). Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for migraine and tension-type headache, with exposure being growth restriction at birth. RESULTS: The effect of growth restriction on migraine was modified by sex, with a significant association in males (p<0.001), but not in females (p = 0.20). In particular, males born VSGA were at increased risk of developing migraine (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.63-4.58, p<0.001), with an intermediate risk among those born SGA (OR 1.50, 95% CI 0.96-2.35, p = 0.08) compared to those born AGA. There was no significant association between growth restriction and frequent TTH (p = 0.051). CONCLUSION: Growth restriction was associated with increased risk of migraine in adulthood among males, but not among females. This suggests that migraine might, in part, be influenced by early life events, and that males seem to be particularly vulnerable.  
  Address Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis