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Author Naicker, K.; Johnson, J.A.; Skogen, J.C.; Manuel, D.; Overland, S.; Sivertsen, B.; Colman, I. url  doi
  Title Type 2 Diabetes and Comorbid Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety: Longitudinal Associations With Mortality Risk Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Diabetes Care Abbreviated Journal Diabetes Care  
  Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 352-358  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anxiety/*complications; Comorbidity; Depression/*complications; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*complications; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Norway/epidemiology; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Factors; Socioeconomic Factors; Surveys and Questionnaires; Young Adult  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Depression is strongly linked to increased mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Despite high rates of co-occurring anxiety and depression, the risk of death associated with comorbid anxiety in individuals with type 2 diabetes is poorly understood. This study documented the excess mortality risk associated with symptoms of depression and/or anxiety comorbid with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using data for 64,177 Norwegian adults from the second wave of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT2), with linkage to the Norwegian Causes of Death Registry, we assessed all-cause mortality from survey participation in 1995 through to 2013. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine mortality risk over 18 years associated with type 2 diabetes status and the presence of comorbid affective symptoms at baseline. RESULTS: Three clear patterns emerged from our findings. First, mortality risk in individuals with diabetes increased in the presence of depression or anxiety, or both. Second, mortality risk was lowest for symptoms of anxiety, higher for comorbid depression-anxiety, and highest for depression. Lastly, excess mortality risk associated with depression and anxiety was observed in men with diabetes but not in women. The highest risk of death was observed in men with diabetes and symptoms of depression only (hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI 1.96, 6.14). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that symptoms of anxiety affect mortality risk in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of symptoms of depression, in addition to attenuating the relationship between depressive symptoms and mortality in these individuals.  
  Address School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada icolman@uottawa.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0149-5992 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28077458 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1961  
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Author Rasouli, B.; Andersson, T.; Carlsson, P.-O.; Grill, V.; Groop, L.; Martinell, M.; Midthjell, K.; Storm, P.; Tuomi, T.; Carlsson, S. url  doi
  Title Use of Swedish smokeless tobacco (snus) and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association Abbreviated Journal Diabet Med  
  Volume 34 Issue 4 Pages 514-521  
  Keywords  
  Abstract AIMS: It has been suggested that moist snuff (snus), a smokeless tobacco product that is high in nicotine and widespread in Scandinavia, increases the risk of Type 2 diabetes. Previous studies are however few, contradictory and, with regard to autoimmune diabetes, lacking. Our aim was to study the association between snus use and the risk of Type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA). METHOD: Analyses were based on incident cases (Type 2 diabetes, n = 724; LADA, n = 200) and population-based controls (n = 699) from a Swedish case-control study. Additional analyses were performed on cross-sectional data from the Norwegian HUNT study (n = 21 473) with 829 prevalent cases of Type 2 diabetes. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated adjusted for age, BMI family history of diabetes and smoking. Only men were included. RESULTS: No association between snus use and Type 2 diabetes or LADA was seen in the Swedish data. For Type 2 diabetes, the OR for > 10 box-years was 1.00 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47 to 2.11] and for LADA 1.01 (95% CI, 0.45 to 2.29). Similarly, in HUNT, the OR for Type 2 diabetes in ever-users was estimated at 0.91 (95% CI, 0.75 to 1.10) and in heavy users at 0.92 (95% CI, 0.46 to 1.83). CONCLUSION: The risk of Type 2 diabetes and LADA is unrelated to the use of snus, despite its high nicotine content. This opens the possibility of the increased risk of Type 2 diabetes seen in smokers may not be attributed to nicotine, but to other substances in tobacco smoke.  
  Address Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3071 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27353226 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1972  
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Author Asvold, B.O.; Midthjell, K.; Krokstad, S.; Rangul, V.; Bauman, A. url  doi
  Title Prolonged sitting may increase diabetes risk in physically inactive individuals: an 11 year follow-up of the HUNT Study, Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Diabetologia Abbreviated Journal Diabetologia  
  Volume 60 Issue 5 Pages 830-835  
  Keywords Adult; Body Mass Index; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/*epidemiology/metabolism; Exercise/physiology; Female; Humans; Incidence; Leisure Activities; Male; Middle Aged; *Sedentary Lifestyle; Epidemiology; Sedentary lifestyle; Type 2 diabetes mellitus  
  Abstract AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We examined the association between sitting time and diabetes incidence, overall and by strata of leisure-time physical activity and BMI. METHODS: We followed 28,051 adult participants of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study (the HUNT Study), a population-based study, for diabetes incidence from 1995-1997 to 2006-2008 and estimated HRs of any diabetes by categories of self-reported total daily sitting time at baseline. RESULTS: Of 28,051 participants, 1253 (4.5%) developed diabetes during 11 years of follow-up. Overall, sitting >/=8 h/day was associated with a 17% (95% CI 2, 34) higher risk of developing diabetes compared with sitting </=4 h/day, adjusted for age, sex and education. However, the association was attenuated to a non-significant 9% (95% CI -5, 26) increase in risk after adjustment for leisure-time physical activity and BMI. The association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by leisure-time physical activity (p Interaction = 0.01). Among participants with low leisure-time physical activity (</=2 h light activity per week and no vigorous activity), sitting 5-7 h/day and >/=8 h/day were associated with a 26% (95% CI 2, 57) and 30% (95% CI 5, 61) higher risk of diabetes, respectively, compared with sitting </=4 h/day. There was no corresponding association among participants with high leisure-time physical activity (>/=3 h light activity or >0 h vigorous activity per week). There was no statistical evidence that the association between sitting time and diabetes risk differed by obesity (p Interaction = 0.65). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that total sitting time has little association with diabetes risk in the population as a whole, but prolonged sitting may contribute to an increased diabetes risk among physically inactive people.  
  Address School of Public Health, Sydney University, Sydney, NSW, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-186X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28054097 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1879  
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Author Islam, M.K.; Folland, S.; Kaarboe, O.M. url  doi
  Title Social capital and cigarette smoking: New empirics featuring the Norwegian HUNT data Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Economics and Human Biology Abbreviated Journal Econ Hum Biol  
  Volume 26 Issue Pages 174-185  
  Keywords *Cigarette smoking; *Instrumental variables; *Longitudinal data; *Social capital  
  Abstract Using a rich Norwegian longitudinal data set, this study explores the effects of different social capital variables on the probability of cigarette smoking. There are four social capital variables available in two waves of our data set. Our results based on probit (and OLS) analyses (with municipality fixed-effects) show that the likelihood of smoking participation is negatively and significantly associated with social capital attributes, namely, community trust (-0.017), participation in organizational activities (-0.032), and cohabitation (-0.045). Significant negative associations were also observed in panel data, pooled OLS, and random effects models for community trust (-0.024; -0.010) and cohabitation (-0.040; -0.032). Fixed-effects models also showed significant negative effects for cohabitation (-0.018). Estimates of alternative instrumental variables (IV) based on recursive bivariate probit and IV-GMM models also confirmed negative and significant effects for three of its characteristics: cohabitation (-0.030; -0.046), community trust (-0.065; -0.075), and participation in organizational activities (-0.035; -0.046). The limitations of our conclusions are discussed, and the significance of our study for the field of social capital and health is described, along with suggested avenues for future research.  
  Address Department of Health Management and Health Economics, University of Oslo, 0373 Oslo, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1570-677X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28448881 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1931  
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Author Zijlema, W.; Cai, Y.; Doiron, D.; Mbatchou, S.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; de Hoogh, K.; Morley, D.; Hodgson, S.; Elliott, P.; Key, T.; Kongsgard, H.; Hveem, K.; Gaye, A.; Burton, P.; Hansell, A.; Stolk, R.; Rosmalen, J. url  doi
  Title Corrigendum to “Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses of harmonized data from 88,336 participants” [Environ. Res. 151 (2016) 804-813] Type Published Erratum
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res  
  Volume 152 Issue Pages 520  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27823774 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2027  
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Author Cai, Y.; Hansell, A.L.; Blangiardo, M.; Burton, P.R.; de Hoogh, K.; Doiron, D.; Fortier, I.; Gulliver, J.; Hveem, K.; Mbatchou, S.; Morley, D.W.; Stolk, R.P.; Zijlema, W.L.; Elliott, P.; Hodgson, S. url  doi
  Title Long-term exposure to road traffic noise, ambient air pollution, and cardiovascular risk factors in the HUNT and lifelines cohorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume 38 Issue 29 Pages 2290-2296  
  Keywords Air pollution; Blood glucose; Blood lipids; Systemic inflammation; Traffic noise  
  Abstract Aims: Blood biochemistry may provide information on associations between road traffic noise, air pollution, and cardiovascular disease risk. We evaluated this in two large European cohorts (HUNT3, Lifelines). Methods and results: Road traffic noise exposure was modelled for 2009 using a simplified version of the Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe (CNOSSOS-EU). Annual ambient air pollution (PM10, NO2) at residence was estimated for 2007 using a Land Use Regression model. The statistical platform DataSHIELD was used to pool data from 144 082 participants aged >/=20 years to enable individual-level analysis. Generalized linear models were fitted to assess cross-sectional associations between pollutants and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), blood lipids and for (Lifelines only) fasting blood glucose, for samples taken during recruitment in 2006-2013. Pooling both cohorts, an inter-quartile range (IQR) higher day-time noise (5.1 dB(A)) was associated with 1.1% [95% confidence interval (95% CI: 0.02-2.2%)] higher hsCRP, 0.7% (95% CI: 0.3-1.1%) higher triglycerides, and 0.5% (95% CI: 0.3-0.7%) higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL); only the association with HDL was robust to adjustment for air pollution. An IQR higher PM10 (2.0 microg/m3) or NO2 (7.4 microg/m3) was associated with higher triglycerides (1.9%, 95% CI: 1.5-2.4% and 2.2%, 95% CI: 1.6-2.7%), independent of adjustment for noise. Additionally for NO2, a significant association with hsCRP (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.5-3.3%) was seen. In Lifelines, an IQR higher noise (4.2 dB(A)) and PM10 (2.4 microg/m3) was associated with 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.3%) and 0.6% (95% CI: 0.4-0.7%) higher fasting glucose respectively, with both remaining robust to adjustment for air/noise pollution. Conclusion: Long-term exposures to road traffic noise and ambient air pollution were associated with blood biochemistry, providing a possible link between road traffic noise/air pollution and cardio-metabolic disease risk.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, W2 1PG, London, UK  
  Corporate Author BioSHaRE Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28575405 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1895  
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Author Halvorsen, S.; Ghanima, W.; Fride Tvete, I.; Hoxmark, C.; Falck, P.; Solli, O.; Jonasson, C. url  doi
  Title A nationwide registry study to compare bleeding rates in patients with atrial fibrillation being prescribed oral anticoagulants Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) European Heart Journal. Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 28-36  
  Keywords Apixaban; Atrial fibrillation; Bleeding; Dabigatran; Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; Oral anticoagulants; Rivaroxaban; Warfarin  
  Abstract AIMS: We aimed to evaluate bleeding risk in clinical practice in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) being prescribed dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban compared with warfarin. METHODS: Using nationwide registries (Norwegian Patient Registry and Norwegian Prescription Database), we identified AF patients with a first prescription of oral anticoagulants between January 2013 and June 2015. Patients were followed until discontinuation or switching of oral anticoagulants, death, or end of follow-up. The primary endpoint was major or clinically relevant non-major (CRNM) bleeding. RESULTS: In total 32 675 AF patients were identified (58% men, median age 74 years): 11 427 patients used warfarin, 7925 dabigatran, 6817 rivaroxaban, and 6506 apixaban. After a median follow-up of 173 days (25th, 75th percentile 84, 340), 2081 (6.37%) patients experienced a first major or CRNM bleeding. Using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for baseline characteristics, use of apixaban [hazard ratio (HR) 0.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.80, P < 0.001] and dabigatran (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.66-0.84, P < 0.001) were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin whereas use of rivaroxaban was not (HR: 1.05, 95% CI 0.94-1.17, P = 0.400). Use of dabigatran and rivaroxaban were associated with higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, whereas use of apixaban and dabigatran were associated with lower risk of intracranial bleeding, compared with warfarin. CONCLUSION: In this nationwide cohort study in AF patients, apixaban and dabigatran were associated with a lower risk of major or CRNM bleeding compared with warfarin. The risk of gastrointestinal bleeding was higher with rivaroxaban and dabigatran compared with warfarin.  
  Address HUNT Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2055-6845 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27680880; PMCID:PMC5216196 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1920  
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Author Sun, Y.-Q.; Langhammer, A.; Wu, C.; Skorpen, F.; Chen, Y.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P.R.; Mai, X.-M. url  doi
  Title Associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level with incidence of lung cancer and histologic types in Norwegian adults: a case-cohort analysis of the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) European Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Epidemiol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Case-cohort study; Histologic types; Lung cancer; Pulmonary adenocarcinoma; Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]; Vitamin D  
  Abstract Previous prospective studies have shown inconsistent associations between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level and lung cancer incidence. The aim of the present study was to explore the associations of serum 25(OH)D levels with incidence of lung cancer overall and different histologic types. We performed a population-based prospective case-cohort study including 696 incident lung cancer cases and 5804 individuals in a subcohort who participated in the second survey of the Nord-Trondelag Health Study in Norway. Cox proportional hazards regression models counting for the case-cohort design were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) for lung cancer overall or histologic types in relation to serum 25(OH)D levels. Compared with the fourth season-specific quartile of 25(OH)D (median 68.0 nmol/L), lower 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the incidence of overall, small or squamous cell lung cancer. However, the risk of adenocarcinoma was lower in the second and third quartiles (median 39.9 and 51.5 nmol/L) compared with the fourth quartile, with HRs of 0.63 (95% CI 0.41-0.98) and 0.58 (0.38-0.88), respectively. The associations of lower levels of 25(OH)D with a reduced risk of adenocarcinoma were only observed in the overweight/obese subjects [HRs for second and third quartiles: 0.40 (0.22-0.72) and 0.50 (0.27-0.92)] but not in the normal weight subjects [HRs: 0.95 (0.52-1.75) and 0.60 (0.32-1.10)]. Serum 25(OH)D levels were not associated with the risk of lung cancer in general. The observation that lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with a lower risk of adenocarcinoma should be interpreted with caution.  
  Address Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0393-2990 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29080012 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2007  
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Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Extracellular matrix markers and risk of myocardial infarction: The HUNT Study in Norway Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) European Journal of Preventive Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Eur J Prev Cardiol  
  Volume 24 Issue 11 Pages 1161-1167  
  Keywords Extracellular matrix; Ykl-40; case-control; myocardial infarction  
  Abstract Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling may influence atherosclerotic progression and plaque stability. We hypothesized that evaluation of extracellular matrix markers, with potentially different roles during atherogenesis, could provide information on underlying mechanisms and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. Methods We conducted a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. A total of 58,761 men and women, free of known cardiovascular disease, were followed for a first MI. During 11.3 years of follow-up, 1587 incident MIs were registered, and these cases were compared with 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. Circulating levels of the ECM proteins CD147 (ECM metalloproteinase inducer; EMMPRIN), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP: thrombospondin-5) and YKL-40 (chitinase-3-like-1) were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Results We found an inverse association between COMP (quartile (Q) 4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.98)) and YKL-40 (Q4 vs. Q1: hazard ratio 0.77 (0.62-0.95)) with incidence of MI after full multivariable adjustment. Serum CD147 was not associated with MI risk in adjusted analysis. Conclusion High levels of COMP and YKL-40 were associated with lower risk of incident MI, suggesting a potential beneficial role in promoting plaque stability in individuals without incident cardiovascular disease.  
  Address 12 Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2047-4873 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28429960 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1999  
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Author Vie, G.A.; Pape, K.; Krokstad, S.; Johnsen, R.; Bjorngaard, J.H. url  doi
  Title Temporal changes in health within 5 years before and after disability pension-the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) European Journal of Public Health Abbreviated Journal Eur J Public Health  
  Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 653-659  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Background: Health status has been reported to change before, during and after disability pension receipt. These associations might be subject to temporal changes according to changes in policy, incidence of disability pensions and other contextual factors. We compared the perceived health around time of disability retirement among persons receiving disability pension in the 1990 s and 2000 s in Norway. Methods: We linked data from two consecutive cross-sectional population based Norwegian health surveys, HUNT2 (1995-97) and HUNT3 (2006-08), to national registries, identifying those who received disability pension within 5 years before or after participation in the survey (HUNT2: n = 5362, HUNT3: n = 4649). We used logistic regression to assess associations of time from receiving a disability pension with self-rated health, insomnia, depression and anxiety symptoms and subsequently estimated adjusted prevalence over time. Results: Prevalence of poor self-rated health peaked around time of receiving disability pension in both decades. For those aged 50+, prevalence the year before disability pension was slightly lower in 2006-08 (74%, 95% CI 70-79%) than in 1995-97 (83%, 95% CI 79-87%), whereas peak prevalence was similar between surveys for those younger than 50. Depression symptoms peaked more pronouncedly in 1995-97 than in 2006-08, whereas prevalence of anxiety symptoms was similar at time of receiving disability pension between surveys. Conclusions: We found no strong evidence of differences in health selection to disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s. However, we found indication of less depression symptoms around time of disability pension in the 2000 s compared to the 1990 s.  
  Address Forensic Department and Research Centre Broset, St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1101-1262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28637220 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2002  
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Author Machiela, M.J.; Hofmann, J.N.; Carreras-Torres, R.; Brown, K.M.; Johansson, M.; Wang, Z.; Foll, M.; Li, P.; Rothman, N.; Savage, S.A.; Gaborieau, V.; McKay, J.D.; Ye, Y.; Henrion, M.; Bruinsma, F.; Jordan, S.; Severi, G.; Hveem, K.; Vatten, L.J.; Fletcher, T.; Koppova, K.; Larsson, S.C.; Wolk, A.; Banks, R.E.; Selby, P.J.; Easton, D.F.; Pharoah, P.; Andreotti, G.; Freeman, L.E.B.; Koutros, S.; Albanes, D.; Mannisto, S.; Weinstein, S.; Clark, P.E.; Edwards, T.E.; Lipworth, L.; Gapstur, S.M.; Stevens, V.L.; Carol, H.; Freedman, M.L.; Pomerantz, M.M.; Cho, E.; Kraft, P.; Preston, M.A.; Wilson, K.M.; Gaziano, J.M.; Sesso, H.S.; Black, A.; Freedman, N.D.; Huang, W.-Y.; Anema, J.G.; Kahnoski, R.J.; Lane, B.R.; Noyes, S.L.; Petillo, D.; Colli, L.M.; Sampson, J.N.; Besse, C.; Blanche, H.; Boland, A.; Burdette, L.; Prokhortchouk, E.; Skryabin, K.G.; Yeager, M.; Mijuskovic, M.; Ognjanovic, M.; Foretova, L.; Holcatova, I.; Janout, V.; Mates, D.; Mukeriya, A.; Rascu, S.; Zaridze, D.; Bencko, V.; Cybulski, C.; Fabianova, E.; Jinga, V.; Lissowska, J.; Lubinski, J.; Navratilova, M.; Rudnai, P.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.; Benhamou, S.; Cancel-Tassin, G.; Cussenot, O.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Canzian, F.; Duell, E.J.; Ljungberg, B.; Sitaram, R.T.; Peters, U.; White, E.; Anderson, G.L.; Johnson, L.; Luo, J.; Buring, J.; Lee, I.-M.; Chow, W.-H.; Moore, L.E.; Wood, C.; Eisen, T.; Larkin, J.; Choueiri, T.K.; Lathrop, G.M.; Teh, B.T.; Deleuze, J.-F.; Wu, X.; Houlston, R.S.; Brennan, P.; Chanock, S.J.; Scelo, G.; Purdue, M.P. url  doi
  Title Genetic Variants Related to Longer Telomere Length are Associated with Increased Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) European Urology Abbreviated Journal Eur Urol  
  Volume 72 Issue 5 Pages 747-754  
  Keywords Genetic variants; Mendelian randomization; Renal cell carcinoma; Risk; Telomere length  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Relative telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been evaluated as a potential biomarker for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk in several studies, with conflicting findings. OBJECTIVE: We performed an analysis of genetic variants associated with leukocyte telomere length to assess the relationship between telomere length and RCC risk using Mendelian randomization, an approach unaffected by biases from temporal variability and reverse causation that might have affected earlier investigations. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Genotypes from nine telomere length-associated variants for 10 784 cases and 20 406 cancer-free controls from six genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of RCC were aggregated into a weighted genetic risk score (GRS) predictive of leukocyte telomere length. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Odds ratios (ORs) relating the GRS and RCC risk were computed in individual GWAS datasets and combined by meta-analysis. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Longer genetically inferred telomere length was associated with an increased risk of RCC (OR=2.07 per predicted kilobase increase, 95% confidence interval [CI]:=1.70-2.53, p<0.0001). As a sensitivity analysis, we excluded two telomere length variants in linkage disequilibrium (R(2)>0.5) with GWAS-identified RCC risk variants (rs10936599 and rs9420907) from the telomere length GRS; despite this exclusion, a statistically significant association between the GRS and RCC risk persisted (OR=1.73, 95% CI=1.36-2.21, p<0.0001). Exploratory analyses for individual histologic subtypes suggested comparable associations with the telomere length GRS for clear cell (N=5573, OR=1.93, 95% CI=1.50-2.49, p<0.0001), papillary (N=573, OR=1.96, 95% CI=1.01-3.81, p=0.046), and chromophobe RCC (N=203, OR=2.37, 95% CI=0.78-7.17, p=0.13). CONCLUSIONS: Our investigation adds to the growing body of evidence indicating some aspect of longer telomere length is important for RCC risk. PATIENT SUMMARY: Telomeres are segments of DNA at chromosome ends that maintain chromosomal stability. Our study investigated the relationship between genetic variants associated with telomere length and renal cell carcinoma risk. We found evidence suggesting individuals with inherited predisposition to longer telomere length are at increased risk of developing renal cell carcinoma.  
  Address Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MS, USA. Electronic address: purduem@mail.nih.gov  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0302-2838 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28797570; PMCID:PMC5641242 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1959  
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Author Zhou, W.; Fritsche, L.G.; Das, S.; Zhang, H.; Nielsen, J.B.; Holmen, O.L.; Chen, J.; Lin, M.; Elvestad, M.B.; Hveem, K.; Abecasis, G.R.; Kang, H.M.; Willer, C.J. url  doi
  Title Improving power of association tests using multiple sets of imputed genotypes from distributed reference panels Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Genetic Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Genet Epidemiol  
  Volume 41 Issue 8 Pages 744-755  
  Keywords Gwas; genotype imputation; multiple reference panels; population-specific; study power  
  Abstract The accuracy of genotype imputation depends upon two factors: the sample size of the reference panel and the genetic similarity between the reference panel and the target samples. When multiple reference panels are not consented to combine together, it is unclear how to combine the imputation results to optimize the power of genetic association studies. We compared the accuracy of 9,265 Norwegian genomes imputed from three reference panels-1000 Genomes phase 3 (1000G), Haplotype Reference Consortium (HRC), and a reference panel containing 2,201 Norwegian participants from the population-based Nord Trondelag Health Study (HUNT) from low-pass genome sequencing. We observed that the population-matched reference panel allowed for imputation of more population-specific variants with lower frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.05% and 0.5%). The overall imputation accuracy from the population-specific panel was substantially higher than 1000G and was comparable with HRC, despite HRC being 15-fold larger. These results recapitulate the value of population-specific reference panels for genotype imputation. We also evaluated different strategies to utilize multiple sets of imputed genotypes to increase the power of association studies. We observed that testing association for all variants imputed from any panel results in higher power to detect association than the alternative strategy of including only one version of each genetic variant, selected for having the highest imputation quality metric. This was particularly true for lower frequency variants (MAF < 1%), even after adjusting for the additional multiple testing burden.  
  Address Department of Human Genetics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0741-0395 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28861891 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2026  
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Author Alsnes, I.V.; Vatten, L.J.; Fraser, A.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Rich-Edwards, J.; Romundstad, P.R.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Hypertension in Pregnancy and Offspring Cardiovascular Risk in Young Adulthood: Prospective and Sibling Studies in the HUNT Study (Nord-Trondelag Health Study) in Norway Type Multicenter Study
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) Abbreviated Journal Hypertension  
  Volume 69 Issue 4 Pages 591-598  
  Keywords Adult; Blood Pressure/*physiology; Cardiovascular Diseases/*epidemiology/etiology/physiopathology; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced/*epidemiology/physiopathology; Incidence; Infant, Newborn; Norway/epidemiology; Pregnancy; *Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular; Prospective Studies; *Registries; Risk Factors; Siblings; adolescent; blood pressure; cardiovascular disease; mother; preeclampsia  
  Abstract Women with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are at increased lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease. We examined the offspring's cardiovascular risk profile in young adulthood and their siblings' cardiovascular risk profile. From the HUNT study (Nord-Trondelag Health Study) in Norway, 15 778 participants (mean age: 29 years), including 210 sibling groups, were linked to information from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Blood pressure, anthropometry, serum lipids, and C-reactive protein were assessed. Seven hundred and six participants were born after exposure to maternal hypertension in pregnancy: 336 mothers had gestational hypertension, 343 had term preeclampsia, and 27 had preterm preeclampsia. Offspring whose mothers had hypertension in pregnancy had 2.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.5) mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure, 1.5 (0.9-2.1) mm Hg higher diastolic blood pressure, 0.66 (0.31-1.01) kg/m2 higher body mass index, and 1.49 (0.65-2.33) cm wider waist circumference, compared with offspring of normotensive pregnancies. Similar differences were observed for gestational hypertension and term preeclampsia. Term preeclampsia was also associated with higher concentrations of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (0.14 mmol/L, 0.03-0.25) and triglycerides (0.13 mmol/L, 0.06-0.21). Siblings born after a normotensive pregnancy had nearly identical risk factor levels as siblings born after maternal hypertension. Offspring born after maternal hypertension in pregnancy have a more adverse cardiovascular risk profile in young adulthood than offspring of normotensive pregnancies. Their siblings, born after a normotensive pregnancy, have a similar risk profile, suggesting that shared genes or lifestyle may account for the association, rather than an intrauterine effect. All children of mothers who have experienced hypertension in pregnancy may be at increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease.  
  Address From the Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (I.V.A., L.J.V., J.H.B., J.R.-E., P.R.R., B.O.A.); MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol and School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, United Kingdom (A.F.); Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Connors Center for Women's Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (J.R.-E.); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (J.R.-E.); Department of Epidemiology, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (L.J.V., J.R.-E.); and Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway (B.O.A.)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0194-911X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28223467 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1875  
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Author Theofylaktopoulou, D.; Midttun, O.; Ueland, P.M.; Meyer, K.; Fanidi, A.; Zheng, W.; Shu, X.-O.; Xiang, Y.-B.; Prentice, R.; Pettinger, M.; Thomson, C.A.; Giles, G.G.; Hodge, A.; Cai, Q.; Blot, W.J.; Wu, J.; Johansson, M.; Hultdin, J.; Grankvist, K.; Stevens, V.L.; McCullough, M.M.; Weinstein, S.J.; Albanes, D.; Ziegler, R.; Freedman, N.D.; Langhammer, A.; Hveem, K.; Naess, M.; Sesso, H.D.; Gaziano, J.M.; Buring, J.E.; Lee, I.-M.; Severi, G.; Zhang, X.; Stampfer, M.J.; Han, J.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Le Marchand, L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Wang, R.; Butler, L.M.; Koh, W.-P.; Gao, Y.-T.; Rothman, N.; Ericson, U.; Sonestedt, E.; Visvanathan, K.; Jones, M.R.; Relton, C.; Brennan, P.; Johansson, M.; Ulvik, A. url  doi
  Title Impaired functional vitamin B6 status is associated with increased risk of lung cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Int J Cancer  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid; Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium; functional vitamin B6 marker; pyridoxal 5'-phosphate  
  Abstract Circulating vitamin B6 levels have been found to be inversely associated with lung cancer. Most studies have focused on the B6 form pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a direct biomarker influenced by inflammation and other factors. Using a functional B6 marker allows further investigation of the potential role of vitamin B6 status in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. We prospectively evaluated the association of the functional marker of vitamin B6 status, the 3-hydroxykynurenine:xanthurenic acid (HK:XA) ratio, with risk of lung cancer in a nested case-control study consisting of 5,364 matched case-control pairs from the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium (LC3). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between HK:XA and lung cancer, and random effect models to combine results from different cohorts and regions. High levels of HK:XA, indicating impaired functional B6 status, were associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, the odds ratio comparing the fourth and the first quartiles (OR4thvs.1st ) was 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.41). Stratified analyses indicated that this association was primarily driven by cases diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma. Notably, the risk associated with HK:XA was approximately 50% higher in groups with a high relative frequency of squamous cell carcinoma, i.e., men, former and current smokers. This risk of squamous cell carcinoma was present in both men and women regardless of smoking status.  
  Address Bevital AS, Bergen, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29238985 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2011  
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Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Vie, G.A.; Janszky, I.; Vatten, L.J. url  doi
  Title Reply to Letter to the editor “Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT Study” Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 242 Issue Pages 8  
  Keywords  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway; Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28619354 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1882  
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Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Vie, G.A.; Krokstad, S.; Janszky, I.; Romundstad, P.R.; Vatten, L.J. url  doi
  Title Cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 232 Issue Pages 127-133  
  Keywords Cardiovascular mortality; Confounding; Couples; Population study; Risk factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: To compare associations of conventional risk factors with cardiovascular death within couples and in the population as a whole. METHODS: We analysed baseline data (1995-97) from the HUNT2 Study in Norway linked to the national Causes of Death Registry. We compared risk within couples using stratified Cox regression. RESULTS: During 914776 person-years, 3964 cardiovascular deaths occurred, and 1658 of the deaths occurred among 1494 couples. There were consistently stronger associations of serum lipids and blood pressure with cardiovascular mortality within couples compared to the population as a whole. For instance, for systolic blood pressure (per 20mmHg), the hazard ratio (HR) within couples was 1.28 (95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.40) compared to 1.16 (1.12, 1.20) in the total population, and for diastolic pressure (per 10mmHg), the corresponding HRs were 1.16 (1.07, 1.26) and 1.11 (1.08, 1.13). Anthropometric factors (BMI, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio) as well as diabetes, smoking, physical activity, and education, showed nearly identical positive associations within couples and in the total population. CONCLUSIONS: Prospective population studies may tend to slightly underestimate associations of these factors with cardiovascular mortality.  
  Address Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway; Regional Center for Health Care Improvement, St Olav Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28082089 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1883  
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Author Safiri, S.; Ayubi, E. url  doi
  Title Comments on cardiovascular mortality – Comparing risk factor associations within couples and in the total population – The HUNT study Type Comment
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 242 Issue Pages 7  
  Keywords *Cardiovascular Diseases; Humans; Norway; Risk Factors  
  Abstract  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: aubi65@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28619353 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1974  
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Author Ueland, T.; Laugsand, L.E.; Vatten, L.J.; Janszky, I.; Platou, C.; Michelsen, A.E.; Damas, J.K.; Aukrust, P.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers are not independently associated with MI risk in healthy individuals – results from the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Cardiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Cardiol  
  Volume 243 Issue Pages 502-504  
  Keywords Leukocyte markers; Myocardial infarction  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that circulating markers reflecting monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in apparently healthy individuals. METHODS: Serum monocyte/macrophage and T cell activation markers soluble (s) CD163, sCD14, Gal3BP, sCD25 and sCD166 were analyzed by enzyme-immunoassay in a case-control study nested within the population-based HUNT2 cohort in Norway. Among 58,761 apparently healthy men and women followed a median 11.3years, 1587 incident MI cases were registered, and compared to 3959 age- and sex-matched controls. RESULTS: Higher serum sCD163 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.27, P-trend 0.002), sCD14 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.38, P-trend<0.001), and especially sCD25 (Q4 vs. Q1 OR: 1.45, P-trend<0.001), were associated with increased MI risk in the age-and sex adjusted models. However, after additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors these associations were strongly attenuated (Q4 vs Q1 ORs between 1.02 and 1.12, P-trends between 0.30 and 0.58). CONCLUSIONS: sCD163, sCD14 and sCD25 may reflect leukocyte activation and inflammatory mechanisms related to atherogenesis, but do not predict MI risk above and beyond conventional cardiovascular risk factors.  
  Address Department of Public Health, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Endocrinology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-5273 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28615143 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 2016  
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Author Bjorngaard, J.H.; Nordestgaard, A.T.; Taylor, A.E.; Treur, J.L.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Munafo, M.R.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Asvold, B.O.; Romundstad, P.; Davey Smith, G. url  doi
  Title Heavier smoking increases coffee consumption: findings from a Mendelian randomization analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Coffee, tea, smoking, Mendelian randomization  
  Abstract Background: There is evidence for a positive relationship between cigarette and coffee consumption in smokers. Cigarette smoke increases metabolism of caffeine, so this may represent a causal effect of smoking on caffeine intake. Methods: We performed Mendelian randomization analyses in the UK Biobank ( N = 114 029), the Norwegian HUNT study ( N = 56 664) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS) ( N = 78 650). We used the rs16969968 genetic variant as a proxy for smoking heaviness in all studies and rs4410790 and rs2472297 as proxies for coffee consumption in UK Biobank and CGPS. Analyses were conducted using linear regression and meta-analysed across studies. Results: Each additional cigarette per day consumed by current smokers was associated with higher coffee consumption (0.10 cups per day, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.17). There was weak evidence for an increase in tea consumption per additional cigarette smoked per day (0.04 cups per day, 95% CI: -0.002, 0.07). There was strong evidence that each additional copy of the minor allele of rs16969968 (which increases daily cigarette consumption) in current smokers was associated with higher coffee consumption (0.16 cups per day, 95% CI: 0.11, 0.20), but only weak evidence for an association with tea consumption (0.04 cups per day, 95% CI: -0.01, 0.09). There was no clear evidence that rs16969968 was associated with coffee or tea consumption in never or former smokers or that the coffee-related variants were associated with cigarette consumption. Conclusions: Higher cigarette consumption causally increases coffee intake. This is consistent with faster metabolism of caffeine by smokers, but could also reflect a behavioural effect of smoking on coffee drinking.  
  Address School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29025033 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1881  
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Author Carslake, D.; Davey Smith, G.; Gunnell, D.; Davies, N.; Nilsen, T.I.L.; Romundstad, P. url  doi
  Title Confounding by ill health in the observed association between BMI and mortality: evidence from the HUNT Study using offspring BMI as an instrument Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Body mass index; cohort study; confounding; instrumental variables; mortality; reverse causation  
  Abstract Background: The observational association between mortality and body mass index (BMI) is U-shaped, leading to highly publicized suggestions that moderate overweight is beneficial to health. However, it is unclear whether elevated mortality is caused by low BMI or if the association is confounded, for example by concurrent ill health. Methods: Using HUNT, a Norwegian prospective study, 32 452 mother-offspring and 27 747 father-offspring pairs were followed up to 2009. Conventional hazard ratios for parental mortality per standard deviation of BMI were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for behavioural and socioeconomic factors. To estimate hazard ratios with reduced susceptibility to confounding, particularly from concurrent ill health, the BMI of parents' offspring was used as an instrumental variable for parents' own BMI. The shape of mortality-BMI associations was assessed using cubic splines. Results: There were 18 365 parental deaths during follow-up. Conventional associations of mortality from all-causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer with parents' own BMI were substantially nonlinear, with elevated mortality at both extremes and minima at 21-25 kg m-2. Equivalent associations with offspring BMI were positive and there was no evidence of elevated parental mortality at low offspring BMI. The linear instrumental variable hazard ratio for all-cause mortality per standard deviation increase in BMI was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.26), compared with 1.05 (1.03, 1.06) in the conventional analysis. Conclusions: Elevated mortality rates at high BMI appear causal, whereas excess mortality at low BMI is likely exaggerated by confounding by factors including concurrent ill health. Conventional studies probably underestimate the adverse population health consequences of overweight.  
  Address Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29206928 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1896  
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Author Paulsen, J.; Askim, A.; Mohus, R.M.; Mehl, A.; Dewan, A.; Solligard, E.; Damas, J.K.; Asvold, B.O. url  doi
  Title Associations of obesity and lifestyle with the risk and mortality of bloodstream infection in a general population: a 15-year follow-up of 64 027 individuals in the HUNT Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume 46 Issue 5 Pages 1573-1581  
  Keywords Bacteraemia; alcohol drinking; exercise; obesity; sepsis; smoking  
  Abstract Background: Bloodstream infections (BSI) cause considerable morbidity and mortality, and primary prevention should be a priority. Lifestyle factors are of particular interest since they represent a modifiable target. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study among participants in the population-based Norwegian HUNT2 Survey, where 64 027 participants were followed from 1995-97 through 2011 by linkage to prospectively recorded information on BSI at local and regional hospitals. The exposures were: baseline body mass index (BMI) measurements; and self-reported smoking habits, leisure time physical activity and alcohol intake. The outcomes were hazard ratios (HR) of BSI and BSI mortality. Results: During 810 453 person-years and median follow-up of 14.8 years, 1844 (2.9%) participants experienced at least one BSI and 396 (0.62%) died from BSI. Compared with normal weight participants (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2), the age- and sex-adjusted risk of a first-time BSI was 31% [95% confidence interval (CI) 14-51%] higher at BMI 30.0-34.9 kg/m2, 87% (95% CI 50-135%) higher at BMI 35.0-39.9 kg/m2 and 210% (95% CI 117-341%) higher at BMI >/= 40.0 kg/m2. The risk of BSI mortality was similarly increased. Compared with never-smokers, current smokers had 51% (95% CI 34-70%) and 75% (95% CI 34-129%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively. Physically inactive participants had 71% (95% CI 42-107%) and 108% (95% CI 37-216%) higher risks of BSI and BSI mortality, respectively, compared with the most physically active. Conclusions: Obesity, smoking and physical inactivity carry increased risk of BSI and BSI mortality.  
  Address Department of Endocrinology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28637260 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1969  
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Author Bosnes, I.; Almkvist, O.; Bosnes, O.; Stordal, E.; Romild, U.; Nordahl, H.M. url  doi
  Title Prevalence and correlates of successful aging in a population-based sample of older adults: the HUNT study Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Psychogeriatrics Abbreviated Journal Int Psychogeriatr  
  Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 431-440  
  Keywords Hunt; components; correlates; prevalence; successful aging  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The factors influencing successful aging (SA) are of great interest in an aging society. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of SA, the relative importance across age of the three components used to define it (absence of disease and disability, high cognitive and physical function, and active engagement with life), and its correlates. METHODS: Data were extracted from the population-based cross-sectional Nord-Trondelag Health Study (HUNT3 2006-2008). Individuals aged 70-89 years with complete datasets for the three components were included (N = 5773 of 8,040, 71.8%). Of the respondents, 54.6% were women. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to analyze possible correlates of SA. RESULTS: Overall, 35.6% of the sample met one of the three criteria, 34.1% met combinations, and 14.5% met all of the three criteria. The most demanding criterion was high function, closely followed by absence of disease, while approximately two-thirds were actively engaged in life. The relative change with age was largest for the high cognitive and physical function component and smallest for active engagement with life. The significant correlates of SA were younger age, female gender, higher education, weekly exercise, more satisfaction with life, non-smoking, and alcohol consumption, whereas marital status was not related to SA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of SA in this study (14.5%) is comparable to previous studies. It may be possible to increase the prevalence by intervention directed toward more exercise, non-smoking, and better satisfaction with life.  
  Address Department of Psychology,Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU),Trondheim,Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1041-6102 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27852332 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1886  
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Author Mauseth, S.A.; Skurtveit, S.; Langhammer, A.; Spigset, O. url  doi
  Title Incidence of and factors associated with anticholinergic drug use among Norwegian women with urinary incontinence Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) International Urogynecology Journal Abbreviated Journal Int Urogynecol J  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Anticholinergic drugs; Drug treatment; Epidemiology; Health survey; Prescription patterns; Urinary incontinence  
  Abstract INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aims of this study were to investigate patterns of prescribing anticholinergic drugs among women with urinary incontinence (UI) and to identify factors associated with prescription of these drugs. METHODS: We analysed questionnaire data on UI from 21,735 women older than 20 years who participated in a cross-sectional population-based study in Nord-Trondelag county, Norway (the HUNT study). These data were linked at the individual level to a national prescription database, and analysed using a multivariate logistic regression model. RESULTS: Among the women with UI, 4.5% had been prescribed an anticholinergic drug during the previous 12 months. Prescription was most frequent in women with urge UI (10.5%) and mixed UI (7.0%). Of women with UI without treatment with an anticholinergic drug, 1.8% obtained such a prescription during the subsequent 12 months, corresponding to 3.1% of women with urge UI and 3.0% of women with mixed UI. Characteristics significantly associated with starting treatment were age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe or very severe symptoms, consumption of four or more cups of coffee per day, and having visited a doctor for UI. No association was found with marital status, parity, smoking, alcohol, body mass index or anxiety/depression. CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based study, 4.5% of women with UI were prescribed an anticholinergic drug, and the 12-month incidence of starting treatment was 1.8%. Age above 50 years, urge or mixed UI, severe symptoms, high coffee consumption and having visited a doctor for UI were factors associated with first-time drug prescription.  
  Address Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olav University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0937-3462 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29103164 Approved no  
  Call Number HUNT @ maria.stuifbergen @ Serial 1954  
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Author Selmeryd, J.; Henriksen, E.; Dalen, H.; Hedberg, P. url  doi
  Title Derivation and Evaluation of Age-Specific Multivariate Reference Regions to Aid in Identification of Abnormal Filling Patterns: The HUNT and VaMIS Studies Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) JACC. Cardiovascular Imaging Abbreviated Journal JACC Cardiovasc Imaging  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Doppler; diastolic dysfunction; echocardiography; heart failure; reference values  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to derive age-specific multivariate reference regions (MVRs) able to classify subjects into those having normal or abnormal filling patterns and to evaluate the prognostic impact of this classification. BACKGROUND: The integration of several parameters is necessary to diagnose disorders of left ventricular (LV) filling because no single measurement accurately describes the complexity of diastolic function. However, no generally accepted validated multiparametric algorithm currently exists. METHODS: A cohort of 1,240 apparently healthy subjects from HUNT (the Nord-Trondelag Health Study) with measured early (E) and late (A) mitral inflow velocity and early mitral annular diastolic tissue velocity (e') were used to derive univariate 95% reference bands and age-specific MVRs. Subsequently, the prognostic impact of this MVR-based classification was evaluated by Cox regression in a community-based cohort (n = 726) and in a cohort of subjects with recent acute myocardial infarction (n = 551). Both evaluation cohorts were derived from VaMIS (the Vastmanland Myocardial Infarction Study). RESULTS: Univariate reference bands and MVRs are presented graphically and as regression equations. After adjustment for sex, age, hypertension, body mass index, diabetes, prior ischemic heart disease, LV mass, LV ejection fraction, and left atrial size, the hazard ratio associated with abnormal filling patterns in the community-based cohort was 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 7.0; p < 0.001) and that in the acute myocardial infarction cohort was 1.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 2.8; p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: This study derived age-specific MVRs for identification of abnormal LV filling patterns and showed, in a community-based cohort and in a cohort of patients with recent acute myocardial infarction, that these MVRs conveyed important prognostic information. An MVR-based classification of LV filling patterns could lead to more consistent diagnostic algorithms for identification of different filling disorders.  
  Address Department of Clinical Physiology, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden; Centre for Clinical Research, Uppsala University, Vastmanland County Hospital, Vasteras, Sweden